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Catalogue of the library of the Young men's association of the city of Milwaukee online

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^UMTED STATES OF AMERICA. ^



CATALOGDE



OF THE



LIBRARY



OP THE



YOUNG MEN'S ASSOCIATION



OF THE



CITY OF MILWAUKEE



^^






ORGANIZED, DEC, 1847. INCORPOMTED, MARCH, 1852.



BI I L W A U K E E :

DAILY NEWS BOOK AND JOB STEAM PRINTINfi ESTABLISHMENT,



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11

25

27



Officers of the Association 1861-2 . . , ^''^t'

Annual Report of the Directors, May 1861 . . . 7

Sketch of the History of the Association

Past Officers of the Association

Act of Incorporation • - . .

General Rules and Regulations of the Association . 30

Rules and Regulations of the Board of Directors . . ' 34

Rules of the Library and Reading Room ... 35

Periodicals and Newspapers' • . . . . 39

List of Maps, Newspapers of Early Date, &c. . . 40

Explanatory Note ^o

Catalogue of the Library, Part I.— by Authors . . 43

" " " Il.-by Titles . . . 109

Synopsis of Classification 277

Errata -to-.



FOR 1861-2.



President,
OREN E. BRITT.

Vice-President,
JAMES MacALISTER.

Seo^etary,
MENZO HIGBY.

Treasurer,

WM. J. McDonald.

Trustees,

W. L, DANA, E. E. BOWNS,

F. W. PITKIN, J. G. JENKINS,

S. P. LANGLEY, T. WHITNEY,

W. a. WHIPPLE.



STANDING COMMITTEES.

Library and Reading Room,
J. MacALISTER, S. P. LANGLEY, W. G. WHIPPLE.

Finance,
T. tVIIITNEY, W. L. DANA, W. J. McDONALD.

Lectiires,
F. W. PITKIN, J. G. JENKINS, E. E. BOWNS.

Librarian,
E. 0. ARNOLD.



[email protected]=" Initiation Fee, $1.00 ; Half-Yearly Dues, $1.00,



ANNUAL REPORT OF THE BOARD OF DIRECTORS



OF THE



iMj^ _^ . . .^ _^ (^



annni Mtn*^ J^gs0^H[ti0M,



MAY, 18 6 1.



■ij^ ^ -^^B^ -^—^^^



Members of the Association : —

The Board of Directors submit to you the following report :

FINANCE.

The Treasurer's Report, herewith submitted, shows

the Receipts from all sources to be $2,883 61

The Expenditures 2,697 68



Balance 8185 93

RECEIPTS.

Balance in Treasury at date of last Annual Report.

Initiation Fees

Dues

Fines

Sale of books, papers and catalogues

Net profits of course of lectures

Lecture by Bartlett

Received on insurance from loss by fire , . .



$72


74


228


00


1,601


73


50


04


35.


86


576


00


69 25


250


00



Total |2,883 62

EXPENDITURES.

Printing and advertising ^58 29

Expenses of Eartlctt's lecture 80 46



8 REPORT OF THE DIRECTORS OF

Room expenses 115 59

Books and binding 860 37

Insurance on property 45 00

Rent 400 00

Gas 116 30

Postage 32 78

Magazines 94 13

Salaries of Librarian and assistant 765 21

Newspapers » 129 55

Total.. |2,697 68

There are dues uncollected to the amount of about $225. The
year has been one of extraordinary financial prosperity. For the
first time in the history of the Association, the revenue from ordi-
nary sources (not including lectures) has been more than sufficient
to meet the running expenses. If the present public interest in
the Association can be maintained, there can be no doubt about
its future prosperity. But our present success is a pledge of still
greater success to come.

NUMBER Of members.

The number of members at the date of the last Annual

Report, including 59 life members, was 716

New members added during the year, including two life

members 234

950

Decrease by removal 80

Decrease by resignation ..... ...... 17

Decrease by death 7 — 104

Present number, including 61 life members. 846

During the year the number of ladies' memberships has advanced
from nineteen to thirty-one.

CONTRIBUTORS TO LIBRARY.

The Association is indebted to E. D. tlolton, J. W. Hoyt, Hon.
John F. Potter, Col. J. D. Graham, (U. S. N.,) G. W. Feather-
stonehaugh, Wm. Daniel, C. Adams, Geo. W. Chapman, S. Chap-
man, Mrs. Chas. Cain, C. Durkee, G. G. Meade, Col. L. H. D.



THE YOUNG MEN S ASSOCIATION. 9

Craue, and others; and to the Patent Office and the Department
of the Interior for valuable contributions of books, maps, papers,
&c.; also to W. H. Sherman for several Hne photographs of dis-
tinguished lecturers.

In accordance with the provisions of the Statute, granting copies
of all State publications to literary institutions which have a
library of three hundred volumes, the President of the Association
has filed with the Secretary of State a verified application for
such pubhcations, and has received and delivered to the Associ-
ation copies of all those of which the edition was not exhausted.
These books, contributed by the State, are valuable, and neces-
sary to the completeness of the library. Copies of all State pub-
lications should hereafter be secured for the Association as soon as
they are published.

Many reports of kindred and other associations have been re.
ceived, and are on tile.

LIURAllY ANn RliADlNG ROOM.

The number of volumes in the library at the date of the

last Annual Report, was 3,798

Number added during the year by purchase 624

Number added during the year by donations 175

Number added during the your by binding periodicals

and pamphlets Si

4,631
Number of volumes sold 49

Number of volumes lost and paid for 4 — 53

Present number of volumes 4,578

We fear that an actual enumeration of the volumes would make
it apparent that a considerable number had been stolen from the
shelves. The Library has become so large, and the rooms of the
Association so much a place of resort, that a proper care for
the safety of the books requires that they should be so enclosed
that no one could take them from the shelves, except the librarian
and his assistant.

In the Reading Room additions have been made, during the year,
to the number of newspapers and magazines. The room is almost
constantly thronged with readers.



10 REPORT OF THE DIRECTORS.

CATALOGUES.

At the comtneucenient of the year the Board of Directors dis-
cussed the siibject of printing a new catalogue of the entire
Library The result of this discussion was the conclusion that,
as a supplement had been printed the year before, a new catalogue
was not absolutely necessary. They therefore decided to postpone
this expense and devote ail the funds, beyond what were required
to meet the running expenses of the Association, to the purchase
of books. Now, however, a sufficient number of books having been
added to the Library to form a new supplement, and the first sup-
plement being out of print, the new catalogue seems to have become
a positive necessity.

LECTURES.

The Lecture Committee make the following report of the receipts
and expenses of the course of lectures, including Grough's extra
lecture, and Miss Stevens' reading :

Receipts from sale of season tickets .... ^HQ 00

Kecipts from sale of evening tickets 708 56



81,454 56
Paid to lecturers . , §!532 25

ITxpense of printing, advertising, telegraph-
ing, &c . 163 SI

Discount on uneurrent money 2 44

Hall rent 180 00— .1^878 56



Net profits 8576 00

The net profits of last year's course, which was regarded as
eminently successful, were ^463 19.

For the first time in many years our course of lectures has
beed carried through without the failure of a single lecturer, whose
name was announced at its commencement. Only those who have
themselves served on a lecture committee can appreciate the dif-
ficulties in the way of such a result, or know what care and energy
were neccessary to accomplish it.

On behalf of the Board of Trustees.

CHABLES OAVEBNO,

President.



SKETCH



OF THE






This record is compiled from information gathered from otficial
sources, and from past officers of the Association, and is presented
here as a collection of facts, which will have an increasing interest
for members, both old and new.*

On Wednesday evening December Hth, 1S47, a number of citi-
zens of the, then, new city of Milwaukee, met in the parlor of the
United States Hotel (corner of East Water and Huron streets,
burned in- 1854,) in pursuance of a call published in the newspa-
pers, to take preliminary steps for the formation of a Young Men's
Literary Association. S. Osgood Putnam, (now of California)
was president of the meeting, and E. P. Allis, secretary. After
considerable consultation and discussion, on motion of H. W. Ten-
ney, resolutions were adopted in favor of the establishment of a
Library in connection with a Reading Room and Debating Society,
and for the appointment of a committee to draft a Constitution for
the organization of a Young Men's Association. The committee
consisted of Messrs. Putnam, Mason, Vliet, Tenney, Holton and
VanDyke.

On the 13th of December the committee submitted the draft of
a Constitution which was considerably discussed and finally adop-



* The Committee are under great obligations to J. K. Brigham, Esii., for valuable
assistance rendered by him in the preparation of this Sketch. His personal recollections
of tne early history of the Association have enabled us to give a much fuller and more in-
teresting account of that period tkan could possibly have been derived Irom the bare
records ot the Association. H. W. Tenney, now of Madison, has also furnished many
interesting reminiscences.



12 SKETCH OF THE HISTORY OF

ted by the meeting, but at an adjourned meeting, Dec, 18i/^, the
subject was again discussed, and the record saows that objections
were made to 13 of the 19 articles which composed the Constitu-
tion, and the whole matter was referred to a new committee, who,
on the 20^7i of December, reported a revised document, wliieb, in
turn, was discussed and rejected, and the original report, somewliat
amended, was finally adopted, and the Young Men's Association
liad a beginning.

The original Constitution divided members into two classes, by
age; those over 35 years being classed as honorary members, and
required to pay $5,00 initiation, and those between 18 and 35, be-
ing regular members, and paying an initiation fee of $2,00. Both
classes paid $2.00 yearly. Life members were admitted to either
class on payment of $25.00, in one sum, and paid no yearly dues.
Besides these classes of members, persons under 18 years of age
had the privilege of the library on payment of dues, but had no
vote, and Avcre ineligible to office. The offices were divided be-
tween the two classes of members. The honorary members tak-
ing five trustees, and the regular members two trustees, the
president, two vice presidents, the treasurer and the correspond-
ing and recording secretaries. This classification of officers was
not adopted until after considerable discussion, and at the end of
a year the syt(^m was revised, the classification dispensed with and
the board of officers established, as it still remains. The first
election of officers, to liold till the regular election in January,
was had in the Common Council Rooms, on the '20th of December',
1847, though the election was not completed until the following
week. A list of the officers is given elsewhere. I'he Constitu-
tion fixed the Wednesday following the second Tuesday in Jan-
uary, as the day of the annual election, and accordingly the first
annu;il election was held -Tanuary 10, 1848.

So fai the proceedings of the Association had shown a special
aptitude for debate and animated discussion, but after several weeks
spent in the settlement of fundamental principles and the prelim-
inaries for a permanent organization, and after the election of a
full board of officers, it still remained to secure members and
money to give the Association practical existence, and there were
found earnest and active men, who undertook this somewhat thank-



THE YOUNG MEn'S ASSOCIATION. 13

less task, and to their labor we owe it, that we now have an As-
sociation and a Library. On the bth of Fthrxiary they report-
ed, a subscription of $1513, and a membership consisting of 52
life members, 20 honorary members and 49 regular members. A
room was leased in what Avas then the second, now third, floor of
the building still standing at the north west corner of Wisconsin
and Main streets, at a rent of 8100 per year, " furnished with
tables, chairs, bookcases, and other necessary fixtures for the use
of the Association," in a style, of which an idea may be had,
from the fact that the bills for the same amounted to considerably
less than 850. The sum of $500 was appropriated for the pur-
chase of books, and this, together with some donations, and some
books received in payment of subscriptions, produced a library,
which, at the end of the first year of the Association, numbered
810 volumes, and together with eleven of the leading English and
American Quarterlies and Monthlies, constituted the attractions of
the Room, which was open on Wednesday afternoon and Satur-
day evening of each week, under the charge of Edward Hopkins,
who volunteered to do duty as the first librarian, and to^ whose
care snd systematic labor during the first two years of the exis-
tence of the Association, very much is due.

At the annual meeting in January, 1849, the Constitution was
revised and amended, as has been stated. The initiation fee was
reduced to 81.00 for all members. The time of the annual elec-
tion was changed to December. During this year, the interest in
the library continued and grew, and for a pare of the time the
Room was kept open every evening. The number of members
rose to 146. The receipts of the year were 8803.44, which, with
a surplus from the previous year, gave a fund of which 8219.35
were expended for books, and 8119,28 for incidental expenses.
Two hundred and ninety nine new volumes were added to the
library, and the list of periodicals was enlarged. We may pre-
sume that the directors found some difficulty in collecting dues and
subscriptions, from the fact that it was ofiicially recommended at
the annual meeting, that measures be taken to procure the legal
incorporation of the Association in order that it might enforce its
collections, though we are not aware that to this day the legal bus-
iness of the Association has been a profit to any attorney.



14 SKETCH OV THE HISTORY OP

The third animal meeting was held December 4, 1849, and
showed that the interest in the Association was well maintained.
The attendance was large and spirited, and the discussion of va-
rious matters and plans for the benefit of the Association, con-
tinued until a late hour. A committee was appointed to canvass
the city for new members and subscriptions; the necessity of a
new and more attractive room was urged; a course of lectures was
proposed, and other suggestions made and considered, all very
much the same in kind, we may venture to say, that have been
proposed, considered and discussed, among its members and direc-
tors, every year, from that to this. At this time so much inter-
est was manifested that an adjourned meeting was held and more
discussion was had, and among other things, it was strongly urged
that the only way to reach the object desired, the establishment of
a good public library, was to create a joint stock company, whose
afi"aira should be managed as any other business operation. It was
however, not found practicable to get the consent of all the sub-
scribers to this arrangement, and that objection to the plan has
grown stronger every year since. During this year a
lecture before the Association was given by Chancellor
Lathrop. A new room was obtained in the then new
Martin's Block. Mr. Hopkins gave up the charge of the
library, and Thomas Hyslop was appointed librarian and re-
ceived a small salary. Eighty new members were added during
the year, and the course of the Association showed no step back-
ward.

Dec. 4, 1850 — The fourth annual election and the beginning of
the fourth year of the Association. During this year was com-
menced the first course of lectures before the Association, and al-
though the lecturers were home men, and the admittance fee quite
small ($1.00 for a family, to the course, and ten cents a single ad-
mission,) the result was satisfactory, and some of the lectures at-
tracted considerable attention, and gave rise to some newspaper
discussion. Debates were also started during this year, in the fall
of 1 851, and for some time created a good deal of interest and
weekly excitement. $360.07 were expended in books and period-
icals this year, and one hundred now books were added to the li-



THE YOUNG MEN's ASSOCIATION. 15

brary which then niimherccl 1320 volumes. The other expenditures
of the year amounted to $157.92.

The fifth annual election, December 3d, 1851, was a scene of
great excitement ; not so much frum the number of votes, as from
the kind, as the record shows the whole number cast to have been
68 But the report of the inspectors, and the tradition of the
times, tell us that in the anxiety of contending aspirants for official
honor some forgot an article in the Constitution which prescribed
thy qualifications of voters, and a rigid inquiry on the part of three
grave inspectors cf election disclosed the fact that some illegal
votes had been cast. A long report was made, upon which a stormy
debate arose, and even acrimony is said to have been exhibited;
but the difficulty was finally surmounted by the remarkable
(though the event would show, not unwise,) proposition by the
new President elect, that all the officers who claimed to have been
elected should resign and allow a new election, which was agreed
to. The election was held December 9th. and the result was that
some of the self-sacrificing men who had resigned, to save the
Society, were again elected, but others Were not. It is a matter
of dispute to this day, among the most active participants in that
wrangle, which party was really in earnest and which only feigned
an excitement, to keep up an interest in the meetings of the Asso-
ciation.

In November of this year, new rooms for the Association were
obtained on the first floor of the large new block of W. P. Young,
corner of Wisconsin and Main streets; bat the library had hardly
been established there before the whole block was burned to the
ground, and the Association was indebted to its active members
and friends for saving its property. The small loss sustained was
fully covered by an insurance; and the Association next found a
landlord in S. L. Rood, and occupied his rooms over store No. 204
East Water street, the entrance at that time being from Wisconsin
street.

In Ilarch, 1852, the Association was incorporated by act of the
Legislature, its then Board of Directors being made corporators.
The time of the annual meeting and election was changed to
October. During *;his year a new catalogue was published —
the second.



16 SKETCH OP THE HISTORY OF

Octoher 6ih, 1852, the sixth annual election. In the winter of
this year a second course of lectures, by home lecturers, was given.
They were fairly attended, though they did not draw large audi.
ences, except the two lectures on the "Spanish Inquisition," by
the (then) Rev. Dr. Ives. These attracted full houses and made
considerable sensation. More profit was realized out of a musical
entertainment, undertaken by the Directors, for the benefit of the
library. By aid of some members of the Musical Society, and
some generously given assistance of ladies and gentlemen not
accustomed to public exhibitions of their talent, the concert was
well attended and well received, and a net profit of -^70 was
realized, which was applied to the purchase of books, and pro-
dnced a valuable addition to the library.

October btJo, 1853, commcneed the seventh, and as it proved, a
most important year of the Association. At this tim , notwitli-
standing its library and reading room afforded pleasure and profit to
its members, they were few, and the Association was hardly known
to the public generally — it filled no important place in the public
mind. Its reading room was most of the time without visitors.
Its annual meetings, wliich at first had bueu attended and partici-
pated in by many of our best and most influential citizens, were no
longer interesting, and passed almost without notice. Anxious
Directors all agreed tbat something must be done to make the
library more attractive, and to induce new members to join.
Among other plans, it was sometimes proposed to unite with the
Musical Society in the purchase, or lease, of some central lot and
the erection of a fine hall ; but this it was thought best, after de-
liberation, to abandon, or at least postpone till it was well settled
that the Association could pay the rent of its present rooms.
About this time a destructive fire left our landlord, Mr. Rood,
without a place of business, and he gave his attention to his tenant
— tbe Association. He became Librarian, and by dint of much
industry and great skill in making it uncomfortable for any body
he applied to who did not join, and very comfortable and pleasant
for all who did, he gained many new members to the Association.
He went into the street with a subscription paper— an undertaking,
at that time, quite too desperate for any body else — and soon
realized a sum which put the library and reading room in good con-



THE YOUNG MEN'S ASSOCIATION. 17

dition. A new carpet, new gas fixtures, a change of the clumsy
book-cases which had come down from the beginning, for a neat and
commodious shelving, and a general brushing up and improvement
of all the interior arrangements of the Association, were his satis-
factory vouchers to subscribers. The library was kept open during
business hours, day and evening, and became a pleasant and fre-
quented place of resort. The great event of the year, however,
vras the course of lectures. It had at that time become the fashion
in other Western cities to call wise men from the East and give
the citizens of the new country a chance to see who is who, and
•^earn lohat is lohat in the old, by hebdomadal lectures. It was
determined that the Young Men's Association should do this for
Milwaukee. It should be remembered that at this tim.e Milwaukee
was a far and almost unknown country to lecturers. No railroad
then connected us with the East ; and in the winter season we had
been accustomed to regard ourselves as more completely shut out
from communication with the seaboard, than those who only know
Milwaukee as it now is can well imagine. But we had a telegraph
and a part of the Milwaukee & Mississippi Railroad, and it was decid-
ed to try. It happened that the management of the matter fell into
the hands of one who had enthusiasm, perseverance and business
capacity, and to him chiefly (though aided by others) is due the
final complete and surprising success of our first course of lec-
tures by men from abroad, — we so style it, though perhaps no
lecture gave more satisfaction than that by our own Mr, Ryan.
We need not say, for any one who was in Mihvaukee during that
winter, that we refer to B. W. Griswold, (now of New fork city)
who, as chairman of the Lecture Committee, was untiring in his
attention from first to last. As a precaution, thought to be neces-
sary, in the first place, a guaranty subscription was obtained from
some forty persons to protect the Association in case of loss by
the venture. Season tickets, for families and individuals, were
hawked about the streets by the committee and other members of
the Board, until 8700 were realized before the lectures commenced.
Advertising was done in all the usual modes, and also by members
of the Board personally, who, one and all, talked lectures every-
where, until it was almost true that the chairman and his commit-
tee neither did, talked, nor thought anything but lectures contin-



18 SKETCH OF THE HISTORY OF

ually. The result was a suecess vphieli gave the Association a net
profit of 8833.39 for its library and a recognized position as an
institution in Milwaukee. The annual report of the doings of the
year shows : total receipts, !$1,288.54 ; total expenditures,
§1,148.36, (this statement includes only net profits of lectures as
receipts); an addition to the library of 351 volumes by purchase;
102 new members added to the Association ; a new catalogue, and
a prosperous condition of things generally.

October 4, 1S54, the eighth regular election. By a change in
the Rules, the Board elected at this time continued in office only
till May. Tli^y were expected to provide a course of lectures,
which had come to be a recognized demand of the people, and duty
of the Association. Ten lectures were given at a cost of iS'897.30,


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Online LibraryYoung men's association of the city of Milwaukee.Catalogue of the library of the Young men's association of the city of Milwaukee → online text (page 1 of 12)