1847; A tour to the river Saguenay...Philadelphia A summer in the wilderness...New York and Philadel.

A hand-book of Anglo-Saxon orthography. In two parts online

. (page 7 of 9)
Online Library1847; A tour to the river Saguenay...Philadelphia A summer in the wilderness...New York and PhiladelA hand-book of Anglo-Saxon orthography. In two parts → online text (page 7 of 9)
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STUDIES IN ANGLO-SAXON OBTHOGRAPHY. 99



8BTBNTT-8IZTH STUDY.
KELATIONS OF GOD TO MAN.

All that is dear ia objects is found in their relations to
US. It is this that makes one man a father. God is kindly
related to us ; and His relations are full of interest. Have
we not aU one Father? Hath not one God created us?

Maker, the Creator. Pxace-hakeb, one wHo reconciles

Is God the Maker of man? parties at variance.

Hold, to keep or maintain. Hioh-pbiest, the chief priest

Up , to support Shepherd, one who feeds and guides

Up er, one who supports* men or sheep.

Rule, to goyern or direct Father, the Author of our being and

BuLCR, one who governs or direotSt happiness.
Daysman, a mediator.

8BTBNTT-8B VBNTB 8 T XT B T •
THE ABOVE OF GOD.

Heaven is His throne, and the earth is His footstooL
God fiUeth heaven and earth with His fulness.

Earth, the world which we inhabit sun, moon, and star»— the dwelling-
HsAVENy the air — the place of the place of holy angels.



CHAPTER IX.
PLAOB AND TXMB.

Place and time belong to every thing which we know,
and require a passing notice. It is wise to notice the local-*
ity of bodies, and the time when events happen. The
names, of some places and divisions of time, may now be
studied, and the things for which they stand, understood.



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STUDIES IN ANGLO-SAXON OBTHOGBAPHr.



BBTEHTY-BiaHTH STXTDT.



TLkOEA ON TRS BABIH A2n> HT THE HBAYBim,

The earth and heavens may be looked upon as places,
and divided into various parts.



Hbayens^ the place wHere the snn,

moon, and stars appear, and holy

angels dwell

Can any one measure the heav-
ens?
East, that place in the heavens

where the sun rises.
West, that place in the heavens

where the sun sets.



NoBTH, the place opposite to the svn

at noon.
South, the place opposite the north.
Ground, the earth as distinct from air

and water.
Earth, the place where plants^ ani«

mals, and man live.
AoRs, a measured piece of earth.
FiBLP, ground not built on.



SB VBNTY-NINTH STUDY.
BELA'iiVJE PLAGES.

Places are compared with one another, and named. The
names mark their relations.



Hrre, the place where we are.
There, a place beyond where we are.
TniTHBa, the place to which a thing

goes.
Where; at what place.
WmTHER, to what place.
Within, inclosed in a place.
Without, outside of a place.
Hexoe, from this place.
High, above in place.
Low, not high in place.
IfrwARD, towards a place.
Fab, distant in place.
Farther, more distant in plaoe.
Over, above in place.



Near, close by a place.
Below, under in place.
Beneath, under in place.
Nigh, near in place.
Out, beyond in place.
Outward, going beyond in plaee.
Betond, at the outside in place.
Up, ascending in place.
Together, brought near in place.
Next, nearest in place.
Middle; coming between the ex-
tremes in a place.
Mid, at equal distance from extremes.
Yonder, distant in place, but in view.



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STUDIES IN ANGLO-SAXON ORTHOGRAPHY.



101



EiaHTIETH STXTDT .



LABOS DIVISIONS OF TDTB.



All events have their times and seasons, which are to
be observed and named. The Saxons gave much attention
to this subject.



TiMiy the measure of eyenta.
Is time a part of eternity ?
Dat «. the time we have sunlight

^-'■bredkj the dawn of

'^•^ighty the light of —

spriitg, the first gleam of—

HtMf the time of

Sun f the day dedicated by the

Saxons to the Smi — the Christian

Sabbath.

MoN , the day of

Tui» , the day of

Wednes 1 the day of —

Thubs 1 the day of —

Fbi ^ the day of

Satue 1 the day of

Night, the time the snn is absent.

'faU, the drop of



Week, the space of seyen days and
nights.

Month, the space of the moon's mo-
tion round the earth.

ly

Year, the space of time in which the

earth moyes round the sun.
Sprinq, the part of the year when

plants bud.
SuMHEB, the manhood of the year.
FALLy that part of the year when

leayes fall
WiNTEB, that part of the year when

cold preyails — the old age of the

year.
Eastbb, the festiyal of the Sayiour's

resurrection.
Lent, the space of forty days before

Easter.



BIOHTT-FIBST BTTTDT.



SMAIXEB DITIBION8 OF TIMB.



Morn, the first part of day.
MoBNiNQ, the opening of the day.
EyENiNG^ the close of the day.
EyENTiDE; the time of evening.
KooN, the part of the day when the
sun is overhead.

— : — -day^ the time of

tide, the highest point of —
After , the time



Fore ^ the time —

NiOHT, the time from sunset to sun-
rise.

Mid f the middle

Twilight, the mixture of day and
night

Morrow, the day after to^ay.

Dawn, the break oi day.



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102 STUDIES IN ANGLO-SAXON OETH0GBAPH7.

BI OHT T-BBO OK D 8TITDT«
BKLATED DIYI8X0N8 OF TDiX.

Some of the divisions of time are known and named as
they are related to each other. Such divisions are useful,
and their names are to be studied.

Now, the present time. Again, repeated in time.

Beforb J time before the present. When, at what time.

IlB&kAFTER, timc after now. Tdbn, at that time.

Always, time unending. While, during a certain timeu

Ever, time without limits. Yet, remaining time.

N f no StilL) time up to the present

Soon, early, at a certain time. New, recent in time.

Late, behind the set time. Old, of long duration.
Early, before the set time.



CHAPTER X.

I
QXTALITISS OF THINGS,

To the qualities of things we now turn. Every thing in
the world has its own qualities. Snow is white and cold :
fire is bright and warm. Qualities form the greater part of
our knowledge. Some of them we have already noticed :
others yet remain to be seen.

The infant mind first acquires the names of things. It
then goes back to learn their qualities. Its third effort is to
learn the actions of these things. This is a law of mind in
acquiring language. First, it learns the names, mamma^
papa, dog. Second, the qualities of these things, thus : good
mamma, kind papa, bad dog. Third, it turns back to learn
the actions of these things: good mamma comes^ kind papa
runs, bad dog biles.

It is out of regard to this law of mind, that we turn back



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STUDIES IN ANGLO-SAXON ORTHOGRAPHY. 103

here, to give the Saxon words denoting quality^ in eacli of
the preceding studies, beginning at Home.

SIOHTT-THIBD 8 T XT D T«
QUAUmS OF HOIO.

To gather up the qualities of home is as pleasant as to
gather flowers.

SwEBT, pleasing. En ^ to make — .

Is home sweet f <, ed, ing — — •

e n, edy ing^ nesSy ishy iahneaa — «- Love, to delight in ■■

Dear, precious, or of great value. dy ly

'■ e tf est, (y, neas Be d, greatly ■



BI a HTT-FO UBTH 8 T XT D T •
QUALITIES OF A BOUSE.

The building, in which we live, exerts a great influence
upon our hearts and lives. It does so by its qualities. Let
them be pleasing, then; and man is happy,

Small^ little in extent Bare, laid open to view;

May a small house be neat? ty, nesa — —

-er, est, ness, ish Shade, shelter from light: to al:c!t.er



Great, large in extent from light

er, esty ness, ly — — y , iiiess ■

Old, a long time mada High, raised far above the earth.

er, est, nets, Uh — er, est, ness

New, lately made. Low, raised a little above the eartlt

—er, est, ness, ish, ly e r, est, ly, line ss

BIOHTT-PIPTH STUDY.
QUALrriES OF OUTHOUBES.

The condition of our domestic animals depends, very
much, upon the character of our outhouses. The habita-
tion of animals should be clean, roomy, and well aired.



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STUDIES IN ANGLO-SAXON ORTHOGRAPHY.



Boon, enough of space.

Is there room enough in the bam ?

y, ine9S,frd, Uy

Long, extended in length.

Nareow, of little width.

er, esty ness, ly -^— -

Wmi; extended between the sidea
— — er, ert, nesi — -



Clean, free from dirt of any kindL

<T, esty ly, lines9y nets .

DmT, any foul matter.

y* *^» i^^t iness

Open, not closed, exposed.

ly, 71688 — -

Dry, free from moisture.

eVf esty n€88y ly —

"Wet, containing moisture.
er, €8t, ne88



EIOHTT-SIXTn STUDY,



QUALITIES OF HOUSEHOLD-STUFF.



The furniture of a house adds mucli to the comfort of the
inmates. It forms the taste of children. It does so by its
quaUties, which should, on this account, receive some
attention.



KiOB, delicate or fine.
Are the chairs nice ?

r, est, ly, ne88

Snow, to present to yiew for show.

y, abounding , splendid.

nesSy Uy — —

Rough, uneven, or not polished.
■ e Vf estf ly, ness



Smooth, even surface, polished.

e r, est, ness, ly .

Even, level, uniform.

ly, ne88

Heavy, weighty or massy.

ly, ness

Light, having little weight
er, est, ness, ly



EI GHTT-S BVENTH S T IT D T .



qualities of the household.



A GOOD and happy family is one of the fairest things iii
the world. Its beauty, whatever it may be, is that of the
good qualities of each member.



Goon, kind and comely.
Is a good father beloved ?
ness, the state — —
ly, liness



Betteb, more kind than another.
Best, the most kind of all.
Faiu, pleasant to behold.
ness, er, est



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STUDIES m ANGLO-SAXON OBTHOGEAPHT.



105



Bust, engaged in some pursuit.
Idle, not actively employed.

y, nesSf er

Glad, pleased and joyous.

ly, ness —

some, somewhat —
nesSy ly



-«ojwtf, somewhat -



God, the Supreme Being, the Good
One.

l y, line8$, like —

Uh ly, liness

Hallow, to make holy.
», ed, inff



Glee, mirth or gayety.

EIOnTT-EIGHTH STUDY.
QUALITIES OF FOOD.

The quality, as well as the quantity of our food, is of the
greatest importance. It is closely connected with health.



Fresh, new, recently procured.
Is fresh bread pleasant ?
e r, est, ness — —
Whole, sound, not diseased.

s ome, somewhat ■
ly, ness



Enough, all that is needed to satisfy

us.
Tart, sharp to the taste.

ness, ly

SouB, sharp and astringent;
ness, ish, I



BIGHTT-NINTH STUDY.



qualities of clothing.



Clothing is a great concern of life. It employs some
millions of the race in producing it. Some of its qualities
may be grouped together.



It should be light and warm.



Warm, that which preserves heat
Are all kinds of clothing alike
warm?

ly, ness, er, est —

Soft, gentle and yielding to the touch.

e r, est, ish, ly, ness — —
Gooi^ not retaining heat

• e r, est, ish, ness, ly — —
Thick, of some extent from side to
side.

er, est, ish, ness —

6*



Thin, not thick.

e r, est, f «/*, ness, ly

Silk, the thread made by the silk-
worm.

en, made of

Wooi^ the soft hair of sheep.

en, made of

Cheap, of low price and valud^

er, est, ness, ly

Tidt, neat in dress.
er, est, ness, ly



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106 STUDIES IN ANGLO-SAXON" OBTHOGRAPHT.

NINETIETH STUDY.
QVAUTIES OF MAN.

The qualities of man are numerous^ He takes to him*
self, in some way, the qualities of all other beings. There
are many, however, which are native to him. Some of these
have been given.

Weak, feeble in strength. Zcm, without

Is man a weak being ? Earnest, order in employment

«•, estf ness^ ly ^— /y, nean

Sin, an evil nature. Fickle, wavering and chang^'able,

— -ful^ fvlly, fulnea^ les8 — nesa

Emptt, vain and foolish, containing Lukewarm, a little warm,

nothing. /y, neaa <

Short, of little height Far , lost to —

er, estt ness Bold, daring.

Free, at liberty to do as one pleases. gr, est, ly, neaa —

ly, neas Evil, wicked.

Best, repose from care and toiL

NINBTT-PIRST BTXTDT.
QUALITIBS of TIIE body of ICAN.

The body is the habitation of the soul, and should be kept
sound and healthy,

Sound, whole and free from disease. Sick, suffering from disease.

Is a sound body desirable f ly, neaa

neaa Hale, robust or sound.

Strong, having much active power. Spare, lean, or wanting in flesh.

er, eafy ly — ^^ neaa

Heai^ to make sound. Bone, the hard, solid part of the

», ed, ing body,

thj the state of — — —y, full of —

-y, abounding in — Flesh, the soft solid part of the



XTn , not — -^ body.

Ltttle, small in size. y , ineaa, leaa •



neaa-



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STUDIES IN ANGLO-SAXON ORTHOGRAPHY.



107



KINSTY-8B00ND STUDY.
QUALITIES OF FABTB OF THE BODT OF MAN;

Every part of the human body has its uses and qualities.
A knowledge of them is desirable. To name these quali-
ties is instructive.

BuDDT, a healthy flesh color. ness

Is the face ruddy f Stiff, not easily bent^ stubborn.
Wan, pale or sickly in appearance. nest, ly •



GiDDT, a whirliDg feeling in the head. Broad, extended in width.
-fWM er, est, ly, nesa ■



Stern, severe and rigid.

CT", ett, ly, ness

Hollow, sunken or depressed.



Felbi, a thin skin.
— -y, partaking of -



NINSTT-THIBD STUDY.



QUALITIES OF THE SOUL.



The soul is a priceless thing. It is the object of much
regard, and should be carefully studied. It is known in its
qualities. The most of these have already been brought to



view.

Dark, obscure and gloomy.
Is a dark soul attractive ?

ty, ness

Light, to make light, or visible.
s, ed, ing



En-



-en, to make •
— s, ed, ing -



-ed, inwardly made -



Self, one's own person, or interest

ish, somewhat

ly, ness

Mean, base, or of little value.

g r, est, ly, ness

/Stubborn, stiff-minded, or obstinate.
ly, ness



Wicked, evil in heart and life.

ly^ ness

Right, according to goodness and
truth.

e &us, full of '
Uh , not



-^y,*



Death, the result of the body and soul
being separated.

less, without — — ^



-ly, like, ful, fulness '



Leave, to permit^ or allow.

Beuevx, to give credit to any thin^
e df ing, ingly



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108 STUDIES IN ANGLO-SAXON OBTHOGRAPHT.

VINETY-FOXTBTH STUDY.
QUAUTISS OF THC HUliTES AND HVNTINO.

Hunting is often a dangerous employment. It reqxiires
skill and courage to pursue it successfully, for profit or
pleasure,

"Wild, roving, savage. 8, ed, ing

Is hunting a wild pursuit t ly, linen

/y, nesSf «*, est A ^ in

Dabe, to face danger. Beadt, quick and prepared.

If edf ing, ingness ■ i/y, inen — —

Lnn^ to be animated.

KINETT-FIFTH flTXTDT.

QTJALITIEB OF THE FISHEB AND FISEXNG.

Fishing is connected with rivers, lakes, and seas. It 13
full of idleness and adventure. .

Haed, fiiin or strong. Watch, attention, observation.

Is a fisher's life hard ? fi d^ fvinest^ fully -



y, abounding in — — Stsadt, firm and constant in mind.

Cabe, tro'ible, caution. ily^ iness

^—^tUffuHy, fulness, less Feab, tlie dread of some danger.

Lust, vigor, active power. less, without

y , abounding

KINETT-SIZTH STXTDT.
qualities of the FABMEB AND FAEMING.

Thebe is no employment that seems to be so full of sim-
ple life as that of farming. Its toils and burdens are con*
nected with fields, groves, and sunsets,

BuTHE, gay and joyous. », ed, ing

Is the farmer blithe ? some, sameness

some, ful, fully, fulness ■ Toil, to labor with fatigue.
Tebi^ to weary. s, ed, ing -.^—



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STUDIES IN ANGLO-SAXON ORTHOGRAPHY. 109

some, 8omenes$ Gold, wanting in heat.

Peace, freedom from disturbance. ty, ness, ish, er, est —

-ful, fullyy fvlnen Bain, to fall in drops of water from

Fallow, not tilled. the air.

Time, a season of anj things op mea- », ed, ing, y, iness -^—

sure of an event. I^y, without moisture.

ly, liness nesSf er, est — —

Early, first in time. Clat, soft and oily earth.

nesSy er, est -^— «y» w'*

Late, after the time. Loam, a kind of colored earth.

ly, ness, er, est — y

Sultry, hot and close. Stone, a hard mass of earth.
ness y , iness — .

N INE T Y- 8E y E N T H B T XT D T .

QUALITIES OF WAB.



"War is a cruel thing, but those who follow it, as a calling
ia life, are often noble. It will cease.

Blood, the vital fluid, also slaughter. thy woe or tender pity.

Is blood the seat of bodily life ? -fy^yfy^ly^ ^«w, lemieu

yy inesSy less Gore, thick blood.

Dead, deprived of life. y, abounding in

ty, linessy ness FouL^ filthy, wicked.

Dread, terror or awe. ■ ly, ness —

fulyfullyy fulness, less —— Fright, violent fear, or terror.

Rue, to lament or grieve. -fuly fully, fulness -



Sy dy ing Rife, abounding, prevailing.

'^'—ful, fully, fulness ly, ness —

NINETY-EIGHTH STITDT.
QUAUnSS OF MECHANIGB AND THEIR 0ALLINO&

Mechanics compose a useful class of men. Their ma-
chines tmd wares are connected with the growth of the nation.
Their callings require some bodily and mental qualities.

Skili^ ready knowledge. Does the mechanic need skill ?



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STUDIES IN" ANGLO-SAXON ORTHOGRAPHT.



-/«/, fully, fulness -



Craft, art^ or practical skilL

— — y, iness, Uy

Need, the want of any thing.



fid, fidly, fulnesM

Cunning, skilful, crafty.

— ^— - workman, a workman m

TVisi^ skilled in practical knowledge.



NINETT-WINTH STUDY.
QUALITIES OF TBS ICAIfUFACTUIlEB AND MANUFACTURINa.

The manufacturing department of life is full of enterprise
and skilL Striking qualities meet us at every step, many
of which have already been pointed out.



Mant, numerous.

Are there many manufacturers ?
SoM^ a certnin quantity.
Raw, not altered, in its natural state.
Mix, to blend or join in some way.

es, ed, ing

Rude, rough in finish.

Home, made in one*s native country.

Any, one or more.

All^ the whole number*



most, the greatest part -

Such, of the like kind.
Born, two taken together.
Otheb^ not the same.
Golden, mode of gold.
Silver, made cf silver.
Silken, made of silk.
Woolen, made of wool.
Wooden, made of woocL
Icon, made of iron.



OKB HXTNDBBDTH STXTDT.
QUALITIES OF THE TRADEA AND TRADING.

Trading is now extensive, ranging from the pedlar to the
wholesale merchant It is a form of life in which there is
much tact, and many fine business qualities needed, in order
to succeed.



Sell, to transfer any thing for money.

Does the merchant seU goods ?

8,ing,er

Sale, the transfer of goods for money.
Whole , the transfer of goods in

quantity.
But, to obtain by purchase.
Cheap, bearing a low price.



e r, est, ness, ly

Fresh, recently made or obtained.

er, eH, ness, ly

Old, of long duration.

Weigh, to find out the quantity by

scalea
Weight, the quantity of a thing.



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STUDIES IN ANGLO-SAXON ORTHOGRAPHY.



Ill



ONE HUNDBED AND FIBST STUDT.
QUAUrnS OF TnS sailor and a SEAFARINa LIFE.

Those who do business on great waters are a noble and
generous class of men. Much of the wealth and comfort of
the nation depend upon their daring and skill.

A , on or before — .

Foam, the froth of water,

f to gather foam.

», edy infff y, less — — -

Path, the way in which a body

moves.

l ess, without

Storm, a yiolent action of air and

rain.



Merrt, gay and noisy.
Are sailors merry f

er, est, ness, ly

Drive, to urge forward by force.

«, i^9

Drift, any thing driven.

A , afloatj or driven along.

Float, to be borne along on water.
8, ed, ing



A , borne along

ILcAn, the upper or foremost part.



ONE HUKDBED AND SEOOND STITDT.
QUALmES OF THE LEAR>'ED FE0FESSI0N8.

Society is more indebted to the learning and life of the
teacher, lawyer, doctor, and minister, than to every thing
else on earth.



Learn, to obtain knowledge.
Must the minister learn much t

8, ed, ing, er

High, raised or elevated.

Each, the whole taken separately.

Etther, one of two.

N , not one



of a thing.

less, y

Thought, the product of thinking.

ful, less, fuhiess, lessly

Mood, style in music

y, iness

Care, concern, interest in any Uiing.



Word, sounds or letters used as a sign -ful, abounding in •

ONE HUNDBED AND THIRD STUDY.

quaijties of officers and offices.

Societt needs men to attend to public business. Officcra



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112



STUDIES IN ANGLO-SAXON OBTHOGRAPHY,



are necessary. Much depends upon their wisdom and jus-
tice. Good qualities in our officers are the pledge of pros-
perity.



FiBST, before aU others.
Does the President fiU the first
office?
Main, chief, or principoL
PfiDii^ highest in rank.
Low, below others in station.

— — mo«4 the very lowest — -
TiBi^ to weary.

a, ed, ing

£f somewhat ^—



Monet, the currency of a conntrj.

edy having

Mild, gentle.

ly^ nesSf er, est — -

Stern, severe and stiff.

cr, cat, /y, ness ■

Tbust, to confide in.

», ed, ing

• y , less, iness, fiU —



"^oorthy, worthy of -



ONE HUNDBSD AND FOUBTH BTUDY.
QUALITIES OF THE WORKS OF MAN.

The works of man are tested by their qualities. These
are numerous, and of every degree of excellence. Atten-
tion to their names is a useful exercise in education.

Like, resembling. Least, smallest

Are the works of man like God's t Keen, sharp in cutting.

Tin , not er, est, ly, ness — —

Tell» to speak, to count Sharp, having a thin edge or points

«, if^g gr, est, ness, ly

Told, did Level, fiat, agreeing with the line

Un ^ not reckoned* where the earth and sky seem to

LnTLB, small in size. meet

Less^ smaller ■ Bough, uneven, not perfect

OKE HUNDBBD AND FIFTH STUDY.
QUALITIES OF THE WORKS OF GOD. ,

Who can point out the perfection of the Divine works ?
They are all goodly. Their qualities are perfect in degres.
In wisdom, has He made them all.



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STUDIES m ANGLO-SAXON ORTHOGRAPHY. 113

Great, large in size or immber, Wondek, strange, great or noveL

Are the works of God great f :/W, fulness, fidly

e i, est, ly, ness Fast, firm and fixed.

End, the last or close of any thing. Bleak, open and exposed to the wind.

less, without — — er, est, ness -^^—

Good, of fine quality.

ONB HVNDBED AND SIXTH STITDT.
QtJALrriES OF MINERAL BODIES.

Earths and metals have many nsefal qualities. To these
we owe the existence of plants, in a good degree, and the
works of man.

Hard, firm to the touch. Bright, shiny.

Are all metals hard ? e r, est, ness, ly -^^—



-er, est, ness Dull, not clear, but clouded.



Gas, a body of a light elastic nature. er, est, ness -

y, full of Flint, a yellow, or grayish black

Weight, quantity of a body. stone, which is very hard.

y, full of , or heavy. y

er, est, iness, ily — ^ Chalk, an earth of a dull white color.

Acid, sharp to the taste. y, iness -^^—

ONB HUNDBED AND BBYBNTH STUDT.

quauties of vegetable bodies.

Plants have always attracted the attention and love of
man. A thousand simple charms hang about our trees and
flowers.

Wood, the firm part of a tree, many Tough, flexible, or bending readily.

trees. er, est, ness, ly -^^—

Is the wood hard ? Mellow, soft with ripeness.

y, abounding in —^ er, est, ness

Leaf, the airy organ of a plant. Ripe, mature in growth.

y , iness, less — er, est, ness —

PRKTry, neat and pleasing. Whole, entire, sound.

Thick, crowded together. some, somewhat -

■4y, ness



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114 STUDIES IN ANGLO-SAXON ORTHOGRAPHY.

ONB HUNDBBD AND EIGHTH STUDY.
QUALTTUCS OF XSTMA1A

Animals, tame or wild, have mucli to attract our notice.
Their qualities appear in every form and variety. Some of
them are recorded by the Saxons.



Tame, accustomed to man. ?y, linesSt «r, est -^^—

Is the ox tame ? Vn /y, Hness

«•, est, ness, less Guslt, frightful.

Gbeedt, haying a strong desire for Shaoot, rough with long hair or wooL

food. Swift, rapid in motion.

er, est, ly, ness -^^— er, est, ly, ness

Grim, fierce, savage. Slow, tardy or lazy in motion.

Clean, free from what is fouL g r, est, ly, ness

Vn f not free

ONE HVNDBED AND NINTH STUDY.
QUALTTIES OF UGHT.

The colors of light are a charm to the eye.

Red, a bright warm color. Blue, a rich warm color.

Is red a color ? Brown, a sober cool color.

Yellow, a bright and brilliant color. Gray, white with a mixture of black.

Green, a soft and cool color, composed White, the color of snow.

of yellow and blue. Black, the color of night.

ONE HUNDRED AND TENTH STUDY.

qualities of god.

As the streams of the earth are fed by the clouds of
heaven, so all the qualities of created things were originally
derived from God. His qualities are the source of all that
is good and true.

Ever, at all times. ■ es, trig



lasting, continuing without end. ■ — ed, pronounced happy.

Bless^ to make happy. Mightt, strong:



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STUDIES JN ANGLO-SAXON OBTHOGRAPHY. 115

^l , having all strength, or Last, the end of all things.


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Online Library1847; A tour to the river Saguenay...Philadelphia A summer in the wilderness...New York and PhiladelA hand-book of Anglo-Saxon orthography. In two parts → online text (page 7 of 9)