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83rd (1861-1864) United States. Army. New York Infantry Regiment.

History of the Ninth Regiment N.Y.S.M. -- N.G.S.N.Y. (Eighty-third N. Y. Volunteers.) 1845-1888 online

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HISTORY



OF THE



NINTH REGIMENT



N. Y. S. M. - - - N. G. S. N. Y.
(EIGHTY-THIRD N. v. VOLUNTEERS.)

1845-1888.



W

a




HISTORIAN

GEORGE A. H U S S E Y.

EDITOR

W I L L I A M T ODD.



PUBLISHED UNDER THE AUSPICES OF

VETERANS OE THE REGIMENT.
NEW YORK.

1889.



COPYRIGHT, 1889, BY
VETERANS OF THE NINTH REGIMENT,

N. G. S. N. Y.

(All Rights Reserved. )



/: : /. * /)

. :^ ..//.../






fRESS OF J. S. OGILVIE,

57 ROSE STREET,

NEW YORK.



DEDICATION.



MEMORY OF THE MEMBERS

OF THE

NINTH REGIMENT, N. Y. S. M.

(EI3HTY -THIRD NEW \ORK VOLUNTEERS.)

AND N. G. S. N . Y.

WHO HAVING SERVED THEIR COUNTRY FAITHFULLY , IN WAR AND IN PEACE,
LAID DOWN THKIR LIVES IN HONOR,

THIS VOLUME IS FRATERNALLY DEDICATED.



" Oh ! if there is upon this terrestrial sphere
A boon, an offering, which Heaven holds dear,
Tis the last libation liberty draws
From a heart that bleeds and dies in its cause."

THOMAS MOORE.



PREFACE.



The Committee having in charge the Publication of the History of
the NINTH Regiment, in order to prepare the work for the press, secured
the services of William Todd, Esq., of Albany, N. V., author of the His
tory cf the Seventy-ninth (Highlanders), N. Y-. S. M., and X. V. Vols.,and
of which regiment he was a member.

Great care has been exercised in preparing the manuscript, and
while there are, doubtless, a few errors, an earnest endeavor has IHTII
made to give the ex-members, members of the regiment, and the public,
the best and most authentic history possible to present for their
consideration.

The Committee are indebted for information and access to records,
to the friends, members and ex-members of the regiment, to whom they
extend hearty thanks.

BENJ. F. BOWXK. GEO. I. BUXTON.

JOSEPH T. HAI.LOCK. THOS. L. HANNA.

JOHN T. LOCK.MAN. JOHN T. PKVER.

WALTER SCOTT. EDWARD SHANLY.

RALPH SHORROCK. THOS. W. THORNE.

WILLIAM SCOTT, GEORGE A. HUSSEY,



ry.



Chairman.



NOTE BY THE EDITOR.



The Historical Committee having engaged the services of the under
signed, to prepare for publication a History of the NINTH Regiment
from data furnished by the historian, Captain George A. Husscy he
entered upon the duty with misgivings as to his ability to satisfactorily
perform the task. Fortunately, the material furnished was, in the main,
so concise, that as the work progressed, he gathered courage to complete
the pleasing undertaking.

For the purpose of a more intelligent understanding of the part
taken by the regiment during its service in the War of the Rebellion, as
well as in t mes of peace, the best authorities have been consulted
Government Records, Histories of Campaigns and Regiments, and

Monographs on special topics.

WILLIAM TODD."

ALBANY, Janv.iiry i, 1889.



CONTENTS



PAGE

ENGAGEMENTS OF THE REGIMENT xiii

ENGAGEMENTS OF COMPANY K xiv

STATIONS OF THE REGIMENT xv

RECAPITULATION OF THE MEMHERSMIP xvi

ILLUSTRATIONS xvii

CHAPTER I.

First Records Extant. Disbandments and Re-organizations. Colo
nel Van Beuren I

CHAPTER II.

Rebellion. Secession. Firing on Fort Sumter. Volunteering for

the War 20

CHAPTER III.

Muster-in at Washington. Under General Stone. " Baptism by

Fire," at Harper s Ferry 3 6

CHAPTER IV.

Under General Patterson. First Valley Campaign. To Winter

Quarters, 1861-2 5&

CHAPTER V.

Camp Claassen, near Frederick, Md 86

CHAPTER VI.

Under General Banks. Into the Shenandoah Valley and out again. 104

CHAPTER VII.
Under General McDowell. Much Marching. . ... 126

[ix]



X CONTEXTS.

CHAPTER VIII.

PAGE

Warrenton, Va. Under General Pope. Battle of Cedar Mountain . . 142

CHAPTER IX.

Battles of the Rappahannock, Thoroughfare Gap, Second Bull Run

and Chantilly 163

CHAPTER X.

Under General McClellan. The Maryland Campaign. Battles of

South Mountain and Antietam. Reports, etc 181

CHAPTER XI.

After Antietam. Under General Burnside 201

CHAPTER XII.
Battle of Fredericksburg. Reports, etc 218

CHAPTER XIII.

Under General Hooker. Winter Quarters, 1862-3. The Chancellors-

ville Campaign 233

CHAPTER XIV.
The Gettysburg Campaign. Under General Meade 251

CHAPTER XV.
Three Days Battle of Gettysburg. Pickett s Charge. Reports, etc. 268

CHAPTER XVI.
Tne Mine Run Campaign. Winter Quarters, 1863-4 289

CHAPTER XVII.

Under General Grant. The Wilderness Campaign. Battle of May

6. Colonel Moesch killed 312

CHAPTER XVIII.

Battles of Laurel Hill, Spottsylvania and Cold Harbor. Record of
the Killed in the Campaign, from May 6th to June 4th. Close
of Three Years Service 3 2 9



CONTENTS. XI



CHAPTER XIX.

PAGB

The Regiment Returns Home. Record of Battles and Lossc.-,

Therein. Promoted to Commissioned Office From 352



CHAPTER XX.

The War Ended. Correspondence between Generals Grant and Lee.

Record of the Dead in National Cemeteries. Army Songs. .. 376



CHAPTER XXI.

Official Register of Officers and enlisted men, showing the service of

all who were honorably discharged 400



CHAPTER XXII.

Reorganization of the Regiment, 1864. Colonel Wilcox. Visit to

Stamford, Conn., 1 869 502



CHAPTER XXIII.

Colonel Fisk, Jr. Encampment at Long Branch, N. J., 1870 520

CHAPTER XXIV.

Excursion to Boston and Charlestown, Mass., 1871 532

CHAPTER XXV.

Orange Riot. Reception of the Grand Duke Alexis, 1871 546

CHAPTER XXVI.

Death of Colonel Fisk. Interment of General Anderson, 1872 561

CHAPTER XXVII.

Colonel Braine. Armory Completed, 1873. Colonel Hitchcock.-

Centennial Celebration, July 3-4, 1876 574

CHAPTER XXVIII.
Labor Strikes. The West Albany Campaign 59



Xll CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XXIX.

PAGE

Death of Colonel Hitchcock, 1878. Colonel Ryder, 1879. The Regi-
ment revisits Washington, 1881. Colonel William Sevvard, Jr., in
Command, 1882. A State Camp Established, 1883 604

CHAPTER XXX..

Death of General Grant, 1885. Death of General Hancock. The
Twenty-fifth Anniversary. Veterans Pilgrimage to the Battle
fields, 1886 6: j

CHAPTER XXXI.

In Camp at Peekskill. Recovery of the Remains of Colonel Moesch,

1887 646

CHAPTER XXXII.

Reception of the Richmond Grays, 1888. . 657

CHAPTER XXXIII.

Veterans revisit Gettysburg. Regiment escorts Society of the Army

of the Potomac, 1888 665

CHAPTER XXXIV.

Dedication of the NINTH S Monument at Gettysburg, 1888 674

CHAPTER XXXV.

Reunion of the Blue and the Gray, 1888 688

REGISTER OF THE COMMISSIONED OFFICERS FROM 1859-1888 713

INDEX 721



LIST OF PRINCIPAL ENGAGEMENTS.



1861. July 4.

1862. August 9.
1862. August 20-23.
1862. August 28.
1862. August 30.
1862. September i.
1862. September 14.
1862. September 17.

1862. December 11-13.

1863. April 29-30.
1863. May 1-4.
1863. July 1-4.

1863. November 28.

1864. May 5-7.
1864. May 8.
1864. May 9-21.
1864. May 23-27.
1864. June 1-3.



Sandy Hook, opposite Harper s

Ferry, Maryland.

Cedar Mountain, Virginia.

Rappahannock Station, Virginia.

Thoroughfare Gap, Virginia.

Second Bull Run, Virginia.

Chantilly, Virginia.

South Mountain, Maryland.

Antietam, Maryland.

Fredericksburg, Virginia.

Fitz Hugh s Crossing, Virginia.

Chancellorsville, Virginia.

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania.

Mine Run, Virginia.

Wilderness, Virginia.

Laurel Hill, Virginia.

Spottsylvania, Virginia.

North Anna (Totopotomoy), Virginia.
Cold Harbor (Bethesda Church), Virginia.



* + * For losses in engagements, see page 359.



ENGAGEMENTS

IN WHICH

COMPANY K (SIXTH NEW YORK INDEPENDENT BATTERY) TOOK

AN ACTIVE PART, EITHER BY SECTION OR AS A \VHOLE,

UNTIL THE TIME OF MUSTER OUT OF THE

UNITED STATES SERVICE OF THE

NINTH REGIMENT.



1861.
Bolivar Heights, Va., Oct. 16. Balls Bluff. Va., Oct. 21.

1862.

Williamsburgh, Va., May 5. Seven Days Battles, Va., June 25-July i.

Malvern Hill, Va., Aug. 5.

1863.

Kelly s Ford, Va., March 17. Chancellorsville, Va., May 2.

Brandy Station, Va., June 9. Gettysburg, Pa., Julv 3.

Shepherdstown, W. Va., July 16. Sulphur Springs, Va., Oct. 12.
Auburn, Va., Oct. 14, St. Stephens Church, Va., Oct. 14.

Bristoe Station, Va., Oct. 14. New Hope Church, Va., Nov. 27.

Parker s Store, Va., Nov. 29. Culpeper Ford, Va., Dec. i.

1864.

Brock Road, Va., May 6. Todd s Tavern, Va., May 7-8.

Island Ford, Va., May 10. Beaver Dam, Va., May 10.

Ashland, Va., May n. Glen Allen, Va., May n.

Richmond Hill, Va., May 12. Ennons Chapel, Va., May 28.



STATIONS OF THE REGIMENT.



June, 1861, Brigade of General Stone.

July and / Division of General Banks, Department of the

August, 1 86 1, )" Shenandoah.

September, 1861, )

to ,- 2nd Brigade, Banks Division, Army of the Potomac.

February, 1862, \

March, 1862 - 2nc * Brigade, ist Division, 5th Corps, Army of the
\ Potomac.

April iS6-> / Abercrombie s Brigade, Department of the Shenan-
\ doah.

.-lay and / 3d Brigade, 2nd Division, Department of the

june, 1862, \" Rappahannock.

July and } 3d Brigade, 2nd Division, 3^! Corps, Army of

August, 1862, i" Virginia.

September, 1862, )

to r^ 3d Brigade, 2nd Division, ist Corps, Army of the

May, 1863, ) Potcmac.

r 2nd Brigade, 2nd Division, ist Corps, Army of the

February, 1864, i Potomac.

March, 1864, )

to f me. Brigade, 2nd Division, 5th Corps, Army of the

June, 1864, ) Potomac.



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ILLUSTRATIONS.



T. New York State Flag. Frontispiece i

2. Colonel Stiles, 1861-3. Portrait 28

3. Model Camp, Rockville, Md 48

4. Harper s Ferry, Va. Battlefield Map 54

5. Camp Claassen, Frederick, Md 86

6. Bull Run, 1862. Battlefield Map 172

7. South Mountain, Md. Battlefield Map :88

8. Antietam, Md. Battlefield Map ] 94

9. Fredericksburg, Va. Battlefield Map 224

10. Colonel Hendrickson, 1863. Portrait 256

11. Gettysburg, Pa. Battlefield Map, No. i 270

1 2. Gettysburg, Pa. Battlefield Map, No. 2 278

13. Colonel Moesch, 1863-4. Portrait 280

14. Chancellorsville, Wilderness, Laurel

15. Hill and Spottsylvania, Va. Battlefields Map 326

16. Seat of War in Pa., Md. and Va. Map No. i 350

1 7. Seat of W 7 ar in Virginia. Map No. 2 350

1 8. Colonel Davis, 1863-4. Portrait 504

19. Colonel Wilcox, 1864-9. Portrait 506

20. Colonel Fisk, 1870-2. Portrait 520

21. Colonel Braine, 1872-5. Portrait 57 2

22. Colonel Hitchcock, 1875-8. Portrait 580

23 Colonel Ryder, 1879-82. Portrait 606

24. Colonel Seward, 1 882. Portrait 616

25. Monument at Gettysburg. Pa 684



THE NINTH NEW YORK-



CHAPTER i.

FIRST RECORDS EXTANT,
181418451860.



The Oldest Survivor, General Samuel I. Hunt. The New York State Militia. Regis
ter of Officers of the NINTH in 1845. Disbanded in 1850. Formation of the Irish
NINTH. Celebrating St. Patrick s Day. The Wheel within a Wheel Disbanded
Again. The Fifty-fifth N. Y. S. M. Re-organization. General Orders. Cap
tain Mansfield Lovell. Register of Officers, June 25, 1859. Washington s Birth
day, 1860. Surgeons and Chaplains in the Militia. Reception of the Japanese
Embassy. Fourth of July. Reception of Ellsworth s Chicago Cadets and the
Savannah Republican Blues. The NINTH would visit Great Britain. Company
A s Reception. Visit of the Prince of Wales. Company C s Target Practice
with Sea-coast Guns.

TN December, 1887, there appeared in the columns of the
New York Tribune, a sketch of the life of General Samuel
I. Hunt, who had died on Sunday, the 4th of the month, in the
ninety-fifth year of his age. In the account it is stated that
"Mr. Hunt enlisted as a private in August, 1814, in the old
NIXTII Regiment, served as Sergeant, Lieutenant, and in
other positions until 1824, when he was elected Colonel. He
resigned in 1828." Colonel Hunt was made a Brigadier-Gen-

o o

eral in 1834. General Hunt was certainly the oldest survivor
of the NINTH Regiment of that period.



2 THE NINTH NEW YORK. 1845

During the early history of the New York State Militia,
the State was divided into about two hundred and sixty-nine
regimental districts, in each of which the arms-bearing popu
lation was enrolled in regiments designated by the number of
the district. In only a few of the districts, however, were the
members uniformed or armed.

But little knowledge respecting the early history of the
original NINTH Regiment can be obtained, except possibly by
delving into old musty records, some dating back of 1812.
This is believed not to be now necessary, or desired. In
1845, the Seventeenth Ward of New York City constituted
the NINTH regimental district. The Military and Naval
Chronicle, of August gth, of that year, gives the following reg
ister of the commissioned officers of the regiment at that

time :

Field and Staff.

Colonel, James Langdon Curtis ; Lieutenant-Colonel,
EBenezer Jessup, Jr.; Major, Thomas Walden ; Adjutant,
William H. Disbrow ; Quartermaster, Edward T. Northam ;
Paymaster, Daniel H. Burnett ; Chaplain, Erasmus D. Foote ;.

Surgeon, .

Company A.

Captain, John C. Helme ; First Lieutenant, Richard H.
Thompson ; Second Lieutenant, Abram J. Post.

Company B.

Captain, George A. Trowbridge ; First Lieutenant, Stephen
H. Cornell ; Second Lieutenant, C. W. Atwood.

Company C.

Captain, ; First Lieutenant, Philip E. Walden ;
Second Lieutenant, - .

Company D.

Captain, Sidney C. Sloane ; First Lieutenant, ;
Second Lieutenant, Robert Cottier.

Company E.

Captain, Amos S. Chamberlain ; First Lieutenant. M. R.
Pittman ; Second Lieutenant, Moses E. Crasto.



FIRST DISBANDMENT. 3

Company F.

Captain, John N. Hay ward ; First Lieutenant, John I.
Ireland ; Second Lieutenant, E. T. Butterwinkle.

Company G.

Captain, David Sherwood; First Lieutenant, Jacob L.
Seabing ; Second Lieutenant, Andrew P. Van Tuyle.

Company H.

Captain, Francis Tillon ; First Lieutenant, - ; Second
Lieutenant, Henry II Melville.

Company I (Lancers).

Captain, Bernard Hannigan ; First Lieutenant, Phillip
McArdle ; Second Lieutenant, Patrick Kelley ; Third Lieu
tenant, Albert H. Nicolay.

On May 6th, 1847, by an act of the Legislature, the First
Division, N. Y. S. M., was organized.

On the 2;th of May, 1850, by orders from the Adjutant-
General s office, the regiment was disbanded ; and Companies
B, E and F, by orders No. 3, from Brig.-Gen. William Hall,
were transferred to the 8th Regiment, N. Y S. M.

From a sketch of the life of Captain Michael Phelan, writ
ten by Mr. Michael Cavanagh, and published in the Celtic
Magazine, June, 1882, we cull the following facts respectino-
-a re organization of the NINTH Regiment :

In 1848, immediately after the receipt of the news of a
revolution in France, a meeting of expatriated Irishmen was
held at the Shakespeare hotel in the city of New York, to dis
cuss the situation in Ireland, and endeavor to decide upon the
best means for accomplishing the freedom of that unhappy
land. Many eloquent speeches were made, notable among
which was one by Michael T. O Connor, who, upon conclud
ing, was asked by Michael Phelan the pertinent question :
" Can you fight as well as you have spoken ?"

Upon it being announced that a brigade was to be. formed
under the title of " Irish Republican Union," Mr. O Connor
heartily approved the movement and headed the roll with his



4 THE NINTH NEW YORK. 1850

signature. Mr. Phelan was next, and among others were John
G. Fay and James F. Markey.

To the latter belongs the credit of having organized the
first company, which was called the " Mitchell Guard," recruited
almost entirely from dealers in Washington Market. When
in 1850 this company was enrolled in the State Militia it was
known as Company C, NINTH Regiment.

The summer of 1848 was a busy one to those interested in
this movement. At a meeting held on August i4th., and

*n t_> i

which was attended by Archbishop Hughes, that distinguished
prelate gave in his adhesion, and supplemented his eloquent
address on the subject of Human Freedom, by a subscription
of five hundred dollars.

The " Irish Republican Union " had maintained its distinct
ive character for over a year, when, for obvious reasons, it was
deemed advisable by its founders, and such other prominent
Irish refugees as had meanwhile arrived in New York, to have
the organization incorporated as a part of the New York State
Militia, and towards the close of 1849, the brigade was divided
into companies and officered in accordance with the militia
laws. Each company of this incipient " Army of Liberation "
adopted as a special designation, the name of some distin
guished Irishman. The one with which Mr. Phelan connected
himself, and of which he was chosen captain in November, was
called " Guyon Guards." Mr. Thomas Murphy was elected
Orderly Sergeant.

On May 29th, 1850, the members were mustered into the
service of the State of New York as the NINTH Regiment,
N. Y. S. M. Colonel James Heuston and Messrs. John
Savage, Michael Doheny, Thomas Devin Reilly, and Joseph
Brenan, refugees of 48, also joined the organization.

On March i 7th, 1851, the NINTH Regiment celebrated the
birthday of Ireland s Patron Saint by a parade in New York
and Brooklyn. The day was the most inclement " Patrick s
Day" in the memory of old New Yorkers; rain and sleet
poured down without intermission, and caused some of the
officers to remonstrate with Captain Phelan who was in com-



l8 55 THE S. K S. r

mand against the parade taking place; the Captain, with his
accustomed decision replied : " I have paid the band, and will
follow it, if necessary, alone !" Thus was inaugurated the
military celebration of St. Patrick s Day on the American
Continent.

From what has been said respecting the personnel of the
NINTH Regiment, it will be seen that the elements which gave
life and soul to the organization, was composed of those who
sympathized with the condition of Ireland, and who hoped to
be able, soon, to render signal service to their native country.
These men had also formed themselves into a secret oro-aniza-

^

tion, known as the " S. F. s," each member being pledged to aid
personally in revolutionizing Ireland. Captain Phelan held
the position of communicating officer, as well as the open
command of Company D, and continued to exercise the duties
devolving upon him in this dual capacity once visiting Ire
land until November 22nd, 1854, when he resigned his com
mission in the State Militia.

Sergeant Murphy, by unanimous vote of the company,
succeeded to the command.

On February 22nd, 1855, the corporation of the city pre
sented the regiment with a set of colors. On May i8th, 1866,
ex-Captain Phelan addressed a letter to the editors of the
Irisli People, from which additional light is gained as to the
status of the regiment durincr the fifties.

o o

Upon the surface, the regiment to which I was attached was the NINTH New
York State Militia simply. A few of the members were nothing else, but the bulk
were Irish rebels in disguise. The wheel within a wheel was the order of the S. F. s.
* * * As a rule those who held the highest positions in the NINTH Militia were not
prominent officers of the S. F s for instance, our Colonel, an American, and a most
worthy gentleman, was not aware of the double character of the organization he had
the honor to command while many privates in the regiment were officers in high
rank among the S. F s. * * * Unfortunately, the growing numbers anil increasing
power of the S. F s attracted the attention of men whose trade was politics, and whose
principles were far from being of the best. * * * At the eleventh hour they wormed
themselves into the organization, with the view of making the credulity of their coun
trymen a stepping-stone whereby, at the worst, they might ascend to local offices o f
trust and power. * * * As a consequence, a powerful and promising organization
was stripped of its boasted unity of action, if not of purpose.



6 THE NINTH NEW YORK. 1858

As for that part of the S. F. s still remaining in 1858, they,
with the other members of the regiment, were transferred,
mostly, to the Sixty-ninth, by special orders No. 41, A. G.
O., dated May 30.

At the time of disbandment the register of the officers was

O

as follows :

Colonel, Lucius Pitkin ; Lieut.-Col., Daniel Kelley ; Major,
Richard Barry.

Company A.

Captain, vacant; First Lieut, vacant ; Second Lieut.,
vacant.

Company B.

Captain, Charles McGuire; First Lieut., Patrick Holden ;
Second Lieut., Bernard Fox.

Company C.

Captain, Edward Kernes ; First Lieut., James Cassidy ;
Second Lieut., Cornelius Dora.

<s

Company D.

Captain, Thomas Murphy ; First Lieut., Lawrence Glynne ;
Second Lieut., vacant.

Company E.

Captain, James Galligher ; First Lieut., Samuel Frazer ;
Second Lieut, Peter Flynne.

Company F.

Captain, William O. Murphy; First Lieut., vacant ; Second
Lieut., vacant.

Company G.

Captain, vacant ; First Lieut., John Conroy ; Second Lieut. ;
vacant.

Company H.

Captain, Robert Coddington ; First Lieut, vacant; Second
Lieut, vacant.

Company I.

Captain, James Murphy; First Lieut., Augustus P. Greene;
Second Lieut., Cornelius Horrigan.



1859 THE PRESENT NINTH ORGANIZED. /

Company A.

Captain, Felix Duffy ; F~irst Lieut., Terrence Duffy ;



Online Library83rd (1861-1864) United States. Army. New York Infantry RegimentHistory of the Ninth Regiment N.Y.S.M. -- N.G.S.N.Y. (Eighty-third N. Y. Volunteers.) 1845-1888 → online text (page 1 of 67)