A. E. Hough J. W. Klise.

The county of Highland: a history of Highland County, Ohio, from the ... online

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the history of Liberty township. Richard Evans, Mrs. Linn's grand-
father, a native of Pennsylvania, first moved to Kentucky with his
father, Hugh Evans, and from there to Highland county in 1799,



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376 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

where he bought land on Clear creek and subsequently became one of
the earliest of the county's associate judges. By his wife, Mary
(Pierce) Evans, he had fifteen children, of whom twelve lived to
mature ago. Xoah Evans, the third son, was born in Kentucky in
1795 and in 1819 was married to Elizabeth Robison, of Chillicothe.
They had ten children, including Mrs. Elizabeth (Evans) Linn, who
was bom in 1832 in the old brick house which was built by her grand-
father in 1809 on his Clear Creek farm in Liberty township. This
was the first brick dwelling-house erected in Highland count)^ and the
venerable structure is still standing as one of the interesting land-
marks of the olden time. In the family it is kno^vn familiarly as the
"Ark," probably because its last proprietor in the Evans line was
named Noah. In 1868, Eobert A. Linn purchased 193 acres from
the Evans estate and ten years later erected the elegant brick house
now occupied by his widow and children, east of Clear creek on the
Chillicothe pike. The children of Robert A. and Elizabeth (Evans)
Linn are Samuel D., Katharine, Margaret E., Lucy and Minnie E.,
who reside on the farm with their mother. William D. Linn, the
second son, was born on the paternal homestead in Highland county,
Ohio, June 30, 1860, and educated in the district schools. In 1879,
he removed to Iowa, where he spent six years employed as a clerk
in various mercantile establishments, after which he returned to High-
land county and in 1886 took up his residence on part of the Linn
estate. In 1879 he was married to Luella Bumgamer, who died in
1885, le^-ving two children: David, born February 5, 1880, and
Frederick, bom April 16, 1882. March 19, 1889, Mr. Linn was
married to Reexlie, daughter of Jacob and Rlebecca (Fettro) Pen-
nington, by whom he has four children: Ruth, bom January 28,
1892 ; Ray, born June 21, 1895 ; Jane, born January 19, 1899^; and
Esther bom March 20, 1902.

Alvin M. Louderback, justice of tlie peace in Clay township, and
widely known as a prosperous farmer and stockraiser, is the grandson
of Peter Louderback, a native of Pennsylvania, who was brought to
Ohio by his parents, who settled as pioneers in the vicinity of the town
of Sardinia. Justice Louderback, is therefore, in the fourth genera-
tion of the family in Ohio. Peter Tx^uderback, when he grew to man-
hood, married Betsey Carbory, a daughter of another pioneer family
of Brown county, and made his home in Brown county, farming
through the warmer months and devoting the winters to his trade as
a shoemaker. Fifteen children were bom to him and his wife:
Jackson, Causby, Mary, Millie, Marion, James, Hamer, Mason, Ema-
riah, Arminda and Clarinda (twins), and Peter. Several of these
are yet living in Ohio, including Hamer, the father of A. M. Louder-
back. Hamer Louderback was bom in 1835, at the home near Sar-
dinia, and when a youth found employment for several years on the



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 377

river boats between Higginsport and Cincinnati. Later he married
Mary Welsh, a native of Clermont county, and they made their home
first at the town of Rural, in that county. Subsequently their home
was on Straight creek and various other places in Brown county,
until they moved to White Oak township, Highland county, where
they resided for seventeen years. There the wife and mother died,
and afterward Hamer Louderback returned to Bro\\Ti county, and
wedded Rachel Martin. He is now living at Georgetown, where he
has been honored for four years with the office of city marshal. By
his first marriage twelve children were bom: A, M., subject of this
sketch; Anna, whose home is in Georgetown; John, in Kansas;
Arthur, in Montana; OUie, in Washington; Martha, in Brown
county ; Emmariah, in Illinois ; Clara, in Brown county ; George, in
Greene county; Flora and Florence (twins), in Brown county, and
Pearl, in the same county. A. M. Louderback was bom at Rural,
Clermont county, October 13, 1854. When sixteen years of age,
having previously attended the district schools, he began w^orking for
himself as a farm employee in Clay and White Oak townships, and
a year later went to Indiana, but soon returned to his native county.
For nine years he worked with William Wills, of Clay township.
Subsequently he was married to Mary Gomia, daufi:hter of Louis and
Mary Gk)mia, old settlers of Highland county. Mrs. Louderback, a
' most estimable lady, was born in the house where she and her husband
have made their home since marriage. Four children have been born
to them: Dettiont Q., Theresa, Bessie and Harley, all of whom are
yet at home. Mr. Louderback is quite successful as a farmer and
breeder of Shorthorn and Jersey cattle, and Poland China and Berk-
shire hogs, and contributes efficiently to the advancement of the agri-
cultural and livestock interests of his county. He is an honored
member of the United Brethren church and the order of Odd Fellows,
in politics is a Democrat, and he is now serving his first term as jus-
tice of the peace of his township.

Milton Glenn Lucas, one of the prosperous farmers of Marshall
township on the fertile banks of Rocky Fork, comes from an old fam-
ily whose history in Highland county goes back to the beginning of
the nineteenth century. James and Catharine (T^vingood) Lucas,
of Delaware, who were the first of the name to arrive in the Scioto
valley, had ten children and among them a son named William. The
latter married Nancy, daughter of John Owens, and became the par-
ents of four children, including John L., who died in Brush Creek
township in 1901, aged about seventy-five years ; Samuel, who died
at the age of twenty-five; and William W., a resident of Missouri.
Elijah Lucas, the oldest of the above mentioned children, was bom
in Paint township iN'ovember 20, 1820, and at present resides three
miles northeast of the village of Marshall. October 21, 1847, he



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378 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

married Amanda, daughter of William W. and Eliza( Roth) Glenn,
members of an old family of the county. The eight children of
Elijah and Amanda (Glenn) Lucas were James William and
Birches M., farmers of Paint township; Lucinda, who married
James Sams and died at the age of thirty-six years ; the subject of
this sketch ; Ellen, widow of Dr. L. T. Glenn ; Mary, wife of James
Sams ; Xettie Jane, who died at the age of nineteen ; and Robert^ who
is at home. Milton Glenn Lucas, fourth of the family, was bom in
Brush Creek to\\Tiship, Highland county, Ohio, December 6, 1858,
and attended the normal department of the Union graded schools at
Hillsboro under Prof. Louis McKibben. June 26, 1895, he was
married to Olive Williams, and they have two children : Milton
Gilbert, bom July 19, 1896, and Ruth Williams, born March 27,
1899. Mr. Lucas is farming his father's place of 200 acres on the
banks of Rocky Fork in Marshall township and owns the 73 acres
where his father now resides. He is a member of the Methodist
Episcopal church and of Paint lodge, Xo. 453, Knights of Pythias
at Rainsboro. Mrs. Lucas' ancestry runs back to the earliest period
of the county's history. Her great-grandfather, George Gall, was a
soldier of the Revolution who located in Highland county in 1801,
and his daughter Susannah married Thomas Williams. Among the
children of the latter was Daniel Williams, who married Mary
Hatcher and by her had three sons and three daughters: Mary
Metta, wife of John Horst, an attorney of Hillsboro ; Priscilla, wife
of J. H. Iliestand, a farmer of Liberty to^\^lsllip ; Joseph Wesley, a
farmer of Fairfield township; Joshua, who died of typhoid fever;
Olive, who became Mrs. Milton G. Lucas; and Elmer, a physician at
Marshall, Texas.

Robert M. Lyle, member of the Highland county infirmary board
and otherwise influential in public affairs, comes of a long line of
farmers who for several generations have been identified with the
agricultural development of Liberty township. William Lyle,
founder of the American branch of this well known family, was a
native of Ireland who married Nancy Gilmore and subsequently emi-
grated to Rockbridge county, Virginia. Among his children was a
son named Samuel, bom in 1773, after the parental emigration to
Virginia, and married in early manhood to Eleanor Finley. The
six children of this union were Sallie, Finley, William, Xancy, Jane,
and Samuel, Jr., all of whom were brought by their parents about
the year 1815 to Highland county, where the father bought over four
hundred acres of land in Concord township. In 1818, a few years
after his arrival, the head of the house divided the Concord farm
between his two eldest sons, Finley and William, and purchased two
hundred acres in Liberty township one mile east of the infirmary,
where he lived until his death in 1842, seven years after his wife



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 379

had passed away. His son, Samuel Lyle, Jr., was bom in Rock-
bridge county, Va., in 1815, and was an infant in arms when his
parents came that year to their new home in the West. He grew up
on the farm in Liberty township and in 1841 was married to Mary
Alice, daughter of John and Ailsie (Boyd) Black, another family
of Virginians. The children of Samuel and Mary (Black) Lyle
were Margaret Ann, now widow of J. B. Gamble, who died at
Noblesville, Ind. ; Sarah E., wife of George Fox, who farms oppo-
site the infirmary; Eobert M., further sketched below; Mary E.,
wife of R. R. West, formerly of Paint township; Alice J., wife of
Hugh A. Evans, of Paint township; Charles A., teaming in Hills-
boro; and Hettie E-, unmarried. Robert M. Lyle, third of the chil-
dren, was bom in Highland county, Ohio, April 6, 1846, on the farm
in Liberty township purchased by his grandfather, inherited by his
father and his own home at the present time. July 17, 1864, he
enlisted in tlie One Hundred and Seventy-fifth regiment Ohio
Xational Guard, with w^hich he sensed until the close of the war.
After tlie termination of hostilities he returned to the home farm
where, with the exception of two years in Iowa in the drug trade, he
has spent all the subsequent years of his life. At present he is one
of the board of directors in charge of the Highland county infirmary
and superintendent of the Marshall pike in Liberty township. He
is a member of the Paint lodge, Xo. 453, Knights of Pythias. In
April, 1880, he was married to Lummie, daughter of Edward and
Sophia (McCoppin) Head, and the children of this union are:
Frank G., bom August 10, 1882; Carrie E. and Mary A., twins,
bom July 19, 1891 ; and Stella M., bom October 11, 1894.

Reuben W. Lyle, prominent for many years in the printing and
publishing business of Hillsboro, comes of old and honorable pioneer
stock identified w^ith Highland from an early period of the county's
history. His great-grandparents w^ere Samuel and Eleanor (Fin-
ley) Lyle, whose lives are mentioned in the foregoing sketch. Their
eldest son, Finley Lyle, was born in Virginia in 1800, married Cath-
arine, daughter of John Ellis of Concord township, in 1830, and
died in March, 1869, on the estate previously settled by his father.
Jame¬І G. Lyle, one of his sons, was bom in Concord township May
22, 1841, and March 19, 1863, married Keziah, daughter of Solo-
mon and Mary Fling, and by her had the following named children :
Catherine A., w^ho died in infancy; the subject of this sketch;
Mary E., who died at the age of tw^enty-two years; S. Ellis, a job
printer in Hillsboro; Charles F., a carriage painter; Albert J., a
tinner at Circleville; Harry H., a blacksmith in Leesburg; Ida Belle,
wife of Walter Rector, lumber inspector at Hillsboro ; and Sarah J.,
a bookkeeper. In 1874 James G. Lyle located at Hillsboro, where
he served eight years on the police force, ten years as city marshal



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380 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

and since 1900 as private watchman for a number of the city mer-
chants. Reuben W. Lyle, the second of his children, was bom in
Highland county, Ohio, May 19, 1865, and passed through the gram-
mar grade of tlie Ilillsboro public schools. When sixteen years old
he began, to learn the printer's trade and six years later was made
foreman of the job-printing department of the Gazette. In 1893 he
formed a partnership with his brother S. E., and opened a job print-
ing establishment under the firm name of Lyle Brothers. March 1,
1895, this concern w^as incorporated as the Lyle Printing Company,
which has since continued business on Xorth High street and is the
leading establishment of the kind in the city. Mr. Lyle is a past
grand of Lafayette lodge, Xo. 25, Independent Order of Odd Fel-
lows and was its representative at the grand lodge session of 1900,
on which occasion he was appointed grand marshal. He is a past
chief patriarch of Tawawa encampment, No. 58, Odd Fellows, and
past master of Buckeye lodge, No. 17, Ancient Order United Work-
men. June 22, 1887, he was married to Frances, daughter of W. I.
and Maggie (Malcom) Davis of Sanders, Ky., and he has one son,
George K, bom January 13, 1889, and a student in the Hillsboro
schools.

D. N. McBride, M. D., a well known physician, of Rainsborough,
has been in the active practice of his profession of that place for
thirty-two years. His grandparents were William and Letetia
McBride, who migrated from Pennsylvania to Ohio as early as 1800
and after tarrying a while in Ross county, near Bainbridge, moved
on to Pike county, where they made a permanent settlement and
spent the remainder of their lives. The father died at about the
age of sixty and his wife when eighty-eight years old. This pioneer
couple had a family of eight children, all long since dead, and the
second in age was John McBride, bom in Pike county, Ohio, March
2, 1809. He married Charlotte, daughter of David and Hannah
Spohn, of Adams county, and a short time thereafter took up his
permanent abode on a farm which he had purchased in Jackson
township. Highland county. He spent a quiet life in the cultivation
of his land, held the office of justice of the peace for many years and
died in 1895, in his eighty-seventh year, the death of his wife hav-
ing occurred in 1873. Of their six children four, William C, Han-
nah, Letetia and Mary C, are dead. Eliza J., the eldest, married
John W. Yowell, now deceased, and who lived near Lynchburg,
Ohio, where Mrs. Yowell still resides. D. N". McBride, second of
the children in age, was born near Belfast, Highland county, Ohio,
September 1, 1840, and remained at home until 1864, w^hen he spent
one year in Illinois in the drug business. In 1865 he began the
study of medicine with Doctors Grier and Noble at Sugartree Ri3ge
and remained with them three years, meantime attending lectures



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 38I

at Columbus and Cincinnati. He was graduated by tlie Cincinnati
College of Medicine and Surgery with the class of 1868 and selected
as his first location the town of Tranquility in Adams county. He
remained at that place three years and then removed to Kainsboro,
which has ever since been his scene of operations. Dr. McBride is a
member of the county, state and national medical associations and
during Cleveland's second administration held the position of pen-
sion examiner for Highland county. He is a member of Petersburg
lodge, Xo. 211, Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and Paint
lodge, Xo. 453, Knights of Pythias, at Rainsboro. He married
Sarah A. Dryden, a native of Brown but reared in Adams county,
by whom he has had five children : Otto, who died at eight years of
age ; Edith, the wife of Dr. J. A. Mercer of Rainsboro ; John D., who
is practicing medicine at Hillsboro; Xewton C, recently admitted
to the bar as an attomey-at-law; and James E., residing at home.
The Doctor and his family are affiliated with the Baptist church.

Edward L. McClain, promoter and proprietor of the manufactur-
ing plant at Greenfield, which bears his name and is the largest of
its kind in the world, has an illustrious genealogy as well as a very
interesting personal history. Two brothers came from Scotland to
Xew Jersey before the Revolution and one of them lost his life w^hile
serving in the patriot army at the battle of Brandywine. He left
a son named Peter McClain, who in turn became tlie father of a boy
who was christened by the patriarchal name of John. The latter
was destined to lead a long and useful life and to become the founder
of the Ohio branch of his family. John McClain was born in
Gloucester county, Xew Jersey, Xovember 23, 1800, and when six
years old was brought by his parents to the region then known as
part of the boundless West. Their destination was Indian creek in
Clermont county, Ohio, and this tJiey reached May 20, 1806. Ten
years afterward, w^hen about seventeen years old, John joined the
Methodist Episcopal church, three years later was licensed to exhort,
and in March, 1834, the quarterly conference of White Oak circuit
gave him a local license to preach. In 1842 he received deacon's
orders at the hands of Bishop Morris and in October, 1846, he was
ordained elder by Bishop Ames. For many years thereafter it was
the custom of this good man to work six days on the farm and spend
Sabbath preaching, and only when bronchial trouble had impaired
his voice did he consent to give up his labors. The declining years
of his life were spent at the home of his son in Greenfield, where he
received every attention that filial affection could suggest until hib
death July 14, 1875. His son, William P. McClain, who was a
native of Clermont county, Ohio, located at Greenfield in 1854,
where for many years he was prominent as a business man. His
children living are Edward L. ; Arthur E. and Xellie M. (now the



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382 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

wife of William M. McCafferty). The family record of the
maternal ancestors of these children is also full of interest. Late
in the nineteenth centurj^ there came to Ohio from Ireland as witty
and jovial a sample of Hibernian as ever left the ^^ould sod," whose
name was Oliver Eoss. Keady for any kind of adventure, from
treeing a bear to fighting Indians, the vivacious Oliver set out in
tlie spring of 1797 with Henry Massie, brother of the famous Gen.
Nathaniel Massie, on a surveying expedition to the headwaters of
Brush creek in what is now Highland county. With the party also
were Robert Huston, a son-in-law of Mr. Eoss, and the latter's
pretty little daughter Rebecca, then a girl about fifteen years of age.
On the evening of April 17, 1797, these explorers camped at n^
spring near what is now the town of Xew Market, w^here Miss Rosd
was made keeper of the camp and cook for the party. This girl, the
first woman of her race to set foot in that part of Highland county,
was presented by Henry Massie with one of the lots in his newly
platted town of Xew Market. Xext year Oliver Ross purchased
one hundred acres of land near the village site, on which he subse-
quently built a cabin and established his family. About the year
1802 there arrived at Xew Market from Pennsylvania George Park-
inson, a professional hat-maker, and he in time became the husband
of Rebecca Ross, They had several children and one of the daugh-
ters became the mother of Albert J. Beveridge, the present eloquent
and famous junior senator from Indiana. Another daughter
married William P. McClain, and was the mother of Edward L.
McClain, who thus is the grandson of Rebecca and great-grandson
of Oliver Ross, who held tlie first state ofiice in the territory which
afterward became Highland county. Edward L. McClain was born
and bred in Greenfield, Ohio, and when a young man used to worry
his mind over the problem whether there could not be invented some
device to prevent collars from chafing and hurting the necks of
horses. This sympathetic and kindly quest, which caused him to do
much thinking, by degrees evolved an invention which proved a
fortune to Mr. McClain, a boon of incalculable value to the equine
race and incidentally a prize to all horse owners. In short, he
invented the pad for horses' collars and in order to test its availabil-
ity, rented a small room, employed a coilple of men as assistants and
began the manufacture on a small scale. The pads proved popular
from the start, business increased by leaps and bounds and the small
room with three lalx)rera of 1881 had extended in 1902 to mammoth
proportions, with over five hundred hands and an annual output of
6,000,000 pads. They are sold practically everywhere that a horse
is found, which amounts to saying that the distributing of this
humane and ingenious contrivance extends throughout the civilized
world. Mr. McClain is also president of the Sun Manufacturing
company, and aside from his regular business is associated with



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 383

many different enterprises. He is a very busy and public spirited
man, who has done much for the development and enrichment of
his native town by employing labor and inviting capital. Ho is
equally prominent in church, social and fraternal circles, being presi?
dent of the board of trustees of the Methodist Episcopal church and
a member of the Knights Templar. In 1885 Mr. McClain was
married to Lula T., daughter of William Johnson, of Hamilton
county, Ohio, by whom he has three bright children : Edward Lee,
a student at Asheville, X. C. ; Helen St. Claire and Donald Scho-
field McClain.

Martin McClure, well known in Ilillsboro business circles and
throughout the county as a farmer and stock-raiser of past years, is
descended from a pioneer couplo who first stepped upon the soil of
Ross county, near by, before Highland was organized as a county.
John and Margaret (Morrison) McClure were Scotch people, the
former bom in 1758 and the latter in 1762, who settled in York
county, Pennsylvania, shortly after the close of the Revolutionary
war and a few years later migrated to Piqua, Ohio. Not liking the
climatic conditions then prevailing in that part of the state, the emi-
grants came to Paint township in Ross coimty, where the husband
purchased land. John. MeC^lure, Jr., son of the aforementioned
couple, was born at the Ross county homo May 26, 1805, and married
Elizabeth Taylor, whose birth occurred March 9, 1802. The former
moved to Paint township, in Highland county, where he died Octo-
ber 2, 1859, liis wife surviWng until September 7, 1864. Their son,
Martin McClure, was bom in Madison township, Highland county,
Ohio, January 11, 1832, and worked on the farm until he had reached
the twenty-second year of his life. October 5, 1854, he was married
to TsTancy Duncan, born October 13, 1831, and member of one of the
well-known pioneer families. Her father, Robert Duncan, was bom
in York county, Pennsylvania, in 1777, came ia Ohio in 1806 and
purchased land in Madison township, Highland county, for $1.25 an
acre, on which he subsequently settled. In April, 1817, he married
Mary Mann, bom November 27, 1796, and daughter of James
Mann, who came from Ireland in 1800. She died in January, 1870,
having long survived her husband, who passed away in September,
1843. The children of Martin and Xancy (Duncan) McClure are
William T., a practicing attorney at Columbus; Robert, a traveling
salesman for a wholesale shoehouse ; Charles, died October 10, 1890,
at the age of twenty-nine years; Sarah E., wife of P. B. Zink, a
grocer of Hillsboro; Myrtie E., at home; Arthur J., interested in the
wholesale confectionery firm of Prince, Mahan & Keeney of Charles-
ton, West Virginia; Frederick J., bookkeeper for C. S. Bell & Co. ;
and Alston B., with the Bancroft Shelving Company of Columbus.
Tor five years after his marriage, Mr. McClure farmed in Ross



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384 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

county, near Greenfield, then returned to Madison township and
continued agricultural pursuits during the succeeding ten years, after,
which he secured a place three and a half miles from Hillsboro. Iq
1876 he went to Penn township, lived there a year or so, and then
located in Hillsboro, where he opened a grocery store. For eight
years he held the position of weighmaster for the Baltimore & Ohio
Southwestern railroad company at this point, but for the past twelve
yeai^ has been dealing in real estate. His knowledge of this subject



Online LibraryA. E. Hough J. W. KliseThe county of Highland: a history of Highland County, Ohio, from the ... → online text (page 44 of 63)