3d sess. U.S. 46th Cong..

Memorial addresses on the life and character of Evarts W. Farr, (a representative from New Hampshire), delivered in the House of representatives and in the Senate, Forty-sixth Congress, third session (Volume 2) online

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Online Library3d sess. U.S. 46th Cong.Memorial addresses on the life and character of Evarts W. Farr, (a representative from New Hampshire), delivered in the House of representatives and in the Senate, Forty-sixth Congress, third session (Volume 2) → online text (page 1 of 5)
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UNITED STATES OF AMERICA.



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MEMORIAL ADDRESSES



Life and Character



EVARTS W. FARR,

(A REPRESENTATIVE FROM NEW HAMPSHIRE,)



DELIVERED IN THE



HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES AND IN THE SENATE,
U f, , FORTY-SIXTH CONGRESS, THIRD SESSION.



PUBLISHED BY ORDER OF CONGRESS.




WASHINGTON:

GOVERNMENT PRINTING OFFICE.

i 88 i .



JOINT RESOLUTION to provide for the publication of the memorial addresses on Evarts
W. Farr.

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of Amer-
ica in Congress assembled, That there be printed twelve thousand copies of the
memorial addresses delivered in the Senate and House of Representatives upon the
life and character of Honorable Evarts W. Farr, late a Representative from the
State of New Hampshire, together with a portrait of the deceased; nine thousand
copies thereof for the use of the House of Representatives and three thousand
copies for the use of the Senate. And a sum sufficient to defray the expense of
preparing and printing the portrait of the deceased for the publication herein pro-
vided for is hereby appropriated out of any moneys in the Treasury not otherwise
appropriated.

Approved, March 3, 1881.



ADDRESSES



Death of Evarts W. Farr.



PROCEEDINGS IN THE HOUSE.



December 6, 1880.

Mr. Briggs. Mr. Speaker, it becomes my painful duty to announce
the death of my late colleague, Hon. Evarts W. Farr, and I desire
to present the following resolutions in connection therewith. I wish
also to give notice that at some future day I will ask to present the
customary resolutions, in order that appropriate remarks may be
heard in relation to the life and services of the deceased.

The Speaker. The resolutions proposed by the gentleman from
New Hampshire will be read.

The Clerk read as follows :


Resolved, That this House has heard with sincere regret the an-
nouncement of the death of Hon. Evarts W. Farr, late a Repre-
sentative from the State of New Hampshire, and a member-elect to
the Forty-seventh Congress from said State.

Resolved, That the Clerk of the House be directed to communicate
the foregoing resolution to the Senate.

Resolved, That as a further mark of respect to the deceased this
House do now adjourn.

The resolutions were agreed to; and accordingly the House ad-
journed.



PROCEEDINGS IN THE HOUSE.



December 22, 1880.
Mr. Updegraff, of Ohio. I have a resolution from the Committee
on Invalid Pensions, which I ask permission to submit at this time.
The Speaker. The resolution will be read.
The Clerk read as follows:

Whereas the Committee on Invalid Pensions desires to place upon
its record its appreciation of the kindly qualities and faithful labors
of their late member, Hon. Evarts W. Farr, of New Hampshire;
and

Whereas its members wish to express their regret and sympathy to
the country, the State of New Hampshire, and to the bereaved family
of the deceased in a worthy and substantial manner: Therefore,

Resolved, That the House be requested to make the customary ap-
propriation of the balance of the salary which would be due to him
as a member of the Forty-sixth Congress; and that the next Con-
gress, to which he was elected, be respectfully requested to make a
similar appropriation of the salary which would have been due to
him as a member of the Forty-seventh Congress.

The Speaker. What disposition does the gentleman desire to make
of the resolution ?

Mr. Updegraff, of Ohio. I desire to have it considered.

The Speaker. The Chair would suggest that action upon it would
be facilitated by reference to the proper committee, the Committee
on Appropriations.

Mr. Updegraff, of Ohio. Very well. I will move that it be re-
ferred to that committee.

The resolution was referred accordingly.



PROCEEDINGS IN THE HOUSE.



February i, 1881.

Mr. Morse. Mr. Speaker, I ask consent at this time to introduce
a resolution touching the funeral expenses of the late Representa-
tive from New Hampshire, Hon. Evarts W. Farr.

The Speaker. The resolution will be read.

The Clerk read as follows:

Resolved, That there be paid out of the contingent fund of the
House a sum sufficient to pay the necessary funeral expenses of Hon.
Evarts W. Farr, late a Representative from the State of New
Hampshire.



The resolution was agreed to.



February 18, 1881.
Mr. Atkins, from the Committee on Appropriations, reported the
following preamble and resolution :

Whereas the Committee on Invalid Pensions desire to place upon
its record its appreciation of the kindly qualities and faithful labors
of their late member, Hon. Evarts W. Farr, of New Hampshire;
and

Whereas its members wish to express their regret and sympathy to
the country, the State of New Hampshire, and to the bereaved family
of the deceased in a worthy and satisfactory manner : Therefore,

Resolved, That the House be requested to make the customary ap-
propriation of the balance of the salary which would be due to him
as a member of the Forty-sixth Congress ; and that the next Con-
gress, to which he was elected, be respectfully requested to make an
appropriation of six thousand dollars, in lieu of the entire salary
which would have been due to him as a member of the Forty-seventh
Congress.

The resolution was adopted.



ADDRESS OF MR. UR1GGS ON THE



^DDRESS OF yVlR. BrIGGS, OF New j-JAMPSHIRE.

FeBRUARV 8, l88l.

Mr. Speaker: I desire to submit the following resolutions.
The Speaker. The resolutions will be read.
The Clerk read as follows:

Resolved, That this House has heard with profound sorrow the an-
nouncement of the death of Hon. Evarts W. Farr, late a Repre-
sentative from the State of New Hampshire.

Resolved, That in token of regard for the memory of the lamented
deceased the members of this House do wear the usual badge of
mourning for thirty days.

Resolved, That the Clerk of this House do communicate these
resolutions to the Senate of the United States.

Resolved, That as a further mark of respect to the memory of the
deceased this Ht>use now adjourn.

Mr. Briggs. Mr. Speaker, I rise to perform the melancholy duty
of announcing to this House the death of my colleague, Evarts W.
Farr, which occurred at his home in Littleton on the 30th of Novem-
ber last. It was my sad privilege to be with him when he passed
away. He died as he had lived, with the heroism of a noble man-
hood born of hope and faith.

It is no vain tribute of respect New Hampshire would fain pay to
her noble and gallant son. As a member of this House, I submit he
was universally respected both by political friends and foes. But it
is not merely an excellent Representative at the National Capitol
that New Hampshire mourns in the death of Major Farr, Among
those who pressed eagerly to the front when an imperiled nation



LIFE AND CHARACTER OF EVARTS W. FARR. "]

called her sons to her rescue, this man was the pride of our State, and
under the flag with which we draped that hearse at Littleton he
earned the imperishable gratitude of our people.

Evarts W. Farr was born at Littleton on the ioth of October,
1840. He belonged to one of the best families of our State. His
father, an honored member of the legal profession, survives him. Mr.
Farr was one of eight children, and his early advantages were those
of the typical New England country lad. He pursued his academic
course at Thetford, Vermont, where he was graduated with honors,
and went thence to college. Frank, earnest, and intelligent, the char-
acter of the boy gave true promise of the man. What might have
been his fortune had he been permitted quietly to pursue his studies,
we cannot tell. Destiny had assigned him a part in a stupendous
drama, which was to startle Christendom. In that drama he per-
formed his part gloriously and well; and like many other young
Americans of that eventful period, he leaped to distinction before he
had reached the age of manhood.

At the breaking out of the war young Farr was a member of Dart-
mouth College. With characteristic decision, he turned his back
upon college and his face to the field. He was the first man to enter
the service from the town of Littleton, from which he enlisted in the
First New Hampshire Volunteers. He served continuously from April
20, 1861, to June 4, 1865.

Soon after he entered the service he joined the New Hampshire
Second; was appointed a lieutenant June 4, 1861 ; he was promoted
to the rank of captain January 1, 1862, and while in command of
company G lost his right arm at the battle of Williamsburgh, Virginia,
May 5, 1862. His regiment, one of the most gallant and distin-
guished in the service, was then one of the four constituting General
Hooker's original brigade.

As soon as his wound permitted he returned to the field, and Sep-
tember 9, 1862. was promoted to rank of major in the New Hamp-



shire Eleventh. After righting with distinguished gallantry at Fred-
ericksburgh, Major Farr went with his regiment to the West, and
participated in the siege and capture of Vicksburgh. After the capt-
ure he went South with General Sherman to attack General John-
ston at Jackson, Mississippi, and during the remainder of the war
served on court-martial duty, most of the time as judge-advocate.

Unquestionably his employment on court-martial duty during all
the latter part of the war alone prevented his high promotion in the
line. As it was, his career as a soldier was an exceptionally brill-
iant and successful one. In many of the severest engagements of the
war he won golden laurels. In the action at Fredericksburgh it was
my fortune to be near him, and no veteran of a hundred battles could
have shown a statelier, loftier heroism. There was a touch of chiv-
alry in his nature, and he was then of the age when this spirit is at
high tide. His patriotism was not lost in the effervescent spirit of the
cavalier; he had devotion as well as courage. Nor was his courage
of that lower order, derived from excitement. It had nothing to do
with rashness nor frenzy. He was cool, patient, and determined. It
was the courage of Ney rather than that of Murat. In the fiercest
and most disheartening fight he was never known to lose his self-
command. This, with his quick decision and soldierly intuition, com-
bined to make him a man of wonderful resources. In action or in
any grave and responsible situation he never was "at his wit's end."

Another trait of a great soldier was his fortitude, his power of en-
durance. " No pain," writes an officer who was long and most inti-
mate with him, "no pain that he suffered could bring a moan, no toil
he encountered could dismay him, the longest and hardest march we
ever made could not bring a word of complaint from his lips."

In the fight between Hooker's and Longstreet's divisions at Will-
iamsburgh, Farr's coolness and endurance came out in full flower.
The fight was close, hot, and prolonged to the verge of human en-
durance. It rained hard, and the sufferings of the men were terrible.



LIFE AND CHARACTER OF EVARTS W. FARR. 9

Farr seemed imbued with the spirit of a multitude. He demeaned
himself through that weary, bloody day in a manner never to be for-
gotten by those to whom it was known. His valor was equaled only
by his equanimity. Only breaking ranks, only the signs of yielding,
could provoke his impatience. Just at the close of that terrible day
he received the shot which made his empty sleeve thenceforth his
badge of honor.



What a tell-tale thing is an empty sleeve.

It tells in a silent tone to all,

Of a country's need, and a country's call,

Of a kiss and a tear for child and wife,

And a hurried march for a nation's life:

It tells of a battle-field of gore,

Of the saber's clash, of the cannon's roar,

Of the deadly charge, of the bugle's note,

Of a gurgling sound in a freeman's throat,

Of the whizzing grape, of the fiery shell,

Of a scene which mimics the scenes of hell;

Though it points to a myriad wounds and scars,

Yet it tells that a flag of stripes and stars,

In God's own chosen time will take,

Each place of the rag with the rattle-snake;

And it points to a time when that flag will wave,

O'er a land where there breathes no cowering slave.

Till this very hour, who could ere believe,

What a tell-tale thing is an empty sleeve,

What a weird, queer thing, is an empty sleeve.



His tastes were essentially military, and he brought to his duties in
the field that energy and fixedness of purpose which characterized
the man in all he undertook. He mastered the science of the camp
and field in an incredibly short time, and, young as he was, became
a recognized authority therein. He was a strict disciplinarian, thor-
ough and exact in all his duties, and requiring the same of others.
But he was full of considerate kindness to his men, to whom he en-
deared himself as the friend of all.



IO ADDRESS OF MR. ER1GGS ON THE

Prompt, brave, and responsible, he was ever at the post of duty ;
and in those evil days there marched not under the flag a hero of
more dauntless courage, a devotee of more unfaltering faith than
Evarts W. Farr.

At the close of the war he embraced the profession of the law and
at once became one of the most promising members of the New
Hampshire bar. An ardent and stirring Republican, he also came
early to the front in the politics of our State. He held, successively,
the positions of assistant assessor and assessor of his internal-revenue
district, solicitor of Grafton County, and a member of the governor's
council. To the latter position he was handsomely elected in a dis-
trict which had always been strongly Democratic; and in this, as later,
in his two Congressional canvasses, his popularity was abundantly
demonstrated. He did credit to every place he held, and his elec-
tion to the Forty-sixth, and his re-election to the Forty-seventh Con-
gress, were only in the natural course of his ascendant fortune. Of
his career in this House, so sadly and so early closed, I will not speak.
That I leave to others. His record is familiar to you all. Is it not
one of promise ?

His memory long will live, alone

In all our hearts, as mournful light
That broods above the fallen sun,

And dwells in heaven half the night.

Of the character of the deceased I propose to offer few words other
than those I have already spoken. His was an open, generous, san-
guine, earnest nature — such an one as "he who runs may read."
Were I fully to express my own admiration for the man, I should be
suspected of intemperate speech. My acquaintance with him began
in the Army, where we were comrades together, and from that time
our friendship was fast. He was instinct with generous and kindly
impulses which endeared him to his friends and bound them to him
in bonds of the strongest affection. Naturally in such a character



LIFE AND CHARACTER OF EVARTS W. FARR. 1 1

there was that which inspired his foes with respect, and however he
might dislike, no man could despise Evarts W. Farr.

Like all of us, the man had his faults; yet he had no prominent
defects, and I never knew a man whose faults counted for less as
against the general strength and purity of his character. I have had
much to say of his earnestness, for this I conceive was the leading
factor of his strength. He was ready to take up any duty that lay
before him, and to attack it with firm and sincere purpose. He fol-
lowed a purpose with his whole soul and did nothing by halves. This
element of his character, together with his versatility, implied large
possibilities. He was a young man, and with length of days must have
accomplished that of which all that he had done was but a hint. On
the whole, his character was solid, well rounded, and symmetrical ; with-
out grotesque or brilliant eccentricities, he was a very positive force.

The immediate cause of his death was a sudden and violent at-
tack of typhoid pneumonia. Overwork had induced extreme debility,
and his system had little power of resistance. His general health
had been blighted in the Army, and his empty sleeve was not the
only sad remembrance, not the only legacy of woe that he brought
back from southern fields. A post-mortem examination disclosed
the presence of chronic disease, which, at best, must ere long have
proved fatal.

In his domestic relations he commanded the strongest affection.
We will not lift the veil from that circle of crushed hearts. There is
that which should be respected. There is a supreme sorrow, as one
day —

There was dole in Astolat.

Major Farr was a great favorite in our State, and his name will be
set among those whom New Hampshire delighted to honor. He
was a most gallant soldier, a promising young statesman, and a noble,
sincere man. We bespeak your respect for his memory as some-
thing we shall proudly and gratefully cherish.



ADDRESS OF MR. ELAND ON THE



^ddress of Mr. Bland, of Missouri.

Mr. Speaker: Death has again visited these gilded walls and
removed from our Chamber one of our most worthy and useful
members. It is not my purpose to give a history of the deceased,
but I shall confine myself to a few outlines that marked his life.
Major Evarts W. Farr was bom at Littleton, New Hampshire,
October 10, 1840. We learn that at the early age of twelve he
struck out for himself, and by industry and hard toil procured the
means for his livelihood and education. He graduated at Thetford
(Vermont) Academy, and entered Dartmouth College with the class
of 1863. But that patriotic ardor and devotion to his country and
to duty that always characterized him caused him to leave college
and volunteer as a soldier in the Union Army. He enlisted in 1861.
For his bravery he was promoted through various grades to the rank
of major. While with Fighting Joe Hooker's brigade he lost his right
arm in the battle of Williamsburgh, in May, 1862. Notwithstanding
the loss of his arm by amputation he continued in the Army, and
served with a major's commission, participating in the battles of
Vicksburgh and Jackson, Mississippi, and various other engagements,
until he was appointed judge-advocate, the duties of which office he
performed with marked distinction. After the war was over he com-
menced the practice of law at his home in New Hampshire. As a
soldier Major Farr was courageous, true to his country, never falter-
ing where duty called. To his soldiers he was kind and considerate,
though exacting in the performance of every command.

Mr. Speaker, it was not rny fortune to know Major Farr person-
ally till I met him in the Committee on Pensions. I shall never



LIFE AND CHARACTER OF EVARTS W. FARR. 1 3

forget the first time I met him in committee-room. The chairman
called over the names of the committee for reports. None were
ready except Major Farr. When his name was called he brought
forward a large list of bills with accompanying papers and his reports.
He began sorting out his reports dexterously with one hand. I then
for the first time noticed he had lost his right arm; but it seemed to
me that this was no embarrassment to him, for he selected his reports
from other papers with as much apparent ease and facility as though
he was using both hands. He read his reports to the committee, and
they were all adopted unanimously.

I was struck with his familiarity with the pension laws, the rulings
of the Pension Department, and the concise manner in which he
stated the laws and the facts bearing on each case. I never knew
one of his reports to be rejected or anywise amended by the commit-
tee. His judgment was clear and logical. He was always careful
of the interests of the public; but, while at all times diligent in pro-
tecting the Government, he never permitted technical questions of
law to weigh against what seemed to him to be an equitable and
meritorious case. His justice was always " tempered with mercy."
At times it was difficult to secure a quorum for business; several
members of the committee were not regular in attendance. Not so
with Major Farr; he was always prompt in attendance, and never
behind with his reports.

From my acquaintance with him I was led to highly respect him
as a man of sterling integrity, of ripe judgment, and great industry.
I think I may truly say his abilities were far beyond the average.
He was serving his first term in Congress, and his modesty, the
insignia of true merit, forbade him entering the arena of every-day
debate and wrangle, a means by which too many endeavor to thrust
themselves in the Record and before the public at the expense of
orderly and intelligent legislation. But he never faltered in the dis-
charge of his duty when he saw it necessary to attack a bad measure



14 ADDRESS OF MR. BLAND ON THE

or sustain a good one. Major Farr was a close attendant upon the
sessions of the House. He was seldom out of his seat. He was
watchful of all the proceedings of legislation. He seemed to com-
prehend instinctively all that was proposed for action, and his judg-
ment as to the right or wrong of a measure was seldom at fault. I
differed with him politically, but I am sure he acted with his party
from as sincere convictions as I did with mine. There was no mem-
ber of the Forty-sixth Congress whom I respected more highly than
him. If I were called upon to give my measure of the man, I should
say that clear judgment, a high sense of honor, an inflexible will were
his peculiar characteristics. He was also a man of generous and
noble impulses.

Mr. Speaker, this occasion brings to us the solemn thought of death,
of the uncertainties of all human aims, and the end of our ambition.
Man, like a shadow, gropes for a while in the gloom of earth and
vanishes. The dark cloud glitters for a moment in the lightning's
glare; the thunderbolt signalizes the approaching storm. The cloud
drenches the earth with torrents that rush headlong down to the
eternal sea. The thunder's roar dies away in soft echoes along the
distant hills. The cloud melts away beneath the effulgence of the
noonday's sun. Thus the whirl of life is spent and passes into eter-
nity. Man may dominate the earth, but it was given to One alone
to conquer death.

We stand here to-day, and the words that fall from our lips are
licked up with the tongue of electric fire and whispered in the ears
of all nations.

We span continents with iron girders and bridge them with the
commerce of the world. We measure the depths of the sea, the
breadth of rivers, and the distances and magnitude of the heavenly
bodies. We predict with mathematical precision the course and
velocity of planets, the visit, exit, and return of comets. Yet, sir,
with all this power over earth and its surroundings we cannot tell the



LIFE AND CHARACTER OF EVARTS W. FARR. 1 5

day nor hour of our existence, for death " cometh as a thief in the

night."

Leaves have their time to fall,
And flowers to wither at the North wind's breath,

And stars to set; but all,
Thou hast all seasons for thine own, O death !

Happy for us we cannot foretell his coming. Our adjournment at
the last session would have been sorrowful indeed had we known
that on our reassembling one seat here would have thus been made
vacant. Our grief was wisely spared us to this last moment. Yet,
when we see a man thus cut down in the prime of life, when the
dreams of his early ambition were being realized, we are tempted to
complain at what would seem to be a harsh visitation of Providence.
But, Mr. Speaker, death waits for no one. The justice and wisdom
of an all-wise God are far beyond human ken. To His will we
meekly bow; to his commiserations and tender mercies we commend
the stricken widow and children of our friend.

Evarts W. Farr is no more. His ■ mortal remains rest beneath
the snow-mantled sod of his native State.

There shall the yew her sable branches spread,
And mournful cypress rear her fringed head ;
From thence shall thyme and myrtle send perfume,
And laurel ever green o'ershade the tomb.

How unspeakably sad it would be to close our tribute to our friend
here. Can we have the heart to consign him to the cold clay of
mother earth, and there leave him as food for the worms? O no!
no! The blessed hope of immortality forbids it.

Let earth dissolve, yon ponderous orb descend
And grind us into dust; the soul is safe;
The man emerges, mounts above the wreck
As towering flame from nature's funeral pyre.



l6 ADDRESS OF MR. BOWMAN ON THE



^DDRESS OF yVlR. BOWMAN, OF MASSACHUSETTS.

Mr. Speaker: It is fitting that we should turn aside for a time
from the business of the session, from our political contests and


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Online Library3d sess. U.S. 46th Cong.Memorial addresses on the life and character of Evarts W. Farr, (a representative from New Hampshire), delivered in the House of representatives and in the Senate, Forty-sixth Congress, third session (Volume 2) → online text (page 1 of 5)