A. E. Hough J. W. Klise.

The county of Highland: a history of Highland County, Ohio, from the ... online

. (page 34 of 63)
Online LibraryA. E. Hough J. W. KliseThe county of Highland: a history of Highland County, Ohio, from the ... → online text (page 34 of 63)
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influential citizen. Mr. Evans is a member of the lodge of Odd Fel-
lows at Buford, and a Republican in politics.

James Fairley, one of the notable pioneers of Highland county,
was a native of Scotland, who came to Ohio from Rockbridge county,
Va., in 1815, and settled on a farm afterward owned by the Pattons,
in Paint township. He built a distillery on his farm on Fall creek
in 1818, and was engaged in that industry, common in that time, for
some years. His death occurred in 1860. By his marriage to
Nancy Lackey, he had eleven children : William, Jane, Nancy Y.,
Addison, Samuel M., Mary A., James Y., Amanda, Christina and
David A. Samuel M. Fairley was bom December 8, 1816, and
married Sophia, daughter of Enoch and Sally Overman. She was
the granddaughter of Zebulon Overman, a native of Green Brier
county, Va,, who came from the Shenandoah valley to Paint town-
ship, with his children, in 1805. The family has always been very
prominent in the Friends society of Highland county. By this mar-
riage Samuel M. Fairley had eight children: Caroline, wife of
Amosiah Baldwin; James W., deceased; Levi B. ; Mary L., wife of
James Hughey; Enoch O. ; Nancy, wife of F. M. Johnson;
Elizabeth, and a son who died in infancy. Enoch Overman Fair-
ley, son of Samuel M. and Sophia Fairley, was bom in High-
land county, October 26, 1852, and married in early manhood
Mary Hindman, born December 9, 1859, daughter of William
and Lucinda (Clark) Hindman. She is one of the children (the
others being David C, Mary C, and Carrie Ellen) of William Hind-
man, bom in Brooke county, W. Va., April 30, 1814, and died at
New Petersburg, October 2, 1895, and his wife, Lucinda Clark, bom
April 3, 1831, in Highland county, and died at New Petersburg
November 9, 1887. Enoch O. Fairley is a prosperous farmer of Paint
township, residing about half a mile north of New Petersburg, where
his home has been since childhood. He is a popular and estimable



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294 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

citizen, maintains a membership in Emerald lodge, No. 211, Inde-
pendent Order of Odd Fellows, at New Petersburg, and is active and
enterprising in his social and business relations. He and his wife
have three children : Marie, bom August 14, 1-878, formerly a teacher
in the public schools and now the wife of James E. Haines of Fay-
ette county; Lula, bom May 10, 1881, and Herbert, bom March 18,
1884.

Cyrus W. Fairley, the well known grocer and livery stable pro-
prietor at Hillsboro, is descended from one of the old pioneer fami-
lies of Highland county. His grandfather was James Fairley, above
mentioned, who came to Ohio from Rockbridge county, Virginia, in
1815 and settled on the farm in Paint township afterward owned by
Joseph Patton. Among his eleven children was James Y. Fairley,
bom in Highland county, Ohio, December 25, 1822, and married in
1844 to Rosanna, daughter of Richard Barrett, an early settler of
Paint township. The children of this union, consisting of five sons
and five' daughters, were Sallie J., wife of Joseph Dwyer, of Paint
towTiship ; Nannie E., wife of Valentine Graff, of Iowa ; Cyrus W.,
further sketched below; David M., farming on the old homestead;
Richard B., superintendent of the new chair factory ; Mary, deceased,
wife of Barney Grimm, a farmer of Penn township; John W., a
shoe merchant of Greenfield; C. Grant, farming in Fairfield town-
ship; Ella, who died in girlhood; Wilma P., living at Hillsboro.
Cyrus W. Fairley, third of the above enumerated children, was bora
in Highland coimty, Ohio, August 30, 1849, and reared on his
father's farm in Paint township. In August, 1897, he came to
Hillsboro and embarked in the grocery business, which he has since
continued with success and now has a very fair trade. As a side
line, he added the livery business, which he has conducted for four
years, and in the spring of 1902 purchased the Jacob Uhrig stock
on Beech street, adjoining the Clifton House, where he has since
enjoyed an increased patronage. August 22, 1876, Mr. Fairley was
married to Hannah E., daughter of Martin S. and Margaret B.
Swain of Clinton county. Mrs. Fairley is a sister of William
Swain, who was for many years superintendent of schools at Mont-
gomery, Ohio. Charles W. Swain, another brother, is a prominent
attorney at Wilmington, Ohio, and Emma, a sister, is the wife of
James L. Fullerton, a shoe dealer of Greenfield. The children of
Mr. and Mrs. Fairley are Charles E., bom in July, 1878, and farm-
ing in Fairfield township; Rosa B., a graduate of the Hillsboro high
school residing at home ; and Herman, a partner with his father in
the grocery business.

The Faris family is one of the oldest, as it is certainly one of the
most numerous and influential of all the family connections in Salem



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 295

townahip. The first of the name to settle in America was James
Ck)llins Faris, bom in Scotland in 1715, and an emigrant to Virginia
in 1740. His son James was born in Virginia in 1742 and there
reared a large number of children, among them being John Faris,
who was bom in 1770 and married Jane Watson, whose father was
a native of Glasgow, Scotland, who had come to Virginia about
1740 and later served in the Revolutionary war. It was from the
last mentioned couple that all the Highland county Farises descended.
In 1813, John and Jane Faris located in Xew Market township and
reared a family of sons and daughters which in numbers as well as
sturdy qualities, was one of the strongest of the pioneer period.
Every one of the entire thirteen grew to maturity, married, and
reared children of their own. By the inexorable law, from which
no mortal can escape, all have long since paid the debt of nature, but
they left upon the commimities in which they resided an impress for
good which still remains as a precious heritage to their descendants.
A few brief biographical details of each one will prove of interest:
Elijah married Mary Miles, settled on one hundred acres of land
where Pricetown now is, and had six children. Catharine married
Samuel Sweinhart in 1815, and first lived south of Pricetown, in a
rough shanty enclosed on three sides only, from which, in her hus-
band's absence, she had to fight away the wolves T^'th an axe. They
had seven children. Beniah had eight children and lived west of
Pricetown. Mary married Jacob Cochran, settled in New Market
and had eight children. Sarah married Abraham Wilkin, settled
near Sonner's Mill in White Oak township and had eight children.
Rachel married Daniel Scott, lived east of Pricetown in Salem town-
ship and had three children. James W. married Mary Hoop, settled
east of Pricetown and had three children. John B., eighdi of the
family, is sketched more fully below. Jesse married Nancy David-
son, a woman of remarkable character, by whom he had eleven chil-
dren. Jane married Samuel Gibler and settled in Liberty town-
ship. Eli S. married Lucilla Pulliam and settled in New Market.
Andrew F. married Susan Hoop, lived on a farm south of Pricetown,
and had eight children. Uriah married Eliza Couch, settled south
of Pricetown and had seven children. John Faris, the patriarch of
this interesting family,* soon after his arrival in the county, bought
about 600 acres of wild land in New Market township, but later pur-
chased 1,000 acres in Salem township which became the basis for his
children's homes. He was a man of prominence and influence, and
active in the promotion of good enterprises. He and his wife were
members of the Christian church at Pricetown and for many years
interested in religious work. He died in 1850 at the age of eighty-
one and his wife one year later in the eightieth year of her age.
John B. Faris, eighth in age of the thirteen children above described,
was bom in Virginia January 2, 1802, and hence was about eleven



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296 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

years old when his parents arrived on the banks of the Scioto. In
1823 he married Catherine, the seventeen-year-old daughter of David
Welty, who came from Kentucky to Hamer township in 1811. The
newly married couple settled on a farm in what was known as the
Bowyer Survey in Salem township, north of Pricetown, where they
retained their residence to the end of life. About 1824, Mr. Faris
constructed on White Oak creek the first gristmill in Salem town-
ship, which he conducted in connection with a sawmill until his
death, which occurred in 1837 at the comparatively early age of
thirty-five years. This ended prematurely a life of usefulness, aB
his business enterprises were at that time the most important in the
township and he himself one of its most progressive men. After his
death his wife showed unusual business ability, by superintending
and carr^dng on all the industries in which her husband had been
interested. She married Mathias Gibler, who, however, only lived
a year afterward, and she herself passed away September 2, 1889,
aged eighty-two years. This good woman had eight children, all
by her first husband, of whom Eliza, Mary N., Sarah and Elizabeth
are dead. The four still living are David, a resident of Illinois;
Josephus and Levi, of Bricetown, and John B. Faris, Jr. The lat-
ter was bom in Salem township. Highland county, Ohio, July 27,
1837, and in early manhood went to Pike county, Illinois, where he
spent some time in work for monthly wages. Returning to his Ohio
home he was married to Chaffalio, daughter of Jacob and Anna Fen-
der, of Clay township, located at Pricetown and for thirty-two years
followed the profession of teaching. This, however, was interrupted
in 1864 by his military service with Company E, One Hundred and
Sixty-eighth regiment Ohio infantry. This command was first sent
to Robinson Station, Ky., where they did guard duty and later part
of the regiment was captured after a fight near Cynthiana with Gen-
eral Morgan. Subsequently they were sent back to Cincinnati,
where they did guard duty, afterward to Camp Dennison and there
they were mustered out of the service September 13, 1864. After
this brief but rather rough experience of war, Mr. Faris returned
to Pricetown and resumed his occupation as a teacher, which he did
not again abandon for many years. In 1872, he was ordained as a
minister of the Christian church and held several charges, but of
later years has given up regular work on account of his health. Ho
lives a retired life at the same home he has occupied since his mar-
riage, with the exception of two years spent in Liberty township.
His estimable wife passed from the scenes of earth April 4, 1901,
and was laid away in the Plainview cemetery. The living children
are John S., who is postmaster of Pricetown; Laxira B., widowed
wife of J. W. White; and Anna, at home. Mary and Moody, the
first bom and twins, and J. Walter, next in order of birth, are dead.
Josephus Faris, fourth of the children of John B. and Catharine



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 297

(Welty) Faris, was bom in Salem township, Highland county, Ohio,
July 21, 1829, and remained at home until his marriage to Millie,
daughter of Philip and Rachel Baker. He enlisted in Company E,
One Hundred and Sixty-eighth regiment Ohio infantry, and shared
the service of that command, above described. Shortly after his
return home from the army, he removed with his family to Illinois,
where he spent sixteen months and then came back to Highland
county. For twenty years he followed the occupation of teaching
school, during which time he has held the positions of assessor, clerk,
supervisor, notary public, and member of the school board. In the
spring of 1902 he was elected justice of the peace for Salem town-
ship, to take office in November. Like most of his family connection,
he is a member of the Christian church and is a most excellent citi-
zen in all the relations of life. He has had eleven children, of whom
Lucilla C, John P., Eliza J., William C. and Flavins J. are dead.
Those living are Sarah E., wife of William T. Wardlow, of Salem
township; Levi S., Rachel B., and Rosa N., at home, and Evadean,
wife of E. L. Gomia, of Salem township. In 1889 was held the first
Faris family reunion, which has been kept up annually ever since.
John B. Faris is president and historian of this reunion association.
As many as four hundred of the descendants of John and Jane (Wat-
son) Faris have attended a single reunion, and this annual event has
now become a fixture among the annual entertainments of Salem
township.

Levi Faris, of Pricetown, is a grandson of that remarkable pio-
neer couple, John and Jane (Watson) Faris, mentioned above, who
located and bought large sections of land in Highland county a few
years after the war of 1812. One of their thirteen children was
John B. Faris, who built the first grist mill in Salem to\vnship and
became one of the most influential and enterprising citizens of his
day. He married Catharine Welty, daughter of an old Kentucky
pioneer, and a woman of great ability and strength of character.
After her husband's death, she carried on his farming and milling
business, besides looking after the needs and education of her chil-
dren. Among the latter was Levi Faris, bom in Salem township,
Highland county, Ohio, July 11, 1831, and educated in the district
schools. In early manhood he was married to Margaret, daughter of
Albert and Elizabeth Malcom, of New Market township. Her
mother is yet living and is in reasonable health, although ninety-two
years of age. Immediately after this marriage Mr. Faris moved to
Hlinois, where he was employed for a while, but not liking the out-
look he returned in a short time to Highland county and settled on a
rented farm in Salem township. Later he bought a small place in
the township on which he resided some time, and in 1872 purchased
property in Pricetown which has since been his home. His military



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298 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

service during the civil war was with Company E, One Hundred and
Sixty-eighth regiment Ohio volunteer infantry, which was organized
in May, 1864, and subsequently sent into Kentucky. This command
Tendered valuable service as protector of railroads and government
property and in checking incursions of raiders from the Kentucky
side of the river. They came in collision with Moi^an near Cyn-
thiana in June, 1864, and after spirited fighting suffered considerable
loss in the way of prisoners. Later the regiment was sent to Cin-
cinnati, where it did guard duty until mustered out of the service
at Camp Dennison in September, 1864. For several years after the
war, Mr. Faris followed the business of carpentering and bridge con-
tracting, but lately has retired from r^ular work on account of fail-
ing health.

John S. Faris, postmaster at Pricetown, is one of the younger gen-
eration of the old and long established Highland county family of
that name, whose history is sketched at length above. He is a greatr
grandson of John and Jane (Watson) Faris, and grandson of John B.
Faris, mentioned in the foregoing. John B. Faris had eight chil-
dren and among the number a son and namesake who married Chaf-
folio Fender. This couple were the parents of John S. Faris, who
was born at Pricetown, Highland county, Ohio, October 20, 1868,
and educated in the district schools. At an early period he evinced a
strong inclination to teach, an occupation in which his father had
met with success, and he devoted fourteen years to this honorable
profession. In 1901, he engaged in mercantile business at Price-
town and at the same time was appointed postmaster of the village,
which position he has since retained. He is also township clerk, was
chairman of the township central committee several years, and in
1900 was appointed to take the census of Salem township. Like
most of his family connections, he is a member of the Christian
church and is regarded as a young man of bright promise for future
usefulness. He married Flora B., daughter of Jonathan and Eliza-
beth Foust, of Pricetown, and has two children, Madge and Glenn.

Benjamin F. Faris, well known in the farming circles of Dodson
and Union townships, is a great-grandson of the pioneers, John and
Jane (Watson) Faris, mentioned in the foregoing family sketch.
The ninth of their children, Jesse, in 1825 married Xancy Davidson,
born in 1805. She was the only daughter of John Davidson, a native
of Pennsylvania, one of the strong characters of that rugged period
and the earliest settler within the limits of the present township of
Salem. He was also the first shoemaker of that neighborhood, vol-
unteered in Captain Barrere^s company for the war of 1812, was
elected lieutenant and surrendered with General Hull at Detroit
After their marriage, Jesse and Xancy (Davidson) Faris settled a



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 299

•mile southwest of Pricetown, but a year later removed to the farm
which the widow Long oAvned. This pioneer couple used to tell
amusing stories of the hardships connected with their honeymoon
days. Their household goods were so meager that they placed them
all in the front end of the wagon-box. On their way they stopped at
the mill and got a peck of corn ground which, with two hams, con-
stituted all their provender. Mrs. Faris soon made five pounds of
butter, which she exchanged for one pound of coffee. This was "put-
ting on style," as before that the family had been content with sassa-
fras tea. Their first soap was made by Mrs. Faris from the fat of
two opossums. John Faris, the patriarch of the Highland county
family, and his wife, were members of the Christian church at Price-
to\vn. He died in 1850 at the age of eighty-one years and his wife
in 1851 when eighty years old. Jesse and Nancy (Davidson) Faris
had eleven children, among the number being Carey C. Faris, who
was bom in Salem township October 30, 1831, and married Eliza
King, born in Hamer township in 1839. In 1863, Carey C. Faris
enlisted in Company B, Second regiment Ohio heavy artillery, with
which he served fifteen months and was eventually discharged for
<lisability, by virtue of which a $30 per month pension was granted.
He owns a small farm and for some time has been living in retire-
ment. He has eight living children, among them Benjamin F.
Faris, who was bom in Salem towTiship, Highland county, Ohio,
February 6, 1861. With a view to fitting himself as a teacher he
attended the National Xormal university at Lebanon, Ohio, where he
went through the regular course. After leaving this institution, Mr.
Faris spent the next seven years as a teacher in the district Schools,
T>ut was eventually forced to give up this employment on account of
failing health. March 5, 1887, he was married to Electa Roush,
daughter of N. W. and Martha Roush, and a member of one of the
leading pioneer families of Hamer township. As early as 1806 her
great-grandfather, Philip Roush, cleared a farm in the north part
of Hamer, which was subsequently owned by his son John. By this
marriage Mr. Faris has three children: Bertsyl W., Otis G., and
Isma Anna. Mrs. Faris died May 17, 1901. For the past twelve
years Mr. Faris^ time has been taken up in agriculture and stock
raising. He is now and has been for five years past a member of the
school board and takes much interest in educational affairs. He is
prominent in Knights of Pythias circles and connected with the
Masonic fraternity at Lynchburg.

J. Frank Fender, senior member of the firm of Fender & Son,
lumbermen, at Taylorsville, is a descendant of George Fender, one
•of the pioneers of the township of White Oak. George Fender, a
native of Virginia, was married there to Magdalene Launce, and in
the fall of 1801, with his family, and his father-in-law, Adam



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300 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

Launce, and his family, he settled on the banks of White Oak, not
far from where the settlement was made in the same year by Robert
Finley and James B. Finley and John Davidson and their families.
This was the first settlement of the township. He first bought a
himdned acres including the site of his home, which is yet standing,
and this was a part of the Hassie and Kerr survey. In after years,
he acquired a large body of land, and became a valued citizen, and
the main stay of the Christian church in that locality. His eight
children were Katie, Sarah, Pollie, Betsey, John, Jacob, Greorge and
one who died in infancy. John*, father of the subject of this sketch,,
was bom on the White Oak farm, January 23, 1813, and when
grown to manhood he married Catherine Kibler, with whom he went
to housekeeping on the old homestead. Later he built there a brick
residence, which was in its day the finest house in the township, and
though now outrivaled, is still standing and substantial. He became
the owner of over five hundred acres of land, held many of the town-
ship offices, and was an earnest worker for the welfare of the Chris-
tian church. He and his wife died within nine days of each other,,
both at the age of seventy-five years. Their children, ten in num-
ber, were, William and Sarah, now living in White Oak township;
Leah and Henry, deceased; Mary, wife of George Carr, of Whit*
Oak township; Rachel, wife of Robert Hatcher, of Hamer town-
ship; Amelia, wife of Charles Moberly, of Clay township; Cath-
erine, wife of E. Carr, of White Oak township; America, wife of
Charles Robinson, of White Oak township ; and J. Frank. J. Frank
Fender was bom in the house where he now lives, February 25, 1856,
was educated in the district school, and in early manhood was
married to Mary Ann Roberts, a native of Highland coimty, and
daughter of Alfred and Catherine Roberts. Seven children have
been bom to them: Newton, Clarence, Virgie, Glenn, and Stanley,
living at home, and Alva and Mertie, deceased. Mr. Fender is "the
owner of about 250 acres of land, which he farms successfully, giv-
ing considerable attention also to the raising of live stock, and in his
connection with the firm of Fender & Son, owning and conducting
the saw mill at Taylorsville, he is contributing efficiently to the
remunerative industries of the township. He has served the com-
munity ably as to^vnship trustee, assessor and constable, is widely
influential in politics as a Democrat, and is a valued member of
Lodge No. 633, at Mowrystown, of the Independent Order of Odd
Fellows.

Charles Fenner, trustee of New Market township, comes of pio-
neer ancestors who settled in Highland county among the first of the
incoming emigrants from the East^ His grandfather, John Fenner,
was a native of Pennsylvania and entered government land in what
is now Liberty township as far back as 1800. He lived to the age



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 30I

of seventy years, became a large landowner and reared a family of
children, ^mong them being a son named William W., who was born
in Liberty township about 1821. William W. Fenner married
Malinda Frost and had ten children, four- sons and six daughters, all
of 'whom grew to maturity and seven of them are still living. The
father was a farmer all his adult life, belonged to the Methodist Epis-
copal church and held various minor offices, including that of town-
ship trustee. He died March 12, 1896, while residing in Union
township, long surviving his wife, who passed away in 1862. Charles
Fenner, the youngest of their surviving children, was bom in Clay
township. Highland county, August 12, 1860, and remained at home
until a year or two after reaching his majority. December 23, 1883,
he was married to Nancy E., daughter of John W. and Mary
(Strange) Hart, of Union township. Mrs. Fenner's paternal grand-
father was Joel Hart, of North Carolina, who came to Ohio first in
1801, two years later brought his family to Highland county, and
removed to Union township in 1832 where he and wife passed the
remainder of their days. In 1826, Joel Hart shot the last bear
killed in Highland county, and in 1848 his son, Jonathan, was the
slayer of the last deer seen inside of the county limits. After his
marriage Charles Fenner spent three years in the counties of Mercer
and Darke and afterwards rented a farm for two years in Liberty
township. Highland county. Subsequently he removed to his pres-
ent place in New Market township, where he owns 118 acres of land
and carries on general farming. He is trustee of New Market town-
ship and a charter member of Russell lodge, No. 706, Knights of
Pythias. Mr. and Mrs. Fenner have three children living, Mary
M., Charles H. and Leonard, the eldest, Clyde, having died when



Online LibraryA. E. Hough J. W. KliseThe county of Highland: a history of Highland County, Ohio, from the ... → online text (page 34 of 63)