A. E. Hough J. W. Klise.

The county of Highland: a history of Highland County, Ohio, from the ... online

. (page 37 of 63)
Online LibraryA. E. Hough J. W. KliseThe county of Highland: a history of Highland County, Ohio, from the ... → online text (page 37 of 63)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


ward married Mary Goux, a native of France. Not long after this
marriage he bought a farm of 110 acres, where he is still living, and
where their home was blessed with ten children. These were Ade-
line, Eugene and Jennie, deceased ; Charles, whose home is in Adams
county; Jennie, at home; Noah; Louisa, wife of A. F. Lilbert, of
Mowrystown; Abel, living in Nebraska; Julia, wife of W. H.
Walker, at the old home, and Edward, in Illinois. The mother of
these children died at the age of forty-five years, and during the next
fourteen years the home of the father was shared by his second wife,
Margaret Trickeer, a native of Adams county. Charles Gayman is
a devoted member of the Bell Run Baptist church, of which he was
one of the organizers, and for several years a local minister, and in
his old age he enjoys the esteem of many friends. Noah Gayman,
at the age of eighteen years, began work for himself as a farm laborer,
and after four years of this he married Ida Cometet, a native of
White Oak township and daughter of Louis and Leah Cornetet, and
began housekeeping near Taylorsville. Four years later they made
their home in Taylorsville, where Mr. Gayman began his business as
a blacksmith and wagon maker and dealer in buggies, wagons, har-
ness and farming implements, in which he has been quite prosperous.
He also owns and cares for a small farm, and is, altogether, a busy
and successful man. At the time of the destructive fire at Taylors-
ville, he lost all his buildings and property, but notwithstanding this
disaster he has continued in business and is doing well. In official
afPairs he has filled for two terms the office of constable and was
school director for several years. In the United Brethren churdi
he is an active and valued worker, aiding greatly in the building of
the new church, and serving as trustee. For fifteen years he has
been superintendent of the Sunday school of this denomination.

Lewis George, a worthy citizen of Paint township, resides on a
farm which was purchased about 1830 by his grandfather, James
George, who came from Hampshire county. West Virginia. Accom-
panied by his son Jesse, who was then about twenty-two years of
age, as he was bom in 1808, the long journey over the mountains and
down and across innumerable streams- waa tnade with a team. At



Digitized by



Google



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 319

the time the Highland cotinty farm was purchased it was all in tim-
ber, but under the industrious management of the newcomers it was
eventually made to "blossom as the rose/' and this fine place is now
in the possession of the third generation of the George family. Jesse
Geoi^ married Elizabeth, daughter of Michael Cannady, and had
four children, two of whom died in infancy ; Hannah married Mor-
gan B. Park and died in 1889, and Lewis is the subject of this sketch.
The father ended his days on the farm where he originally settled,
his death occurring in August, 1876, and that of his wife in 1864.
Lewis Greorge, their youngest and only surviving child, was bom at
the family homestead in Highland county, Ohio, May 31, 1845, and
with the exception of one year has spent his entire life on this place.
December 24, 1867, he was married to Eleonora, daughter of Thomas
Barrett, by whom he has two children : Leslie, a resident of Paint
township, and Bessie, wife of Frank Smalley. In 1868 Mr. George
took charge of the home farm of 245 acres, which he now owns,
besides another tract of 176 acres, making his entire holdings 421
acres of superior land. The original log cabin put up in the woods
by his grandfather over seventy years ago has given place to an ele-
gant modern farm house erected by Lewis Greorge in 1898. All the
surroundings indicate peace, plenty and comfort such as befit a rep-
resentative farmer of the prosperous coimty of Highland. Mr.
Oeorge carries on general farming and raises considerable stock, his
place being cultivated by modem methods and supplied with every
adjunct of a first class Ohio farm.

James T. Gibson, M. D., a popular physician of Lynchburg, is of
Irish lineage which became Americanized by residence in Old Vir-
ginia. His grandfather, Thomas Gibson, was a native of the little
town of Hillsboro, Ireland, where he married Elizabeth Brown and
emigrated to America in 1822. After a short sojourn in the east,
the new arrivals made their way to the Old Dominion and located in
fche county of Augusta, where they spent the eleven subsequent years.
In 1833 they caught the "Western fever," then so prevalent, and con-
cluded to try their fortunes in the still crude but rapidly developing
country beyond the Alleghanies. After making the usual journey
across the mountains and down the rivers, Thomas Gibson and wile
-finally reached Highland county, Ohio, and found a home near the
city of Hillsboro. There they spent the remainder of their days, Mr.
Gibson dying at the ripe old age of ninety-three years. His children
consisted of five boys and four girls, including James B. Gibson, who
was bom March 10, 1832, and reared at the Highland county home
of his parents. In April, 1860, he was married to Elizabeth, daugh-
ter of James Hogsett, and member of an influential pioneer family.
The children resulting from this union are Cora A., who remains at
liome; Frank R., in the coal trade at Aurora, Illinois; James T., the



Digitized by



Google



320 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

subject of this sketch ; and William Arthur, at home. James T. Gib-
son, third of the above enumerated children in order of birth, after
obtaining the usual education in the common schools, successfully
taught for five years in the public schools of Clinton county. After
this he entered the Medical College of Ohio and on finishing the
course was graduated with the class of 1897. In the following
month of May he located in the enterprising town of Lynchburg,
entered immediately into the practice of his profession and has since
continued to reside there, his office being in the Holmes block on
Main street May 5, 1897, he was married to Vemice, daughter of
Alfred and Virginia (Smith) Cadwallader, from the Willettsville
neighborhood in Highland county. Mrs. Gibson's mother, Vii^inia
Smith, was a daughter of James D. and Sarah (Ryan) Smith, of
Buckingham county, Va., and sister of Prof. E. G. Smith, of Hills-
boro, Ohio. Dr. Gibson is a member of the Highland county medi-
cal society and the Alumni association of his alma mater. He is a
past-master of Lynchburg lodge, Ko. 178, F. & A. M., and member
of the Modem Woodmen of America. Frank Brown Gibson, only
child of Doctor and Mrs. Gibson, was bom December 2, 1900.

Daniel R. Glaze, a prominent citizen of Bmsh Creek township,
is a grandson of John W. Glaze, of Maryland, a soldier of the war
of 1812, who married Anna Wolfe and had six children: Elizabeth,
Samuel, Mary, Lemuel E., John X., and Daniel. John N. Glaze,
father of the subject of this sketch, was bom in Ohio, and during
the great civil war he was enrolled among the Ohio men who fought
for the preservation of their country, making an enduring record as
a patriot. He died in August, 1895. By his marriage to Mary^
daughter of Christopher and Mary Setty, John N. Glaze had these
children : J. Wesley, who died after maturity and at the time of his
death was a prominent school teacher, Daniel R., Mary E., wife of
Griffith L. Vance; Samuel X. and Milton S. By a second wife,
Mary A. Barrow, daughter of Ezra Barrow of Dodson towTiship, he
had two children: Annie E. and Carrie E. Daniel R. Glaze was
bom October 22, 1854, in Highland county, received a good common-
ochool education, which enabled him to teach school for some time,
and in 1876 (March 16) he was married to Mary O, daughter of
Hugh P. and Maria (Core) Sheperd. Mrs. Glaze was bom Sep-
tember 2, 1851. Their home has been blessed with three children;
Blanche, bom December 18, 1876, and teaching school in the county;
Ora L., bom March 10, 1878, wife of S. P. Ferguson; and Emest
W., born August 31, 1888. Mr. Glaze owns a valuable farm of 250
acres in Brush Creek and Marshall townships, and resides in the
home that has been his since childhood. He and his wife are mem-
bers of the Methodist church, and he is a member of the Odd Fel-
lows lodge of Sinking Spring, has been honored by his fellow citi-



Digitized by



Google



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 321

zens with the office of justice of the peace, and is highly regarded by
all his neighbors.

Ellis Good, one of the representative farmers of Penn township,
bears a name long honored in Highland county on account of its
being so worthily borne by his late respected father. The family is
of Pennsylvania origin, having been conspicuous in that state for
generations in connection with the famous religious denomination
known as the Society of Friends. The genealogical history is traced
through the records of the Friends church, which extend back for
many generations in the old state of William Penn. From these it
appears that in 1730 Thomjfis Good, Sr., married Mary Jardel, of
New Britain, Pa., and their son Thomas, Jr., had a son named
Joseph. The latter married Martha Michener and had a large fam-
ily, two of whom in after years became residents of Ohio. These
were Rebecca, wife of Joseph Conard, who settled in Penn township
in 1847, and Charles who came to the same township in 1854. He
was born in Chester county. Pa., March 16, 1807, and in 1838 was
married to Betsey, daughter of Caleb and Ann (Fell) Moore. For
sixteen years after this union they lived in Lancaster counts, but
then decided to risk their fortunes in the great state whieb had
attracted so many of their co-religionists in the past Charles Qood
purchased land in Penn township. Highland county, one and a half
miles west of the village of Careytown, where in course of time he
became celebrated in all the country around for his progressive meth-
ods in farming. His place consisted of 220 acres, w^hich he improved
and cultivated with such skill as to become recognized as authority
in all matters relating to agriculture. He was not only a model
farmer but a model citizen, one of the best types of the many fine
men and women furnished Ohio in. the period of settlement by thfe
high-minded and liberty-loving Society of Friends. He had no polit-
ical aspirations but accepted such offices as those of township trustee,
supervisor and school director, which he believed it to be his duty
to hold in the interest of the public and in discharge of his duties as
a citizen. His scientific methods of farming, united with good
judgment and economy, brought to this quiet Quaker the just
reward of abundant prosperity, and in 1873, in connection with oth-
ers, he purchased the bank at Xew Vienna. He lived until his
eighty-ninth year and passed away April 30, 1895, his wife surviv-
ing until Xovember 5, 1899, and dying when ninety years old. The
children of this worthy couple were Mary, wife of Washington
Blackburn, who is mentioned in the sketch of his son elsewhere.
Elizabeth F., widow of Dr. A. T. Johnson, living in Norwood near
Cincinnati ; Martha E., married Dr. G. R. Conard, of Xew Vienna,
and died at about the age of thirty-five years; Ellis, who is fully
fl-2l



Digitized by



Google



322 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

sketched below; Lydia C, residing with her sister, Mrs. Blacibum;
Evan, a farmer in Penn township; and Rachel M., wife of James
M. Wright, a farmer of Clinton county. Ellis Good, fourth of the
family, was bom at the old homestead in Highland county, Ohio,
September 25, 1845. He attended the common schools in the usual
way and supplemented tliis training by a short course at the Dunk-
ard's Academy in New Vienna. In September, 1864, he enlisted
in the One Hundred and Seventy-fifth regiment Ohio volunteer
infantry with which he served to the close of the civil war, taking
part in the battles of Franklin and Nashville, besides various lighter
engagements in middle Tennessee. After returning from the army
he resumed work on the farm where he had the best of training under
the care and instruction of his lamented father. At pres ent he
resides on a farm of 126 acres adjoining Careyto\vn, upon which he
erected a handsome dwelling-house some four years since, and it is
only necessary to glance over the surroundings to be assured that
the proprietor is carrying out the up-to-date and progressive methods
of farming which were taught him in youth. He became connected
with the Xew Vienna bank in the second year of its establishment
and for ten years past has been president of that financial institution.
He avoids the strifes and intrigues of '"^practical politics" and only
consents to hold such places as that of school director, which he does
for the purpose of assisting the cause of education which he has
much at heart. March 3, 1886, Mr. Good was married to Anna
Hallowell, a lady of excellent social connections and high standing
in the community. Her parents were El wood and Mary D. (Phil-
lips) Hallowell, who came from Chester county. Pa,, and secured
a home in Fairfield township about 1850. Besides Mrs. Grood, their
children are Joseph C, who resides in Denver; Edgar, residing at
Highland ; and Bertha H., w^ife of Charles G. Blackburn. Mr. Hal-
lowell, the father, died July 9, 1885, aged about sixty-one years.
Mr. and Mrs. Ellis Good are members of the Society of Friends.

John H. Gossett, trustee of Salem township, is a grandson of one
of the most distinguished and enterprising of the Highland county
pioneers. John Gossett emigrated from Pennsylvania to Kentucky
and from there, in 1797, to Chillicothe, where he remained two years.
He then came to Highland county and settled in New Market townr
ship, where in 1801 he established two miles below Xew Market the
first successful grist mill in the county. It was a good-sized, hewed-
log stnicture, with a clapboard roof — quite an imposing affair for
those days. The millwright who did this architectural job was an
old Scotchman, who received as his pay one hundred acres of land
which made him independent for life. The iron used in this pio-
neer mill had to be brought all the way from Kentucky, while John
Gossett himself manufactured the stones from two large boulders.



Digitized by



Google



BIOGRAPHICAL. SKETCHES. 323

He disposed of the mill after running it several years, but it was
long continued by his successors. He was a very kind-hearted man,
and if persons applying for flour or meal were unable to pay for it,
he would cheerfully give to them. Eventually, he sold his place on
White Oak and removed to a farm two miles east of New Market
and later to Salem township, where he passed the remainder of his^
life. He was the first representative of Highland county in the
state legislature, serving during the year 1808. Among the chil-
dren of this worthy pioneer was a son named Joseph Gossett, who
was bom in New Market township in February, 1821, and proved
during a comparatively short life to be the worthy offspring of a
worthy sire. He married Louisa, daughter of Greorge Rader, and
first located on what is now known as the M. Barr farm, but in a few.
years traded for a farm in Brush Creek, and later bought 203
acres in Salem towTiship, mostly unimproved land. This he greatly
improved and much of it was brought into cultivation, the area at
the same time being increased until his holdings amounted to 377
acres. For a while he conducted a brickyard at Lynchburg and sub-
sequently had a tannery at Pricetown, being in fact one of the busi-
est and most enterprising men in the county. He was a great friend
of education and one of the first promoters of the free school system
in Salem township, his sympathies being due largely to the fact that
he was himself a man of reading and fully appreciated the advan-
tages of learning. His life, so bright and promising of future use-
fulness, was cut off in the very flower of his manhood, at the age of
thirty-four years. His widow continued to live on the home place
for nine years, when she married Daniel Workman and shortly
afterward removed to Iowa, where she died at the age of eighty.
Joseph and Louisa (Rader) Gossett had nine children, of whom •
Riley, the first bom, is the only one that has died. Those living are
Mary M., wife of M. Young of Iowa; the subject of this sketch;
James W., at the old home place; Martha J., widowed wife of B.
Steers, of Iowa ; Anna E., wife of A. Cochran, of Salem township ;
Nancy E., wife of J. Lewis, of Oklohoma; Louisa, wife of William
Phifer, of Iowa; and Joseph, a resident of California. John H.
Gossett, third in age of the family, was bom in Salem township,
Highland county, Ohio, September 4, 1845, and remained at home
until maturity. He married Luvina, daughter of Abraham and
Mary Roberts, of Clay township, and located there on a farm of 54
acres which he had previously purchased. This place he sold and in
conjunction with his brother bought the old home farm which they
conducted in partnership five years, after which time John H. Gossett
became owner of the estate where he now resides. This consists at
present of 70 acres but he owns interests in other landed property
and altogether is one of tlie substantial farmers of the township.
His home place is well improved with modem dwelling house and



Digitized by



Google



324 .THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND/

convenient farm buildings, and everything indicates good manage-
ment and painstaking care. He is a member of the Christian
church and is serving his second term as trustee of Salem township.
By his first marriage he has seven children : Wyatt H., of Clay town-
ship; Alva C, of Salem township; Mary E., wife of Alva Kobin-
son, of Hamer township; Elmer L., of Clay township; Myrta L.,
wife of William Koberta, of Hamer township; Verdie M., wife of
Dr. Pratt, of Pricetown; and John A., at home. Their mother died
in 1884, and a year later he married Caroline, daughter of James
M. and Millie Faris, of Salem township, and they have had three
children: Joseph C. and Haider H., at home, and Bessie, deceased.

Francis M. Granger, M. D., of Russell, is one of the best known
physicians of Highland county, where he has been practicing medi-
cine nearly thirty years. He comes, too, of a highly honorable line-
age, both of his grandfathers being soldiers in the Revolutionary war,
and his ancestors all down the line noted as industrious and patri-
otic citizens. His grandfather, Ephriam Granger, was a native of
New York, where his forefathers had been settled several genera-
tions, his birth occurring far back in the eighteenth century. He
served in the Revolutionary war and in the second decade of the
last century joined the tide of emigration that was setting in strongly
towards the northwest. In 1814 he located in what was then
Columbia but now a part of Cincinnati, and soon afterward erected
in the present county of Brown the first horse mill seen in that part
of Ohio. Thurstin Granger, one of his sons, was bom near Seneca
Lake, Cayuga county, N. Y., October 1, 1803, and was consequently
about eleven years old when brought by his parents to the west-
ern wilderness. February 15, 1827, he was married to Hannah
Doughty, who was bom at Spotswood, N. J., April 1*, 1812 and still
i^esides with her son at Russell, Ohio. Her parents were Benjamin
and Euphama Doughty, the former bom November 25, 1767, died
April 29, 1853 ; the latter bom in 1773, died October 20, 1846. The
children of Thurstin and Hannah (Doughty) Granger were nine in
number and all the dates of their births, and deaths when such have
occurred, are recorded in the old family Bible printed in 1819, still
preserved and much valued by the descendants. From these records
a transcription shows as follows; Euphama, eldest child, bom in
January, 1830 ; Benjamin D., bom January 6, 1834, now a prac-
ticing physician at Hillsboro; EjAriam, born January 9, 1837;
Margaret S., bom June 3, 1839, wife of John B. Gustin of Indian-
apolis; Frances A., bom inl841, and died at four years of age; Mary
A., bom in 1843, now residing as the widow of Eli Smith in Spring-
field, Ohio; Mathilda, bom in 1846, died at the age of seven years;
Sarah A., born July 15, 1851, now a milliner at Cincinnati. Fran-
cis M. Granger, who completes the list, was the youngest but one



Digitized by



Google



BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 325

of the children, his birth occurring October 14, 1847. His educa-
tion was acquired in the schools at Lebanon and Warren, Ohio, and
in 1869, after finishing his academical course, he entered the Ohio
Medical college. After putting in several years of hard study at
that institution he was graduated with the class of March, 1873.
Without loss of time he located at Russell and entered actively upoa
the practice of his profession, which he has kept up continuously
for nearly thirty years. During this long period of ministering to
the -sick and healing the wounded. Dr. Granger has acquired a wide
acquaintance and his friendships are numerous all over the county.
He is a member of the state and county medical societies, and keeps
posted on all the new discoveries and appliances affecting his pro-
fession. October 10, 1895, he was married, to Emma, daughter of
John Moody and Rachel (Smith) Whitacre of Lynchburg. Mrs.
Granger's father was born August 23, 1817, near Rochester, Ohio,
and died March 24, 1896, at the residence of his son. Perry Whit-
acre, of Lynchburg. Her mother, Rachel (Smith) Whitacre, was
a native of Edwardsville, Ohio, and died February 19, 1876. Dr.
Granger's religious affiliations are with the Methodist Episcopal
church, of which he has been a member for some years. He is a
member of the Masonic fraternity.

Hayes I. Gray, one of the leading grocers of Greenfield, though
a native of Ross, has spent all of his adult life in Highland county.
His father, David Gray, was born and reared in Highland, but after-
wards settled at Chillicothe, where the followed the business of build-
ing and contracting imtil his death, which occurred in 1890. He
married Mary C Robbins, of Grenfield, by whom he had two sons,
the eldest of whom, Charles F. Gray, is in the jewelry business at
Dayton, Ohio. Hayes I. Gray, the other son, was bom in 1876
while his parents were living at Chillicothe, Ohio. When fourteen
years of age he secured a position in the general merchandise store of
Boden Bros., at Greenfield, and worked for that firm eight years.
In 1899 he decided to go into business on his own account and
selected groceries as the line in which he would embark. Accord-
ingly he opened a stock in Greenfield and started in a modest way
at first, but has met with success, his trade growing steadily until his
establishment has become one of the leading grocery concerns of the
city. For awhile he conducted a branch grocery in the Oklahoma
district but later disposed of that by sale. Aside from his regular
business he holds stock in the Home Phone company of Greenfield
and takes an interest in every enterprise which promises to aid in
the city's development He is fond of the fraternal fellowship
afforded by the various fraternities and holds membership in several
of them. In Masonry he has reached the Royal Arch degree and
he is connected with the Woodmen of America and Improved Order



Digitized by



Google



326 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

of Red MeD. In January, 1902, he was married to Mary L., daugh-
ter of Rev. Howard Phillips and niece of George W. Rucker. His
religious affiliations are with the Methodists, and he holds memher-
ship in the church of that denomination at Greenfield.

Jacob M. Grim, a civil war veteran with the rank of first lieuten-
ant, and a substantial farmer, belongs to a family which has been
prominently identified with the agricultural interests of Highland
county since 1820. In that year his father, Peter Grim, came from
Rockbridge county, Virginia, and settled in Highland county, where
he became a popular and influential citizen. He married Mary,
daughter of John Walker, an Irishman by birth who also came to
Ohio from Virginia and was one of the first settlers of Highland
county. Peter and Mary (Walker) Grim reared a family of five
children, of whom John W. and William C. reside in Paint town-
ship ; Sarah Ann married William P. Hughey, but is now dead, and
Henry Turner has also passed away. Jacob M. Grim,, the youngs
est of tlie family, was born in Paint township. Highland county,
Ohio, in 1833, and grew to manhood on his father's farm. The log
cabin schoolhouse was still in vogue in his boyhood days and he got
the full benefit of the same, after which his life passed uneventfully



Online LibraryA. E. Hough J. W. KliseThe county of Highland: a history of Highland County, Ohio, from the ... → online text (page 37 of 63)