A. E. Hough J. W. Klise.

The county of Highland: a history of Highland County, Ohio, from the ... online

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on the farm until the outbreak of the civil war. During the sum-
mer of 1863, it became necessary to garrison numerous forts and
other strongholds captured from the enemy and to meet this demand
two regiments of heavy artillery were recruited in the Sixth
Ohio congressional district. June 7th, 1863, Jacob M. Grim was
appointed second lieutenant of Company A, Second regiment Ohio
heavy artillerj% which was mustered into the service at Camp Den-
nison and on August 19 ordered to the barracks at Covington, Ky.
In the spring of 1864 it was sent to Tennessee and participated in
the campaigns of that and other states during the remainder of the
war under the command of Col. H. G. Gibson. January 1, 1864,
Mr. Grim received promotion to the first lieutenancy of his com-
pany and he held a commission as such when mustered out August
23, 1865. After the cessation of hostilities, he resumed farming,
which has been his lifelong occupation in the county of Highland,
with the exception of one year spent in Iowa during his early man-
hood. He owns a fine dairy farm in Paint township and it would
be proper to describe him as one of the successful and representa-
tive agriculturists of Highland county. Aside from his farming
interests, he has found time to take a lively part in all the local
political battles and has been quite prominent in the ranks of his
party. He came within one vote of obtaining the nomination for
sheriff some years ago and has held several of the more important
township offices, being trustee for six years and justice of the peace
for a long period. He helped to organize Trimble post, No. 442,



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 327

Grand Army of the Kepublic, at Rainsboro, and was commander
of the same several years. He has been connected with the Masonic
order for half a lifetime, being a member of the blue lodge for thirty-
five years and of the chapter for twenty years. He has also held
membership in the order of Odd Fellows for forty-nine years. In
1853 he married Nancy Malvina Maddox, member of a famfly that
was old and highly respectable on the side of both parents. Her
father, Samuel Maddox, who came from Virginia, was a prominent
and prosperous citizen of Paint township and noted for his enthusi-
astic patriotism before and during the civil war. Though above
the military age, he insisted in volunteering and became a member
of the Eleventh regiment Ohio cavalry, with which he was serving
in the Rocky Mountain regions at the time of his death near Cripple
Creek, CoL, March 31, 1863. His wife was Malin4a E. Huitt, a
near relative of the distinguished New York family of this name.
Her father, Dorthica Huitt, was the builder of the old mill on Paint
creek, known by his name for many years, and one of the first estab-
lishments of the kind in Highland county. He was a notable char-
acter in many ways, being a Methodist preacher of considerable
reputation, and known far and wide for his skill with the fife, hav-
ing played that instrument of martial music during the stirring days
of the war of 1812. Samuel and Malinda (Huitt) Maddox reared
a family of nine childrwi: Xancy Malvina, as previously stated,
became the wife of Jacob M. Grim; Mary, who married Milton
Xewby is dead; Ainanda, wadow of William Edmondson, is living
at Indianapolis; Leonidas served four years in the civil war, first
in the Sixtieth Ohio regiment with which he was captured at Harp-
er's Ferry and paroled, subsequently joining the Twenty-fourth
Ohio independent battery of light artillery and being shortly after-
ward killed ; Samuel is an attorney at Louisville, Ky. ; Emily, widow;
of Sanford W, Washburn, resides at Springfield; Allen D. is a
Methodist minister of Westville; Eva, is wife of William Hblrin,
shipbuilder at Xe^vport News; John is in the lumber business at
Clarksburg, W. Va. Mr. and Mrs. Grim have had four children,
only two of whom are living. Frank, the eldest son, who had been
in the railroad business for twenty years, was struck October 25,
1899, by a train in the yards at Chattanooga, Tenn., and died in a
few hours. Mary Ida died in 1860 at the age of four years; Will-
iam P. lives in lioss county and George resides on the old home place
near 'New Petersburg, Highland county. Mr. and Mrs. Grim are
members of the Methodist Episcopal church.

George G. Grim is one of the popular and substantial men of Paint
township, as is proved by his repeated elections to the position of
trustee, the most important of the township offices. He is a native
of Paint township and has spent all his life there, doing his share



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328 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

towards the growth and development of that portion of Highland
county. He is a son of Jacob Grim and his birth occurred at Kew
(Petersburg, Highland county, October 23, 1857. He grew up on
a farm, learned all the details connected with that kind of work and
in the meantime secured a fair education by attendance at the com-
mon schools of the village. In 1882 he was married to Miss Minnie
Martin and soon after, in conjunction with his brother Frank,
bopght the farm where Thomas Cope now lives. In 1890 he
removed to his present place of residence where he has since carried
on general farming and stock-raising. * When the removal of Thomas
Davis caused a vacancy in the office of township trustee, Mr. Grim
was appointed to fill the same and at the expiration of his term was
elected to serve one year. In the spring of 1902 he was again
elected trustee of Paint towTiship for a term of three years, which
he is now serving. Mr. Grim has a fondness for fraternal life and
has been quite active in Oddfellowship. For fifteen years he has
been a member of Emerald lodge, Xo. 211, Independent Order of
Odd Fellows, at Xew Petersburg, and has filled all the chairs con-
nected therewith. At present he holds the position of financial sec-
retary and is regarded by his associates as one of the moving spirits
in keeping up interest in the order. He is also a member of the
popular fraternity known as the Modem Woodmen of America.
Mr. and Mrs. Grim have three children, Grace, Frank L. and Ralph
W. and the family is highly esteemed in the commimity.

John J. Grove, a lately deceased citizen of Paint township, was
an extensive land-owner and well known for many years as a minis-
ter of the Christian church. He was a son of George L. Grove and
bom in Paint township. Highland county, Ohio, on the farm now
occupied by James Parshell, May 20, 1829. His early education
and training for future duties were received in his native township
where he managed the farm for his mother several years before
reaching legal age. February 7, 1849, he was married to Sarah
A. Snider, by whom he had five children: George L., Thomas and
William live in Clinton county ; Lucinda married Daniel West and
resides in Kansas; Samuel, the youngest, has passed away. After
his marriage, Mr. Grove lived some time on the farm now occupied
by Mr. Finegan, later went to Liberty township where he spent
eleven years and then returned to the farm in Paint township where
he spent the remainder of his days. His first wife died July 6,
1869, and March 31, 1870, he was married to Miss Mary A. McFad-
den, a native of Clinton county. The children by this union were
five in number and named as follows : Hannah, wife of Frank Bay-
ham ; Walter, a resident of Paint township; Mary S., deceased ; Har-
rison, at home with his mother; and Rebecca, deceased. Mr.
Grove's death occurred August 12, 1897, and his remains were



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 329

interred at the cemetery near Centerville in presence of many who
had known him long and esteemed him as a good man. He was a
devoted member of the Christian church and for many years a min-
ister of that denomination. He owned a considerable amount of
land on which he had placed many improvements.

Thomas J. Gustin, of Belfast, a veteran business man and influ-
ential citizen, is of a family long known in this part of Ohio, being
a grandson of Dr. John Gustin, of Adams county, famous among
the early settlers for his success in treating disease with those nat-
ural remedies known to the Indians and other students of nature.
On account of the nature of his practice he was widely known as
the "Root doctor." Dr. Gustin was a native of Kentucky and son
of a soldier of the Revolution who served under General Morgan and
earned to his grave a British bullet received at the battle of Cowpens.
When a young man Dr. Gustin married Susanna Scott, daughter
of a Revolutionary soldier, and with his wife removed to Adams
county with the early settlers. Their children were Edward S.»
deceased; William, of North Liberty; Bratton, living at the old
home in Adams county ; Cornelius, Melinda, Susanna, Rebecca and
Rhoda, deceased; and Delilah J., of Adams county. Edward S.
Gustin, father of Thomas J., was bom on the home farm near May-
hill, Adams county, where Dr. Gustin at one time owned a large
area of land, and he resided there after his marriage to Louisa Kerr,
a native of Virginia, imtil his untimely and lamented death at the
age of thirty-six vears. His widow, who survived him for many years,
reared at the old homestead their family of five boys, Thomas J.,
Charles W., John M., and Nicholas O. The two latter are now upon
the home place, and C. W. resides also in Adams county. Thomas J.
Gustin was bom at the Adams county home of his family, Decem-
ber 20, 1845, and was reared there until in his youth he went to the
battlefield witli the gallant boys of Ohio in defense of the Union.
His first enlistment was a private in Company G of the Hundred
and Seventy-second regiment, Ohio volunteer infantry, with which
lie was mustered in at Charleston, Va., and served in the mountain
campaigns in the Virginias. He was often under fire, took part in
numerous skirmishes and was a participant in the battles of Cloyd
Mountain, Loop Creek and the Salt Works, while with this r^-
ment, and six months later re-CDlisted in Company A of the Eighty-
fourth regiment Ohio infantry, with which he was in various minor
engagements, and while at Charleston received injuries that crip-
pled him for life. After this devoted service for his country Mr.
Gustin returned home, and for ten years was employed with his uncle
William at North Liberty, as a carriage maker. Subsequently,
after residing at various places, he made his home at Belfast, where
be carried on the work of carriage manufacturing until 189^7. Since



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330 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

then he has conducted an undertaking establishment He also owns
a small farm in Jackson township and several pieces of town prop-
erty. He is a man widely known and popular, and is a valued
member of the Methodist church, the Masonic order, the Odd Fel-
lows, in which he has held all the offices in the Belfast lodge, and
the Grand Anny of the Republic. After the war he was married
to Mary J., daughter of Thomas and Mary Roberts, a lady belong-
ing to one of die old and influential families of the county, and
they have four children: Clyde, Homer (deceased), Mary and Ber-
tha.

Jame« V. Guthrie, of Leesburg, bears a name which has figured
creditably in the history not only of Highland but other Ohio coun-
ties. His great-grandfather was James Guthrie, a native of Virginia,
bom near Richmond in 1751. About 1778 he was married to Jane
Candler and to them were born ten children, among whom were:
William, October 11, 1779; Henry, September 29, 1782; Patsey,
January 25, 1784; Penelope, December 26, 1787; Agnes, February
15, 1790; Elizabeth, May 24, 1793; J. John, December 16, 1795;
Mildred, June 19, 1798 ; James, the grandfather of the subject of
this sketch, born in Virginia, March 16, 1801; and Harriett, the
youngest child of this family, bom December 19, 1806. James
Guthrie, Sr., brought this large family to Ohio with him when he
emigrated here from Virginia about 1820. He became quite prom-
inent in the affairs of the community, and after a long and useful life
he died in Leesburg, 0.,.Februarv^ 27, 1848. James Guthrie, son of
the latter, and grandfather of the subject of this sketch, was identi-
fied witli Ohio life after coming with his father, and was prominent
in the affairs of Adams and Highland counties, took part in the early
political struggles and was a factor in the development of Leesburg
during a long period before his death, which oceurrexl in 1874. In
early manhood he had married Mahala C Hardy, bom in Ross
county, Ohio, in 1805, who shared his fortunes with dutiful affection
until her untimely deiith in 1843. Among their children was James
Thomas Guthrie, bom at Leesburg, Highland county, Ohio, in 1830;
A few years afterward he was taken by his father to Indiana, which
state became the place of residence of the family for some time and
it was here that James Thomas received his early education and
spent alx>ut five years in learning the tanner's trade. Subseqtiently
he spent several years as an employe on steamboats plying between
Ohio river points and New Orleans and about 1849 returned to his
native county. When this was acquired he worked at it in different
parts of Highland county, eventually locating at Lexington where he
opened a shop and commenced business on his owti account. After
a short experience here he selected Leesburg as a more promising^
place for his purposes, and having removed there made it his perma-



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 331

nent home. He was of an inventive turn of mind and put in much
of his time during the latter years of his life as an experimenter
along different lines. He obtained patents on various devices, some
of which proved commercially successful, the most valuable of his
inventions being a new method of extracting gas from a combination
of coal and gasoline. During his long residence in Leesburg he was
one of the public spirited citizens of that place and enthusiastic over
every proposal that promised advancement or a betterment of condi-
tions. His ingenious mind was always devising plans to improve
conditions, lessen labor and confer additional happiness on his fel-
loAVTuan. During the period of the Mexican war he united with a
military company as a drummer boy for service in that struggle, and
was in government employment for a while. In 1856 he was married
to Maria B. Johnson, who has resided at Leesburg since the death
of her husband, which occurred August 11, 1901. A worthy son suc-
ceeds this worthy sire in the person of James V. Guthrie, who was
bom at Leesburg, Ohio, in 1856. At an early age he developed a
talent for music and so directed his subsequent education as to assist
in tlie development of that valuable accomplishment. In course of
time he became a teacher of music and for several years was a pro-
fessional instructor of military bands in different places. Eventu-
ally he located at Leesburg and embarked in the jewelry business, to
which he has devoted his later years, being now the priilcipal dealer
in his line in that part of Highland county. Mr. Guthrie, like his
father and grandfather before him, is one of the enterprising and pro-
gressive men of his community, believing in progress and in keeping
well to the front in all movements that promise benefit to the people.
In 1886 he was happily married to Minnie M. Pushee, an accom-
plished lady of Highland county of excellent social connections.

James Hallam, the well knowTi contractor and builder at Green-
field, Ohio, has been prominently connected with the city's business
affairs for many years. His father, Isaac Hallam, came from Penn-
sylvania to Ohio in the early part of the last century and married
Margaret A. Beatty, a native of Belmont, then resident in Clinton
county. Five boys resulted from this union, of whom David is a car-
penter at Greenfield, Simon is foreman of the Rucker Stone company,
Mathew is a liquor dealer and John a carpenter. James Hallam, the
other son, was born at Leesburg, Highland county, Ohio, in 1844, but
was reared to early manhood on a farm in Clinton county. In 1862
he came to Greenfield and four years later he was working as a car-
penter in connection vdth the building of railroad bridges. He fol-
lowed this employment at different points until 1869, when he
returned to Greenfield and engaged in contracting and building,
which has since been his regulai* business. Most of the time he has
been alone, but for five years from 1883 was associated with I. C.



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332 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

Baldwin. During his long career at Greenfield, Mr. Hallam has
been connected with the erection of all the principal residences and
business buildings of the city. His latest contract of importance was
for the construction of the First Presbyterian church, which is to be
one of the finest buildings in the city, costing not less than $50,000.
His reputation as a workman, however, is not confined to Greenfield,
but extends far and wide, and he gets work from many distant points
over a large area of territory. Mr. Hallam 's attention was early
turned to the necessity and best means for securing homes for labor-
ing men and he became a charter member of the Home Building and
Loaii association, in the business of which he has always taken a deep
interest Since the organization was formed in 1888 he has been a
member of the board of directors and the finance committee and one
of the leading spirits of the association, which has become one of the
cherished institutions of Greenfield. Mr. Hallam has not been an
office seeker or ultra partisan in politics but has served as a represen-
tative of his ward in the city council of Greenfield. In 1869 he was
married to Susan Fugate, of Clinton county, Ohio, who died in 1879,
leaving four children: Eva R., wife of Walter O. Skeen, an elec-
trician at Perth Amboy, N. J. ; Harry, a carpenter of Greenfield ;
Thomas O., telegraph operator for the Baltimore and Ohio South-
western railroad company at Athens, Ohio ; and Katy, wife of Hugh
Brown, of the Sun Manufacturing company. In 1883 Mr. Hallam
took a second wife in the person of Mary F. Jones, of Greenfield, by
whom he has two children, Carrie Lee and Martha.

Charles M. Harsha, of Hillsboro, one of the prominent business
men of the county, is a grandson of Thomas Harsha, a native of Ire-
land, who came to America many years ago, married Rosanna
Young, and made his home in Alleghany City, Pa., where Paul
Harsha, father of the subject of this sketch, was bom October 30,
1829. Paul moved to Ohio in e^rly manhood, was married October
21, 1852, in Muskingum county, to Duanna, daughter of Samuel and
Mary (Shively) Shrifi:ley, and in February, 1854, came with his
family to Highland county and located three miles north of Hillsboro.
In the same year he embarked in business at Hillsboro as a marble
cutter and monument dealer, and though a long time crippled by dis-
ease, continued the business for thirty years, finally yielding to dis-
ease March 25, 1884. Ten years before his de^th the firm had been
made Harsha & Sons, and in December, 1893, it was incorporated as
the Harsha Monument company, with Charles M. Harsha as mana-
ger. The children of Paul and Duanna Harsha were: Emma I.,
who married Charles E. Ellipitz, of Columbus ; two sons who died in
infancy; Charles M., subject of this sketch; Maggie, wife of
George W. Bowers, a bookkeeper at Xew York ; Minnie, widow of
Charles McClure, formerly a bookkeeper at Hillsboro; Florence, at



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 333

Hillsboro. Charles M. Harsha was bom June 13, 1855, at Hills-
boro, and in his youth became tlie assistant of his father and later a
partner, as has been mentioned. He is now the manager of the busi-
ness, which is flourishing, and one of the important industries of the
city. In early manhood he married Lizzie, daughter of Dr. Enos
and Annie (Jones) Holmes, and they have had six children: Lena,
who graduated in the Hillsboro high school in 1901, and married
C E. McMullen, a business man of Hillsboro ; Clara, who died in
infancy ; Paul, a graduate of the Hillsboro high school in 1901, and
the assistant of his father in business ; Ella, a graduate of the high
schooj, class of 1902, and organist for the Methodist church ; Mora,
in the high school class of 1904; and Duanna, bom May 15, 1890.
Mrs. Harsha's living brothers and sisters (sons and daughters of Dr.
Enos and Annie (Jones) Holmes), are Alice, widow of Thomas J.
North, of Dayton; Rev. E. E. Holmes, of Ghent, Ky., and Scott, city
prosecutor of Cincinnati. Ella Mary died in Illinois, at the age of
eighteen years, soon after her graduation in the Hillsboro Female
college. Mrs. Harsha is also a graduate of that institution, class of
1877. Dr. Enos Holmes, her father, bom January 13, 1821, was a
son of Enos H. Holmes, of Pennsylvania, who married Mary Wilkin^
and was one of the pioneers of Ohio and a devout Methodist. Jacob
Holmes, father of Enos H., was a pioneer of Jefferson county, Ohio.
During the civil war Dr. Holmes was prominently associated with
the enlistment of troops as an examining surgeon.

Charles P. Helsley, justice of the peace and prominent citizen of
White Oak township, was bom November 20, 1842, on the farm
now owned by Frank Sauner, in White Oak township. He is a son
of Joseph Helsley, for many years one of the leading men of the
township, of whom some mention should be made in any work upon
the history of the county. Joseph Helsley was brought west as a
child in liie early days of settlement of the state, by his parents,
Henry Helsley and wife, whose former home was in the Shenandoah
valley of Virginia. They settled in Koss county, at the site of the
old Indian town of Chillicothe, now known as Frankfort, but not
long afterward Henry Helsley died, whereupon the mother retraced
the long and weary journey over the mountains to her old home, on
horseback, carrying her infant son with her. Subsequently she
married Henry Surber, also a native of Virginia, and with him
returned to Ohio before the war of 1812. Their home was made in
White Oak township, and they soon became prominent among the
early settlers. Henry Surber was a devout Christian and deserving
of remembrance for his efforts in aid of the building of churches and
the general advancement of the community. He and his wife reared
a large family of children, who, and their descendants, are among
the best people of the county. Joseph Helsley, on reaching man-



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334 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

hood after his second coming to Ohio, married Asenath Collins, a
native of Highland county, and they had five children : Henry,
deceased ; Peter C, in California ; Mary A., deceased ; Catherine, of
Mowrystown, and Joseph P., deceased. His first wife dying, he
married Viena Davis, of Bro^vn county, and to this union were bom
two children : Charles P., and Sarah E., deceased. Soon after this
marriage Joseph Helsley and wife removed to Kockford, 111., but he
soon returned to White Oak township, where he became a very suo-
cessful farmer and stock raiser and dealer, and a leader in his com-
munity.

Charles P. Helsley was born in Highland county, Ohio, Xovember
20, 1842, and was reared at home and educated in the district schools.
When, he was in his nineteenth year the civil war came on, and he
enlisted in 1861 in Company A of the Sixtieth regiment, Ohio vol-
unteer infantry, mustered in at Hillsboro. Their first field of active
service was in Virginia, under the command of General Fremont,
and Mr. Helsley took part in the famous Shenandoali valley cam-
paign against Stonewall Jackson, and was at tlie battles of Strasburg,
Cross Keys, Winchester, Hallstown and Harper's Ferry. At the
latter town, just before the battle of Antietam, the Union forces were
compelled to surrender, and he was a prisoner of war for some time,
though at once paroled and sent north. Being discharged at Chicago,
he returned hortie, and was out of the service imtil he re-enlisted in
Company G of the Hundred and Xinety-second Ohio, in which he
was promoted to orderly sergeant. With this command he served
again in the Shenandoali valley, until the close of the war, and was
mustered out at Columbus in September, 1865. After the war he
married Sarah E. Searight, a native of Uniontown, Pa., and they
made their home at Mowrystown two years, then one year on a farm
now owned by E. Sauner, after which they bought tie farm where
they now live, originally 136 acres, to which they have added 34



Online LibraryA. E. Hough J. W. KliseThe county of Highland: a history of Highland County, Ohio, from the ... → online text (page 38 of 63)