A. C. (Augustus Charles) Thompson.

Eliot memorial : sketches historical and biographical of the Eliot Church and Society, Boston online

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THE NEW Y

PUBLIC LIBR.

ASTOR, LENOX '
TILOEN FOUNP' ^



lEUot flpcmortal

SKETCHES

HISTORICAL AND BIOGRAPHICAL

OF THE

ELIOT CHURCH AND SOCIETY
BOSTON

BY

A. C. THOMPSON



BOSTON

Ube ipilarim press

CHICAGO



1 : ^

THE^iEWYORK

PUBLIC LIBRARY



Copyright, 1900,

RY

A. C. Thompson



Electrotyped by Thomas Todd.

14 Beacon Street,

Boston.



PREFACE.



THE origin of this volume was as follows : —
The four Deacons of the Eliot Church — Messrs. Timothy
Smith, Alpine McLean, Frederick C. Russell, and Clarence T.
Mooar — communicated a joint and earnest written request that I
should prepare such a work. They stated that my long connection
with the Church had made me acquainted with many members now
deceased, and with many facts in our collective life known to no
one else now living. Emphasis was given to a suggestion that there
should be special freedom in recording items of autobiography.
The introduction of matters personal to the writer has accordingly
been employed much more amply than might otherwise have seemed
consistent with modesty. Without such freedom there would have
been constraint and awkwardness in an endeavor not to appear
egotistic.

The volume is an unpretentious contribution to local history, a
response to the reasonable desire of friends for some acquaintance
with a limited period not long ago, and with individuals whose names
and but little more are familiar to them. After the preliminary
chapters there follows a simple record, for the most part, of occur-
rences between the years 1834 and 1871. Much greater fullness per-
tains naturally to the period of my active pastorate, from 1842 to
1871. At the last mentioned date Rev. B. F. Hamilton, d.d., be-
came a valued colleague. Memoranda, regularly made at the time,
aid these reminiscences.

The book comes from the press on the eighty-eighth anniversary
of my birth, and in the fifty-eighth year of my connection with the
Eliot Church.

A. C. Thompson.

Boston, April jo, igoo.



CONTENTS.



PAGE



HISTORICAL SKETCHES,

I. RoxBURY — Early and Later

II. Local Orthodoxy and Liberalism 14-26

III. Preliminaries and Organization 27-33

IV. First Pastoral Settlement 34-36

37-42

43-49



V. Second Settlement
VL The Pulpit . . .



VII. Pastoral Service

1 Parish Calls

2 Extra-Parochial Service .

3 Deaths and Funerals .



50-60
60-65
66-74



50

4 Marriages 74-77

5 Contrasts and Coincidences . 78-86

6 Peculiar Persons and Proceedings, 86-95



VIII. Church Functions . . .

1 Sacramental Services . . . 96-100

2 Church Prayer Meeting . . 100-108

3 Special Church Fellowship . 108-110



96

4 Church Discipline .... 110-113

5 Revivals 113-120



IX. Eliot Sunday School , 121-



X. Various Devotional Meetings

1 Maternal Meeting .... 132-136 I 3 Other Prayer Meetings

2 Female Prayer Meeting . . 136-137 I



137-



131

132
139



XI. Various Associations . .
I Dorcas Society 140-141



I 2 Eliot City Mission .



141-



XII. Special Occasions and Occurrences



1 Social Gatherings .... 1 49-1 51

2 Anniversaries 151-153

3 Receptions ^ 53-157



4 Civil-War Time 157.

5 Sickness and Absences . . 163-



XIII. Colonial Churches . .

1 Vine Street Church . . . 170-172

2 Highland Church .... 173-175



3 Walnut Avenue Church



175-18



140
148

149
■163
-169



170
181



XIV. Fellowship — Ecclesiastical and Ministerial

V



i8z



VI



CONTENTS.



BIOGRAPHICAL
XV The Diaconate

1 Alvah Kittredge . . . 195-197

2 William G. Lambert . . . 198-199

3 Henry Hill 199-202

4 William W. Davenport . . 202-206

5 Andrew S. March .... 206-208

6 Edward B. Huntington . . 20S-210

XVI. Ministerial Parishioners

1 Rev. Stephen Sanford Smith, 224-225

2 Rev. Huntington Porter . . 225-226

3 Rev. Ezra Conant .... 226

4 Rev. Charles Baker Kittredge, 226-228

5 Rev. William Henry Porter . 229

XVII. Missionary Officials . .

1 Rev. Rufus Anderson, D.D.,LL.D.,

239-242

2 Rev. David Greene . . . 242-245

3 Miss Mary Evarts Greene . 245-247

4 Mrs. Mary P. H. Leake . . 247-248

XVIII. Missionaries

1 Mr. George Christopher Hurler

25 s-

2 Mrs. Elizabeth Grozer Hurter, 257-

3 Rev, Daniel Crosby Greene, d.d.,



SKETCHES.



4 Mrs. Mary Carpenter Paris .

5 Mrs. Louisa Bradbury l]unker, 260-

6 Mrs. Maria Chamberlain Forbes, 262-

7 Mrs. Mary Ballanthie Fairbank, 263

8 Mrs. Harriet S. Caswell . . 266-



■257
-258

-260
260
-262
-263
-265
■267



193
210-211
212-214
214-216
217-219
219-221
222-223

224

6 Rev. Charles Shaw Adams . 229-230

7 Rev. David Meaubec Mitchell, 230-232

8 Rev. L. Burton Rockwood . 233-234

9 Rev. Edward W. Hooker, D.D. 234-236



7 Moses H. Day . .

8 Lucius H. Briggs .

9 J. Russell Bradford
10 Charles W\ Hill

n Andrew Marshall .
12 William Francis Day



5 Rev. Joseph Sylvester Clark, D.D.,

6 Rev. Henry Brown Hooker, D



7 Mr. Benjamin Perkins



XIX. Educators and Litterateurs
Rev. Jacob Abbott .... 283-285
Rev. William Channing Wood-
bridge 285-287

William Alexander Alcott,M.D, 287-288
Rev. Solomon Adams . . . 288-290



9 Mrs. Jane Herring Loomis

10 Rev. David Coit Scudder

11 Miss Ellen Maria Stone .

12 Miss Anna Wells Bumstead

13 Miss Mary G. Bumstead

14 Rev. Charles W. Munroe

15 Rev. Samuel Greene . .

16 Miss Elizabeth Ellen Backup,

17 Miss Susan Maria Underwood,



5 Rev. Horatio Quincy Butter-

field, D,D

6 Charles Short, ll.d. .

7 Prof. William Ripley Nichols,

8 Prof, Frank Eustace Anderson,

9 Horace ElishaScudder.LiTT.D.



XX. Lawyers

1 Hon. Samuel Hurd Walley . 303-305

2 Hon. Charles Theodore Russell,305-3o6

3 Hon. William Gaston, ll.d. . 307-308

4 Nehemiah Chase Berry . . 308-309

5 Henry Hill Anderson . . . 309-310

6 Josiah Woodbury Hubbard . 311



7 David Brainerd Greene . .

8 Jeremiah Evarts Greene

9 Hon. Roger Sherman Greene,

10 William Phillips Walley

1 1 Gen. Henry William Fuller,

12 John Wentworth Porter



237
248-250

250-253
253-254

25s
267-268
268-271
272-273
273-275
275-277

277
277-279
279-280
280-282

283

290-293
293-294
294-298
298-300
300-302

303
311-312
313-314
3M-316

316
316-317
317-319



CONTENTS.



XXI. Physicians . . .

1 Daniel Francis Gulliver, M.D.

2 Alfred C. Garratt, M.D. . .

3 Henry Blatchford Wheelwright,

M.D

4 Ariel Ivers Cumniings, M.D. .



321-322
322-324

324-325
325-326
326-327



333-334
334-335



5 Henry S. Steele, m.d. . . .
XXn. Artists ^ . .

1 Samuel Lancaster Gerry .

2 Mrs. Victoria Adelaide Root,

XX HI. Deaf-Mutes

1 Jonathan P. Marsh .... 340-342

2 Mrs. Pauline P. Marsh . . 342-343

3 Mrs. Pauline Marsh Bowes . 343-344

XXIV. Noteworthy Laymen . .

1 Dr. Nathaniel Shepherd Prentiss,

349-353

2 John Heath 353-355

3 Melzar Waterman .... 355-357

4 Richard Bond 357-35^

5 John Newton Denison . . 358-360

6 Isaac Davis White ... 360-361

7 John Brown 361-362

XXV. Young Men

1 Henry Martyn Hill . .

2 John C. Carruthers, Jr.

3 D. Jarvis Hastings .

4 Nathan Haggett Brown
5



379-38'
381-382

3S2-383

383-385



Edward P. Flint 385-386

XXVI. Ministerial Recruits . .

1 Prof. John F.Gulliver,D.D.,LL.D., 392-393

2 Rev. William Ladd Ropes . 393-394

3 Rev. William Sewall . . . 394

4 Rev. John Henry Denison, d.d., 395-396

5 Rev. George Edwards Hill . 396

6 Rev. Isaac C. White . . . 396-398

7 Rev. Evarts Scudder . . . 398-399

8 Rev. Alexander S. Twombly,

DD 399-400

XXVII. Ministerial Colleagues .

1 Mrs. Hannah C. Bowles Wolff, 410-41 1

2 Mrs. Sarah P. Gulliver Pratt, 411-412

3 Mrs. Susan M. Huntington

Perkins 412-413

4 Mrs. Elizabeth G. Strong . . 413-414

5 Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth Boardman,4i4-4r5



320

6 Stephen Wallace Bowles, m.d. 327-328

7 Timothy R. Nute, m.d. . . 328

8 Benjamin Mann, m.d. . . 329

9 Frank H. Davenport, m.d. . 330
10 Robert Bell, m.d 330-331



3 Miss Emily Percy Mann .

4 Mr. Frank Thayer Merrill



4 William Lynde ....

5 Mrs. Caroline F. Lynde .

6 Mrs. Mary Coffin Lynde .

8 Dea. James Clap . . .

9 George Domett . .

10 Abner Kingman

11 Hon. Joseph S. Ropes .

12 Sylvester Bliss ....

13 Robert McMaster Carson

14 William Henry Wardwell

15 Wesley Ireson ....



6 George Alvah Kittredge

7 Joseph Eppes Brown .

8 Hon. James M. W. Hall

9 Col. Ebenezer W. Stone



332

335-336-
33^337
338
344-346
346-347
347-348'

349-
362-365.
366-367

367-369-
369-370
371-372
373-374
374-375
37^377

37S
386-388
388-390

390
390-391



39»

9 Rev. Francis Brown Perkins, 400-401

10 Rev. Edward Anderson . . 401

11 Rev. Abbott Eliot Kittredge,

d.d 401-402

12 Rev. James Winchel Grush, 402-404

13 Rev. Isaac Curtis Meserve,D.D. 404-405

14 Rev. Alfred Henry Hall . 405-407

15 Rev. George Ross Hewitt . 407-409



• 410

6 Mrs. Hannah T. P'enn . . 415-416

7 Mrs. Mary Anderson Street, 416-417

8 Mrs. Jane Perkins Childs . 417-418

9 Mrs. Caroline Forbes Penniman, 418
10 Mrs. Angenette F. Tinkham

Hamilton 419



VIU



CONTENTS.



XXVIII, Young Women ....

1 Maria Antonia Martina Eche-

verria 421-422

2 Charlotte H. Baker . . . 422-423

3 Emeline Silsbee 423-424

4 Charlotte R. Steele . . . 423-424

XXIX. Honorable Women . .
I Mrs. Mehitable Grozer Kit-

tredge 433-434

Mrs. Harriet L. Dickinson . 434-436
Mrs. Clara Stovvell Franklin, 436-437
Mrs. Catharine Louisa Stone, 437-438
Miss Caroline Maria Stone . 438-440

6 Mrs. Abigail F. Wardwell . 440

7 Mrs. Mary J. Basford . . 441

8 Mrs. Anna F. Waters . . 442-444

9 Mrs. Magdalena Kuhn . . 444-446

10 Mrs. Mary Callen .... 446-448

11 Mrs. Judith Nutting . . . 448-451



XXX. Children

1 Caring for the Young . . . 473-474

2 Early Piety 474-477

3 Early Deaths 477-479



5 Eliza Hill Anderson

6 Marcia Evelina Atkins

7 Ann Maria Bond

8 Caroline W. Bond .

9 Ann Bell ....



420
425-427
427-428
428-429
429-430
430-431

432
451-453
453-455



12 Mrs. Lucy Waterman

13 Miss Susan Wesson

Ministers^ Wives.

14 Mrs. Eliza Hill Anderson . 456-461

15 Mrs. Sarah Elizabeth R. Peck, 461-462

Widows of Ministers.

16 Mrs. Mary Codman . . .

17 Mrs. Martha Vinal Hooker,

18 Mrs. Lucy Gilpatrick Marsh,

19 Mrs. Sarah Collins Porter .



464-466
466-467
467-470
470-472



XXXI. Epilogue .
I Harmony amidst Diversity



473

4 Our Young Saints : 479-483

(a) John Eliot Bowles . 479-480

{b) Guy Richards . . . 480
{c) Frances Elizabeth Murke, 481

484

. . 488-496



484-488 I 2 A Happy Pastorate



CHAPTER I.

ROXBURY EARLY AND LATER.

The first of several churches now in our Commonwealth
bearing the name Eliot was planted in Roxbury. The very
name takes us back more than two and a half centuries.
Notable contrasts are suggested. The wilderness then lying
between the northern and southern lines of New England
latitude, and stretching three thousand miles west to the
Pacific, had not been penetrated by Europeans. Only its
Atlantic fringes had been entered at a few points. Savage
tribes were sparsely scattered over the broad territory, which
remained in primitive rudeness. When John Eliot arrived,
only five towns had been incorporated in the Massachusetts
colony, and the early period of these feeble, coastwise settle-
ments was one of privation and hardship. The first meet-
ing house in Roxbury, built of logs, with a thatched roof and
clay floor, but without spire, gallery, pew, or plaster, was
erected in 1632, and, owing to fear of attack by Indians, all
citizens were required to live within half a mile of the same ;
and the men were ordered to bring their firearms to church
on the Sabbath. Wolves' heads were nailed to the meeting
house. Bears and other wild animals were common in the
neighborhood. Indeed, more than a century passed before
they were exterminated.' At first, there was no physician in

' During one week in September, 1725, not less than twenty bears were killed,
it is said, within two miles of Boston.



ELIOT MEMORIAL.



Roxbury, and some years after the settlement began, a ser-
vant was one day (1639) sent into Boston, the adjoining
town, for a dentist, and both of them were found days after-
ward, beneath the snow, frozen to death. For a long time
there were but few physicians in the colony, and no medical
associations were formed till near the Revolution, 1776.
Now there are over a thousand and five hundred physicians
in Boston, and the present population of our city is not,
perhaps, far short of the whole number of inhabitants in
New England at the Declaration of National Independence.
When a municipal charter was granted (1822) the popula-
tion of Boston had not reached 44,000 ; now it is over
500,000. At that time, the towns immediately adjoining
were all separate communities, and so continued till annexa-
tions to the city took place — East Boston in 1836, Roxbury
in 1867, Charlestown, Brighton, and West Roxbury in 1873.
At the date referred to (1822), there were no good pave-
ments. Now we have excellent roads in all directions, while
our Franklin Park has ten miles of smoothest highways, and
twenty miles of walks. There were no lighted streets at
night, no water-works, no telegraphs. The cemeteries of
Roxbury were then barely respectable: none in the land are
now more attractive than our Forest Hills. The pillory,
the stocks, and the whipping-post were banished long ago.
Advance in facilities of public conveyance has kept
joace with other improvements. At the opening of this
nineteenth century there were only a few stage-coaches in
the neighborhood. A trip to New York required about a



ROXBURY EARLY AND LATER.



week's time. Even so late as when the Eliot Church was
formed (1834), that journey, by schedule, took forty-one
hours, night included. Now it may be accomplished in a
little over one-eighth of that time. The fare by stage from
Roxbury to Boston was twenty-five cents, and when an
hourly was established,' in 1826, twelve and a half cents was
the charge. At the date last named there was not a rail-
road in the country, and the first passenger railroad — that
from Boston to Newton — was not opened till 1834. Thirty
years later came the horse car (1866), and after twenty-two
years more (1888), the electric car, with fare reduced and
speed increased.

The existing place of worship, on the same site -as the
one where Eliot began his long pastorate, was built in 1740,
and is the fifth in succession. The house that stood there
previously was riddled by cannon balls during the siege of
Boston, and the lawn in front was a camping ground of our
troops. The present pastor of the First Church, Dr. De
Normandie, is the eleventh in succession.^



' By Horace King, now ninety-five years of age.

^PASTORS.

Thomas Welde. July, 1632. Died in England, March 23, 1661.
John Eliot. November 5, 1632. Died in Roxbury, May 20, 1690.
Samuel Danforth. September 24, 1650. Died in Roxbury, November 10, 1674.
Nehemiali Walter. October 17, 1688. Died in Roxbury, September 17, 1750.
Thomas Walter. October 19, 1718. Died in Roxbury, January 10, 1725.
Oliver Peabody. November 7, 1750. Died in Roxbury, May 29, 1752.
Amos Adams. September 12, 1753. Died in Roxbury, October 5, 1775.
Eliphalet Porter. October 2, 1782. Died in Roxbury, December 7, 1833.
George Putnam, d.d. July 7, 1830. Died in Roxbury, April 11, 1878.
John Graham Brooks. October 10, 1875. Dismissed, April 15, 1882.
James De Normandie, d.d. March 14, 1883.



ELIOT MEMORIAL.



The geographical limits of Roxbury, extending eight
miles from east to west and two miles from north to south,
remained substantially unchanged for more than two hun-
dred years. Besides the First Church, there was no other
till the one organized in West Roxbury, 1712, which has had
thirteen pastors.' Towards sixty years passed before the
third church, that at Jamaica Plain was gathered {lyyoy

Though the primitive region about Boston was so rude,
the men who first came to these shores had been familiar
with the conveniences, culture, and refinement of the mother-
country. A fair proportion of them had enjoyed the advan-
tagres of her schools and universities. No well informed



' PASTORS.

Ebenezer Thayer. November 26, 1712. Died, March 6, 1733.
Nathaniel Walter. July 10, 1734. Died, March 11, 1776.
Thomas Abbot. September 29, 1773. Dismissed, March 10, 1783.
John Bradford. May 30, 1785. Died, January 27, 1825.
John Flagg. February 2, 1825. Died, March 14, 1831.
George Whitney. June 15, 1831. Dismissed, Februarj', 1836.
Theodore Parker. June 21, 1837. Dismissed, February 8, 1846.
Dexter Clapp. December 20, 1848. Dismissed, November 23, 1851.
Edmund B. Wilson. July 18, 1852. Dismissed, May, 1859.
Trowbridge T. Forbush. July i, 1863. Dismissed, May 8, 1868.
Augustus Mellen Haskell. May 22, 1870. Dismissed, 1888.
Frank Wright Pratt. 1891. Dismissed, 1895.
Alfred Rodman Hussey. 1895. Dismissed, 1898.
John H. Applebee. June 6, 1899.

^PASTORS.

William Gordon, d.d. July 6, 1772. Dismissed, March 17, 1786.

Thomas Gray, d.d. March 27, 1793. Died, June i, 1847.

George Whitney. February 10, 1836. Died, April 2, 1842.

Joseph H. Allen. October 18, 1843. Dismissed, February 21, 1847.

Grindall Reynolds, D.D. 1848. Dismissed, 1858.

James W. Thompson. 1859. Died, 1881.

Charles F. Dole. June, 1879.



ROXBURY EARLY AND LATER.



person can now reside here without gathering inspiration
from the annals of those early times. To settle in a place
where there have been no eminent citizens, and hence where
there is little or no history, is like pitching one's tabernacle
on a broad sand-plain. Whatever the great or good may
have or may not have to bequeath by last will and testa-
ment, they leave an invaluable legacy, one that may enrich
future generations, but which does not go through the pro-
bate office. Such influence is second only to that of distin-
guished contemporary residents. Roxbury has no gallery of
portraits, but her prominent men form landmarks. They are
like hills in an attractive landscape. Solomon did well to
speak of the hyssop that springeth out of the wall, a low
garden plant, but his far-reaching thought was chiefly on
cedars that were in Lebanon.

Among conspicuous names in the early days of Rox-
bury is found that of Dudley. A visitor in our city going
from the present Dudley School building down Dudley
Street, will pass the site of the Governor Dudley mansion
(1636), where stood the late Universalist meeting-house.
Thence by Washington Street he will go to our oldest
cemetery, at the head of Eustis Street, one of the oldest in
New England, and where interments began in 1633. On
entering the enclosure, he will soon find the Dudley tomb.
There rest the remains of two governors, a chief-justice, and
other prominent men who bore that name. Thomas Dudley
was an officer in the English army at the siege of Amiens,
under Henry of Navarre. He came to the Massachusetts



ELIOT MEMORIAL.



Colony as Deputy-Governor in 1630, and held either that
position or the office of Governor till his death in 1653. He
was a man for the times and the place, a man of decided
piety, unbending integrity, and ever on the alert for the
public welfare. No clamor could make him swerve a hair-
breadth. His daughter Anne, wife of Governor Bradstreet,
was a noted poet of her day, and it is to be borne in mind
that Oliver Wendell Holmes and Richard H. Dana were
among her descendants. Joseph, a son of Governor Thomas
Dudley, born in Roxbury, 1647, hel<^ successively numerous
public offices, including the Chief-Justiceship of Massachu-
setts, as well as that of New York, being later Deputy-
Governor of the Isle of Wight. He was a member of the
British Parliament, the first native of New England to whom
that honor was accorded, and at length he became Governor
of Massachusetts. His talents were of a high order, and few
men of any period or nationality have passed through greater
vicissitudes. His son, Paul Dudley, studied law at the
Temple in London, and, like his father, held many public
offices, becoming Chief-Justice of Massachusetts, a position
which he adorned. He was one of the few men in this
country who have been elected members of the Royal So-
ciety of England. By his will he provided for the annual
Dudleian lecture at Harvard College, of which institution
he was a graduate. The town of Dudley in this state per-
petuates the family name.

Other colonial governors, as well as governors of the
Commonwealth, have resided here. One who held that



ROXBURY EARLY AND LATER.



office from 1741 to 1756 was William Shirley, a graduate of
Cambridge University, England, who enjoyed the favor of
Sir Robert Walpole and the Duke of Newcastle. He pro-
jected the famous expedition which captured Louisburg.
After serving as Governor of the Bahamas, he returned to
Roxbury and died 1771. Increase Sumner, a graduate and
afterwards master of our Latin School, became senator,
judge, and in 1797 governor of the State. After his last
election the oath of office was administered to him on his
deathbed, June 7, 1799.

Eustis Street takes us to the site of a well known man-
sion, that of Governor William Eustis, who was at the Battle
of Bunker Hill, and served as surgeon through the war. He
discharged various offices — member of Congress, Secretary
of War, Minister to Holland — dying while Governor of
Massachusetts. He was noted for urbanity and hospitality.
Many distinguished men were his guests, among them Gen-
eral Lafayette, a companion in arms.

Heath Street reminds us of Major-General Heath, who
bore the name William, as did his immigrant ancestor who
came to this place in 1636. For not less than five genera-
tions the homestead remained in the family. John Heath, a
descendant, was the first treasurer of the Eliot Church and
Society. It was to General Heath that Washington en-
trusted the command of West Point after Arnold's treason
had been detected, and his division of the army was the last
to be disbanded at the close of the Revolutionary War.

But we must go to Warren Street to find the residence



ELIOT MEMORIAL.



of one whose name has numerous local mementos, and is
more widely known as a hero of the Revolution than that of
any other Roxbury resident. The front of a stone cottage
exhibits two tablets with inscriptions as follows : —

" On this spot stood the house erected in 1 720 by Joseph
Warren, of Boston, remarkable for being the birthplace of
General Joseph Warren, his grandson, who was killed at the
battle of Bunker Hill, June 17, 1775."

'< John Warren, a distinguished phj'sician and anatomist,
was also born here. The original mansion being in ruins,
this house was built by John C. Warren, m.d., a son of the
last named, as a permanent memorial of the spot."

General Warren, as patriot, exhibited great activity,
guided by prudence, firmness, and fearlessness. Few men
in this country, or any other country, would have ventured
upon delivering an oration commemorative of the " Boston
Massacre " at such a time as March 5, 1775. British officers
had threatened that it should cost any man his life who dared
to do it. Capacious Old South Church was crowded to its
utmost. Two score British officers in uniform occupied
front pews or the pulpit stairs. Fully self-possessed and in
a firm tone Warren proceeded with his oration, most of the
audience applauding. One of the officers on the stairs held
up his hand with several bullets in plain sight. Without
interruption the speaker dropped a white handkerchief on to
the hostile hand. In the battle at Lexington he showed
coolness and undaunted bravery. At Bunker Hill, though
a major-general, he preferred that Prescott should have



ROXBURY EARLY AND LATER.



command, while he himself went into the redoubt where
he fell.

The Pierponts were at one time among the chief fam-
ilies of Roxbury. Among descendants in Connecticut were
distinguished individuals, as Sarah, daughter of Rev. James
Pierpont, of New Haven, who became the wife of Jonathan
Edwards ; Rev. John Pierpont, known as poet and preacher
in Boston; and Edwards Pierpont, who became United
States Minister to the court of St. James. It is not out of
place to speak of Gilbert Stuart (born 1756, died 1828), the
most distinguished of American portrait-painters, who was
here during the War of 18 12. He occupied the large square



Online LibraryA. C. (Augustus Charles) ThompsonEliot memorial : sketches historical and biographical of the Eliot Church and Society, Boston → online text (page 1 of 31)