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DURHAM

Library Association*



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Book ....Cn1.4- .-^

Volume ■... Xj*&. .;. ...

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Accession No.— W^-^-



THE



GRANITE MONTHLY



A New Hampshire Magazine



DEVOTED TO



HISTORY, BIOGRAPHY, LITERATURE,
AND STATE PROGRESS






VOLUME XXVI 11 v ; cw > -



CONCORD, N. H.

PUBLISHED BV THE GRANITE MONTHLY COMPANY

I 900



N

V. Z8

Published, 1900

By the Granite Monthly Company

Concord, N. H.



Printed, Illustrated, and Electrotyped by
Runiford Printing Company (Rum/ord, Press>
Concord, Nciv Hatitpshire, U. S. A.



The Granite Monthly.



COxNTENTS OF VOLUME XXVHL



yamiary — jitiie, igoo.



Abbott, Emma F., Our Heroes [poem) ......

Allen, Frederick J., Life (poem) ........

White Horse Cliff, North Conwav, N. H. [pjeni) .

Derelict and Fortu.ne-Favored [poeni] .....

A Midsummer's Day Drea.m. A Prehistoric Idyl, Caroline C. Lamprey

Among the Christian Science Churches, Henrietta H. Williams

A Prosperous Industry and its Man.^ger, H. H. Metcalf

A Quatrain (poem), Clara B. Heath .......

A Sugar Se.a.son at the Farm, Esther E. Ellis ....

A Wo.man's Pr.\yer (poem). Ethel F. Comerford .....

Baker, Elizabeth Fenner, Fast Day, April 19, 1900 (poem)

Barney, Ernest Albert, Mascoma Valley Sketches. Amateur Photog

and Notes .......

Beede, Eva J., When the Stars Fell

Brennan, James F., Peterborough Town Library; Thl

brary ........

Brown, Clara Frances, Concord's Children
Brush, Frederic, Song of the Merrimack (poem)

Carr, Laura Garland, Out of the Way (poem)
Charlesto\v.\ — "Number Four,'" Thomas D. Howard
Chase, Arthur B., The Congregational Church in Newport
Chase, Bishop Carlton, Rt. Rev. W. W. Niles, D. D.
Chesley, Charles Henry, Trailing Arbutus (poem)
Clark, Luella. Thy Work (poem) ....

Clarke, James Freeman, James De Normandie, D. D.



raphs



Pioneer Public Li



Shea



304
60

83
279

146

264

309
340

155
16

246

134
15

281
138
138

255

93
295

352
280

115
1 67



(o^^\



IV



CONTENTS.



Colby, Fred Myron, The Waiting of the Moor {poem)
Comerford, Ethel F., A Woman's Prayer {poem)
Concord Landmarks, Some, Mrs. Joseph B. Walker
CoNCORiys Children, Clara Frances Brown
Court, Ormsby A., The Derelict {poem) .

Life {poem) . . ' .

Crossing {poem), Elisabeth B. Hunt
Crumbs {poem), Moses Gage Shirley
Currier, Hon. Frank D., H. H. Metcalf
Currier, Mary M., Irene {poem) ....

Poet Songs {poem) .....

Dana, Francis, The Dawn of Promise {poem)

Daniell, Mary Eastman, First L-nitarian Church of Franklin

De Normandie, James, D. D., James Freeman Clarke

Derelict and Fortune-Favored {poem), Frederick J. Alltn

Dover by the Cocheco. — Strafford's First City, Mary Olive Godfrey



Easter {poem), George William Gray ......

Easter Morn (poem), Mary Baker G. Eddy ....

Eddy, Mary Baker G., Easter Morn {poem) ....

Effingha.m. "The Old Squire Lord House," John Livingston Wri
Ellis, Esther E., A Sugar Season at the Farm
Emerson, Mertie Alice, B. A., The Women's Clubs of Manchester
Evening {poem), Hervey Lucius Woodward .....



ght



Fast Day, April 19, 1900 {poem), Elizabeth Fanner Baker .
First Unitarian Church of Franklin, Mary Eastman Daniel
Flam:\i.e Amoris {peom), C. C. Lord .....



Godfrey, Mary Olive, Strafford's First City — Dover by the Cocheco
Grant, Fanny, Songs Especially Pleasing .....

Gray, George William, E.aster {poem) .......

Harris, William S., The Death of Washington ....

Heath, Clara B., A Quatrain {poem) .......

Heavenward {poem), Cyrus A. Stone .......

Howard, Thomas D., Charlestown — -'Number Four"'

Hoyt, Samuel, The Anthe.m {poem) .......

Hunt, EHsabeth B., Crossing {poem) .......

Hunt, Mrs. N. P., The Nineteenth Century Woman

Hurd, Willis Edwin, The Dream Engine .......

Hurlin, William, The Acade.mical and Theological Institution, New
ton, N. H .

Irene, {poem), Mary M. Currier ........

Johnson, Clarence, So:\ie Queer People I have seen in Washington

Life {poem), Frederick J. Allen ........

Life {poem), Ormsby A. Court ........

Lippincott, Alartha Shepard, Sweet Home {poem) ....



Hamp-



148

16
246
138

14
254

364
368

321

305

35

159

167

279

•93

253
263

263

98

155

67

346

246

159
43

193

'-^53
253-

85.
340
325
93
58
364
103

30

17

305
364

60

254

145.-



CONTENTS.



Lord. C. C, Flamm.e Amoris (poem) ....

O Little Bird (poem) .....

The Poet's Mission (poem) ....

Si' RING (poem) .......

"Love in Sequel Works with Fate," Anna W. Young



43
115

15s

242

49



Masco.ma Valley Sketches

belt liainey
Metcalf, H. H., A Prosperous Industry and it

Hon. Frank D. Currier
Misjudged (poem), Moses Gage Shirley
My Snow Maide.n (poem). A. P. S.
My Valentine, (poem), C. Jennie Swaine



New Hampshire Necrology
Balcom, Hon. George L. .
Baldwin, Charles W.
Barnard, Joseph
Bartlett, Gen. Charles H.
Bayley, Tlmothy East.man
Bennett, Joseph E.
Bidwell, Dorothy Lovering
Brooks, Charles H. .
Brown, Rev. Joseph H.
Calhoun, Issac .
Carbee, Samuel P., '\\. D.
Clark, Hon. Lewis W.
Cole, Myron W.
CoMSTOCK, Hon. Charles C.
CouES, Dr. Elliott
Cutcheon, Hon. Sullivan AL
Dame, Miss Harriet P.
Dane, Col. John B.
Dorr, Charles AL
DuRGiN, Luther P.
Eaton, George R.
E.mery, Alfred E., AL D.
Flanders, Dea. John B. "
Fogg, Hon. E. Knowlton
Foss, James M. .
Foster, Joshua L.
Foster, Col. Roger E.
French, George B.
French, John C.
Gale, William B.
Goodrich, Rev. Masenna
Graves. Frank W., AL D.
Hale, Otis G.
Hall, Herbert E., .\L D.
Hall, Col. John B. .



Am.-vteur Photographs and Notes, Ernest Al
s Manager



134

309
321

158

109

102



60, 116, 179, 256, 315, 368

370

63
62

116

188

186

260

123

260

260

184

368

124

181

60

317

315
121

119

185
187

369
64
372
257
118
259

371
117
61
318
256
258
260
121



VI



CONTENTS.



New Hampshire Necrology (Contiinied ) :
Head, William F.
Hildreth, James C.
Hill, Edwin P. .
Hill, Hon. John M.
HOBBS, John S. .
Hopkins, Charles B.
Houston, Rev. Hiram

HURD, VVlLLARD O., iM. D.

Jaclard, Augustus P.

Kimball, Edward P. .

Kingsbury, Rev. Josiah \V.

McDuFFEE, John E.

McLane, Neil

Merrill, Rev. John \V., D. D.

Merrill, Maj. Darius

Murray, George W. .

Parsons, Rev. E. G. .

Read, Col. Benjamin

Reynolds, Hon. Leonard P.

Richardson, Abel P., M. D.

Rollins, Hon. Amos L.

Rublee, Dea. Henry F.

Sands, Hon. Thomas .

Scott, John

Smart, James H., LL. D.

Spinney, Elder Joseph

Spring, John L. .

Springfield. Hon. Isaac W.

Stackpole, Paul A.. M. D.

Swett, John L., M. D.

Taylor, Hon. Jonathan M.

Twitchell, Emma A.

Way, Hon. George O.

Whittle, James P., M. D.

Worcester, Joseph H.
New Hampton, The Awakening of a Town, Richard Pattee
New Orleans, Converse J. Smith

Niles, Rt. Rev. W. W., D. D., Bishop Carlton Chase
Notes on the New Sweet-Peas, Clarence Moores Weed

Ocean Reveries (poei/i), W. M. Rogers

O Little Bird (poem), C. C. Lord ....

On the Golden Shore, Converse J. Smith

O Spring, I Love Thee Best (poem), Hervey Lucius Woodward

Our Heroes (poem), Emma F. Abbott

Out of the Way (poem), Laura Garland Carr

Packer, Thomas, Some Notes on, Irving A. Watson

Packer's Falls, Lucien Thompson

Pattee, Richard, The Awakening of a Town



62

124
259

'79
189

259
37^
123
257
122
122
372
318
188
258
120
372
256

63
182

189

190

316

259
18s

124
370
119
258
317
371

64
318

63
315
347
127

352
242

292

115

33

280

304

255

1 10
16s
347



CONTENTS.



VI 1



EHISTORIC



InVL



Petekborough Town Lihraky: The Pioneer Public Librarv. James F
Brennan ......■••■•

Poet Sosgs (poc//i), .Mary M. Currier . •

Richards, Col. .Seth M. .A. Prosperous Industry and its M.\.\ager, H. H

.Metcalf

Rogers, W. .M., Ocean Reveries (poeiii) ....
Rowell, Mary A., Women's Clubs in Franklin

S., A. P., Mv Snow Maiden (poem)

San Fra.nxisco. On the Golden Shore, Converse J. Smith
Shea, Caroline C. Lamprey, A Midsummer's Day Dream. A Pr
Sliirley. Moses Gage, Misjudged {poem) ....

Cru.mbs {poem) ........

Smith, Converse J., On THE Golden Shore

New Orleans ........

Some Concord L.\ndmarks, Mrs. Joseph B. Walker .

Some Notes on Thomas Packer, Irving A. Watson .

Some Queer People I have seen in Washington, Clarence Jo

Song of the Merrimack (poem), Frederic Brush

Songs Especially Pleasing, Fanny Grant

Spring {poem), C. C. Lord .......

Stevens. Frances C, Useless Things

Stone, Cyrus A., Heavenward {poem) ....

Swaine, C. Jennie, .My Valentine {poem) ....
Sweet Home {poem), Martha Shepard Lipp'ncott .



hnson



The Acade.mical and Theological Institution, New Ha.mpton, N. H.,
iam Hurlin . . . . . . •

The Anthe.m {poem), Samuel Hoyt .....

The Awakening of a Town, Richard Pattee .

The Congreg.\tio.nal Church in Newport, Arthur B. Chase

The Dawn of Pro.mise {poem), Francis Dana

The Death of Washington, William S. Harris

The Derelict {poem), Ormsby A. Court ....

The Destructive Tent Caterpillars, Clarence Moores Weed
The Dre.\m Engine, Willis Edwin Hurd ....

The First Settlement of New Hampshire, Joseph B. Walker
The Nineteenth Century Woman, Mrs. N. P. Hunt
'•The Old Squire Lord House," John Livingston Wright
The Poet's Mission {poem), C. C. Lord ....

The South Congregational Church of Concord, i 835-1 S99
The Unitarian Movement in Littleton, Jane Hobart Tuttle
The Waiting of the Moor {poem), Fred Myron Colby
The Wo.men's Clubs of Manche.ster, Mertie Alice Emerson, B. A.
Thompson, Lucien, Packer's Falls .....

Thy Work {poem), Luella Clark ......

Trailing Arbutus {poem), Charles Henry Chesley

Tuttle, Jane Hobart, The Unitarian Movement in Littleton

Useless Things, Frances C. Stevens .....



Will



281
351



309
292

109

33
146

158

368

127
246
I 10
364
138

i\i
149

325
102

145



17

58

347

295

90

85

14

341

30
56

103
98

15s
3
326
148
67
165

115
280
326

149



vni



CONTENTS.



Walker, Joseph B., The First Settlement of New Hampshire
Walker, Mrs. Joseph B., Some Concord Landmarks .
Washington, The Death of, William S. Harris
Watson, Irving A., Some Notes on Thomas Packer
Weed, Clarence Moores, Notes on the New Sweet-Peas

The Destructive Tent Caterpillars
When the Stars Fell, Eva J. Beede
White Horse Cliff, North Conway, N. H. (poem), Frederick J. Allen
Williams, Henrietta H., Among the Christian Science Churches
Women's Clubs in Franklin, Iviary A. Rowell .....
Woodward, Hervey Lucius, O Spring, I Love Thee Best {poem}

Evening (poem) ..........

Wright, John Livingston. "The Old Squire Lord House"



56
246

85
1 10

242

341

15

83

264

336

280

346

98



Young, Anna W.,



Love in Sequel Works with Fate "



49




SOUTH CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH CONCORD.



Tnn (iRANITC i^ORTMM.



Vol. XXIX.



JANUARY, 1900.



No.



THE SOUTH CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH OF CONCORD.

1835-1899.
Compiled from Records of f/ie ChurcJt.




OT more thau sixty-four years
have passed since it was pro-
posed to establish the South
Congregational church in
Concord, but Congregational worship
has been that best known here since
1730, when the First church was or-
ganized, and the minister of that
church was entitled the Minister of
the Town. The Old North church,
which stood where is now the Walker
school, was the parent of each of our
other Congregational churches. As
its location ceased to be convenient
to portions of the growing town, and
for no other reason, three new churches
were one after another formed.

The need for the South church be-
came apparent in 1835, when Con-
cord, III years after its settlement,
had about 4,500 inhabitants. In
that year the South Congregational
Society was organized, its original
members being George Kent, Thomas
Chadbourne, Nathaniel G. Uphani,
Franklin Evans, Leonard Kimball,
Eaton Richards, James Weeks, James
Sullivan, George N. Damon, Walter



Harris, Asa McFarland, Samuel S.
Dow, George Hutchins, Asaph
Evans, Philip Watson, Ira H. Cur-
rier, Joseph Grover, Samuel Evans,
Hamilton Hutchins, James Rines,
Samuel Evans, Jr., Caleb Parker,
Samuel Fletcher, Joseph Low, John
B. Chandler, W. W. Estabrook, Ar-
thur Fletcher, Josiah Stevens, Charles
P. Blanchard, William D. Buck.

A suitable site, at the southwest
corner of Main and Pleasant streets,
was obtained for $1,200, and in the
summer of 1836 a church edifice was
built thereon, at a further cost of
about $8,800. This edifice was 77
by 64 feet in area. Within its granite
basement, level with the street, were
the chapel, 64 by 36 feet in area, and
two stores, — from the rental of the
latter it was expected some income
would come to the society. Two
parlors and the main audience room
were above these, entered by a stair-
way from Main street. On the floor
of the audience-room were loS pews,
beside a few in the gallery. There
w^ere three aisles and six rows of



SOUTH CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH.



pews. The means to build this
church were the resources or the
credit of certain members of the so-
ciety-, who appear to have obtained
by loan from the town treasur}- a por-
tion of a fund which came to the
town by a division of certain surplus
revenues of the United States. Philip
Watson, a parishioner, was the build-
er. This church was dedicated in



tion. The walls and ceiling were
white, and the plain glass windows
were hung with Venetian blinds.
The north and south walls joined the
ceiling by suitable curves. Each
white pine pew was carpeted and
cushioned, and perhaps its interior
painted, to please the separate fancy
of its owner. There was a door to
close each pew. After a time, a




The Old South Church.



the forenoon of Februar}- i, 1837.

That year of 1837 is remembered
as one of financial disaster. The
secular affairs of the parish did not
prosper immediateh*, and after a lit-
tle time a singular situation resulted
— the chapel and two stores went in-
to private ownership, and the societ\"
paid rent for its chapel until 1854,
w^hen it was redeemed for $500.

The interior of this church was, at
the outset, a place without decora-



broad, crimson curtain, upheld by a
rod with enlarged, car\^ed ends, was
hung behind the pulpit, to relieve
the plainness of the background,
lyittle people thought the temple at
Jerusalem might have nothing finer
in its way than that. Still later the
walls and ceiling were frescoed, in
the manner of that time, with col-
umns and panels, and behind the
pulpit was drawn a chancel in per-
spective.



SOUTH CONGREGATIOXAL CHURCH.



The congregation took no audible
part in the worship, but arose and
faced the choir when hymns were
sunsf- The hvmn-book was a collec-
tion entitled "Church Psalmody."
Its selections included 421 of the
compositions of Dr. Isaac Watts.
There were, probably, thirt}' voices
in the choir. The organist and di-
rector was Dr. William D. Buck.
There were at different times three
organs placed in the gallery of the
old church ; one, a small affair, built
at Ph-mouth, X. H., was lent hx the
builder in hope of a sale : another,
which cost S700, had been in use in
Troy, X. Y., and the third, which
was satisfactor}-, was built by Sim-
mons of Boston. Likewise there
were two bells in the tower : the first
was broken in ringing out welcome
to the news of a townsman's nomina-
tion to the presidency of the United
States.

The living church was organized
on the daj- of the dedication with
sixty-seven members, all of them
from the First church. In the fol-
lowing March, Rev. Daniel James
No3'es, a graduate of Dartmouth and
Andover, was called, and he was or-
dained and installed as pastor, Ma}'
3, 1837, at the age of twenty-five
years.

The first pastor ma^- be rightly
characterized as an eminenth* saintly
man. His presence and manner
might say to the most casual observ-
er that here was the conscientious
pastor of a church. His figure was
slight, his carriage and deportment
dignified, and his face, so it seems to
the writer's fanc}', bore resemblance
to busts of the illustrious Italian poet
Dante. He was a careful student
and an interesting preacher. An



active laborer in the vineyard, he
had at one time a large class of chil-
dren, which met on Saturday after-
noons for instruction in the "West-
minster Assembly's Shorter Cate-
chism." There was a thriving Sun-
da^-'School with devoted teachers,
the class books being more simple
than those now extant. There was
no rivalr}- then from week-day clubs
of many sorts, or Young Men"s Chris-




Rev. Daniel J. Noyes.

tian Association, Young People's So-
ciety of Christian Endeavor, or Ju-
nior Young People's Societ}' of Chris-
tian Endeavor. The pastorate of Mr.
Xoyes covered twelve and one half
j-ears, and at its close the church ap-
pears to have numbered 231 mem-
bers ; the admissions were 259 :
losses, 95. In October. 1S49, he was
dismissed, to become professor of
theology in Dartmouth college. He
died at Chester, X. H., on December
22, 1885.

During one period of his pastorate.



SOUTH CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH.



Mr. Noyes was assisted by Rev.
Ezra E. Adams, a native of Concord,
preacher at the seamen's church in
Havre, France, and during his own
absence in Europe, in 1846, the pul-
pit was occupied by Rev. Daniel




Rev. Henry E. Parker.

Temple, a returned missionary, who
had served at Malta and other East-
ern stations.

Among active parishioners of the
early time, not hereinbefore men-
tioned, were David Kimball (editor
of the New Hampshin- Observer), Asa
Morrill (afterward captain of Boston
police), David L. Morril (an ex-gov-
ernor of New Hampshire), Eevi P.
Morton (afterward vice-president of
the United States), Franklin Pierce
(afterward president of the United
States), Ira Perley (afterward chief
justice of New Hampshire), Rev.
Benjamin P. Stone and Rev. Henry
Wood (editors of the Congrcoational
Journal ).

The second pastorate was that of



Rev. Henry E. Parker, a graduate of
Dartmouth and Union Theological
seminary, who came to the church,
at the age of thirty years, in April,
1850, from temporary service at East-
port, Me., and was installed May 14,
1851.

This pastorate was attended by
most salutary results. There were
281 admissions to the church, and a
net gain of 120 members. In 1857
(another year of general financial dis-
turbance), the church edifice was re-
paired and improved, but in 1859 it
was destroyed by a fire which origi-
nated on neighboring premises. Af-
ter futile efforts at rescue, when it be-
came evident that destruction was in-
evitable, the pastor gave a final pull
to the bell, which had been sounding
loud tidings of disaster. There was
no insurance, and all that remains of
the old building, which was endeared
to many, is a framed large photo-
graph of its exterior, a pulpit sofa,
and the communion table, which are
preserved in the existing church.

A temporary place for public wor-
ship was found in Phenix hall, but
the historic site of the present church
was, before long, chosen on which to
build in a larger, better way. Here
had been the residence of Hon. Will-
iam A. Kent, where the Marquis de
Lafayette was lodged in 1825, Ralph
Waldo Emerson was married in 1829,
and Daniel Webster was, at various
times, an honored visitor. Mr. Charles
Edward Parker, a brother of the pas-
tor, was the designer of the new
church, and Lyman R. Fellows, Dut-
ton Woods, William G. Mason, and
Daniel H. Fletcher, all of them
parishioners, were concerned in its
construction. The building commit-
tee were Nathaniel G. Upham,



SOUTH CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH.



George Hutchins, Arthur Fletcher,
John Kimball, George Clough, Dut-
ton Woods, Caleb Parker, E. G.
Moore, and Joseph I^. Jackson.

The corner-stone was laid on May
3, i860, and on the 27th of the fol-
lowing November the completed
building was dedicated. Its lofty in-
terior and exposed beam work were
architectural features new to Pilgrim
churches in this vicinity, and excited
the surprise of some of the visiting
clergy. So did the cross on the tall
tower, until reflection proved that no
other Christians had better claim to
use of that sacred emblem. It is
there in the spirit of Sir John Bow-
ring's hymn, —

" In the cross of Christ I glor}',
Towering o'er the wrecks of time."

The interior of this church had
originally three aisles, and six rows
of pews on the main floor, number-
ing in all 142. Beside these, there
were nine in the north gallery. One
hundred pews were appraised for sale
at prices which would produce S19,-
570 and title to the remainder was
retained. The interest in land on
which the old church stood was sold
for $1,100, and a considerable sum
was derived from premiums for choice
of the new pews. The bell was ob-
tained by public subscription.

This church, together with the
chapel which, in 1S96, became only
a memory, cost $24,545, but it was
evident very soon that the expecta-
tion of growth in the list of parish-
ioners would be realized.

The second pastor of the church
endeared himself not only to his own,
but to all the townspeople, being
everywhere and always a public-
spirited, large-hearted Christian gen-



tleman. He had leave of absence
twice, once to serve as chaplain of
the New Hampshire Volunteers from
June, i86r, to August, 1862, and
again to go abroad for six months
from September, 1865. While in
London he resigned the pastorate,
and a council held in March, 1866,
granted a dismissal. He went hence
to Dartmouth college, where he was
until recent years professor of Latin,
and died in Boston, November 7,
1896.

The church had no installed pas-
tor from March, 1866, to January,
1869. It was voted September 24,
1866, to call Rev. William F. V.
Bartlett, of Brooklyn, N. Y. ; he ac-
cepted conditionally, but his health




Rev. Silas L. Blake.

failed, as he had apprehended, and
he withdrew in May, 1867. He is,
and has been more than twenty
years, pastor of the First Presbyte-
rian church of Lexington, Y^y.

There was then a period of nearly



SOUTH CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH.




Rev. Charles E. Harrington.

two years for which there is not
much but material progress to relate.
In January, 1867, a debt of $2,890.50,
part of which appears to have been
left over from construction of the
church, was cancelled. That same
year side galleries were built, and
the north gallery enlarged, whereby
space for thirty-four pews was gained.
Funds for this enlargement ($3,104.56)
were provided by twenty- five associ-
ates, known as the Gallery associa-
tion, who were gradually reimbursed
by appropriation to that purpose of a
portion of the gallery pew rentals. In
1868 the organ was obtained. It cost
$4,000, and $424.02 was expended
in making a place for it, because
the original design located the organ
where is now the choir-room. Toward
this expenditure 156 contributors
gave $3,522.80, and the Social Circle
$631.19. From other sources $320.03
was derived, and $950 was borrowed
temporarily.

In December, 1868, a call was ex-



ended to Rev. Silas L. Blake, of
Pepperell, Mass., a graduate of Mid-
dlebury and Andover. His service
commenced the first Sunday of Janu-
ary, 1869, and his installation was on
the 27th of the same month.

The nearly nine years' pastorate
which followed was eminentl}^ satis-
factory. Two hundred and forty -
seven persons came into the church,
of whom one hundred and fifty-seven
were on confession of faith. At the
height of the pastor's usefulness, he
received a call from the Woodland
Avenue Presbyterian church of Cleve-
land, Ohio ; so he resigned and was
dismissed by council, October 14,
1877. He is now pastor of the First
Congregational church of New lyon-
don, Conn.

If we may consider the year 1869
as a fair example for that decade, it
will be interesting to note here that
the current income of the society
that year was $3,687.84 ; expenses,
$3,638.24; benevolences, $1,575.06.




Rev William H. Hubbard.



SOUTH CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH.




Interior South Congregational Church, as Decorated for Meeting of American Missionary Association, October, 1898.



These figures are exclusive of cer-
tain receipts aud payments toward
an organ debt hereinbefore men-
tioned.

The fourth pastorate was that of
Rev. Charles E. Harrington, called
from Lancaster, N. H., and installed
by council, April i8, 1878. This
was a period of earnest endeavor and
devotion, terminated by a call to the



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