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THE THIRTEENTH BOOK



THE METAMORPHOSES



OV I D.



WORKS EDITED BY CHARLES HALNES KEENE.



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LONDON : MACMILLAN AND CO. ; AND NEW YORK.



THE THIRTEENTH BOOK



THE METAMORPHOSES



OF



OVID

WITH INTRODUCTION AND NOTES



BY

CHARLES HAINES KEENE, M.A. DUBL.

PROFESSOR OF GREEK, QUEEN'S COLLEGE, CORK



FOURTH EDITION



LONDON

GEORGE BELL & SONS, YORK-ST., COVENT GARDEN

CAMBRIDGE : DEIGHTON, BELL, & CO.

1898



DUBLIN :

PRINTED AT THE UNIVERSITY PRESS
BY PONSONBY AND WELDKICK.



PA



I. Iff

CONTENTS



PAGE

[INTRODUCTION 7

TEXT :

CONTEST FOR THE ARMS OF ACHILLES . . 13

5 TRANSFORMATION OF HECUBA INTO A DOG . 28
\\V-~ 1 TRANSFORMATION OF THE ASHES OF MEMNON INTO

BIRDS 35

TRANSFORMATION OF THE DAUGHTERS OF ANIUS

INTO DOVES 36

TRANSFORMATION OF THE ASHES OF THE DAUGH-
TERS OF ORION INTO YOUNG MEN . . 38

TRANSFORMATION OF THE JUDGE, CRAGALEUS,
INTO STONE, AND OF THE SONS OF THE KING

OF THE MOLOSSI INTO BIRDS ... 40

TRANSFORMATION OF ACIS INTO A RIVER-GOD . 40

TRANSFORMATION OF GLAUCUS INTO A SEA-GOD 47

NOTES 51

INDEX 12?



1057651



IN preparing a Second Edition, I have again had
the advantage of PROFESSOR PALMER'S kind assist-
ance. To both him and Mr. L. C. PURSER, Fellow
of Trinity College, who has made numerous cor-
rections and suggestions, I desire to express my
most cordial thanks.

A Table of Contents and an Index have been
added.

DUBLIN, January, 1888.



In the present (the Fourth) Edition, a considerable
amount of new matter has been introduced into the
Notes. This however, by means of some changes in
the arrangement, has been done without increasing
the bulk of the volume.

January, 1898.



INTRODUCTION

PUBLIUS OVIDIUS NASO, born at Sulmo, B.C. 43,
died at Tomi, A.D. 17, was one of the most prolific
poets of his time. His works may be divided into
three periods. In the first he treated of love; in the
second he wrote on Greek mythology and Italian
legends; in the third he laments his sufferings at
Tomi, his place of exile on the Black Sea. The
Metamorphoses belong to the second period ; and,
besides their intrinsic merit, are interesting as being,
perhaps, the most complete system of Classical
Mythology which we possess. The work covers the
period from Chaos, when the earth was without
form and void (rudis indtgestaque moles, i. 7), to the
transformation of Julius Caesar into a star ; and the
several tales of which it is composed are most in-
geniously linked together, so as to form a connected
chronological series. The connexion between the
tales is, however, often exceedingly slight, and in
some cases (e. g. the Contest for the Arms of
Achilles) the episodes can hardly be properly said



8 INTRODUCTION

to describe a transformation. The thread of con-
nexion in the present book is as follows :

The promise made by Ulysses during the contest
for the arms of Achilles leads to an account of that
hero's expedition to Lemnos to fetch Philoctetes
and his bow and arrows. As the Greeks start for
home after the capture of Troy, the grief of the
Trojan matrons, torn from their native land, serves
to introduce the account of the sufferings of Hecuba,
which culminate in her transformation into a dog.
Hecuba's grief for the loss of her children reminds
the poet of another mother, Aurora, who had to
mourn her son, Memnon, slain by the spear of
Achilles. The wanderings of Aeneas after the
destruction of Troy furnish an opportunity for
introducing various legends connected with the
places he visits, the narration of which closes the
thirteenth Book.

The subject-matter of the Metamorphoses had
been treated by Boeos (Botos) in his 'OpvifloAoyia,
and by the Alexandrine poet, Nicander, in his
'ErepoLovfjifva, as well as by Parthenius, Theodorus,
and Antigonus. We learn through Antoninus Libe-



INTRODUCTION 9

ralis that, in part at least, Ovid followed Nicander
in his method of connecting together the several
legends. Ovid made much use of Homer and Euri-
pides (especially the Hecuba and Bacchae), and
probably also of the works of Aemilius Macer and
Hyginus.

It appears from Tristia, 1,7, 13, that the editing
of the Metamorphoses was interrupted by Ovid's
exile, and that he made an unsuccessful attempt to
destroy his work, which had not yet been subjected
to the ultima lima.

The Metamorphoses are in hexameter verse, being
the only work in which Ovid has used that metre,
except his treatise on the fish of the Black Sea,
called Halieutica.

The three following are the principal manuscripts
of the Metamorphoses :

M, in the Library of the Dominicans of St. Mark,
at Florence. End of eleventh century.

L, in the Laurentian Library at Florence. Eleventh
century. The most ancient in Italy.

E, in the Collegium Amplonianum at Erfurt.
Twelfth century.



jo INTRODUCTION

M and L seem to be copied from the same origi-
nal. Merkel considers M the more trustworthy, as
the writer of L seems to have frequently introduced
marginal glosses into the text. E is a carefully
written MS., and free from the bold interpolations
of L. In some instances Merkel prefers it to M.

The text of the present edition is that of Moriz
Haupt, edited by Otto Korn, Berlin, 1881, with the
following points of difference :

Capitals instead of small letters are used at the beginning of
lines and sentences.

Lines 332, 379, 849, omitted by Haupt as spurious, are given
in brackets.

The brackets are removed from the passages 230, 295, 333
(mecumque reducers nitar), 404-407, 409-417, 461, which
are bracketed as doubtful by Haupt ; but the reasons for
regarding the readings with suspicion are given in the
several notes.

Line 51, Merkel' s una is given for ilia: 163, etia omitted :
189, Merkel' s Nunc is given for Hanc: 291, Merkel' s
norit for novit : 423, 549, and 556, Siebelis' Hecabe for
Hecuba: 460 and 461, Merkel'saw^for hand: 589,MerkePs
venio for vent : 693, Merkel' s hac for hanc: 694, Merkel' s
iliac, demisso per inertia vulnere tela for illam demissa per
fortia pectora tela : 884, MerkePs is molis for e saxo :
928, conlecto semine (see note) for conlectos sedula : 967,
Merkel' sfurens for deum.



INTRO D UCT10N i \

I have made use of the following editions :

Moriz Haupt, edited by Otto Kom, Berlin, 1881.

Gierig, edited by Jahn, Leipzig, 1823.

Merkel, Leipzig, 1880.

Siebelis, edited by Polle, Leipzig, 1878.

Zingerle, in the series edited by Kvicala and Schenkl,

Leipzig, 1884.

Bailey's translation of Minellius' edition, London, 1770.
Davidson's edition, London, 1 750.

The references to the Metamorphoses are in Ro-
man numerals, e. g. in note on line 7 the reference
xiv. 467 = Metamorphoses, Book 14, line 467.

My thanks are due to Professor PALMER for
reading a portion of the notes, and making many
valuable suggestions ; also to Professor MAGUIRE
for reading the proofs and suggesting several addi-
tions to the notes.

DUBLIN, September, 1884.




Orba parente suo quicumque volumina tangis,
His saltern vestra detur in urbe locus !

Quoque magis faveas, haec non sunt edita ab ipso,
Sed quasi de domini funere rapta sui.

Quicquid in his igitur vitii rude carmen habebit
Emendaturus, si licuisset, erat.



P. OVIDII NASONIS

METAMORPHOSEON

LIBER TERTIUS DECIMUS



CONTEST between Ajax and Ulysses for the arms of Achilles.
The arms are awarded to Ulysses. Ajax, in a fit of indig-
nation, kills himself, and from his blood springs the hyacinth,
whose leaves are marked with the initials of the hero's name
(AI).

CONSEDERE duces et vulgi stante corona
Surgit ad hos clipei dominus septemplicis Aiax ;
Utque erat inpatiens irae, Sigei'a torvo
Litora respexit classemque in litore vultu,
Intendensque manus ' agimus, pro luppiter ! ' inquit
' Ante rates causam, et mecum confertur Ulixes !
At non Hectoreis dubitavit cedere flammis,
Quas ego sustinui, quas hac a classe fugavi.
Tutius est igitur fictis contendere verbis, 9

Quam pugnaremanu. Sed nee mihi dicere promptum,



Nee facere est isti : quantumque ego Marte feroci

Inque acie valeo, tantum valet iste loquendo.

Nee memoranda tamen vobis mea facta, Pelasgi,

Essereor; vidistis enim. Sua narret Ulixes, 14

Quae sine teste gerit, quorum nox conscia sola est.

Praemia magna peti fateor : sed demit honorem

Aemulus : Aiaci non_.e J sXliiuisse superbum,

Sit licet hoc ingens, quicquid speravit Ulixes.

Iste tulit pretium iam nunc temptaminis huius,

Quo cum victus erit, mecum certasse feretur. 20

Atque ego, si virtus in me dubitabilis esset,

Nobilitate potens essem, Telamone creatus,

Moenia qui forti Troiana sub Hercule cepit,

Litoraque intravit Pagasaea Colcha carina.

Aeacus huic pater est, qui iura silentibus illic 25

Reddit, ubi Aeoliden saxum grave Sisyphon urguet.

Aeacon agnoscit summus prolemque fatetur

luppiter esse suam. Sic ab love tertius Aiax.

Nee tamen haec series in causam prosit, Achivi, w^** ***Y

Si mihi cum magno non est communis Achille. 30

Frater erat ; fraterna peto. Quid sanguine cretus

Sisyphio, furtisque et fraude simillimus illi

Inserit Aeacidis alienae nomina gentis ?

An quod in arma prior nulloque sub indice veni,

Arma neganda mihi ? Potiorque videbitur Hie, 35

Ultima qui cepit, detrectavitque furore

Militiam ficto, donee sollertior isto

Sed sibi inutilior timidi commenta retexit



LIBER XIII. 15

Naupliades animi, vitataque traxit ad arma ?
Optima num sumat, quia sumere noluit ulla ? 40
Nos inhonorati et donis patruelibus orbi,
Obtulimus quia nos ad prima pericula, simus ?
Atque utinam aut verus furor ille, aut creditus esset,
Nee comes hie Phrygias umquam venisset ad arces
Hortator scelerum ! non te, Poeantia proles, 45
Expositum Lemnos nostro cum crimine haberet :
Qui nunc, ut memorant, silvestribus abditus antris
Saxa moves gemitu, Laertiadaeque precaris
Quae meruit, quae, si di sunt, non vana precaris.. t ,
Et nunc ille eadem nobis iuratus in arma, 50

Heu ! pars una ducum, quo successore sagittae
Herculis utuntur, fractus morboque fameque
Velaturque aliturque avibus, volucresque petendo
Debita Troianis exercet spicula fatis.
Ille tamen vivit, quia non comitavit Ulixen. 55

Mallet et infelix Palamedes esse relictus,
(Viveret aut certe letum sine crimine haberet)
Quem male convicti nimium memor iste furoris
Prodere rem Danaam finxit, fictumque probavit
Crimen et ostendit, quod Jam praefoderat, aurum. 60
Ergo aut exilio vires subduxit Achivis,
Aut nece. Sic pugnat, sic est metuendus Ulixes.
Qui licet eloquio fidum quoque Nestora vincat, ^v
Haud tamen efficiet, desertum ut; Nestora crimen \ "
Esse rear nullum : qui cum inploraret Ulixen 65
Vulnere tardus equi fessusque senilibus annis,



1 6 MET A MORPHOSEON

Proditus a socio est. Non haec mihi crimina fingi
Scit bene Tydides, qui nomine saepe vocatum d,^

<6t*LCoiripmt, trepidoque fugam ejpxojjravjj amico. 4

Aspiciunt oculis super! mortalia iustis : 70

En eget auxilio, qui non tulit ; utque reliquit, ((

Sic linquendus erat : legem sibi dixerat ipse.

fa* Conclamat socios. Adsum, videoque trementem^.J^
Pallentemque metu et trepidantem morte future. ^
Opposui molem clipei texique iacentem, 75

Servavique animam minimum est hoc laudis

inertem.

Si perstas certare, locum redeamus in ilium .
Redde hostem vulnusque tuum solitumque timorem,
Post clipeumque late, et mecum contende sub illo.
At postquam eripui, cui standi vulnera vires 80

Non dederant, nullo tardatus vulnere fugit.
Hector adest, secumque deos in proelia ducit :
Quaque ruit, non tu tantum terreris, Ulixe,
Sed fortes etiam : tantum trahit ille timoris. /O^uw^
Hunc ego sanguineae successu caedis ovantem 85
Eminus ingenti resupinum pondere fudi : < i j.
Hunc ego poscentem, cum quo concurreret, uiius
Sustinui : sortemque meam vovistis, Achivi,
Et vestrae valuere preces. Si quaeritis huius
Fortunam pugnae, non sum superatus ab illo. 90
Ecce ferunt Troes ferrumque ignemque lovemque
In Danaas classes. Ubi mine facundus Ulixes ?
Nempe ego mille meo protexi pectore puppes,



LIBER XIII. 17

Spem vestri reditus. Date tot pro navibus arma.
Quod si vera licet mihi dicere, quaeritur istis, 95
Quam mihi, maior honos, coniunctaqiie gloria

nostra est,

Atque Aiax armis, non Aiaci arma petuntur.
Conferat his Ithacus Rhesum inbellemque Dolona
Priamidenque Helenum rapta cum Pallade captum.jir
Luce nihil gestum, nihil est Diomede remote. "loo
Si semel ista datis meritis tarn vilibus arma,
Dividite, et pars sit maior Diomedis in illis.
Quo tamen haec Ithaco ? qui clam, qui semper

inermis

Rem gerit et furtis incautum decipit hostem ? **~* Hl
Ipse nitor galeae claro radiantis ab auro 105

Insidias prodet manifestabitque latentem.
Sed neque Dulichius sub Achillis casside vertex
Pondera tanta feret, nee non onerosa gravisque
Pelias hasta potest inbellibus esse lacertis,
Nee clipeus vasti caelatus imagine mundi no

Conveniet timidae nataeque ad furta sinistrae.
Debilitaturum quid te petis, improbe, munus ?
Quod tibi si populi donaverit error Achivi,
Cur spolieris, erit, non cur metuaris ab hoste,
Et fuga, qua sola cunctos, timidissime, vincis, 115
Tarda futura tibi est gestamina tanta trahenti.
Adde quod iste tuus, tarn raro proelia passus,
Integer est clipeus : nostro, qui tela ferendo
Mille patet plagis, novus est successor habendus.
P



1 8 METAMORPHOSEON

Denique, quid verbis opus est ? spectegm^aggndaJ
Arma viri fortis medios mittantur in hostes : 121
Inde iubete peti et referentem ornate relatis.'
Finierat Telamone satus ; vulgique secutum
Ultima murmur erat : donee Laertius heros
Adstitit, atque oculos paulum tellure moratos 125
Sustulit ad proceres, expectatoque resolvit
Ora sono ; neque abest facundis gratia dictis.
' Si mea cum vestris valuissent vota, Pelasgi,
Non foret ambiguus tanti certaminis heres,
Tuque tuis armis, nos te poteTemu'r', * Achille. 130
Quern quoniam non aequa mihi vobisque negarunt
Fata,' manuque simul veluti lacrimantia tersit
Lumina ' quis magno melius succedat Achilli,
Quam per quern magnus Danais successit Achilles ?
Huic modo ne prosit, quod, uti est, hebes esse
videtur; 135

Neve mihi noceat, quod vobis semper, Achivi,
Profuit ingenium, meaque haec facundia, siqua est,
Qua^e* nunc pro dominoy x pro vbbis saepe locuta est,

ia careay IJonaTh ec sua quisque recuset.

'genus et proavos et quae non fecimus ipsi, 140




ea nostra voco. Sed enim quia rettulit Aiax
Esse lovis pronepos, nostri quoque sanguinis auctor
luppiter^st, totidemque gradus distamus ab illo.
Nam mihi Laertes pater est, Arcesius illi,
luppiter huic, neque in his quisquam damnatus et
exul. 145



LIBER XIII. 19

Est quoque per matrem Cyllenius addita nobis
Altera nobilitas. Deus est in utroque parente.
Sed neque materno quod sum generosior ortu,
Nee mihi quod pater est fraterni sanguinis insons,
Proposita arma peto. Meritis expendite causam. 150
Dummodo quod fratres Telamon Peleusque fuerunt
Aiacis meritum non sit, nee sanguinis ordo,
Sed virtutis honor spoliis quaeratur in istis.
Aut si proximitas primusque requiritur heres,
Est genitor Peleus, est Pyrrhus films illi. 155

Quis locus Aiaci ? Phthiam haec Scyrumve ferantur.
Nee minus est isto Teucer patruelis Achilli.
Num petit ille tamen, num si petat, auferat ilia ?
Ergo operum quoniam nudum certamen habetur, 159
Plura quidem feci, quam quae comprendere dictis
In promptu mihi sit. Rerum tamen ordine ducar.
Praescia venturi genetrix Nere'ia leti
Dissimulat cultu natum. Deceperat omnes,
In quibus Aiacem, sumptae fallacia vestis.
Arma ego femineis animum motura virilem
Mercibus inserui. Neque adhuc proiecerat hei
Virgineos habitus, cum parmam hastamque ter
1 Nate dea,' dixi 'tibi se peritura reservant
Pergama. Quid dubitas ingentem evertere Troiam ?
Iniecique manum, fortemque ad fortia misi. 170

Ergo opera illius mea sunt. Ego Telephon hasta
Pugnantem domui, victum orantemque refeci.
Quod Thebae cecidere, meum est. Me crediteLesbon,

BZ




20 METAMORPHOSEON

Me Tenedon Chrysenque et Cillan, Apollinis urbes,
Et Scyrum cepisse : mea concussa putate 175

Procubuisse solo Lyrnesia moenia dextra.
Utque alios taceam, qui saevum perdere posset
Hectora, nempe dedi : per me iacet inditus Hector.
Illis haec armis, quibus est inventus Achilles,
Arma peto : vivo dederam, post fata reposco. 180
Ut dolor unius Danaos pervenit ad omnes,
Aulidaque Euboicam complerunt mille carinae,
Expectata diu nulla aut contraria classi
Flamina erant, duraeque iubent Agamemnona sortes
Inmeritam saevae natam mactare Dianae. 185

Denegat hoc genitor, divisque irascitur ipsis,
Atque in rege tamen pater est. Ego mite parentis
Ingenium verbis ad publica commoda verti.
Nunc equidem fateor, fassoque ignoscat Atrides :
Difficilem tenui sub iniquo iudice causam. 190

Hunc tamen utilitas populi fraterque datique
Summa movet sceptri, laudem ut cum sanguine penset.
Mittor et ad matrem, quae non hortanda, sed astu
Decipienda fuit. Quo si Telamonius isset,
Orba suis essent etiam nunc lintea ventis. 195

Mittor et Iliacas audax orator ad arces,
Visaque et intrata est altae mihi curia Troiae :
Plenaque adhuc erat ilia viris. Interritus egi
Quam mihi mandarat communem Graecia causam,
Accusoque Parin praedamque Helenamque re-
posco, zoo



LIBER XIII. i\

Et moveo Priamum Priamoque Antenora iunctum. x
At Paris et fratres et qui rapuere sub illo,
Vix tenuere manus scis hoc, Menelae ! nefanda^ :
Primaque lux nostri tecum fuit ilia jjericli. < $*~*^
Longa referre mora est. quae consilioque manuque
Utiliter feci spatiosi tempore belli. -W-M *+&*iha(>
Post acies primas urbis se moenibus hostes
Continuere diu, nee aperti copia Martis
Ulla fuit : decimo demuin pugnavimus anno.
Quid facis interea, qui nil, nisi proelia, nosti ? 210
Quis tuus usus erat ? nam si mea facta requiris,
Hostibus insidior, fossas munimine cingo,
Consolor socios, ut longi taedia belli
Mente ferant placida : doceo, QUO simuij alendi
Armandique inodo ; mittor, quo postulat usus. 215
Ecce lovis monitu, deceptus imagine somni,
/Rex iubet incepti curam dimittere belli.
Ille potest auctore guana defendere vocem. /~*f v<n
Non sinat hoc Aiax, delendaque Pergama poscat, 219
Quodque potest, pugnet. Cur non remoratur ituros?
Cur non arrna capit, dat, quod vaga turba sequatur ':
Non erat hoc nimium numquana nisi magna loquenti.
Quid quod et ipse fugit? vidi, puduitque videre,
Cum tu terga dares inhonestaque vela parares.
Nee mora, 'quid facitis? quae vos dementia' dixi
'Concitat, o socii, captain dimittere Troiam? 226
Quidve domum fertis decimo, nisi dedecus, anno?'
Talibus atque aliis, in quae dolor ipse disertum



22 METAMORPHOSEON

Fecerat, aversos profuga de classe reduxi.
Convocat Atrides socios terrore paventes : 230

Nee Telamoniades etiam nunc hiscere quicquam :&
Audet. At ausus erat reges incessere dictis
Thersites, etiam per me baud impune, pjotervis.
Erigcir, et trepidos cives exhortor in hostem,
Amissamque mea virtutem voce repono. 235

Tempore ab hoc, quodcumque potest fecisse videri
Fortiter iste, meum est, qui dantem terga retraxi.
Denique de Danais quis te laudatve petitve ?
At sua Tydides mecum communicat acta,
Me probat et socip semper confidit Ulixe. 240

Est aliquid, de tot Graiorum milibus unum
A Diomede legi : nee me sors ire iubebat.
Sum tamen et spreto noctisque hostisque periclo
Ausus et ausum eadem, Phrygia de gente Dolona
Interimo : non ante tamen, quam cuncta coegi 245
Prodere, et edidici, quid perfida Troia pararet.
Omnia cognoram, nee, quod specularer, habebam,
Et iam promissa poteram cum laude reverti.
Hand contentus eo petii tentoria Rhesi,
Inque suis ipsum castris comitesque peremi;-*-' 250
Atque ita captivo victor votisque potitus
Ingredior curru laetos imitante triumphos.
Cuius equos pretium pro nocte poposcerat hostis,
Arma negate mihi, fueritque benignior Aiax ! KWAA^
Quid Lycii referam Sarpedonis agmina ferro 255
Devastata meo ? cum multo sanguine fudi



LIBER XIII. 23

Coeranon Iphitiden et Alastoraque Chromiumque
Alcandrumque Haliumque Noemonaque Prytanimque,
Exitioque dedi cum Chersidamante Thoona 259
Et Charopem, fatisque inmitibus Ennomon actum,
Quique minus celebres nostra sub moenibus urbis
Procubuere manu. Sunt et mihi vulnera, cives,
Ipso pulchra loco : nee vanis credite verbis :
Aspicite en!' vestemque manu diduxit et ' haec sunt
Pectora semper' ait 'vestris exercita rebus. 265

At nil inpendit per tot Telamonius annos

r> Sangninis in socios, et habet sine vulnere corpus.
Quid tamen hoc fefert, si se pro classe Pelasga
Anna tulissejrefert contra Troasque lovemque ?

_ Confiteorque, tulit : neque enim benefacta maligne &T
Detractare meum est. Sed ne communia solus 271
Occupet, atque aliquem vobis quoque reddat hono-

rem.

Reppulit Actorides subjmagiae, tutus Achillis <
Troas ab arsuris cum defensore carinis. J^
Ausum etiam Hectoreis solum concurrere telis 275
Se putat, oblitus regisque ducumque meique,
Nonus in officio, et praelatus munere sortis.
Sed tamen eventus vestrae, fortissime, pugnae
Quis fuit? Hector abit violatus vulnere nullo.
Me miserum, quanto cogor meminisse dolore 280
Temporis illius, quo Graium murus, Achilles
Procubuit! nee me lacrimae luctusve timorve
Tardarunt, quin corpus hunio sublime referrem.



24 METAMORPHOSEON

His umeris, his, inquam, umeris ego corpus Achillis,
Et simul arma tuli : quae nunc quoque ferre

laboro. 285

Sunt mihi, quae valeant in talia pondera, vires,
Est animus certe vestros sensurus honores.
Scilicet idcirco pro nato caerula mater
Ambitiosa suo fuit, ut caelestia dona,
Artis opus tantae, rudis et sine pectore miles 290
Indueret? neque enim clipei caelamina norit,
Oceanum et terras cumque alto sidera caelo,
Plei'adasque Hyadasque inmunemque aequoris

Arcton

Diversasque urbes nitidumque Orionis ensem.
Postulat, ut capiat, quae non intellegit, arma. 295
Quid quod me duri fugientem munera belli
Arguit incepto serum accessisse labori,
Nee se magnanimo maledicere sentit Achilli?

/CT". , . . j r ,

Si simulasse vocas cnmen, simulavimus ambo.
Si mora pro culpa est, ego sum maturior illo. 300
Me pia detinuit coniunx, pia mater Achillem ;
Primaque sunt illis data tempora, cetera vobis.
Haud timeo, si iam nequeam defendere, crimen
Cum tanto commune viro. Deprensus Ulixis
Ingenio tamen ille : at non Aiacis Ulixes. 305

Neve in me stolidae convicia fundere linguae
Admiremur eum, vobis quoque digna pudore
Obicit. An falso Palameden crimine turpe
Accusasse mihi, vobis damnasse decorum est ?



LIBER XIII. 25

Sed neque Naupliades facinus defendere tantum 310
Tamque patens valuit, nee vos audistis in illo
Crimina : vidistis, praestoque obiecta patebant.
Nee Poeantiaden quod habet Vulcania Lemnos,
Esse reus merui. Factum defendite vestrum ;
Consensistis enim. Nee me suasisse negabo, 315
Ut se subtraheret bellique viaeque labori,
Temptaretque feros requie finire dolores.
Paruit, et vivit. Non haec sententia tantum
Fida, sed et felix ; cum sit satis, esse fidelem.
Quern quoniam vates delenda ad Pergama poscunt,
Ne mandate mihi : melius Telamonius ibit, 3zi

Eloquioque virum morbis iraque furentem
Molliet, aut aliqua producet callidus arte.
Ante retro Simois fluet et sine frondibus Ide
Stabit, et auxilium promittet Achaia Troiae, 325
Quam, cessante meo pro vestris pectore rebus,
Aiacis stolidi Danais sollertia prosit. -: ' .
Sis licet Infers sor.iis regique mihique, .

Dure Philoctete ; licet exsecrerg, meumque ^ '"
Devoveas sine fine caput, cupiasque dolenti 330


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Online Library43 B.C.-17 or 18 A.D OvidThe thirteenth book of the Metamorphoses → online text (page 1 of 11)