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of the Rajputs, 309, 310 ; Aurangzeb's
revenues and land-tax, 310, 311 ;
character of Aurangzeb, 312; decline
and fall of the Mughal Empire, the
six puppet kings (1707-20), 312,
313 ; independence of the Deccan, of
Oudh, and of the Rajput States, 314 ;
oppressions of the Sikhs, 314; the
Maratha chauth, 314; Persian and
Afghan invasions from the north, 314,
315; third battle of Panipat (1761),
and fall of the Mughal Empire, 315 ;
the last of the Mughals (1862), 316.
Mughalpur, town in N.-W. Provinces, ix.

529-
Mughal Sarai, town in N.-W. Provinces,

ix. 529-

Mughia, aboriginal tribe in Central India,
ix. 529.

Mugori. See Magori.

Muhamdi, town, tahsil, and pargand in
Oudh, ix. 529, 530.

Muhammad III., king of Gujarat, be-
sieged Diu (i537-45)> and was de-
feated by Joao de Castro, iv. 307.

Muhammadabad, tahsil in Ghazipur Dis-
trict, N.-W. Provirfces, ix. 530.

Muhammadabad, tahsil in Azamgarh
District, N.-W. Provinces, ix. 530, 531.



INDEX.



225



Muhammadabad, town in N.-W. Pro-
vinces, ix. 531.

Muhammad Afzal Khan, moved capital
of Afghan -Tiirkistan from Balkh to
Takhtapul (1858), i. 55.

Muhammad All, Nawab of the Karnatik,
held Arcot (1760-80), i. 310; granted
jdgir of Chinnamanaik to the East
India Company (1750), i. 321, and
Chengalpat (1760), iii. 382 ; took
Tanjore with English help (1773), xiii.
182 ; fled to Trichinopoli, where he was
besieged by Chanda Sahib, xiii. 356.

Muhammad Ali Shah, third king of
Oudh (1837-41), built the Husainabad
Imambara at Lucknow, viii. 509.

Muhammad Amin Khan, brother of
Amir Sher Ali, Governor of Kandahar
(1858), rebelled and was killed in
battle (1865), vii. 395.

Muhammadans, for their number, see the
Population section of each District
article in the following Districts and
States : — Aden, i. 17 ; Bahawalpur, i.
422 ; Bakarganj, i. 443 ; Bannu, ii.
92, 93 ; Bogra, iii. 37, 38 ; Chittagong,
iii. 438 ; Dacca, iv. 82, 83 ; Dera
Ghazi Khan, iv. 213 ; Dera Ismail
Khan, iv. 222 ; Dinajpur, iv. 292,
293 ; Faridpur, iv. 398, 399 ; Gujran-
wala, v. 183; Gujrat, v. 191 ; Haidar-
abad (Sind), v. 276 ; Hazara, v. 363 ;
Tehlam, vii. 170; Jessor, vii. 186;
[hang, vii. 209 ; Karachi, vii. 447 ;
Kashmir, viii. 69, 70 ; Khairpur, viii.
135; Khulna, viii. 206; Kohat, viii.
246 ; Lahore, viii. 407 ; Maimansingh,
ix. 193, 194 ; Montgomery, ix. 497 ;
Multan, x. 6 ; Muzaffargarh, x. 59, 60 ;
Nadiya, x. 133, 134 ; Noakhali, x. 344,
345; Pabna, x. 514, 515; Peshawar,
xi. 150 ; Rajshahi, xi. 431, 432 ; Ram-
pur, xi. 457 ; Rangpur, xi. 493 ;
Rawal Pindi, xii. 26 ; Shahpur, xii.
364 ; Shikarpur, xii. 392 ; Sialkot, xii.
444 ; Sylhet, xiii. 148 ; Thar and
Parkar, xiii. 266 ; Tipperah, xiii. 315 ;
Upper Sind Frontier, xiii. 440. See
also Assam, i. 357, 358 ; Bengal, ii.
288-290, 292, 293 ; Bijnaur, ii. 431 ;
Bombay Presidency, iii. 51, 52, city,
iii. 81 ; Broach, iii. 103 ; Lower
Burma, iii. 179 ; Calcutta, iii. 256 ;
Central Provinces, iii. 317; Coorg,
iv. 35 ; Delhi city, iv. 195 ; Faizabad,
iv. 383 ; Haidarabad, v. 246 ; Berar,
v. 266, 267 ; Kaira, vii. 303 ; Kamrup,
vii. 360; North Kanara, vii. 371;
Lucknow, viii. 496, 497, 526 ; Madras
Presidency, ix. 18, 22, 23, city, ix.
108 ; Malabar, ix. 224, 225 ; Maldah,
ix. 242, 243 ; Murshidabad, x. 25 ;
N.-W. Provinces, x. 372; Oudh, x.
VOL. XIV.



497, 498 ; Patna, xi. 99 ; Punjab, xi.
272, 273 ; Rajputana, xi. 408, 410,
411 ; Saharanpur, xii. 119; Shahjahan-
pur, xii. 347 ; Sibsagar, xii. 464 ; Sind,
xii. 517; Tinnevelli, xiii. 304.

Muhammadan architecture, article 'India,'
vi. 112; 304. See also Architecture.

Muhammadan conquest of India only
partial and temporary, article India,'
vi. 270.

Muhammadan population of India, article
'India,' vi. 51, and Appendix V. vi.
693. See also Muhammadans.

Muhammadan States of the Deccan
(1489-1688), article 'India,' vi. 288.

Muhammad Bakhtiyar Khilji, first Mu-
hammadan invader of Bengal ^1199),
ii. 275 ; defeated by Hajo, the Koch
leader in Kamrup (1204), vii. 356;
his invasion and its results in Lucknow,
viii. 494 ; took Monghyr, ix. 491 ;
took Nadiya (1203), x. 141 ; first
Muhammadan organizer of Oudh, x.
486.

Muhammad Beg, Governor of Agra
(1779-84), i. 69.

Muhammad Ben Manzur, mentions the
pearl fishery of Tinnevelli ( 1 2th century),
xiii. 308.

Muhammadgarh, Native State in Central
India, ix. 531.

Muhammad of Ghor, the first king of the
Ghor dynasty in India (1 186 -1206),
article ' India,' vi. 275-278 ; his con-
quests in N. India and overthrow of
the Rajput clans, 275, 276 ; subjuga-
tion of Bengal, and defeat of its last
independent Hindu king, 277, 278.
Local notices — Took Benares, ii. 263 ;
his wars with Prithwi Raja, iv. 190,
191 ; established colony of Dundiya
Kayasths at Dundwaraganj, iv. 321 ;
plundered Etawah, iv. 379 ; overran
Fatehpur, iv. 423 ; took Gwalior, v.
236 ; took Kanauj, vii. 386 ; moved
the capital from Lahore to Delhi, viii.
405 ; destroyed Mahim, ix. 181 ; his
invasions of the N.-W. Provinces, x.
363, 364 ; defeated the Ghakkars, who
afterwards murdered him, xii. 24 ;
took Uchh, xiii. 400.

Muhammad Hassan, mutineer leader,
occupied Gorakhpur (Aug. 1857-Jan.
1858), v. 167.

Muhammad Kasim, first Muhammadan
invader of India, conquered Dera
Ghazi Khan (712), iv. 210; took
Merankot on site of Haidarabad, v.
287 ; conquered Multan, x. 4 ; said to
have taken Sehwan, xii. 306 ; his
invasions of Sind, xii. 508, 509 ; said
to have been defeated by Bappa Rawal,
xiii. 403.



226



INDEX.



Muhammad Khan, the most prosperous
Nawab of Dera Ismail Khan (1792-
181 5), founded Mankera, iv. 221.

Muhammad Khan, granted Kohat and
Hangu by Ranjit Singh (1834), gave
up G. Lawrence to the Sikhs (1849),
viii. 244, 245.

Muhammad Khan Bangarh, annexed
part of Budaun (1719), iii. 118.

Muhammad Khan, Nawab of Farukh-
abad, founded that city(i7i4), iv. 417.

Muhammad Khan of Sangarhi, his story,
granted Seoni by Raghuji Bhonsla for
his bravery, xii. 310.

Muhammad Khan's Tando, Sub-division
in Sind, ix. 531, 532.

Muhammad Kuli Kutab Shah, fifth king
of Golconda (1577- 1611), founded
Haidarabad (1589), his power and
buildings there, v. 254, 255.

Muhammadpur, village in Patna Dis-
trict, Bengal, ix. 532.

Muhammadpur, town in Jessor District,
Bengal, ix. 532.

Muhammadpur, town and pargana in
Oudh, ix. 532.

Muhammad Shah, Emperor (1719-48),
defeated and took prisoner AH Muham-
mad, the Rohilla leader (1746), ii. 139 ;
Marathas appeared before the walls of
Delhi (1726), iv. 193 ; induced Mubariz
Khan to attack the Nizam (1724), v.
258 ; defeated at Karnal by Nadir
Shah (1739), viii. 20; built grove and
tank at Loni, viii. 490 ; reconquered
Rohilkhand, ix. 506.

Muhammad Shah of Ahmadabad, de-
feated the rebel cobbler, Takhi, at
Karra (1346), viii. 48.

Muhammad Shah Bahmani 11., first
Muhammadan invader of Kistna, viii.
227 ; took Kondapalli (1471), viii.
287 ; and Masulipatam (1478), ix. 353.

Muhammad Shuja, Viceroy of Bengal,
moved capital back from Rajmahal to
Dacca, iv. 81 ; built the Katra at
Dacca, iv. 90.

Muhammad Tughlak, second king of the
Tughlak dynasty (1324-51), article
' India,' vi. 283-285 ; expeditions to
the south, 283 ; his cruelties, enforced
change of capital, revolts, revenue
exactions, 284, 285 ; ' man-hunts,' 284,
285. Local notices — Annexed Dacca
to Afghan kingdom of Gaur, iv. 80 ;
twice forcibly changed the capital from
Delhi to Daulatabad, iv. 159, 160,
192 ; completed the conquest of the
Deccan (1338), iv. 165 ; capture of
Kulbarga (1323), viii. 332; expelled
Ibrahim Sultan of Jaunpur from Sam-
bhal, ix. 505, 506 ; blockaded Kond-
hana, now Sinhgarh (1340), xii. 543 ;



gave up Surat to be plundered (1347),
xiii. 120.

Muhammad Tughral, invaded Tipperah
(1279), xiii. 314.

Muhammad Yusaf, occupied Sholavandan
(1717) to cover Calliaud's operations
against Madura, xii. 422 ; his rule in
Tinnevelli (1756-58, 1759-63), xiii.
300.

Muhammadzais, Pathan tribe in Pesha-
war, xi. 149.

Muhpa. See Mohpa.

Muir's, Dr. John, Sanskrit Texts, quoted,
article 'India,' vi. 81 (footnote 2);
84 (footnote 3); 94 (footnote); 212
(footnote 4) ; 334 (footnotes I and 2).

Muir, Sir William, central college, Allah-
abad, named after, i. 198; Lieut. -
Governor of N.-W. Provinces (1868-
74), x. 370.

Mujnai, river in Bengal, ix. 532, 533.

Mukama, town in Bengal, ix. 533.

Mukandwara, village in Rajputana, ix.

533-

Mukarrab Khan, Governor of Surat,
allowed English captain to sell there,
xiii. 121.

Mukarrab Khan, physician to Shah
Jahan, granted the town and surround-
ing country of Kairana, vii. 308.

Mukarrab Khan, the last independent
Ghakkar chief, defeated by the Sikh,
Gujar Singh (1765), and murdered, v.
190, xii. 24.

Mukerian, town in Punjab, ix. 533.

Mukimpur, town in Oudh, ix. 534. See
Shahganj.

Mukri-betta, peak in Madras, ix. 534.

Muktsar, town and tahsil in Punjab, ix.

534, 535-
Mul, hill range in Central Provinces, ix.

535-

Mul, town and tahsil in Central Pro-
vinces, ix. 535.

Mula, mountain pass in Baluchistan,

ix ', 536. .

Mulagvil, village in Assam, ix. 537.
Mulajmapura, petty State in Bombay,

l x ' 537-
Mulanur, town in Madras, ix. 537.
Mulbagal, town and taluk in Mysore, ix.

537-
Mulberry, Cultivation of, in Bengal,
article 'India,' vi. 513. Local notices
— In Badakshan, i. 407 ; Baluchistan,
ii. 36 ; Bangalore, ii. 63 ; Bardwan,
ii. 130 ; Bengal, ii. 271 ; Birbhum, iii.
5 ; Bogra, iii. 25, 29 ; Herat, v. 391 ;
Hugli, v. 494 ; Kandahar, vii. 391 ;
Kangra, vii. 412 ; Kashmir, viii. 71 ;
Khairpur, viii. 136 ; Kolar, viii. 276,
279 ; Lahore, viii. 404, 410 ; Lakhim-
pur, viii. 433 ; Maldah, ix. 240, 244 ;



INDEX.



227



Mergui, ix. 410 ; Midnapur, ix. 429 ;
Murshidabad, x. 26 ; Mysore State, x.
100, District, x. 1 19; Nadiya, x. 135;
Peshawar, xi. 146 ; Rajshahi, xi. 433 ;
Rangpur, xi. 496 ; Safed Koh Moun-
tains, xii. 99 ; Sind, xii. 520 ; Sukkur,
\iii. 91 ; Thayet-myo, xiii. 285 ; Tum-
kur, xiii. 378 ; Yelandur, xiii. 552.

Mules, article 'India,' vi. 521.

Mulgund, town in Bombay, ix. 538,

Muli, Native State and town in Kathia-
war, ix. 537, 538.

Mulila Deri, petty State in Bombay, ix.
538.

Mulki, town in Madras, ix. 538.

Mullama Konda. See Horsley Konda.

Midler, Professor Max, History of San-
skrit Literature, translation of Rig-
Veda, article ' India,' vi. 83 (footnotes
1 and 2) ; 84 (footnotes) ; 85 (foot-
note) ; Chips from a German Workshop,
83 (footnote 1) ; 127 (footnote 3) ; 142
(footnote 2) ; 151 (footnote 2) ; Con-
temporary KevirM for July 1 870, 15 1
(footnote 3) ; Sacred Books of the East,
vol. xxii., the Jaina Sutras, by Her-
mann Jacobi, 161 (footnotes 4, 5, 6, 7,
and 8).

Mulraj of Multan, farmed Dera Ghazi
Khan from the Sikhs up to 1848, iv.
212 ; when diivan, driven out of Hazara
by a revolt (1845), v - 3 62 > Nawab of
.Miiltan (1844-49) when his rebellion
was put down, and he was transported
for murder, x. 5.

Multai, town and tahsil in Central Pro-
vinces, ix. 538, 539.

Multan, Division or Commissionership in
Punjab, x. 1.

Multan, District in Punjab, x. 2-10 ;
physical aspects, 2, 3 ; history, 3-5 ;
population, 5, 6 ; religion, 6 ; town
and rural population, 6, 7 ; agriculture,
7, 8 ; commerce and trade, 8, 9 ; ad-
ministration, 9, 10; medical aspects, 10.

Multan, tahsil in Punjab, x. 10, II.

Multan, city and commercial centre in
Punjab, x. 11-13.

Multan, cantonment in Punjab, x.

l >,

Multan, town in Central India, x.

I 3«

Mundargi, town in Bombay, x. 13.
Mundas, aboriginal tribe of Kols in

Chutia Nagpur, article 'India,' vi. 71

(footnote). See Kols.
Mundavers, wandering pastoral tribe in

the Anamalai Hills, article ' India,' vi.

55-
Mundhri, town in Central Provinces,

Mundias, gold-washing aboriginal tribe
in Seoni, xii. 309.



Mundlana, town in Punjab, x. 13, 14.

Mundra, port in Bombay, x. 14.

Mungapakam, village in Madras, x. 14.

Mungeli, town and tahsil in Central Pro-
vinces, x. 14, 15.

Mungir. See Monghyr.

Municipal administration and statistics,
article ' India,' vi. 455-457 ; 47°- See
especially the notices of the following
more important municipalities : — Agra,
i. 76; Ahmadabad, i. 97; Ahmad-
nagar, i. 109; Ajmere, i. 133; Ali-
garh, i. 178; Allahabad, i. 199;
Ambala, i. 226 ; Amritsar, i. 266 ;
Bangalore, ii. 71 ; Benares, ii. 267 ;
Bombay, iii. 82 ; Calcutta, iii. 256,
257 ; Cawnpur, iii. 293 ; Chittagong,
iii. /j/|/| ; Dacca, iv. 89 ; Delhi, iv.
197 ; Dharwar, iv. 267 ; Gaya, v. 53 :
Howrah, v. 456 ; Jabalpur, vii. 37 :
Karachi, vii. 459 ; Lahore, viii. 419 ;
Lucknow, viii. 517; Madras, ix. 109-
III ; Madura, ix. 133 ; Mangalore, ix.
314 ; Masulipatam, ix. 352 ; Meerut,
ix. 394; Mirzapur, ix. 462 ; Moradabad,
ix. 514; Multan, x. 12 ; Murshidabad,
x. 32 ; Muttra, x. 54 ; Mysore, x. 122 ;
Nagpur, x. 174 ; Patna, xi. no ; Pesha-
war, xi. 159 ; Poona, xi. 210 ; Ran-
goon, xi. 484 ; Rawal Pindi, xii. 37 ;
Salem, xii. 166 ; Shahjahanpur, xii.
356; Sialkot, xii. 451; Surat, xiii.
135, 136; Tanjore, xiii. 195; Trich-
inopoli, xiii. 364, 365 ; Vizagapatam,
xiii. 498.

Munir. See Maniar.

Munj, village and ruins in N.-W. Pro-
vinces, x. 15.

Munjpur. See Mujpur.

Munoli. See Manoli.

Munro, Major (afterwards Sir Hector),
suppression of the first Sepoy Mutiny
by, article ' India,' vi. 386 ; defeat of
the Imperial and Oudh armies at
Baxar, 386. Local notices — His victory
at Baxar (1764), ii. 220; failed to take
Chanar (1763), iii. 347 ; took Pondi-
cherri (1778) xi. 198; took Timeri
(1760), xiii. 297.
Munro, Sir Thomas, introducer of the
rayatiuari system of land settlement
into Madras, article ' India,' vi. 446.
Local notices — Commissioner of the
Ceded Districts, made settlement of
Bellary, ii. 243, 248 ; his administra-
tion and settlement of Cuddapah, iv.
49 ; general order on his retirement,
quoted, iv. 50 ; resided for some years
at Dharmapuri, iv. 254 ; pointed out
the failure of the Permanent Settlement
in Godavari (1822), v. 125 ; memorial
well at Gooty, v. 161 ; made the first
settlement of Kanara (1800), vii. 382 ;



228



INDEX.



his difficulties in making the settlement
of Karnul then included in Bellary, viii.
43 ; assisted by the Desai of Kittur in
his siege of Belgaum (1818), viii. 237 ;
abolished the Government timber
monopoly in Malabar and S. Kanara
(1822), ix. 6 ; his advocacy of the im-
proved rdyatwdri system in Madras,
ix. 45, 46 ; Governor of Madras (1820-
27), ix. 67 ; statue of, at Madras, ix.
106 ; buried in St. Mary's Church,
Madras, ix. 107 ; died of cholera at
Pattikonda, xi. 118; took Ranibennur,
(1818), xi. 503; assistant to Capt.
Read, Collector of Salem (1792), and
later Read's secretary (1799), xii. 155 ;
took Sandiir (1817), xii. 207; stormed
Sholapur (1818), xii. 421 ; administered
Travancore for Lakshmi Rani (1811),
xiii. 347.
Munro, J. C, Sub-collector of Sholapur,
monument to, at Dharwar, iv. 267 ;
killed at taking of Kittur (1824), viii.
237-
Munro, J., on the forests of Travancore,

quoted, xiii. 345.
Munyeru, river in Madras, x. 15.
Murad, son of Akbar, driven from
Ahmadnagar by Chand Bibi (1595), i.
108.
Murad, son of Shah Jahan, defeated by
Aurangzeb, near Dholpur (1658), iv.
276.
Muradabad, District, talis il, and town.

See Moradabad.
Muradabad, town in Oudh, x. 15, 16.
Muradnagar, village in N.-W. Provinces,

x. 16.
Murarai, village in Bengal, x. 16.
Murassapur, town in Oudh, x. 16.
Murbad, Sub-division in Bombay, x.

16, 17.
Murdara, town in Central Provinces,

x. 17.
Murdeswar, port in Bombay, x. 17.
Murgod, town in Bombay, x. 17.
Murliganj, town in Bengal, x. 17.
Murmis, aboriginal tribe, in Darjiling,
iv. 133 ; in the Himalaya Mountains,
v. 413.
Murnad, village in Coorg, x. 17.
Murray, Lt. -Col., occupied Perim (1799),

xi. 138.
Murree, tahsil \n Punjab, x. 17-19.
Murree, hill station and sanitarium in

Punjab, x. 19.

Murree Hills, range in Punjab, x. 20.

Mursan, town in N.-W. Provinces, x. 20.

Murshidabad, District in Bengal, x. 20-

31 ; physical aspects, 21, 22 ; history,

22-24 ; people, 24, 25 ; religion, 25 ;

tribes, castes, etc., 25; towns, etc.,

25, 26 ; agriculture, 26-28 ; manu-



factures, 28 ; trade, 28, 29 ; means of
communication, 29 ; administration,
2 9j 30 ; education, 30 ; medical aspects,

30, 31.

Murshidabad, Sub-division in Bengal,

x. 31.
Murshidabad city Sub-divison. See

Lalbagh.
Murshidabad, city in Bengal, x. 31-39;
area and population, 31, 32 ; history,
32, 33 ; the city and its buildings,
33-36 ; the Raft Festival, 35 ; general
aspect of the city, 36 ; the Motijhil,
36, 37; the Punyd, 37; the Khush
Bagh, 37, 38 ; the Kuttara, 38, 39 ;
trade, 39.
Murshid Kuli Khan, Nawab of Bengal,
his transfer of the capital from Dacca
to Murshidabad, article 'India,' vi.
380, 381. Local notices — Nawab of
Bengal (1704-25), ii. 278 ; his transfer
of capital (1704), iv. 81, 90; his
foundation of Murshidabad and rule
over Bengal, x. 22, 23 ; his tomb, x. 39.
Murtazapur, town and taluk in Berar, x.

39, 40.
Murtiza AH, murdered Sabdar AH at
Vellore (1741), and held Vellore until
1760, xiii. 468.
Murwara, town and tahsil in Central

Provinces, x. 40.
Musafirkhana, tahsil. See Muzaffarkhana.
Musahars, semi-Hinduized tribe in Ben-
gal, ii. 296.
Museums, at Allahabad, i. 198 ; Delhi,
iv. 196 ; Jaipur, vii. 60 ; Karachi, vii.
454 ; Lahore, viii. 418 ; Madras, ix.
118; Nagpur, x. 172; Rajamahendri,
xi. 387 ; the Phayre at Rangoon, xi.
484 ; the Napier at Trivandrum, xiii.
37p.
Music, Hindu, article 'India,' vi. 110-
112; peculiarities of Indian music, III ;
its modern revival, in, 112. Local
notices — Of the Bhutias, ii. 412 ; of the
Gonds, iii. 308 ; of the Santals, xii.
242.
Music, The Imperial, still maintained at

Murshidabad, x. 35.
Musical instruments, made at Miraj, ix.

440 ; Murshidabad, x. 39.
Musiri, town and taluk in Madras, x. 41.
Muskara, tahsil in N.-W. Provinces,

x. 41.
Musk deer, article ' India,' vi. 658.
Local notices — Bhutan, ii. 414 ;
Chamba, iii. 329; Darjiling, iv. 130 ;
Garhwal, v. 22 ; Himalaya Mountains,
v. 409 ; Kangra, vii. 413 ; Kashmir,
viii. 68 ; Kulu, viii. 338 ; Mishmi
Hills, ix. 464.
Muslin manufactures of Dacca and
Madras, decline of the industry, article



INDEX.



229



' India,' vi. 602, 603. Local notices —

At Behar, ii. 228 ; Chicacole, iii. 407,

v. 7 ; Dacca, iv. 81, 82, 86, 90, 91 ;

Delhi, iv. 197 ; Dindigal, iv. 301 ;

Mahmudi in Hardoi, v. 327 ; Jais, vii.

65 ; Lucknow, viii. 516 ; Maiman-

singh, ix. 198 ; Santipur in Nadiya, x.

137 ; Sehore, xii. 304 ; Sikandarabad,

xii. 478.
Mussooree, town and sanitarium in N.-W.

Provinces, x. 41, 42.
Mustafabad, tahsil in N.-W. Provinces,

x. 42.
Mustafabad, town in Punjab, x. 42.
Mustafabad, town in Faizabad, Oudh,

x. 42.
Mustafabad, town in Rai Bareli, Oudh,

x. 42, 43.
Mustagh, pass over the Himalayas on

the trade route from the Punjab into

E. Turkistan, article 'India,' vi. 6.
Mutiny of Sepoys, at Barrackpur (1824),

ii. 175; Vellore (1806), xiii. 464;

Vizagapatam (1780), xiii. 498.
Mutiny, The, of 1857-58, article * India,'

vi. 417-421; its causes, 417, 418;

outbreaks at Meerut and Delhi, 419 ;

spread of the revolt, 419 ; loyalty of

the Sikhs, 419 ; massacre at Cawnpur,

420 ; siege and relief of Lucknow, 420,

421 ; siege of Delhi, 421 ; reduction of
Oudh, 421 ; campaigns of Sir Colin
Campbell (Lord Clyde) and Sir Hugh
Rose (Lord Strathnairn), 421, 422.
Local notices — Agra District, i. 62,
city, i. 70; Ajmere-Merwara, i. 122;
Aligarh, i. 171 ; Allahabad District, i.
187, 188, city, i. 197, 198; Arrah, i. 334,
335, xii. 328, 329 ; Azamgarh, i. 394,
395 ; Baksar, i. 450, 451 ; Balihri, ii.
13; Ballabgarh, ii. 17 ; Banda, ii. 49;
Bara Banki, ii. 109 ; Bareilly, ii. 140 ;
Barrackpur, ii. 175, 176; Bellary, ii.
243 ; Benares, ii. 257 ; Bengal, ii. 280,
281 ; Berhampur, ii. 325 ; Bijnaur, ii.
430 ; Bilaspur, ii. 448 ; Budaun, iii.
118, 119; Bulandshahr, iii. 134, 135;
Cawnpur District, iii. 281-283, city,
iii. 291, 292 ; Champaran, iii. 335 ;
Chanda, iii. 351 ; Chatra, iii. 374,
375 ; Chittagong, iii. 437, 445, 446 ;
Dacca, iv. 82 ; Delhi, iv. 194, 195 ;
Deori, iv. 206 ; Dinapur, iv. 300 ;
Etah, iv. 360 ; Etawah, iv. 372 ;
Faizabad, iv. 382 ; Farukhabad, iv.
411; Fatehgarh, iv. 420; Fatehpur,
iv. 424, 425 ; Firozpur, iv. 441 ; Gaya,
v. 45, 46 ; Ghazipur, v. 64, 65 ; Gonda,
v. 149, 150 ; Gorakhpur, v. 167 ;
Gurgaon, v. 217; Gwalior, v. 233;
Haidarabad, v. 252 ; Hamirpur, v.
300 ; Hissar, v. 428 ; Indore, vii. 7 ;
Jalaun, vii. 96 ; Jaswantnagar, vii.



147; Jaunpur, vii. 153; Jhansi, vii.
219, 220; Jind, vii. 232; Kalpi, vii.
342 ; Kanjia, vii. 433 ; Karwi, viii.
56, 57; Khair, viii. 127, 128; Khcri,
viii. 191 ; Kimlasa, viii. 201 ; Kotah,
viii. 305 ; Kot Kamalia, viii. 312 ;
Kunch, viii. 363 ; Kurai, viii. 368 ;
Lahore, viii. 406, 407 ; Lalitpur, viii.
449, 450 ; Lohardaga, viii. 479 ;
Loisinh, viii. 488 ; Lucknow, viii.
512-515; Mainpuri, ix. 204; Mandla.
ix. 303 ; Mandrak, ix. 309 ; Mataundh,
ix. 362 ; Maudha, ix. 370; Meerut, i.\.
384, 385 ; Mianganj, ix. 421 ; Miran-
pur, ix. 441 ; Mirzapur, ix. 454, 455 :
Montgomery, ix. 496 ; Moradabad, ix.
506, 507 ; Muttra, x. 46, 47 ; Muzaf-
farnagar, x. 69, 70; Nagina, x. 160;
Nagpur, x. 168, 169 ; Nargund, x.
211; Nasirabad, x. 239; Nawabganj,
x. 248; Nimar, x. 331 ; N.-W. Pro-
vinces, x. 370 ; Oudh, x. 495, 496 ;
Patna, xi. 96-98 ; Peshawar, xi. 149,
150 ; Phaphund, xi. 166 ; Pilibhit, xi.
173; Punjab, xi. 267-269; Rahatgarh,
**■ 345> 346 > Rajputana, xi. 407 ;
Ramgarh, xi. 448 ; Ravval Pindi, xii.
25 ; Rewari, xii. 55 ; Rohtak, xii. 70,
71 ; Sadabad, xii. 91 ; Sagar, xii. 102,
103; Saharanpur, xii. 117, 118; Sam-
balpur, xii. 181 ; Secunderabad, xii.
303 ; Segauli, xii. 303 ; Shahjahanpur,
xii. 345, 346 ; Shamli, xii. 375 ;
Shorapur, xii. 423; Sialkot, xii. 443,
451 ; Sikandarabad, xii. 478 ; Singh -
bhum, xii. 534 ; Sitapur, xiii. 32, 33 ;
Srinagar, xiii. 78 ; Sultanpur, xiii. 98,
105 ; Thana Bhawan, xiii. 259 ; Trim-
bak, xiii. 366 ; Tulsipur, xiii. 374 ;
Udaipur (Bengal), xiii. 412 ; Unao,
xiii. 429, 430 ; Vaniyambadi, xiii. 463.
Muttra, District in N.-W. Provinces, \.
43-52 ; physical aspects, 43-45 ; his-
tory, 45-47 ; population, 47, 48 ; agri-
culture, 48, 49 ; natural calamities, 49.
50 ; commerce and trade, 50 ; admini-
stration, 50, 51; medical aspects, 51,

5 2 -

Muttra, tahsil in N.-W. Provinces, x.

52, 53-
Muttra, city in N.-W. Provinces, x. 53,

54-
Muvattapalai, taluk in Travancore. Sec

Muattapalai.

Muwanah, tahsil in N.-W. Provinces.
See Mawana.

Muzaffar II., king of Gujarat (1513-26).
repaired fort of Dohad, iv. 312.

Muzaffarabad, town in Kashmir, x. 54.

Muzaffargarh, District in Punjab, x. 54-
64; physical aspects, 55-58; history-,
58, 59 ; population, 59-61 ; agriculture,
61, 62; commerce and trade, 62, 63;







INDEX.



administration, 63, 64 ; medical as-
pects, 64.
Muzaffargarh, tahsil in Punjab, x. 64,

65.

Muzaffargarh, town in Punjab, x. 65, 66.

Muzaffar Jang, second Nizam (1748-51),
held Adoni, i. 27 ; defeated Anwar-ud-
din at Ambar, i. 230 ; granted Alam-
parai to Dupleix, i. 163 ; his battle
with Morari Rao at Chilambaram, hi.
412 ; ceded Masulipatam to the
French, iii. 468 ; his murder, iv. 49,
56, viii. 42 ; his reign in Haidarabad,

v - 2 49-
Muzaffar Jang, Nawab of Karmil (1815-

23), his history, viii. 42.
Muzaffar Khan, Nawab of Multan, helped
the last Sial chief of Jhang against
Ranjit Singh, vii. 208 ; held Multan
(1779-1818) when defeated by Ranjit
Singh and killed, x. 65 ; built Muzaffa-
garh, x. 65.
Muzaffar khana, tahsil in Oudh, x. 66.
Muzaffarnagar, District in N.-W. Pro-
vinces, x. 66-76 ; physical aspects,
66-68; history, 68-70; population,
70-72 ; agriculture, 72, 73 ; natural
calamities, 74 ; commerce and trade,
74; administration,' 74, 75; sanitary
aspects, 75, 76.
Muzaffarnagar, tahsil in N. -W. Provinces,

x. 76.
Muzaffarnagar, town in N.-W. Provinces,

x. 76, 77.
Muzaffarpur, District in Bengal, x. 77-83 ?
physical aspects, 77-79 ; population,
79, 80; agriculture, 80, 81; manu-
factures, 81, 82 ; means of communi-
cation, 82; administration, 82, 83.
Muzaffarpur, Sub - division in Bengal,

x. 83.
Muzaffarpur, town in Bengal, x. 83, 84.
Muzaffar Shah, last king of Ahmadabad,

lost Broach to Akbar (1573), hi- 113.
Muzang, suburb of Lahore, x. 84.
Myan - aung, township and town in

Burma, x. 84.
Myauk-bhet-myo, township in Burma,

x. 84.
Myaung-mya, township in Burma, x.



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