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lx - 343-
Mao-san-ram, petty State in Assam, ix.

343-
Mao-thad-rai-shan, mountain range in

Assam, ix. 343.
Mappillas. See Moplas.
Mapusa, town in Portuguese territory,

ix. 343, 344-

Marahra, town in N.-W. Provinces, ix.
344.

Marakans, sea-water fishermen in Cochin,
iv. 4.

Mara-marnai, river in Assam, ix. 344.

Marang Baru, hill in Bengal, ix. 344.

Maratha power, The (1634-1818), article
'India,' vi. chap. xii. pp. 317-324.
British India won, not from the Mughals,
but from the Hindus, 317 ; rise of the
Marathas, Shahji Bhonsla, 317; Sivaji,
the consolidator of the Maratha power,

317 ; state of parties in the Deccan
(1650), 318; the Marathas courted by
the two rival Muhammadan powers,

318 ; Sivaji's hill forts, army of horse,
tactics, etc., 319; his murder of the
Bijapur general Akbar Khan, 319;
coins money in his own name, 319 ;
visits Delhi (1666), 319; enthrones
himself as an independent prince at
Raigarh (1674), 319; death (1680),

319 ; Aurangzeb's mistaken policy in
the Deccan, 319 ; Sambhaji and Sahu,
successors of Sivaji, 319 ; the Satara
and Kolhapur families, the last of
Sivaji's line, 320 ; rise and progress of
the Peshwas, 320; second Peshwa
(1721-40) invades the Deccan, 320;
third Peshwa (1740-61), conquests in
the Deccan, and raids from Bengal to
the Punjab, 320, 321 ; defeat of the
Marathas by Ahmad Shah the Afghan
(1 761), 321 ; fourth Peshwa (1761-72),
321 ; the five great Maratha branches,
321 ; fifth Peshwa (1772), his assassina-
tion, 321 ; decline of the Peshwas



(1772-78), 321, 322; the northern
Marathas, Sindhia and Holkar (1761-
1803), 322 ; the Bhonslas of Berar
(1751-53), 322; the Gaekwars of
Baroda, 322, 323 ; the sixth and
seventh Peshwas (1774-1818), and the
three Maratha wars, 323, 324 ; end of
the Peshwas (1849), 324. Local notices
—Held Agra (i77<>74, 1784-87, 1788-
1803), i. 69, 70 ; in Ahmadabad, i. 84 ;
Ahmadnagar, i. 108 ; took Ajaigarh
(1800), i. 112; in Akola, i. 142; their
battle with the Nizam there, i. 146 ;
in Aligarh, i. 170; Allahabad, i. 187;
Alwar, i. 204; North Arcot, i. 313;
Banda, ii. 48 ; Bardwan, ii. 127, 128 ;
defeated in the Barmul Pass (1803),
ii. 157 ; Basim, ii. 184, 185 ; took Bas-
sein (Wasai), ii. 191 ; in Bellary, ii.
242 ; Bilaspur, ii. 446 ; plundered
Broach (1675-86), iii. 113, exacted
chaulh in Berar (1671), which was
granted to them (1717), iii. 144;
plundered Burhanpur (1685), iii. 164;
in Central India, iii. 294; Central
Provinces, iii. 302 ; Cuddapah, iv. 48 ;
defeated Nawab of Cuddapah (1757),
iv. 49 ; in Damoh, iv. 109 ; at Delhi
(1726, 1771), iv. 193; tookDeori(i74i),
iv. 206 ; Dharwar (1753, 1791), iv. 266 ;
Dholka (1736), iv. 272; in Etawah,
iv. 371 ; occupied Fatehpur (1736-50),
iv. 424; took Ghorbandar (1737), v.
75; held Gingi (1677-98), v. S3, 84:
their incursions to Goa, v. 104, 105 ;
in Godavari District (1753), v. 124;
held Gooty (1714-76), v. 160 ; their
intervention in Haidarabad, v. 249 ;
war with Nizam Ali, v. 25 1 ; plunder-
ing of Berar, v. 263 ; conquered
Orchha and Jhansi (1742), vii. 218;
made Kalpi their head - quarters in
Bundelkhand, vii. 342 ; held Kalyan
(1648-60, 1662- 1 780), vii. 347 ; Karanja
Island (1737-74), vii. 467 ; and Karnala
hill fort (1740-1818), viii. 30; their
dealings with Karwar, viii. 54, 55 ;
their rule over Kathiawar, viii. 91 ;
defeated by Ah' Vardi Khan at Katwa,
viii. 102 ; in Khandesh ( 1 760-1818), viii,
153 ; defeated the Nizam at Kharda
(1795), viii. 166; reduced Lakhnauti
(1794), viii. 441 ; sacked Madgiri
(1774, I79i),viii. 540; attacked Madras
(1741), ix. 103; held Mahuli (1670-
1817), ix. 187; overran Malwa(i737),
ix. 267 ; plundered Manikpur (1760),
ix. 321 ; defeated at Mehidpur (1817),
ix. 398; sacked Nagamangala (1792),
x. 154; in Nimar, x. 330; the N.-W.
Provinces, x. 366, 367 ; Orissa, x. 430,
431 ; their defeat at Panipat (1761),
xi. 45-47 ; their rise to power, xi. 204 ;



INDEX.



!Q(J



in Raipur, xi. 369 ; Rajputana, xi.
406, 407 ; defeated at Ramghat, xi.
449 ; defeated Safdar Khan at Ratan-
pur (1705), xi. 516; in Ratnagiri,
xii. 6 ; defeated Haidar Ali at Ratti-
halli (1764), xii. 14; in Saharanpur,
xii. 116, 117 ; held Salsette (1739-74),
xii. 169; in Sambalpur, xii. 179, 180;
Sarguja, xii. 267 ; Satara, xii. 277,
278; ravaged Shaikhawati (1754), xii.
372; surprised the British at Shikoh-
abad (1802), xii. 398 ; defeated Tipu's
troops at Shimoga (1791), xii. 406;
in Sholapur, xii. 412 ; defeated by
Saadat Khan at Sikandarabad (1736),
xii. 478 ; at Sinhgarh, xii. 543, 544 ;
and Sira, xii. 546 ; their raids on Surat,
xiii. 122 ; conquest of Tanjore, xiii.
182, 194 ; ravages in Udaipur, xiii.
405-407; took Vellore (1676), xiii.
467 ; in Wiin, xiii. 540.

' Maratha Ditch,' The, moat constructed
partly round Calcutta as a protection
against the Marathas, article 'India,'
vi. 320, 321 ; iii. 241.

-Maratha wars, The first ( 1 778-81), article
' India,' vi. 323 ; 391. Local notices —
The treaty of Salbai, iii. 38 ; the re-
treat from Talegaon Dabhara (1779),
xiii. 166 ; convention of Wadgaon
(1779), xiii. 505. The second (1802-04),
article ' India,' vi. 398. Local notices —
The battle of Argaum, i. 329 ; Assaye,
'• 374> 375; treaty of Bassein (1802),
ii. 192; its history, iii. ^8; storm of
Gawilgarh, v. 43 ; war with Holkar,
vii. 6. The third and last, annexation of
the Peshwa's dominions (1818), article
' India,' vi. 323 ; 402. Local notices —
Its history, iii. 39 ; battles of Mehid-
pur, vii. 6; Kirki, viii. 121; Korigaum,
viii. 298, 299.

Marathi literature and authors, article
' India,' vi. 346.

Mara Tista, river in Bengal, ix. 344.

Marble-carving, article ' India,' vi. 112.
See Stone cutting and carving.

Marble for building, article ' India,' vi.
628. Local notices — Found or quarried
at Mount Abu, i. 4 ; Alwar, i. 203 ;
Upper Burma, iii. 211, 218; Khavda
in Cutch, iv. 60; Danta, iv. 118;
Jabalpur, vii. 31 ; Jaipur, vii. 51, 52 ;
Jehlam, vii. 167 ; Jodhpur, vii. 237 ;
Nawanagar, x. 252 ; Nepal, x. 278 ;
Palnad, xi. 16 ; Patiala, xi. 87 : Maneri
in Yusufzai, xi. 146 ; Rajputana, xi.
402 ; Rawal Pindi, xii. 22 ; Rewa
Kantha, xii. 49 ; Sirohi, xiii. 2 ;
Taung-ngu, xiii. 221 ; Trichinopoli,
xiii. 355 ; Wankaner, xiii. 518.

Marco Polo, by Colonel Yule, quoted,
article 'India,' vi. 152 (footnote 1);
VOL. XIV.



231 (footnote 1); 233 (footnotes I and
3) ; 237 (footnote 4) ; 239 (footnote 3) ;
356 (footnote). Local notices — On the
Andaman Isles, i. 283 ; the kingdom
of Anumakonda, i. 294; Bengala, ii.
269 ; Cambay, iii. 274 ; the caw
dwellings on the Hindu Kush, v.
417; Kayal, viii. 107 ; Kistna District,
viii. 227 ; the name Malabar, ix. 217 :
Motupa.lli, ix. 521,522; Sendarbandi
Pandya, king of Madura, xi. 42 ;
Quilon, xi. 339 ; Tinnevelli, xiii.
308.

Marble rocks. See Bheraghat.

Mardan, tahsil in Punjab, ix. 344, 345.

Mardan. See Hoti-mardan.

Mardan Singh, Raja of Bhanpur, mu-
tinied, and defeated by Rose at
Barodia Naunagar (1858), xii. 103.

Margao, town in Portuguese territory,
ix- 345-

Margary, Mr., murdered (1875) m trying
to open a trade route between China
and Burma, iii. 228.

Margram, town in Bengal, ix. 345.

Mar, Gregory, first Jacobite Bishop of
the Syrian Church in India, vi. 242,

243-
Mariadeh, village in Central Provinces,

ix. 345, 346.
Mariahu, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro-
vinces, ix. 346.
Mariao, petty State in Assam, ix. 346.
Marias, aboriginal tribe in the Central

Provinces, article 'India,' vi. 55.

Local notices — Central Provinces, iii.

307 ; Kotapalli, viii. 309.
Marias, The, tribe in Assam, i. 358, ix.

346.
Marine, The Bombay, iii. 67, 68.
Maris, aboriginal tribe in the Central

Provinces, iv. 53, iii. 307.
Marja, pass in Punjab, ix. 347.
Marjata, estuary in Bengal, ix. 347.
Markandi, village in Central Provinces.

ix. 347-

Markapur, tdluk in Madras, ix. 347.

Markham, Mr. Clements R., introduced
cinchona into the Nilgiri Hills (i86oj,
ix. 34, x. 316 ; on the passes from
Sikkim into Tibet, xii. 483, 484.

Marlborough, Earl of, sent with a fleet to
take possession of Bombay, iii. 37.

Marmagao, peninsula, village, and port
in^Portuguese territory, ix. 347, 348.

Marmots, in Kashmir, viii. 68 ; Ladakh,
viii. 397.

Marochetti, his sculptured angel on the
well at Cawnpur, iii. 291, 292.

Maroli, port in Bombay, ix. 348.

Marpha, historic fort in N.-W. Pro-
vinces, ix. 348.

Marri. See Murree.



INDEX.



Marriage ceremonies and customs of the
Kadava Kunbis, i. 86, xiii. 437, 438 ;
the Arakan Hill tribes, i. 301 ; the
Baluchis, ii. 38; the Kurkus, ii. 331 ;
in Bhandara, ii. 363 ; of the Bhilalas
and Bhils, ii. 391 ; of the Burmese, iii.
180 ; of the Karens and Chins, iii. 181 ;
of the Gonds, iii. 311 ; of the Deori
Chutiyas, iii. 467 ; of the Coorgs, iv.
35 ; of the Daphlas, iv. 119; of the
Mechs, iv. 332 ; of the Garos, v. 29 ;
of the Juangs, vii. 252 ; of the Kandhs,
vii. 403 ; of the Kangra tribes, vii.
421, 422; of the Karens, viii. 4; of
the Khasis, viii. 175 ; of the Kols, viii.
257, 258 ; of the Kotas, viii. 301 ; of
the Ladakhis, viii. 398 ; of the Bhils of
Mahi Kantha, ix. 178; of the Nairs,
ix. 227, 228, xiii. 348 ; of the Malay-
an's, ix. 238, 239 ; in Manipur, ix. 330 ;
of the Meos, ix. 419 ; of the Mikirs,
ix. 437, 438 ; of the Miris, ix. 444 ; of
the Rengma Nagas, x. 148 ; of the
Xicobarians, x. 296 ; of the Koravars,
xi. 17, 18; of the Rewa Kantha Bhils,
xii. 52 ; of the Kolis, xii. 53 ; of the
Santals, xii. 243, 244 ; of the Hos or
Larka Kols, xii. 537 ; of the Chins,
xiii. 281, 282 ; of the Banjaras and
Gonds in Wun, xiii. 541, 542.
Marriage law of the Hindus, article

' India,' vi. 195, 196.
Marriott, Col., deposed Muzaffar Jang
(1815), and placed his brother on
throne of Karnul, viii. 42.
Marris, a tribe in Baluchistan, ii. 29 ;

infesting the Bolan pass, iii. 35.
Marsaghai, town in Bengal, ix. 349.
Marshall, Gen., took Dhamoni (1818),
iv. 240 ; Hathras, v. 355 ; and Mandla,
ix. 303.
Marshes, jhils or bils, in Allahabad, i.
186 ; Azamgarh, i. 392, 393 ; Bakar-
ganj, i. 440; Ballia, ii. 18; Bara
Banki, ii. 106, 107 ; the Bayra bil, ii.
221 ; Benares, ii. 255 ; Bhagalpur, ii.
344 ; Bhongaon, ii. 403 ; Bogra, iii.
25 ; Bonra, iii. 88 ; Cachar, iii. 233 ;
theChalan bil, iii. 327 ; inChamparan,
iii. 337 ; the Rann of Cutch, iv. 58,
59; Dacca, iv. 79; the Najafgarhy'////
near Delhi, iv. 178 ; Dhandhuka, iv.
243 ; Dhol Samudra, iv. 278 ; Dhul-
apra, iv. 280 ; Dig, iv. 286 ; Etah, iv.
358 ; Etawah, iv. 368 ; Faridpur, iv.
395, 396 ; Farukhabad, iv. 409 j
Fatehpur, iv. 423 ; Goalpara, v. 112;
Gogo, v. 138 ; Gonda, v. 146 ; Gorakh-
pur, v. 164 ; Gurdaspur, v. 207 ;
Hardoi, v. 322 ; Hissar, v. 426 ;
Howrah, v. 461, 462 ; Hugh', v. 490 ;
Bhuj jhil in Jaisalmer, vii. 66 ; in
Jalandhar, vii. 84 ; Jessor, vii. 183 ;



Jodhpur, vii. 235, 236 ; Kabar, vii.
265 ; Kahnuwan, vii. 294 ; Mari
Kalang and Pota Kalang, vii. 323 ; in
Kamrup, vii. 355 ; in Karachi, vii.
445 ; of the Karatoya, vii. 469 ; in
Karnal, viii. 19; Kheri, viii. 189;
Khulna, viii. 206 ; Kistna, viii. 226 ;
Kuch Behar, viii. 319 ; Lakhimpur,
viii. 426 ; Mahuwa, ix. 187 ; Maihar,
ix. 289 ; Haoda bil in Maimansingh,
ix. 192 ; Mainpuri, ix. 202 ; Mallani,
ix. 260; Mat, ix. 357; Mohanlalganj,
ix. 472 ; Montgomery, ix. 494 ; Morad-
abad, ix. 504 ; Miiltan, x. 2, 3 ;
Murshidabad, x. 21 ; Muzaffarnagar, x.
66, 67 ; Nadiya, x. 129 ; Naga Hills,
x. 143 ; Nicobar Islands, x. 298 ;
N.-W. Provinces, x. 361 ; Nowgong,
x. 406 ; Oudh, x. 481 ; Pabna, x. 511,
512 ; Partabgarh, xi. 69 ; Paung-deh,
xi. 119; Peshawar, xi. 146; Pilibhit,
xi. 172 ; Porbandar, xi. 215 ; Prome,
xi. 226 ; Purniah, xi. 322, 331 ;
Rahon, ?:i. 347 ; Rai Bareli, xi. 353 ;
Rajputana, ix. 397 ; Rajshahi, xi. 427,
428 ; Rangpur, xi. 488 ; Rudrapur,
xii. 81 ; Santal Parganas, xii. 227 ;
Sara, xii. 248 ; Saran, xii. 251, 252 ;
Seoni, xii. 308 ; Shahjahanpur, xii.
343, 344 ; Sialkot, xii. 440, 441 ; Sib-
sagar, xii. 460 ; Sirsa, xiii. 9 ; of the
Solani river, xiii. 49 ; Sultanpur, xiii.
96, 97; Surat, xiii. 118; Sylhet, xiii.
145 ; Talbehat, xiii. 164 ; Talgaon,
xiii. 167 ; Tamranga, xiii. 173 ; Tando
Muhammad Khan, xiii. 177 ; Tanjore,
xiii. 181 ; Tarai, xiii. 207 ; Tatta, xiii.
217 ; Taung-ngu, xiii. 227 ; Thana,
xiii. 250 ; Tharawadi, xiii. 272 ; Tinne-
velli, xiii. 298 ; Tipperah, xiii. 313 ;
Twenty-four Parganas, xiii. 387, 389 ;
Unao, xiii. 427 ; Vizagapatam, xiii.
496, 497.

Marshman, H. M., his account of the
battle of Laswari, quoted, viii. 466 ;
one of the Baptist missionaries of
Serampur, xiii. 318.

Martaban, township in Burma, ix. 349.

Martaban, ancient town in Burma, ix.

349, 350-
Martin, Gen. Claude, founded the

Martiniere at Lucknow, viii. 507 ;

built a palace at Najafgarh, x. 178.
Martin, Frangois, purchased site and

established the French at Pondicherri,

iv. 451, 452, xi. 198.
Martindell, Col., took Kalinjar (1812),

vh. 333.
Martinez, Col. Manuel, first proposed to

deepen the Pambam Passage, xi. 22.
Martoli, village in N.-W. Provinces, ix.

35o.
Marttan. See Matan.



INDEX.



Martyn, Col., occupied Ramnad (1792;,
xi. 451.

Martyrdoms of Jesuit missionaries, article
' India,' vi. 252, 253.

Marufganj, village in Bengal, ix. 350.

Marwar, State in Rajputana, ix. 350.
See Jodhpur.

Marwaris, Agarwalas, etc., trading caste
of importance in Agroha (their original
seat), i. 77, 78 ; Ahmadnagar, i. 104,
105, 109 ; Ajmere-Merwara, i. 123 ;
Assam, i. 359, 360 ; Azamgarh, i. 402 ;
Bengal, ii. 311 ; Bhiwapur, ii. 401 ;
Bombay city. iii. 81 ; Dacca, iv. 87 ;
Darrang, iv. 149; Goalanda, v. in ;
Hamirpur, v. 301 ; Hinganghat, v.
421, 422; Jaggayapet, vii. 42; Jodh-
pur, vii. 237 ; Joshat, vii. 248 ; Kal-
adgi, vii. 319 ; Kamrup, vii. 363,
364 ; Kamthi, vii. 367 ; Kelod, viii.
in; Kuch Behar, viii. 324, 328 ;
Lakhimpur, viii. 430, 436 ; Lakhna,
viii. 440 ; Mandawar, ix. 292, 293 ;
Nasik, x. 231 ; Parner (riot against),
xi. 66; Patna, xi. 112; Rahuri, xi.
348 ; Ranchi, xi. 468 ; Sibsagar, xii.
465, 469, 472; Sirajganj, xii. 548;
Sonapur (Assam), xiii. 58; Surat, xiii.
158.

Marwats, Pathan tribe in Bannu, ii.

9h 93-.
Masan, river in Bengal, ix. 350.
Masai", village in Bengal, ix. 350, 351.
Masaud. See Sayyid Salar Masaud.
Masaud, founded Ghazipur (1530), v. 6^,

64 ; his tomb there, v. 64.
Mascarewas, Dom Joao, defended Diu

against the king of Gujarat (1545), iv.

307.
Mashobra, village and hill in Punjab, ix.

35*-
Masjidkur, site of an old mosque, Bengal,

ix. 35i- .

Maskhal, island in Bengal, ix. 351.

Massacres, at Alleppi (1809), i. 200;
Black Hole of Calcutta (1757), iii.
241 ; Cawnpur (1857), iii. 282, 291 ;
Delhi (1857), iv. 194 ; of Bhils at Dhar-
angaon, iv. 250; Fatehgarh (1857), iv.
420 ; Hardwar, v. 334 ; Hugh, v. 500 ;
Jhansi (1857), vii. 219 ; Khatmandu
(1846), viii. 184; of Bhils at Kopar-
gaon (1804), viii. 293 ; Manantawadi
(1802), ix. 275; Meerut (1857), ix.
385 ; Nong-klao (1829), x. 353 ; Patan
Saongi (1742), xi. 84; Patna (1763),
xi. 95, 96 ; Pharamgiri (1871), xi.
166 ; Shamli (1857), xiii. 259 ; Vellore
(1806), xiii. 469.

Masson, quoted, on the Kafirs, vii. 290 ;
on the population of Kandahar, vii.
390 ; of Khelat, viii. 188 ; on the
Alula Pass, ix. 536.



Master, Streynsham, Governor of Madras
(1678-81), ix. 66.

Massy, Gen. \V. G. Dunham, archway
and market in honour of, at Rawal
Pindi, xii. 38.

Mastgarh, fortress in Punjab, ix. 351.

Masti, village in Mysore, ix. 351.

Masuda, town in Rajputana, ix. 352.

Masulipatam, town and seaport in
Madras, ix. 352 - 357 ; history, 353-
357 ; Company's factory established at
(1622), article 'India,' vi. 368; tem-
porarily abandoned (1628), but re-
established under a farman from the
king of Golconda (1632), 368 ; murder
of the Company's factors at (1689),
371 ; recapture of, from the French,

3 8 .5-

Masura, town in Bombay, ix. 357.

Masuri. See Mussooree.

Mat, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro-
vinces, ix. 357, 358.

Matabhanga, river in Bengal, ix. 358,

359-
Mataikhar, forest reserve in Assam, ix.

359-
Matak, tract of country in Assam, ix.

359,360.
Mataks. See Moamarias.
Matamuri, river in Bengal, ix. 360.
Matan, ancient temple in Kashmir, ix.

360, 361.
Matar, town and Sub-division in Bom-
bay, ix. 361.
Matari, town in Bombay, ix. 361, 362.
Mataundh, town in N.-W. Provinces, ix.

362.
Material Condition of the People. See

Condition of the People.
Mathematics, Brahmanical system of, vi.

106.
Matheran, hill station and sanitarium in

Bombay, ix. 362-364 ; physical aspects,

362-364 ; history, 364 ; chief public

buildings, 364.
Mathura. See Muttra.
Mathura, town in Oudh, ix. 365.
Mathwar, petty State in Central India,

ix. 365.
Matiakhar. See Mataikhar.
Matiana, village in Punjab, ix. 365.
Matin, estate in Central Provinces, ix.

365-
Matla, river in Bengal, ix. 365, 366.
Matla. See Port Canning.
Matra Timba, petty State in Kathiawar,

ix. 366.
Mats, made at Ampta, i. 245 ; Wandi-

wash in North Arcot, i. 317 ; South

Arcot, i. 326 ; Ami, i. 331 ; Assam, i.

367 ; Bakarganj, i. 447 ; Barsoi, ii.

177 ; Lower Burma, iii. 198 ; Daman,

iv. 103 ; Dharampur, iv. 249 ; Dhar-



212



INDEX.



war, iv. 264 ; Faridpur, iv. 397, 405 ;
Gopalganj, v. 161 ; Hanthawadi, v.
316 ; Kasijora, viii. 80 ; Khasi Hills,
viii. 178; Kheri, viii. 196; Kbyrim,
viii. 215 ; Kuch Behar, viii. 324 ; Lakh-
impur, viii. 434 ; Lohardaga, viii.
485 ; Magura, ix. 141 ; Maimansingh,
ix. 198 ; Palghat in Malabar, ix. 235 ;
Midnapur, ix. 420 ; Muzaffargarh, x.
63 ; Narajol, x. 203 ; Nellore, x. 269 ;
Noakhali, x. 350; Nowgong, x. 412;
Pabna, x. 517; Porto Novo, xi. 222;
Pudukattai, xi. 238 ; Pullampet, xi.
241 ; Rangoon, xi. 479 ; Rangpur, xi.
498 ; Sayyidpur, xii. 300 ; Sehwan,
xii. 305 ; Serampur, xii. 318 ; the
Sundarbans, xiii. 112; Sylhet, xiii.
153, 157; Tipperah, xiii. 319; Upper
Sind Frontier, xiii. 447.

Matthews, Gen., stormed Honawar
(W^)) v - 440; started on his march
against Bednur from Kandapur, vii.
399-

Mattod, village in Mysore, ix. 366.

Mattra. See Muttra.

Ma-tun, river in Burma, ix. 366, 367.

Mau, cantonment in Central India. See
Mhow.

Mau, tahsil in Jhansi District, N.-W.
Provinces, ix. 367, 368.

Mau, town in Jhansi District, N.-W.
Provinces, ix. 368, 369.

Mau, town and tahsil in Banda District,
N.-W. Provinces, ix. 369.

Mau, town in Azamgarh District. See
Mau Natbhanjan.

Mau Aima, town in Allahabad District,
N.-W. Provinces, ix. 369, 370.

Ma-ubin, village in Burma, ix. 370.

Maudha, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro-
vinces, ix. 370.

Maudhunkhalla. See Mondemkhallu.

Maulmain, town and seaport in Burma,
ix. 370-372; population, 371; princi-
pal buildings, 371; education, 372;
medical aspects, 372.

Maunagar, town in N.-W. Provinces,
ix. 372.

Mau Natbhanjan, town in N.-W. Pro-
vinces, ix. 372, 373.

Maunda, village in Central Provinces,
^. 373-

Maung Da, former governor of Tavoy,
headed revolt there (1829), xiii. 229.

Maung-daw, town in Burma, ix. 373, 374.

Maung-ma-gau. See Moscos.

Maung Myat Thun, made Donabyu his
head-quarters in second Burmese war,
where he defeated Loch, but was
eventually killed, iv. 313, xiii. 289;
leader of revolt in Henzada, v. 385.

Maung Sat, Governor of Than-lyin, after
first Burmese war assumed title of



king, but was defeated (^1827), xiii.

158, 159-

Mau Ranipur, town in N.-W. Pro-
vinces, ix. 374. See Mau and Rani-
pur.

Mauranwan, town and pargand in Oudh,
ix. 374.

Maureswar, village in Bengal^ ix. 374.

Mauritius, India's trade with, article
' India,' vi. 578, 579.

Mausoleums, article 'India,' vi. 112.
Local notices — The following mau-
soleums and cenotaphs are particularly
noteworthy, the Taj Mahal and that
of Ihtimad-ud-Daula at Agra, i. 75;
Ahmadabad, i. 98 ; the Khusru Batdi
at Allahabad, i. 196, 198 ; of AH
Muhammad Khan at Aonla, i. 296 ;
of Saadat-ulla-Khan at Arcot, i. 311 ;
of Telang Rao at Arvi, i. 336; of
wife of Aurungzeb at Aurungabad, i.
587 ; of Malik Ambar at Roza, i. 388 ;
of Sayyid Abdul Aziz at Aurungabad
Sayyid, i. 388 ; of Khan Jahan at
Bagherhat, i. 417; of Jaswant Rao
Holkar at Bhanpura, ii. 369; of the
Raos of Cutch at Bhuj, ii. 408 ; of the
Rajas of Biindi at Bundi, hi. 160; of
Chhatar Sal at Chhatarpur, iii. 396 ; of
Humayun at Delhi, iv. 188; of the
Bahu Begam at Faizabad, iv. 388 ; of
Shaikh Salim Chishti at Fatehpur
Sikri, iv. 434 ; of kings of Bengal at
Gaur, v. 40 ; of kings of Golconda at
Golconda, v. 144 ; of Mahan Singh at
Gujranwala, v. 187 ; of Muhammad
Ghaus at Gwalior, v. 234, 235 ; of the
Mirs at Haidarabad (Sind), v. 288 ; of
the wife of Akbar at Hasan Abdal,
v. 342 ; of the Rajas of Jodhpur at
Mandor, vii. 247, ix. 309 ; of Babar
and Timur Shah at Kabul, vii. 268 ; at
Kalpi, vii. 343 ; at Kanauj, vii. 387 ; of
Ahmad Shah Durani at Kandahar, vii.
391 ; of the first Nawab of Karniil at
Karnul, viii. 45 ; of Pir Ghulam Ali at
Kera, viii. 116, 117 ; of Sayyid Khurd
at Kheri, viii. 199 ; of Fateh Muham-
mad Khan at Kolar, viii. 279 ; of
Jahangir, Nur Jahan, and Ranjit Singh
at Lahore, viii. 415, 416, 417 ; of
Shahal Muhammad Kalhora at Lark-
hana, viii. 463, 465 ; the Imambara at
Lucknow, viii. 506, 507 ; of Hoshang
Ghori at Mandogarh, ix. 308 ; at
Meerut, ix. 393 ; Mehmadabad, ix.
400 ; of the Rajas of Coorg at Merkara,
ix. 414 ; of Sawan Mall at Multan, x.
12 ; of Murshid Kuli Khan, x. 38, 39 ;
of the Bhonsla Rajas at Nagpur, x. 174;
of Nawab Najib-ud-daula at Najibabad,
x. 179; at Nakodar, x. 180, 181 ; of
Gunna Begam at Nurabad, x. 418 ;



INDEX.



213



at Palwal, xi. 21 ; at Pandharpur, \i.

37 ; of Sadr Jahan at Pihani, xi. 170 ;
of Randulla Khan at Rahimatpur, xi.
346 ; at Rai Bareli, xi. 360 ; of Faiz-
ulla-Khan at Rampur, xi. 459 ; of
Peshwa Baji Rao at Raver, xii. 14; at
Sakhi Sarwar, xii. 146 ; of Sher Shah
at Sasseram, xii. 273 ; of Haidar Ali
and Tipu Sultan at Seringapatam, xii.
320; of Akbar at Sikandra, xii. 481 ;
of Khair-ud-din Shah at Sukkur, xiii.
93 ; of the Oxendens at Surat, xiii.
135 ; of Zafar Khan at Tribeni, xiii.
353 ; of the Ranas of Mewar at Ar
or Arhar, near Udaipur, xiii. 410 ; of
Abdulla Khan at Ujhani, xiii. 417.
Mavalikara, town and taluk in Madras,

«. 374, 375-
Mawai, town and pargand in Oudh, ix.

375-

Mawal, Sub -division in Bombay, ix.
375; 376.

Mawana, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro-
vinces, ix. 376.

Maxwell, Colonel, advanced on Mysore
from Kaveripatam (1790 , viii. 106.

May, Mr., Superintendent of the Ma-
tabhanga river, and founder of the
deepening system there, v. 475.

Mayakonda, village in Mysore, ix. 376,

377-.

Mayani. See Maini.

Mayapur, village in Bengal, ix. 377.

Mayavaram, town and taluk in >Iadras,
i*- 377-

Mayne, F. O., his improvements at
Etah, where the market-place is called
Mayneganj after him, iv. 366.

Mayo, Earl of, Viceroy of India (1869-
72), article ' India,' vi. 425, 426 ;
the Ambala darbar ; visit of the Duke
of Edinburgh ; administrative reforms ;
abolition of customs lines ; assassina-
tion at the Andaman Islands, 425 ; his
scheme for Indian feeder lines of rail-
way, 445, 446. Local notices — His
interview with Sher Ali Khan at Am-
bala, i. 51 ; his murder in the Anda-
man Islands, i. 284 ; statue of, at
Calcutta, iii. 250 ; made treaty with
the Maharaja of Kashmir for regulating
the trade of Ladakh, viii. 400 ; resolved
tu severely punish the Lushais, viii.
531-

Mayo Mines, salt-mines in Punjab, ix.

377-379-
Mayn, river in Burma, ix. 379.
Mayiir Pandit, Marathi religious poet of

the 18th century, vi. 346.
Mazagon, suburb of Bombay city, ix.

379-
M'Bean, General, his campaign in Arakan

in the first Burmese war (1824-26),



i. 153, iii. 225 ; took Mro-haung, where
he cantoned, and must of his troops

died of disease, ix. 524; occupied
Sandoway, xii. 205.

M'Caskill, General Sir J. ('., destroyed
Istalif in Afghanistan for harbouring
the murderers of Burnes, i. 33, 34 ;
commanded second division in Pollock's
advance through the Khaibar Pas-, and
lost two guns there, viii. 126, 127.

M'Crindle, Mr. J. W. M., Commerce and
Navigation of the Erythraan Sea,
quoted, article ' India,' vi. 166 (foot-
notes 1 and 2); 356 (footnote); Aiirient
India as desodbed by Megasthenes and
Arrian, quoted, vi. 168 (footnote 1);
356 (footnote).

M'Donell, Mr. Fraser, his gallantry in
the attempt to relieve Arrah (1857), iv.
300, xi. 98.

M'Dowall, Colonel, took Malegaon, but
with heavy loss (1818), ix. 254.

Means of communication, article ' India,'
vi. chap, xviii. pp. 545-554. History



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