A. E. Hough J. W. Klise.

The county of Highland: a history of Highland County, Ohio, from the ... online

. (page 43 of 63)
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married Rachel Reece of the Winchester (Va.) neighborhood, and
migrated to the West during the first quarter of the nineteenth cen-
tury. He located first in Harrison county, Ohio, but in 1837
removed to Samantha, in Highland county. The children of this
Pennsylvania couple, all now dead, were Reece, who moved to Iowa ;
John S., Joseph and Ann, the latter wife of Edwin Arthur. John S.
Larkin, the second of these children in order of birth, married
Sarah, daughter of Michael and Rachel Yost, of Harrison county,
Ohio, and the result of this union was a large family as follows :
Isaac, a resident of Hillsboro ; Mary Ann, widow of William Hus-
sey ; Elijah H. ; Margaret E., wife of William Polk ; Rachel E., wife
of Samuel Polk of New Vienna ; Martha K., wife of F. M. Miller,



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368 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

residing near Hillsboro ; John, who died at the age of fourteen years ;
and William, who resides at Hillshoro. By a second marriage to
Mrs. James Hussey, nee Edwards, John S. Larkin had two addi-
tional children, whose names were Charles and Alice. Elijah H.
Larkin, third of the first family of children, was bom March 6,
1838, at Samantha, Highland county, Ohio, where his father kept
tavern many years. In 1867 he was married to Rebecca, daughter
of Charles and Elizabeth (Gibson) Stafford, and descended from one
of the earliest settlers of the county. Her grandfather, Shadrick
Stafford, was a native of Virginia who came out and built a fulling
mill in Liberty township as early as 1805 and next year brought his
family for permanent residence. The children of Elijah H. Lar-
kin by his first wife were John Charles, the subject of this sketch,
and Leoto, a teacher in the public schools at Muncie, Ind. In 18T2
Mr. Larkin contracted a second marriage with Susan, daughter of
Brice Cooper, by whom he had the following named children:
Adima, teacher in the Hillsboro schools; McShurley, bookkeeper in
Cleveland; Dora, exchange clerk at the Merchants Xational bank;
and Fred W., a student in the Hillsboro schools. John Charles
Larkin, eldest of his father's children, was born at Hillsboro, High-
land county, Ohio, June 1, 1868, and as he grew up obtained the
best education that could be afforded by the schools of his native
city. After finishing a four years' course in the Hillsboro high
school he took charge of one of the district schools and followed the
occupation of teaching from the years 1888 to 1893, inclusive. In
the leisure hours before and after school and on holidays, the young
teacher devoted most of his time to reading with a view to educating
himself as a physician. In the fall of 1893 he matriculated at tHe
Medical collie of Ohio, where he finished the course in 1896 and,
had the honor of being appointed speaker for the class which gradu-
ated that year. Shortly after obtaining his diploma. Dr. Larkin
formed a partnership with Dr. Truman Holmes for the practice of
medicine at Hillsboro, which association continued until the removal
of Dr. Holmes to Washington in Xovember, 1900. Since then Dr.
Larkin has been alone, and has long since demonstrated that he was
destined to be one of the most popular and successful physicians in.
the Highland capital. In 1896 he was appointed coroner of High-
land county and gave such satisfaction that at the expiration of his
term ho was elected to serve two additional years. He is local sur-
geon for the Baltimore & Ohio Southwestern railroad company,
examiner for several life insurance companies, and member of the
county, state and American medical associations. Dr. Larkin's fra-
ternal connections are numerous and he is regarded as one of the
most popular and attentive fraternity members in the city. At pres-
ent he is worshipful master of Hillsboro lodge, Xo. 38, Free and
Accepted Masons; exalted ruler of lodge No. 361, Benevolent and



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 369

Protective Order of Elks, and medical examiner of Buckeye lodge,
No. 17, Ancient Order United Workmen.

David X. Lawson, of Brush Creek township, an energetic and
valued citizen, was bom May 28, 1841, on the farm now owned by
James M. Lawson, in that township. He is the son of James Law-
son, bom in Virginia in 1802, who was orphaned by the death of
his father at seven years of age, and was reared by John Palmer.
At twenty-five years, of age James Lawson married Mary Hammond,
a native of Brush Creek township, and they began housekeeping on
the farm now owned by their son, James M., and were the parents
of eleven children: John, living in Adams county; Alfred A., in
Kansas; Josiah, deceased; David N. ; James M. ; Sarah A., wife of
B. Cravens, of Illinois; Lucinda E., wife of James Woods, of lowaj
Lucilla, Jemima and Agnes, deceased ; and Mary, wife of James A.
Taylor, of Brush Creek. James Lawson lived to the age of sixty-
eight years, and had an honorable and fairly successful life, acquir-
ing a comfortable property, although he began poor, and he was
honored among his associates in tlie Universalist church, of which he
was one of the trustees and staunchest supporters, and honored also
by the people of the township, who made him township treasurer
and trustee. David X. Lawson, son of the foregoing, started out at
the age of eighteen years to make his own way in the world, working
by the month at farming, but soon the great w^ar came on, and he vol-
unteered in defense of the nation he loved, becoming a private soldier
in Company I of the Twenty-fourth regiment Ohio infantry. His
first active service was in the West Virginia campaigns, fighting at
Greenbrier and Cheat Mountain. Early in the spring of 18G2,
being transferred to the west, he was in the great battle of Shiloh,
and after that he was in the campaigns under Buel and Rosecrans,
participating in the great march from middle Tennessee to Louis-
ville and back, and fighting at Crab Orchai'd, Perryville, and Stone
River. In the Chickamauga campaign he was in numerous engage-
ments, including the great battle of September 20th, 1863, when he
with many others wTre made a prisoner of war. Then followed a
long period of confinement in the southern prison pens, at Libby,
prison, Richmond, where he was held four or five months ; Danville,
Va., a like period ; Andersonville prison, four or five months ; and
several months at Charleston, S. C, and Florence. Toward the
close of the war, early in 1865, w^hile being transferred to Raleigh,
N. C, he escaped by jumping from a moving railroad train, and had
the good fortune to reach the Union lines at Smithland. Being sent
to Annapolis, he was given a furlough to visit his home, and was
soon afterward honorably mustered out at Columbus. Since then
Mr. Lawson has been a worthy citizen of Brush Creek township,
H-24



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370 THE COUNTY OP HIGHLAND.

for some time farming rented places, at one of which, the Hizer
farm, he remained for twenty years, and is now the owner of a val-
uable farm of 129 acres. He has also for eight years been engaged
in operating a threshing machine, and is the owner of a saw mill.
He is a member of tha Grand Army post at Sinking Spring, and of
the Threshers National Protective association ; and has served twelve
or fourteen years as supervisor and constable. After the war he
married Louisa Hatter, and they have two children: Agnes M.j
wife of S. West, of Brush Creek, and Laura J.

John O. T^mon, a well-to-do farmer of Xew Market township, is
one of the many descendants of an old pioneer who joined the rap-
idly increasing army of Highland coimty settlers in 1814. Samuel
Lemon, a native of Peimsvlvania, was a shoemaker bv trade and
after his arrival in Ohio drove a thriving business by making boots
and shoes for the inhabitants of his bailiwick. His custom was to
ply the awl and thread during the inclement season of winter and
devote his time to farm work in summer, in this way earning a com-
fortable living and laying up some store for the future. He bought
and settled on a farm two and a half miles north of the town of Xew
Market and there spent the remainder of his days. Samuel Lemon's
marriage proved fruitful and Avas blessed with twelve children, of
whom John, Adam, James M., Samuel, George, Perry, William
Isaac, Isaiah, Catherine and Anna have passed away. The only one
living is Eliza J., who married Thomas Peal of Lynchburg.
James M. Lemon, third of the children in age, was born in Xew Mar-
ket township, June 1(), 1816, and as he grew up acquired knowledge
of the chaimiaker's trade. He worked at this in Hillsboro for a
while before his marriage to Mary, daughter of John and ilary
Chapman, old settlers of Xew Market township. He located with
his bride on the farm now owne<l by 'Mr, ^IcTvee and shortly after-
ward engaged in general mercantile business at what is now known
as Shackelton. This he followed several years, meantime continu-
ing to make chairs during his hours of leisure, and altogether between
merchandising, farming and chairmaking he did a thriving business.
He became a man of considerable local influence, having held all thQ
important township offices and reached the age of eighty-two before
his death. The children of ]Mr. and Mrs. James ^I. Lemon were
Rachel, wife of Rol)ert Purdy of Xew ^larket township; John O.,
subject of this sketch ; I>aura, deceased, and Charlie, a resident of
Hillsboro. John O. I^mon, second of the family, was bom near
Xew Market, Highland county, Ohio, March 16, 1847, and remained
with his father on the farm until he reached his majority. About
that time he was married to Miss Frances, daughter of William and
Lucinda Strange, of Hamer township. The first ten months of their
married life w^as spent on a farm, from which they removed to



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 371

occupy a place purchased on the Cincinnati pike. Here they lived
about fourteen years, when they took up quarters at the old home-
stead for the purpose of caring for Mr. Lemon's aged parents. After
the death of the latter, he bought the home place and has since
resided there, being now owner of 146 acres which he cultivates with
the usual crops and raises considerable stock. Mr. Lemon has been
township trustee six years, also school director. His children, two
in number, are Alvin, a resident of Union township, and Walter,
who remains at home. The family are communicants of the Chris-
tian church.

Charles M. Lewis, an estimable citizen of Concord township,
resides upon the farm purchased in 1818 by his grandparents, Lewis
and Abigail Lewis, who came to Ohio from Bucks county, Penn.
They bought three hundred acres of Avild land, much of which they
cleared and improved, and Lewis Lewis came to be one of the leading
men of his township, successful as a farmer and stock raiser, and
active in politics, holding the office of justice of the peace for many
years. His home was a polling place for many elections. The chil-
dren of these grandparents were William, Clinton, , Lewis, Judah,
Milton, Celia and Alford. Milton was bom in Bucks county. Pa.,
July 1, 1814, and reared from four years of age in Concord town-
ship. In early manhood he married Catherine, daughter of Camp-
bell Nance, a lady bom in Virginia and reared in Highland county,
and they began their married life and filled out their lives on the old
home place, the husband dying at eighty-three years of age and the
wife at seventy-two. Both are buried in the Lewis cemetery on the
home farm. It can be said in memory of Milton Lewis that he was
one of the leading men of the township, being honored with many
local offices which he honorably filled, and that he prospered in busi-
ness, becoming an extensive dealer in live stock. At one time he
owned over three hundred acres of land in the township. Jlis five
children are: Martha, wife of Godfrey Wilkin; Jennie, wife of
Joseph Burns ; AUie, wife of William Stewart, of Greenfield ; Ella,
widow of Daniel Butters, of Marshall, and Charles M., the subject
of this sketch. The latter was born in the house where he now lives,
February 23, 1862, was educated in the district school, and in early
manhood was married to Elizabeth, daughter of James K. Shannon.
One child has been born to them, a daughter. May. Mr. Lewis is an
affable, courteous man, as well as of business habits and industry,
and is notably popular throughout his vicinity. He is the owner of
nearly two hundred acres of well-improved land, and his residence
and farm buildings have been remodeled and improved until they are
among the most attractive and convenient in the township. In addi-
tion to farming and the breeding of Shorthorn cattle, Mr. Lewis
gives much of his time to the introduction of the Page wire fence



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372 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

in his neighborhood, and whatever he undertakes is likely to meet
with success. He is a member of the school board of the township,
is a communicant of the Church of Christ, and is firmly allied to the
Republican party, with which his family has long been identified.

Milton E. Lewis, notable among the leading men of Concord town-
ship, is a grandson of LeAvis and Abigail Lewis, early settlers of the
township, of whom, a sketch is given in the foregoing. His father
was William Lewis, born in Chester county. Pa., December 24, 1810,
eight years before his parents came to Ohio. In youth William
Lewis found employment in the work of pioneer farming with his
brother Judah, in, (Concord township, was a teamster in the days of
forest roads before the era of canals or railroads, hauled pottery from
the Concord township pottery to various parts of the county, and
made one trip down the Ohio and Mississippi rivers in the flat boats
of that day. Meeting with success in his efforts he was able to buy
a farm of lOG acres, and then married a Miss Williams, a native of
Highland county, and settled dowTi to farming, varying his employ-
ment witli work as a carpenter for a good many years. His in-
dustry and business instinct made him a well-to-do man in his time,
and he w^as tlie owner of 212 acres. He passed away at the ripe age
of eighty-nine years, survive<l by several of his children. These
were, Cecilia, deceased; Phoebe A., wife of William Hidings, of
Kansas; Elizabeth, deceased; Xanc}', wife of William Link, of Con-
cord ; Anna, deceased ; ililton E., subject of this sketch ; Clinton,
deceased ; William, of Clinton county ; John, deceased ; Thomas, of
Concord township; Edward, living on the old homestead. Milton
E. Lewis was born near Fairfax, Ohio, November 28, 1846, was
reared on the farm and educated in the district school. When seven-
teen years of age he began work on the farm for his uncle, Milton,
which continued four years; after that he followed the carpenter
trade for six years, and then si)ent a short time in Iowa. Coming
back to Taylorsville, he succeeded J. T. Potts as a general merchant,
but did not remain in business long, leaving it to engage in farming
on a place that he traded the store for. On securing this home he
married Levinia Hetherington, daughter of William Hetherington
and descended from one of the pioneer families of the township,
A year latei* they changed their home to the farm of 126 acres wherQ
they now reside, but have disposed of some of the land. They have
one child, Eva Alice, wife of James Shannon, of Washington to^\^l-
ship. Mr. Lewis is quite successful as a farmer and breeder of live
stock, and is held in high esteem by his neighbors. Eor six years
he has served as a member of the school board. He is a valued mem-
ber of the Methodist church and in politics a Republican. He has
made all the improvements now^ to be seen on his attractive property,
and has one of the best equipped farms in that region. With a corn-



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 373

mendable spirit of enterprise he was one of the principal promoters
of the Concord pike, Xo. 49, and Rural free delivery, No. 2, and he
is one of the stockholders in the Merchants Xational bank of Hills-
boro.

Christopher Lewis, proprietor of the famous farm in Penn town-
ship known as Flora Vale, is the principal living representative of
one of the oldest and most honorable families in Highland county.
They came originally from Wales. According to the carefully pre-
served records it was in the year 1682 that three brothers emigrated
to America and fixed their abodes in differeht parts of the colonial
settlements along the Atlantic coast. Two of them were lost to sight,
so far as subsequent history is concerned, and it is not known whether
they left descendants or what became of them. Evan Lewis, second
in age of the trio, settled in Philadelphia and became the progenitor
of the family subsequently so well known in the West. Among his
children was a son named Jehu, bom in 1723, who afterward settled
in Chester county, Pa., and remained there until the close of that
century, when he removed to Bedford county, Va. He married Alice,
daughter of George and Hannah Maris, and their nine children were
as follows: Jesse, bom in 1750; James, in 1751; Elijah, in 1752
(these three died young) ; Joel, in 1755; Hannah, in 1757; Evan,
in 1760 ; Jesse (named from the eldest, who died), in 1763 ; Greorge,
in 1765; Ann, in 1767. Jehu Lewis died in 1804 and his wife,
who was bom in 1726, died in 1820, both being buried in Friends'
graveyard. Goose Creek meeting house, in Bedford county. Their
son Joel, accompanied by his brothers Evan and Jesse and sister
Ann, migrated to Ohio in 1814 and settled first on the Little Miami,
near Millgrove, where he remained until 1822. In that year Joel
removed to Highland county, where he purchased a farm in the
southern part of what is now Penn township. March 9, 1786, he
wajs married to Sarah, daughter of William and Esther Daniel, of
Loudoun county, Va., and his four children were: Jehu, bom in
1791, and died in 1875, at State Center, Iowa; Daniel, more fully
noticed below; Sarah, bom in 1797 ; and a second daughter who died
on day of birth in 1802. Joel Lewis died at his home in Penn town-
ship Xovember 30, 1829, after which his widow was tenderly cared
for by her children and grandchildren until her death, which
occurred June 23, 1840, in the eighty-second year of her age. Her
remains were deposited in the cemetery of Clear Creek by the side of
those of her husband which had been left eleven years before in the
same place of final rest. Daniel Lewis, the second son of this pio-
neer couple, was bom in Bedford county, Va., in 1794, and after
coming to Ohio with his parents in 1814, taught school several years
in the counties of Warren, Clinton and Highland. In 1825 he
bought of G<)v. Allen Trimble the farm in the northwestern part of



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874 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

Penn township now known as Flora Vale and owned by his son. At
the time of the purchase this land was covered by an unbroken for-
est, which disappeared in the course of years before the woodsman's
ax and pioneer fortitude and eventually emerged as one of the hand-
somest estates in the county. In 1825 Daniel Lewis married Pris-
cilla, daughter of Christopher and Sarah Hussey, and the eight
children resulting from this union were as follows: Charles D.,
born in 1829; Christopher, fully sketched below; Sarah A., bom in
1835; Albert, in 1836; Alvah, in 1839; Mary B., in 1841; George,
in 1843 ; and Rachel, in 1845. The father of this family died
November 28, 1847, his widow surviving him many years and pass-
ing away in May, 1885. Charles D. Lewis, their oldest son, was a
young man of great promise and had entered upon a career that
promised most fniitful results but which, unhappily, was cut short
in the prime of life by a railroad accident July 4, 1857. At the time
of his death he was professor of chemistry and pharmacy in the
Eclectic college of medicine at Cincinnati and had exhibited remark-
able versatility of talent, as well as much force of character, during
his brief but brilliant life. Christopher Lewis, second in age of
the eight children of his parents, was born on tlie homestead farm
in Highland county, Ohio, September 16, 1831, and has devoted his
entire life to the quiet pursuits of agriculture. Under his skillful
management and endless industrs' the place has been steadily
improved and is now almost ideal both in its external and internal
appointments. In the fall of 1825 his father built a comfortable
hewed-log house, which gave place in fourteen years to the present
neat dwelling-house where Mr. Lewis and his family have so long
resided. In 1870 several additions and tasteful improvements were
made by the proprietor and it would now be difficult to find a pret-
tier place than Flora Vale, with its lovely lawns, choice shade trees
and shrubbery, highly cultivated fields and other concomitants of
rural repose. In fact, the contrast between "pioneer days," as exem-
plified by Mr. Lewis' father, and twentieth-century civilization, as
witnessed by ^Ir. Lewis himself, can nowhere be seen in more force
than at this luxurious country home in Highland county. Septem-
ber 22, 1859, Mr. Lewis was married in Philadelphia to Louisa K.,
daughter of Joseph and Esther C. Hallowell of Chester coimty. Pa.
Shortly after this event, he began purchasing the interests of the
other heirs in his father's estate, which was kept up from time to
time until 1865, when he obtained and has retained full possession
of this desirable property. The farm, consisting of a hundred acres,
is situated in Penn to^vnship on what is now known as the Carey-
town pike, about three miles and a half southeast of l^ew Vienna.
Mr. and Mrs. Lewis have three children of whom Eugene C, the old-
est, was bom June 20, 1860. Walter H., the second son, was bom
November 17, 1862, and married April 19, 1888, to Maude K.



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 375

Smith, his children being Walter H., Ealph M., Glertrude M.,
Louise K., William Waddell and Priscilla. Marion, the only
daughter, was bom May 25, 1866, and married December 24, 1890,
to Horace K. Anson, their children being Virgil L. and Louisa L.
Mr. Lewis served several years as master of Union grange, No. 77,
Patrons of Husbandry, at New Vienna and was for a long time
school director in his district. He and his wife have long been
devoted members of the religious Society of Friends and prominent
in connection with church affairs. They possess the same reposeful
traits of character, the same industrious habits, the same love of lib-
erty, good morals and right-doing that have characterized these peo-
ple for centuries and made them such staunch supports of law and
order and free government everywhere.

The Linn Family: вАФ About the year 1790 Robert Linn, who lived
in the north of Ireland, became weary of the unequal struggle for
existence in that tax-ridden and badly governed land and yielded his
shattered frame and saddened heart to the Grim Destroyer which in
time conquers every human being. A widow and six children, most
of them helpless, were left to bemoan tlie irreparable loss which had
deprived them of their only support and protector. There was no
recourse left but that of expatriation, the last hope of many a heart-
broken Irishman as he turned his sorrowful gaze upon his country
and resolved to leave it forever. Whe^ the widow Linn left the
shores of Erin in 1796, boimd for free and hospitable America, hei*
oldest child Samuel was just twenty-one years of age. After the
wearisome and protracted voyage was completed, the little band made
their way to Lancaster county, Pa., where a temporary location was
secured to be followed by removal to Virginia in 1803. L^nlike most
Irish immigrants of that day, the Linns were of Scotch ancestry and
adherents of the Protestant faith. Samuel, being the eldest, stood
somewhat in the relation of a father to the other children and was a
great help as well as comfort to his Avidowed mother. Xovember 8,
1803, he was married to Catharine Slaymaker, member of one of the
distinguished military families of Virginia. Her father, Capt. John
Slaymaker, was with Braddock at the time of his memorable defeat
by the Indians and subsequently commanded a company in the war
for American independence. Robert Alexander Linn, one of the
children of this marriage, was bom October 8, 1810, and removed
wuth his father to Highland coimty in 1832. The latter died here in
September, 1860, at the ripe age of eighty-five years. August 13,
1857, Robert A. Linn was married to Elizabeth, daughter of Noah
and Elizabeth (Robinson) Evans, and member of a family notable in



Online LibraryA. E. Hough J. W. KliseThe county of Highland: a history of Highland County, Ohio, from the ... → online text (page 43 of 63)