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the caste, 96; work done by Brahmans
for India, 97 ; Brahman theology, 97 ;
the post- Vedic gods, 97, 98 ; the
Hindu triad, 98; Brahman philosophy;
its six darsanas or schools, 98, 99 ;
summary of Brahman religion, 100 ;
Brahman science, 100 ; Sanskrit gram-
mar, 100, 101 ; Sanskrit and Prakrit
speech, 101; Sanskrit manuscripts, 102 ;
the Indian alphabets, 102, 103 ; Sans-
krit writings almost entirely in verse,
103 ; prose, a forgotten art, 103, 104 ;
Sanskrit dictionaries, 104 ; Brahman
astronomy, 104-106 ; Brahman mathe-
matics, 106 ; Brahman medicine, 106-
1 10 ; Indian surgery, 107, 108 ;
Buddhist public hospitals, 108, 109 ;
decline of Hindu medicine, 109 ; Eng-
lish Medical Colleges, 108, 109 ; verna-
cular medical publications, no; Hindu
art of war, no; Indian music, 110-
112; Indian architecture, 112; Indian
decorative art and painting, 112, 113 ;
Brahman law, 113-118 ; code of Manu,
113, 114; code of Yajnavalkya, 114,
115; scope of Indian law, its rigid caste
system, 115, 116; growth of Hindu
law, 116; its incorporation of local
customs, 117 ; perils of modern codi-
fication, 117, 118; secular literature
of the Hindus, 118-129; the Maha
bharata, 1 18-122; the Ramayana,
122-125; age of the Sanskrit drama,
125, 126; Sakuntala and other Hindu
dramas, 126, 127 ; the Hindu novel,
127 ; Beast stones, 127 ; Sanskrit
lyric poetry, 128 ; the Puranas, 128,
129; Indian modern vernacular litera-



INDEX.



ture, 129 ; intellectual and religious
development of the early Aryans,
129, 130; the Brahmans in Indian
history, and attacks on Brahmanism
from the 6th to the 19th century, 130,

Aryan influences on the Dravidian races,
vi. 329, 330 ; the modern Aryan ver-
naculars of India, 334-355.

Asa, the Ahir, story of, as told by
P'irishta, iii. 301.

Asaf Jah, Nizam-ul-Mulk (Chin Kilich
Khan), Governor of the Deccan (1720-
48), defeated and killed Mubariz
Khan, the Imperial General at Fateh-
khelda, iii. 144, iv. 422 ; lived at
Burhanpur, where he died, iii. 164 ;
took Chicacole, iii. 406 ; granted the
Northern Circars to Anwar-ud-din
and Rustam Khan, iii. 468 ; obtained
Daulatabad at death of Aurungzeb, iv.
160 ; his history, v. 248, 249, 257, 258 ;
appointed Nizam-ul-Mulk by Faruk-
siyyar, v. 257 ; founded reigning dy-
nasty of Haidarabad, v. 258.

Asaf Khan, brother of Nur Jahan, Vice-
roy of Kara Manikpur, conquered
Garha, vii. 31 ; tomb at Shahdara,
viii. 416, xii. 341 ; defeated Rani Dur-
gavati of Garha-Mandla at Mandla,
ix. 301, 302, xii. 259; stormed Chau-
ragarh, x. 218.

Asafpur, village in N.-W. Provinces,
i- 336, 337-

Asaf-ud-daula, Nawab of Oudh (1775-
98), ceded Benares to the East India
Company, ii. 255, and Ghazipur, v. 64,
and Jaunpur, vii. 153 ; took the mate-
rials for his buildings at Lucknow from
Karra, viii. 48 ; built the Imambara
and other edifices at Lucknow, viii.
506-508 ; his subsidiary treaty with the
English, x. 367 ; his reign and transac-
tions with the East India Company,
x. 490, 491.

Asaish, village in Oudh, i. 337.

Asansol, village in Bengal, i. 337.

Asarur, village in Punjab, i. 337.

Asasuni, village in Bengal, i. 337.

Asbestos, found in Chitaldriig, iii. 423 ;
Kumaun, viii. 394; Mysore District,
x. 114.

Ashritas, a sect of the Kumbhipathias,
in the Central Provinces, iii. 315.

Ashta, town in Central India, i. 337.

Ashta, town in Bombay, i. 337, 338.

Ashtagram, Division in Mysore, i. 338.

Ashtagram, taluk in Mysore, i. 338.

Ashti, historic town in Central Pro-
vinces, i. 338.

Asiatic non-Indian population of British
India, article ' India,' vi., appendix,
vi. p. 694.



Asin, town in Rajputana, i. 338.

Asirgarh, fortress in Central Provinces,
i; 33&, 339-

Asiwan, town and pargand in Oudh,
i- 339, 340.

Aska, town and zamind&ri in Madras,
i. 340.

Aslana, village in Central Provinces,
i. 340.

Asoha Parsandan, pargand in Oudh,
i. 340.

Asoha, village in Oudh, i. 340, 341.

Asoka, Buddhist King of Magadha or
Behar (257 B.C.), article 'India,' vi.
144-147 ; his Great Council (244 B.C.),
144 ; his Rock and Cave Edicts, 145
and footnote ; his Department of
Public Worship, 145 ; his missionary
efforts and doctrinal code, 145 ; charac-
ter of the Rock Edicts, 146, 147 and
footnote. Local notices — Built temple
at Buddh Gaya, iii. 125 ; ruled over
Kathiawar, viii. 90 ; his reign, x. 362,
363 ; ruled over the Punjab, xi. 260 ;
put down rebellion at Taxila, xii. 23 ;
built tower at Surnath, xii. 270 ; sent
relics to Taung-ngu, xiii. 221 ; had his
capital at Ujjain when Viceroy, xiii.
417 ; built stupas at Asarur, i. 337 ;
Bara Banki, ii. 107 ; Taxila, iv. 270 ;
Ghazipur, v. 63 ; Sakala, vii. 207 ;
Kasia, viii. 79 ; Sangala, xii. 214 ;
Sankisa, xii. 224 ; Edicts and Inscrip-
tions, copies of, on rocks, caves, and
pillars at — Shahbazgarhi in Afghanis-
tan, i. 53 ; Allahabad, i. 86 ; Araraj, i.
306 ; Benares, ii. 266 ; near Lauriya in
Champaran, iii. 334-341 ; Kalsi near
Haripur in Dehra Dun, iv. 170, vii.
344; Delhi, iv. 192; Girnar, v. 85;
between Junagarh and Girnar, viii. 90 ;
Purushottapur, xi. 333.
Aspari, town in Madras, i. 341.
Assam, Province in N.-E. India, i. 341-
374; history, 342-346;' physical aspects,
346, 347 ; soil, 347 ; minerals, 347,

348 ; forests, 348, 349 ; wild animals,

349 ; population, 350, 351 ; population,
regarded ethnically, 351-353; religion
— Hindus, 353 ; Bhuiyas, 354 ; Kalitas,
354, 355 ; Kaibarttas, 355, 356 ;
Katanis, 356 ; Chandals, 356 ; Borias,
356, 357 5 Napits, 357 ; Bhumij, 357 ;
Muhammadans, 357 ; Christians, 358,

359 ; Buddhists, 359 ; Jains, 359,
360 ; Brahmos, 360 ; distribution of
the population into town and country,

360 ; occupations of the people,
360, 361 ; material condition of the
people, 361; agriculture, 361-364;
natural calamities, 364; tea cultivation,
364-366 ; importation of coolies, 366 ;
manufactures, etc., 367; commerce,



22



INDEX.



367, 368 ; communications, 368, 369 ;
administration, 369 ; police force, 369-
371 ; military force, 371 ; education,
371, 372; medical aspects, 372-374.

Assam, unsuccessful invasion of, by
Aurangzeb's general, Mir Jumla, article
1 India,' vi. 309 ; expulsion of the Bur-
mese from, and annexation of Assam to
British territories (1826), 404; yearly
settlement of the land revenue, 445 ;
frontier trade of, 588-590.

Assaye, village and battle-field in Nizam's
Dominions, i. 374, 375 ; battle of
(1803), vi. 323, 398.

Asses, Wild, found in Baluchistan, ii. 36 ;
Bombay, iii. 45 ; Cutch, iv. 59 ; Dera
Ghazi Khan, iv. 210 ; Jhang, vii. 207 ;
Ladakh, viii. 397 ; Sind, xii. 507 ; the
Parkar, xiii. 264.

Assia, range of hills in Bengal, i. 375.

' Assisted ' railways in India, vi. 548.

Astronomy, Brahmanical system of, vi.
104-106 ; astronomy of the Vedas,
104 ; Greek influences on Indian
astronomy, 105 ; decay of astronomical
science under Muhammadan rule, 105 ;
Raja Jai Singh's observatories in the
1 8th century, 105, 106. See also
Observatories.

Asurgarh, historic fort in Bengal, i.
375-

Aswamedha or Great Horse Sacrifice of
ancient India, vi. 82 ; connection of the
Horse Sacrifice with the Man Sacrifice
of pre-Buddhistic times, 175, 176.

Asylums. See Leper, Lunatic.

Atak. See Attock.

Atari, village in Punjab, i. 375.

Atasarai, trading village in Bengal, i.

375/

Atchaveram, village in Madras, i. 375.

Atcheepore. See Achipur.

Ateha, pargand in Oudh, i. 376.

Athaide, Dom Luis de, successfully de-
fended Goa against AH Adil Shah, v.
101.

Atharabanka, river in Bengal, i. 376.

Athara-nura, range of hills in Bengal, i.
376.

Atharva-Veda, The, article 'India,' vi. 88.

Athgarh, tributary State in Orissa, i. 376,
377-

Athgarh, village in Orissa, i. 377.

Athirala, shrine in Madras, i. 377.

Athmallik, tributary State in Orissa, i.

377, 378.

Athni, town and Sub-division in Bombay,

i. 378.
Athpadi, town in Bombay, i. 378.
A-thut, tidal river in Burma, i. 378.
Atia, Sub-division in Bengal, i. 378.
Atmakur, town and tdluk in Madras, i.

378, 379-



Atmospheric conditions. See Medical As-
pects section under each District, and
Meteorological Statistics.

Atner, town in Central Provinces, i. 379.

Atpadi, town in Bombay, i. 379.

Atrai, river in Bengal, i. 379 ; its changes
of course, vi. 30.

Atranji Khera, prehistoric mound in
N.-W. Provinces, i. 379, 380.

Atrauli, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro-
vinces, i. 380.

Atrauli, town in Oudh, i. 380.

Atri, village in Bengal, i. 380.

Atsanta. See Achanta.

Attaran, river in Burma, i. 380, 381.

Attari, village in Punjab, i. 381.

Attigada, estate in Madras, i. 381. See
Kallikot.

Attikuppa, village in Mysore, i. 381.

Attili, town in Madras, i. 381.

Attock, town, fortress, and tahsil in
Punjab, i. 381, 382.

Atur, tdluk in Madras, i. 382, 383.

Atiir, town in Madras, i. 383, 384.

Atwa Piparia, pargand in Oudh, i. 384.

Auber's Analysis of the Constitution of
the East India Company, quoted,
article ' India,' vi. 364, 365 (footnotes).

Auckland, Lord, Governor-General of
India (1836-42), article 'India,' vi.
406-409 ; Afghan affairs and our early
dealings with Kabul, 406, 407 ; Dost
Muhammad, Afghan dynastic wars,
407 ; Russian influence in Afghanistan
and the installation of Shah Shuja and
occupation of Kabul by a British force,
407, 408 ; rising of the Afghan people,
and massacre of the British army on its
retreat to India, 408. Local notices —
Encouraged tea-planting in Assam, i.
365 ; sanctioned relief works during
famine of 1838 in N.-W. Provinces,
x. 391 ; declared it necessary to break
agreement with Mirs of Sind about the
Indus, xii. 514.

Auckland Bay, in Burma, i. 384.

Augasi, tahsil in N.-W. Provinces, i.
384.

Augusto, Dom, brother of King of Por-
tugal, sent to put down revolt at Goa
(1871), and disbanded the native army
there, v. 106.

Aundh, town and petty State in Bombay,
i. 384, 385.

Aundhi, estate in Central Provinces,
i. 385.

Auraiya, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro-
vinces, i. 385.

Auranga, river in Bombay, i. 385, 386.

Aurangabad, village and Sub-division in
Bengal, i. 386.

Aurangabad, town and pargand in Oudh,
i. 3S6.



INDEX.



23



Aurangabad, town in the Nizam's Domi-
nions, i. 387, 388.

Aurangabad Sayyid, town in N.-W. Pro-
vinces, i. 388.

Aurangzeb, sixth Mughal Emperor of
India( 1658-1 707) article 'India,' vi. 305-
312 ; his rebellion and usurpation of
the throne, 305, 306 ; chief events of
his reign, 306, 307 and footnote ;
murder of his brothers, 307 ; conquest
of Southern India, 307 ; rise of the
Maratha power, 307, 308 ; Aurang-
zeb's Grand Army and twenty years'
war with the Marathas, 308, 309 ; his
despair and death, 309 ; unsuccess-
ful expedition to Assam, 309 ; his
bigotry and persecution of the Hindus,
309 ; revolt of the Rajputs, 309, 310 ;
revenue of his Empire, 310, 311;
Aurangzeb's character, 312. Local
notices — His generals took Adoni, i.
26 ; defeated his brother Dara at
Ajmere, i. 21 ; ruins of palace and
mausoleum to his wife at Aurangabad,
i. 385 ; in Bellary, ii. 242 ; took
Bijapur, ii. 424 ; destroyed walls of
Broach and rebuilt them, iii. 112, 113 ;
built mosque at Burhanpur, iii. 164 ;
had temple of Debi Patan destroyed,
iv. 164 ; conquered the Deccan, iv.
166 ; had his capital at Delhi, iv. 193 ;
took Dharwar, iv. 226 ; defeated his
brother Murad at Ranka Chabutra,
near Dholpur, iv. 276 ; restored fort
of Dohad, iv. 312; built mosque at
Fatehabad, iv. 419 ; took Golconda,
v. 144 ; his wars with Abdulla Kutab
Shah, King of Golconda, and annexa-
tion of that kingdom, v. 255, 256 ;
joined by the Sidi of Janjira, vii. 140 ;
invaded Marwar, and plundered Jodh-
pur, vii. 241; took Kondapalli, vii. 287 ;
built the Jama Masjid at Lahore, viii.
416 ; built mosque at Lucknow, viii.
504, 505 ; his visit to Manikpur, ix.
321 ; destroyed temples at Muttra,
x. 54 ; restored Poona to Sivaji,
xi. 212; took Purandhar, xi. 298;
took Raigarh, xi. 364 ; at first em-
ployed Rajput chieftains, but eventu-
ally invaded Rajputana, xi. 405 ; took
Satana, xii. 274 ; obtained Sholapur
from Ali Adil Shah, of Bijapur, xii.
412; took Sinhgarh, xii. 544; increased
the importance of Surat, as port for
Mecca, xiii. 122; defeated Dara at
Ujj un, xiii. 417.

Auras, village in Oudh, i. 388.

^/wj,autumn rice crop. 6V<?Ricecultivation.

Ausgram, village in Bengal, i. 388.

Austen, Col. Godwin, surveyed Muztagh
range of the Himalaya Mountains, v.
404.



Australia, India's trade with, vi. 578,

579-
Ava, ancient capital of the Burmese

Empire, i. 388-390.
Avalanches, frequent in Kumaun, viii.

335-

Avani, village in Mysore, i. 390.
Avatars or Incarnations of Vishnu,
article ' India,' vi. 215, 216 (footnote

3)-
Avati, village in Mysore, i. 390.

Avchar, petty State in Bombay, i. 390.

Avinashi, town in Madras, i. 390.

Avitabile, Sikh general, Governor of
Peshawar, xi. 149 ; built wall round
Peshawar, xi. 158 ; re-built Wazirabad,
which he made his head-quarters, xiii.

535.
Avulapali, range of hills in Madras, i.

391.

Awah, town in N.-W. Provinces, i. 391.

A wans, Muhammadan tribe, numerous
in Hazara, v. 363, 364 ; Jehlam, vii.
168-170; Peshawar, xi. 151; Rawal
Pindi, xii. 27 ; Sialkot, xii. 444.

Awar, pargand in Central India, i. 391.

Ayakotta, town in Madras, i. 391.

Ayakiidi, town and zamind&ri in Madras,
i. 391.

Ayub Khan, defeated by Abdur Rahman
Khan (June 1881), vii. 275 ; his victory
at Mai wand (26th July 1880), vii. 396 ;
defeated by Gen. Roberts at Kandahar
(1st Sept. 1880), vii. 397 ; captured
Kandahar (27th July 1881), but again
defeated by Abdur Rahman Khan
there (22nd Sept. 1881), vii. 398.

Ayyankere, artificial lake in Mysore, i.

39 1 -

Azamgarh, District in N.-W. Provinces,
i. 391-401 ; physical aspects, 392, 393;
history, 393-395 ; archaeology, 395 ;
population, 395-397 i agriculture, 397-
399 ; natural calamities, 399 ; com-
merce and trade, 399 ; administration,
400 ; medical aspects, 400, 401.

Azamgarh, town and takstlmN.-W. Pro-
vinces, i. 401.

Azimabad. See Patna.

Azimganj, village in Bengal, i. 402.

Azim, son of Aurangzeb, Nawab of Ben-
gal (1697-1704), ii. 278; sold three
villages on site of Calcutta to the East
India Company, iii. 240 ; defeated and
slain by his brother Muazim in Dhol-
pur, iv. 276.

Azim Khan, Durani leader, defeated by
Ranjit Singh at Peshawar, xi. 149.

Azim Khan, brother of Amir Sher Ali
Khan, defeated him at Khelat-i-Ghilzai,
vii. 395.

Azim Shah, son of Sikandar Shah, King
of Bengal, proclaimed his independence



24



INDEX.



at Sonargaon, and invited the poet
Hafiz to his court, xiii. 59.
Azmeriganj, village in Assam, i. 402.



B



Baba Budan, range of mountains in
Mysore, i. 402, 403.

Baba Jagjiwan Das, founder of the Sat-
namis, born at Daryabad, iv. 151.

Baba Sahib. See Bharkar Rao.

Babai, town in Central Provinces, i. 403.

Babar, first Mughal Emperor of Delhi,
(1526-30), early life, defeat and over-
throw of Ibrahim Lodi at Panipat ;
conquest of Northern India, article
'India,' vi. 290,291. Localnotices — His
description of Afghanistan, i. 31 ; made
Agra his capital, and died there,
i. 69 ; took Allahabad, i. 196 ; took
Biana, and defeated Rana of Udaipur
there, ii. 418 ; invaded India, and after
victory of Panipat, entered Delhi, iv.
192, 193 ; took Dholpur, iv. 277 ; his
mention of Dipalpur, iv. 303 ; con-
quered Etawah, iv. 371 ; Fatehpur, iv.
424 ; and Ghazipur, v. 64 ; took fort
of Gwalior by stratagem, v. 236 ;
mentions Hangu, v. 310 ; his tomb at
Kabul, vii. 268; boasts of the commerce
of Kabul, vii. 271 ; on the Kafirs, vii.
292 ; took Kandahar, vii. 392 ; defeated
the Rajput princes at Khanna, viii.
164 ; on the Bangash tribe, viii. 243 ;
defeated Ibrahim Lodi near Lahore,
viii. 405 ; mentions Mahaban, ix. 150 ;
occupied Rapri in Mainpuri, ix. 203 ;
his victory over Ibrahim Lodi at Pani-
pat, xi. 44, 45 ; subdued the Pathans
in Peshawar, xi. 149 ; his invasions of
the Punjab, xi. 261 ; defeated the Raj-
puts at Fatehpur Sikri, xi. 404 ; de-
feated the Ghakkars, and took Pharwala,
xii. 24; planted colonies in Saharanpur,
xii. 45 ; marched through Sibi, xii.
457 ; invaded Mewar and defeated
Rana Sanga, xiii. 403, 404.

Babbala, village in N.-W. Provinces, i.

403.

Baber, H., introduced coffee planting into
the Wainad, ix. 231.

Baberu, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro-
vinces, i. 403.

Babhans or Military Brahmans, especially
numerous in Behar, ii. 225 ; Cham-
paran, iii. 338 ; Darbhangah, iv. 124 ;
Gaya, v. 46, where many of them are
aakdits, v. 52 ; Lohardaga, viii. 481 ;
Monghyr, ix. 484 ; Muzaffarpur, x.
79 ; Patna, xi. 99 ; Purniah, xi. 325 ;
Santal Parganas, xii. 229 ; Saran, xii.
253 ; Shahabad, xii. 327.



Babhar, town and petty State in Bom-
bay, i. 403, 404.

Babhnipair, pargana in Oudh, i. 404.

Babington, Dr., quoted on the inscrip-
tions at Mahabalipur, ix. 149.

Babla, river in Bengal, i. 404, 405.

Babra, petty State in Bombay, i. 405.

Babrias, tribe in Kathiawar, now princi-
pally to be found in Babriawar, i. 405.

Babriawar, tract of country in Kathia-
war, i. 405.

Babuabera, trading village in Bengal, i.

405-

Babul trees and reserves, Akola, i. 141 ;
Allahabad, i. 190 ; Anantapur, i. 274 ;
Azamgarh, i. 392 ; Bara Banki, ii.
106 ; Belgaum, ii. 232 ; Bombay, iii.
44, 45 ; Broach, iii. 102 ; Buldana, iii.
143 ; Chengalpat, iii. 382 ; Daman, iv.
102 ; Etawah, iv. 369 ; Fatehpur, iv.
423 ; Gwalior, v. 227 ; Haidarabad
(Sind), v. 275 ; Indore, vii. 2 ; Jaipur,
vii. 51; Jamner, vii. 130; Jerruck,
vii. 180; Karachi, vii. 444; Kathia-
war, viii. 89 ; Larkhana, viii. 462,
463 ; on the Lonar lake, viii. 489 ;
Madras, ix. 30 ; Mainpuri, ix. 202 ,
Mohar, ix. 396 ; Mughalbhin, ix. 529 ;
N.-W. Provinces, x. 380, 381 ; Pan-
han, xi. 43; Rai Bareli, xi. 353 ;
Rameswaram, xi. 443 ; Sholapur, xii.
412; Sibi, xii. 454; Sind, xii. 505,
506 ; Sirohi, xiii. 1 ; Sitapur, xiii. 30 ;
Sultanpur, xiii. 97; Surat, xiii. 120;
Tando Muhammad Khan, xiii. 177 ;
Tasgaon, xiii. 216; Tinnevelli, xiii.
306; Utras, xiii. 431; Upper Sind
Frontier, xiii. 439.

Babu Rao, chief of Monumpalli, mutinied
in 1858, executed at Chanda, iii. 351.

Babulgaon, village in Berar, i. 405.

Bachhraon, rural town in N.-W. Pro-
vinces, i. 405.

Bachhrawan, town and fla7'gai2d in Oudh,
1, 405, 406.

Bachireddipalem, village in Madras, i. 406.

Backergunge. See Bakarganj.

Badagara, town in Madras, i. 406, 407.

Badagas or Vadagas, aboriginal tribe on
the Nilgiri Hills, x. 310, 311.

Badakshan, tract of country in Afghan-
Turkistan, i. 407.

Badakshis, tribe akin to the Tajiks, and
grouped with them as Galchas, in Bad-
akshan, i. 407.

Badami, town and Sub-division in Bom-
bay, i, 407.

Badan Singh, father of Suraj Mall of
Bhartpur, formally declared leader of
the Tats (1712), 'ii. 373, x. 45 ; his
palace at Sahar, xii. 113.

Badarganj, trading village in Bengal, i.
407, 408.



INDEX.



25



Badari, river in Mysore, i. 408. See
also Vagachi.

Badariya, village in N.-W. Provinces, i.
408.

Badarpur. See Badrpur.

Badansa, town and tahsil \w N.-W. Pro-
vinces, i. 408.

Badesar, village in Rajputana, i. 408.

Badgujars, landowning clan of wealthy
Rajputs, in Bulandshahr, iii. 135.

Badhalgaon, town in N.-W. Provinces,
i. 408.

Badin, town and taluk in Bombay, i.

408, 409.

Badipudi, historic taluk in Bombay, i.

409.
Badnera, town in Berar, i. 409.
Badnur, town in Central Provinces, i.

409, 410.

Bado Sarai, town and pargand in Oudh,
i. 410.

Badrachalam. See Bhadrachalam.

Badrihat, police outpost in Bengal, i. 410.

Badrinath, mountain peak in N.-W. Pro-
vinces, i. 410, 411.

Badrpur, village in Assam, i. 411.

Badshahpur, town in N.-W. Provinces, i.

Badshahpur, hill torrent in Punjab, i.

411.
Baduria, town in Bengal, i. 411, 412.
Badvel, town and taluk in Madras, i.

412.
Baffa, town in Punjab, i. 412.
Bagalkot, town and Sub-division in Bom-
bay, i. 412, 413.
Bagaspur, town in Central Provinces, i.

413.
Bagasra, petty State in Kathiawar, i. 413.
Bagasra, town in Bombay, i. 413.
Bagat. See Land tenures.
Bagaud, pargand in Central India, i. 413.
Bagdis, semi-Hinduized aborigines in

Bengal, generally fishermen, numerous

in Bankura, ii. 81 ; Bardwan, ii. 129 ;

Bengal, ii. 296 ; thieves in Hugh', v.

491 ; coolies in Jalpaiguri, vii. 112;

Kuch Behar, viii. 323 ; Midnapur, ix.

427 ; Nadiya, x. 133.
Bagdogra, town in Bengal, i. 413.
Bagepalli, village in Mysore, i. 413. 414.
Bagesar, town in N.-W. Provinces, i.

414-
Bagewadi, Sub-division in Bombay, i. 414.
Bagh, river in Central Provinces, i. 414.
Bagh, town and pargand in Central India.

i. 414.
Baghal, Hill State in Punjab, i. 415.
Baghar, offshoot of the river Indus, i.

415;
Baghat, Hill State in Punjab, i. 415, 416.
Baghbanpur, village in Punjab, i. 416.
Baghdanga, village in Bengal, i. 416.



Baghelas, a branch of the Sisodhiya Raj-
puts, which once ruled in Gujarat, i.
416 ; in Central India, iii. 295.

Baghelkhand, tract in Central India, i.
416, 417.

Bagherhat, village and Sub-division in
Bengal, i. 417.

Baghjala, town in Bengal, i. 417.

Baghmati, river in Behar, i. 418.

Baghmati, Little, river in Behar, i. 418.

Baghmundi, plateau and hill range in
Bengal, i. 418.

Bagirhat. See Bagherhat.

Bagirji, village in Bombay, i. 418.

Bagli, petty State in Central India, i.
418, 419.

Bagor, town in Rajputana, i. 419.

Bagpat, town and tahsil in N.-W. Pro-
vinces, i. 419.

Bagrasi, town in N.-W. Provinces, i.
420.

Bagru, town in Rajputana, i. 420.

Bagula, village in Bengal, i. 420.

Bahadran, town and district in Rajput-
ana, i. 420.

Bahadurganj, town in N.-W. Provinces,
i. 420.

Bahadurgarh, town in Punjab, i. 420,
421.

Bahadur Khel, salt mine in Punjab, i,
421.

Bahadurpur, village in Assam, i. 421.

Bahadur Shah, Mughal Emperor (1707-
12), defeated hisbrotherAziminDholpur,
iv. 276 ; took Haidarabad with Khan
Jahan, v. 256 ; defeated his brother
Kam Baksh, v. 256 ; campaign against
the Sikhs, xi. 263.

Bahadur Shah, King of Gujarat (1526-
37), allowed Portuguese to build a
fort at Diu, where he was killed, iv.
307 ; defeated by the Emperor Huma-
yun, viii. 91 ; overthrew Ghori dynasty
of Malwa, ix. 267; invaded Mewar, and
took Chittor, xiii. 404.

Bahadur Shah, last Muhammadan king
of Ahmadabad, tried to take Surat
(1609), xiii. 121.

Bahadur Shah, Regent of Nepal (1786-
95), x. 286.

Baharagarha, market village in Bengal,
i. 421.

Bahawa, village in Bengal, i. 421.

Bahawalpur, Native State in Punjab,
i. 421-424; physical aspects, 421;
population, 421, 422 ; commerce, 422 ;
history and administration, 423, 424.

Bahawalpur, city in Punjab, i. 424.

Bahera, market village in Bengal, i. 424.

Baheri, tahsil in N.-W. Provinces, i. 424,

4 2 5- ,
Bahilwara, town in Bengal, i. 425.
Bahli, mountain range in Punjab, i. 425.



26



INDEX.



Bahlol Lodi, Emperor. See Lodi.

Bahlolpur. See Bhilolpur.

Bahmani, Muhammadan dynasty in
Southern India (1347-1525), article
' India,' vi. 287. Local notices — Its
later capital at Bidar, ii. 419 ; its
earlier capital (1347- 1432) at Kulbarga,
viii. 352, 353 ; took Masulipatam
(1478), ix. 353; its history, xi. 201,
202 ; ruled over Satara, xii. 277.

Bahraich, District in Oudh, i. 425-433 ;
physical aspects, 425, 426 ; history,
426-429 ; population, 429, 430 ; agri-
culture, 430-432 ; commerce and trade,
432 ; administration, 432, 433 ; medical
aspects, 433.^

Bahraich, tahsil in Oudh, i. 433, 434.

Bahraich, pargand in Oudh, i. 434.

Bahraich, town in Oudh, i. 434, 435.

Bahramghat, town in Oudh, i. 435.

Bahrampur. See Berhampur.

Bahrampur, town in Punjab, i. 435, 436.

Bahsuma. See Bisambhar.

Bahu, river in Madras, i. 436.

Bahu Begam of Oudh, lived at Faizabad
(1798-1816), where her mausoleum is.
iv. z%%.

Bahuleshwar, village in Bombay, i. 436.

Bai, estate in Central India, i. 436.

Baiadgi, town in Bombay, i. 436.

Baideswar, village in Orissa, i. 436.

Baidiir, town in Madras, i. 436.

Baidyabati, market town in Bengal,
i. 436.

Baidyanath, village in Bengal, i. 436.

Baidyas, numerous caste in Bengal, ii.
296.

Baigas, priests of the Gonds, an ab-
original tribe. See Balaghat, i. 455 ;
Central Provinces, Hi. 310 ; Manula,
ix. 303, 304 ; Sambalpur, xii. 182.

Baikal. See Bekal.

Baikanthpur, town in Bengal, i. 436,
437-

Baila Bhela, town in Oudh, i. 437.

Bailgaon, village in Oudh, i. 437.

Bailhongal. See Hongal.

Baillie, Col., defeat of, by Haidar Ali, at
Pullaluror Perambakam (1780), iv. 27,
43, ix. 13, xi. 136.



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