A. E. Hough J. W. Klise.

The county of Highland: a history of Highland County, Ohio, from the ... online

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obtained him the appointment as real estate appraiser for Hillsboro
and Liberty township in 1900. Mr. McClure's religious affiliations
are with the Presbyterian church and his political views are in
accord with the Republican parly.

Wilson McClure, a business man and influential citizen of Sink-
ing Springs, was bom at that place July 3, 1832. His family came
from Pennsylvania, where his grandfather was bom, married, and
died, leaving a widow and eight children: Mary, Jane, Eliza,
Thomas W., George, William, James, and Robert, all now deceased.
The widow with her family came down the Ohio river in a house
boat to Manchester, and settled near Cynthiana, Pike county, and
several years later removed to Xew Petersburg, where she lived until
her death. Thomas W. McClure was bom in Westmoreland county,
Pa., and when a young man learned the trade of making the wheels
for the old time spinning wheels. lie followed this for several
years, and afterward manufactured chairs and bed steads for the
pioneer homes, and eventually was the proprietor of a cabinet shop.
He died at the age of sixty-nine years. His first marriage was to
Mary Hedges, a native of Adams county, Ohio, and they had nine
children: Elizabeth, and Marj^ J., deceased, and three who died in
infancy; Wilson, the subject of this sketch; Sarah and Martha,
residing at Sinking Springs, and James, deceased. By a second
marriage to Martha ilcCague, other children were bom — Marga-
ret A., Joseph W., of Fayette ; R. D., of Waverly ; George W., of Sci-
oto county; Thomas, deceased, and two who died young. Wilson
McClure was reared at home and educated in the district school. In
early manhood he married Ellen J. Belleson, a native of Maryland,
daughter of George W., and Eva Belleson, also natives of that state.
By this union four children were born: George E., now residing at
Sinking Springs; James A., of Pike county; Thomas H., of Sink-
ing Springs, and Wilson G. of Hillsboro. \VTien the civil war came
on Mr. McClure, though past thirty years of age and with a family,
offered his services to the nation, and went to the front as a member
of Company B, Hundred and Seventv^-fifth Ohio infantry. While
serving at Columbia, Tenn., and in that vicinity he was injured
while engaged in the construction of a blockhouse, and being sent
to hospital was honorably discharged for disability upon his conva-



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 335.

lescence. Since his return from the army he has been occupied as
a cabinet maker at Sinking Springs, and for some time has con-
ducted an undertaking establishment. Since 1849 he has been a
member of the Methodist church; he is a valued brother of the
Masonic lodge at Sinking Springs, and in politics he adheres to the
Republican party.

Van B. McConnaughey, M. D., one of the most prominent and
successful practicing physicians of Hillsboro, comes of Scotch and
English ancestry. His great-great-grandfather, William McCon-
naughey, was bom in the ''Highlands" of Scotland about 1740 and
for a number of years was a prominent importer of flax-seed from
America to his native country. His frequent trips to America con-
vinced him of its vast opportunities and he accordingly cast his lot
with the struggling pioneers of Pennsylvania, locating in Washing-
ton county, where about 1770 he was married to Ellen Berry, also
a native of the "Highlands" of Scotland and who, when but a mere
girl and without the knowledge of her parents, boarded a vessel
bound for Philadelphia, where soon after her arrival she met young
McConnaughey and they were married. After their marriage they
continued to reside in Washington county, Pa., until their respect-
ive deaths, and reared a family of seven sons, one of whom was
David McConnaughey, bom March 11, 1776. His early youth was
pfissed amid the stirring scenes of the Revolution, and on Novem-
ber 6, 1790, he man-ied Prudence Thompson, also a native of Penn-
sylvania, of Scotch extraction, bom June 8th, 1783. They began
housekeeping in Washington county. Pa., and for a number of years
successfully maintained one of the best hotels in that part of the
state. They reared a family of thirteen children, the second of
whom was Andrew, bom in Washington county, Pa., on October 16,
1802, where he was reared to manhood on a farm but subsequently
turned his attention to mining iron ore, in which occupation he
became quite successful. On November 23, 1826, he was married
to Mary Vance, a native of Fayette county. Pa., where she was bom
June 26, 1808, and the daughter of Davis and Hannah (Tedrick)
Vance, natives of Pennsylvania. Andrew began housekeeping in
Fayette county. Pa,, and continued to reside there until the fall of
1835, when they removed to Highland county, Ohio, and located for
a few months near Fairview, but in the spring of 1836 he purchased
a tract of land two miles east of the present village of Xew Market,
and removed to it. Later on he purchased another f ami in the same
neighborhood, removed to it and continued to reside there until his
death, which occurred on April 15, 1888. He was prominent in
local affairs and a devoted member of the Baptist church, filling the
office of deacon for a number of years. His widow survived him
H-25



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386 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

but a few months, passing away on December 4, 1888. They reared
a family of ten children: Davis A., bom February 12, 1828;
Eliza A., October 13, 1829 ; Benonia A., May 17, 1833 ; Eleanor,
May 2, 1835; David, March 8, 1836; Andrew V., June 17, 1837;
Thomas A., September 1, 1839; Mary L., August 1, 1841; Isaiah,
December 24, 1843, and Orlando, December 21, 1846, all of whom
have passed away except B. A., who resides in a comfortable home
one mile west of Xew Market and to whom the writer is indebted
for a great deal of this information. Davis A. McConnaughey, as
noted above, was bom in Fayette county. Pa., February 12, 1828,
and was only seven years old when his parents landed in New Mar-
ket township. He spent his boyhood on the farm attending the dis-
trict schools and received a fair education for that day. On Sep-
tember 30, 1857, he was united in marriage with Miss Sarah C.
Hibbs, bom near Portsmouth, O., Jime 26, 1834. Her parents
were Jacob and Rebecca (Lucas) Hibbs, old and respected residents
of Scioto county, Ohio. The former was born in Pennsylvania
November 5, 1793, and was the son of Aaron and Catharine (Craft)
Hibbs. Aaron Hibbs was an Englishman by birth and emigrated to
Pennsylvania soon after the Kevolution, where he married Catharine
Craft and removed to Adams county, Ohio, where he died in 1832
at the age of sixty-six. His widow survived him until 1846, when
she also passed away at the age of seventy-seven. Jacob Hibbs was
quite young when he accompanied his parents to Adams county,
where it might be said he was reared. On March 30th, 1813, he
was united in marriage with Rebecca Lucas, the estimable daughter
of Judge Joseph Lucas, a noted jurist of Ohio, and the father of
Robert Lucas, at one time governor of Ohio, and later of the state
of Iowa. The father of Judge Joseph Lucas was William Lucas,
who fought under Washington at ^*Braddock's defeat," and who
served as a captain in the Revolutionary war. His father was
Edward Lucas, a noted Quaker of England, who with his young wife,
who was a Miss Dark, accompanied William Penn to this country
and assisted him in founding the first colony of that great religious
sect at the "City of Brotherly Love." After the close of the "Revo-
lution" Capt William Lucas emigrated from Virginia to a point in
Scioto county, Ohio, which he named Lucasville and which has borne
that name ever since. Jacob and Rebecca (Lucas) Hibbs were the
parents of eleven children, of whom Sarah C. was the tenth. After
a long and useful life Jacob Hibbs passed away on July 12, 1852,
and Mrs. Hibbs survived him until October 20, 1853. Davis A.
and Sarah C. McConnaughey, the parents of Dr. Van B. McCon-
naughey, began life together in an humble way on a farm in !N'ew
Market township. Mr. McConnaughey devoted the greater part of
his life to the buying and selling of live stock, which he successfully



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 337

carried oi\ until his death, which occurred September 11, 1897. He
was a man of pleasing address and of exemplary habits. He held
aloof from political preferment, but his party elected him commis-
sioner of Highland, which office he filled with credit to himself and
friends. His widow survives him and resides on the old homestead.
They were the parents of nine children, as follows : Charlie D., bom
July 9, 1858 ; Ella A., November 20, 1859 ; Van B., October 2, 1861 ;
Grant M., December 27, 18G3; Harry O., December 6, 1865; Lil-
lie M., February 26, 1867; Joseph B. and Mary B. (twins), bom
October 22, 1871 ; Clarence S., October 4, 1878, all of whom are
living except Charlie D. and Ella A. Dr. Van B. McConnaughey,
the subject of this sketch atid a worthy scion of this honorable ances-
try, was bom near Hillsboro, Ohio, October 2, 1861, and the third
child in the above named family. His earlier education was
obtained in the district schools and the Hillsboro high school. He
at first chose agriculture, which he successfully followed for four
years, when on account of an accident he was compelled to abandon
that occupation. He then turned his attention to teaching and for
a number of years was one of the foremost teachers in Highland and
Greene counties. Finally he decided to devote all his energies to a
thorough study of medicine and attended two courses of lectures at
The Starling Medical College. He studiously applied himself until
March 7, 1893, when he was graduated from The Ohio Medical Uni-
versity, being the first candidate to receive a diploma from that insti-
tution. With his diploma he was also awarded the very unusual
distinction, by the Ohio Medical University, of "Distinguished
Honorable Mention," for original investigation on the subject of
"Relocolization" of Tubercular Bacilli by Therapeutic measures,
preparatory to radical operation, with history of case, so treated, suc-
cessfully. The noted Dr. Senn of Rush Medical College highly
complimented his effort. Having fully equipped himself, not only
in learning, but also in apparatus, for the successful practice of medi-
cine and surgery, he located at Berrysville, where for eight years he
met with flattering success. He then removed to Hillsboro, where
for the past three years his services have been in such demand that
it taxes him to the utmost to handle his rapidly increasing practice.
On October 20th, 1885, he w^as united in marriage with Miss
Flora A. Strain, daughter of John A. and Ellen (McConnaughey)
Strain, old and respected residents of Highland county, now
deceased. Three children have blessed this union, two of whom are
living: Leone and Greorge, both being students in the Hillsboro high
school. Dr. and Mrs. McConnaughey are both substantial and active
members of the Baptist church and occupy a high place in the social
circles of Hillsboro. He is a member of the Masonic and Knights
of Pythias orders, as well as several beneficiary orders, and is also a



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THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

member of the Highland county Medical Society. The Poctor i&
now in the prime of life, and alert to all the necessities requisite to
successful practice, and being a close student he keeps abreast of the
most modem thought of the day in his chosen profession.

John A. McCoppin, for many years a merchant at Carmel and
latterly in the hardware business at Hillsboro, is connected by
descent and marriage with some of the sturdiest of the old pioneer
families. The name was formerly spelled McAlpin, but for con-
venience was changed to McCoppin. His grandparents were Rob-
ert and Mary (Burford) McCoppin, who migrated from Virginia to
Highland coimty in 1823 and located on Fall Creek, and later in the
neighborhood of Carmel. They had twelve children, including
William H., who was bora in Virginia March 15, 1817, and began
teaching in early manhood, which occupation he kept up several
years, alternating his task by farming during the summer months.
In 1844 he was married to ilarv E., daughter of William and Mary
(McLaughlin) Head, lx)th of whose parents were representative pio-
neer families from Kentucky. William and Bigger Head, the first
of a name that afterwards became very familiar in Highland coimty,
came from Barren county, Ky., about 1800, and settled, the former
in what is now Brush Creek township, and tlie latter where Mar-
shall now stands. Both reared large and respectable families and
their descendants have included many of the most esteemed citizens
of the county. The children of William II. and Mary (Head)
McCoppin were John A., who is further noticed below; William
Carey, who was six years county commissioner and now in the insur-
ance business ; Mary ]M., wife of Senator T. M. Watts ; and Roxy J.,
wife of W. E. Lucas, who is in the im])lement trade at Hillsboro.
John A. McCoppin was born at the paternal homestead in High-
land county, Ohio, April 10, 1847, and remained on the farm until
1870. In that year he opened a store at Carmel which he conducted
with more or less success for eighteen yeai-s. Desiring a larger
field, he then removed to Hillsboro, where he embarked in the hard-
ware business and has since been identified with that branch of mer-
chandising. In 1001, he took C. S. Bell into partnership and the
firm opened in the Opera House block the store which they still own
and manage. April 7, 1869, Mr. McCoppin was married to Anna E.,
daughter of Henry F. and Sarah (Upp) Foraker, both parents
being representatives of old and highly respected pioneer families.
Mrs. McCoppin is a cousin of Hon. Joseph Benson Foraker, the
present distinguished senator from Ohio. The children of Mr. and
Mrs. ^McCoppin are Cora, mfe of Wade Turner, a teacher in the
Hillsboro High School; Ida, wife of W. H. Mason of Leesburg;
Eva, wife of W. G. McClure, in the monument business ; Harry F.
and Maud A., pupils in the Hillsboro schools.



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BIOGRAPHICAL, SKETCHES. 389

John McCoy, a prosperous fanner of Washington township, is a
native of Jackson township, bom November 22, 1846, and a grand-
son of a pioneer of Highland county. His lineage is associated also
in a conspicuous way with the early settlement and commercial
and manufacturing development of Ross county. His grandfather,
Thomas McCoy, a native of Marjdand, was reared in that state and
married there, a imion that was blessed with five children — Thomas,
Joseph, Eliza, Mary and Nancy. With his family Thomas McCoy
came to Highland county before the war of 1812, in which he ren-
dered patriotic service as a soldier of the republic, and in civil life
he was a potent influence for good in the early days. His son,
Joseph, bom in Maryland, May 29, 1801, accompanied the family
to Highland county, and married Mary Walker, a native of Con-
cord township. He made his home for forty years in Jackson town-
ship, and there reared a family of eleven children (one died in
infancy) : Martha A., Rebecca, Thomas, Mary E., Martin V. B.,
Samuel, Joseph, Catherine, John and Nancy. Joseph McCoy was
a man of high character and good business qualifications, became the
owner of about six hundred acres of land, and filled several of the
township ofiices; in politics was a staunch Democrat, and in relig-
ious life an adherent of the Christian church. He died at an
advanced age, in Concord township, where he passed the later years
of his life. John McCoy was born in Jackson township Novem-
ber 22, 1846, and educated in the district school of that neighborhood,
passing his youthful years on the home farm. He married Lydia,
daughter of John and Parmelia Kelley, of Liberty township, went
to housekeeping on the home farm. Afterward he lived on an
adjoining farm until the death of his father, when he occupied the
old homestead. His home has been blessed with six children:
Birdie, now the wife of J. L. Mercer, of Jackson township : Wilber,
at home; Mattie, wife of Charles Chancy, of Jackson ; Hattie J. H.,
and Stella E., at home. Mr. McCoy is one of the substantial
men of his township, standing high in the estimation of his neigh-
bors. He follows general farming and stock raising, and has occu-
pied the local office of land appraiser. In politics he is a Democrat,
and his religious affiliation is w^ith the Protestant Methodist church.

William A. McKee, a worthy citizen of New Market township,
lately deceased, was well known in his capacity as a blacksmith,
which trade he followed in Highland county for many yeai's. He
was bom in Miami county, Ohio, August 19, 1833, son of William
McKee and his wife Martha, who was the eldest daughter of Alex-
ander and Elizabeth Morrow, pioneers of Highland county, w^ho died
at Greenfield about 1818, apd were both buried in the same grave.
William A. McKee came to Highland county in 1850 and spent all
the remainder of his life in this county. He married Mahala



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390 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

Pence, who was born September 28, 1829, of an old family whose
descendants are widely distributed throughout this portion of Ohio.
Iler grandparents were Virginians who came to Ohio in the very
vanguard of the pioneer army and first located in Adams county,
afterward removing about the year 1810 to the county of Highland.
Their son Henry married Catherine, daughter of Isaac and Mary
Layman, al§o Virginia immigrants w^ho moved westward in the
beginning of the century. Henry and Catherine Pence located in
that part of old Xew Market which is now included in Hamer
township, where they hewed and grubbed out a farm w^hich eventu-
ally became valuable land. He was a soldier in the war of 1812, a
man of great industry and excellence of character and lived to a ripe
old age. His wife, Avho w^as bom in 1790, was not far from round-
ing out a century, as her death did not occur until she w^as ninety-
five years old. They had fourteen children, of whom Sarah, Abi-
gail, Lucinda, Polly, Peter, George, Philip, Ellis, Allen, and Louis
have passed away. Those living are John, Henry, and Mahala,
the latter being the youngest. After their marriage William and
Mahala McKee lived a short time in a house near their present resi-
dence, to which they removed in about six months and from that on
made their home. They had five children, of whom William H.
and Joseph C, second and third in order of birth, have passed away.
Carey F., the first born and Mary J., the fourth, remain at home
with their mother, and ^lartha C. is a resident of Indiana. Will-
iam A. McKee died at the age of sixty-nine years, and was buried
in the cemetery of ilount Zion church of which during life he had
been a consistent member. Since her husband's death, Mrs. McKee
has conducted the business of the estate with the assistance of her
son and daughter, and everything has gone along smoothly. Carey
F. ^McKee, the eldest son and mainstay of his mother, taught school
for some time and later was engaged two years in the mercantile busi-
ness but contemplates trucking for the future. He is a man of good
business qualifications and the habits of industry that make the best
assurance of success, ilrs. McKee and her entire family are mem-
bers of Mount Zion church.

John McMullen, of Rainsboro, farmer and surveyor, and for-
mer trustee of Paint township, w^as bom December 24, 1858, and
is of Irish descent. His grandfather, James McMullen, bom Sep-
tember 1, 1778, in County Down, Ireland, came to America in early
manhood and married Mrs'. Xancy Matthews Sloan, of Ross county,
also a native of Ireland. They had two children: Robert B., and
Louisa, who married John Arnott. Robert B. was bom July 1,
1829, and died August 4, 1901. His wife was Maiy Jane McChire,
bom June, 1833, and died September 6, 1893, and she was the
daughter of John and Elizabeth (Taylor) McClure, both members



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 39 1

of the early and prominent families of Highland county. The
children of Robert and Mary J. McMiillen were James, who died
in 1899, aged thirty-three years ; John, subject of this sketch ; Will-
iam J., who died in childhood; Joseph Scott, who died at the age
of thirty-one years; Marie, wife of George Free, who owns the
adjoining farm ; Ernest, who married Jennie Town, and is a farmer
in Oklahoma; and Birdie, wife of X. P. Clybum, an attorney at
Greenfield. John McMuUen was given a good education, in the
district school and at South Salem and Lebanon institutes, and for
six years after leaving school he followed the profession of teaching.
He also took a course in surveying, in which he is quite expert, and
he has found considerable employment in this profession during the
past twenty years. He owns a valuable farm of 300 acres, where he
has recently built a country home which is one of the most attrac-
tive of the county. In his relation to religious and social life he is
one of the popular men of the township. He is an elder and leader
in vocal music of the Petersburg Presbyterian church, of which his
family are also valued members, and he maintains fraternal con-
nection with the Rainsboro lodge of Knights of Pythias, No. 453,
and the lodge of Modem Woodmen, No. 4,711, and with his wife, is
a member of Mizpah temple, Rathbone Sisters, of Rainsboro. The
office of township trustee he held in the years 1894-1900. Mr.
McMullen's marriage on Febniary 3, 1880, was to Jennie, daughter
of Jacob and Jane (Brown) Pearce, of Xew Petersburg. Mrs.
McMullen is a granddaughter of Benjamin and Catherine (White)
Pearce, both notable among the pioneer families of the county. She
had five brothers — Benjamin, Robert, Charles, Jacob and Hosea —
and one sister, Ella, deceased, and has two brothers living, at Peters-
burg, Frank and George, merchants. The children of Mr. and Mrs.
McMullen are John Pearce, born November 5, 1886; Robert
Beecher, bom January 26, 1888 ; Raymond Fay, born March 5,
1889 ; Marie Jane, born August 30, 1892 ; Paul Huggart, bom
April 17, 1895 ; and Harold, born Febmary 10, 1901, died in
infancy.

James McXary, one of the prominent farmers of Paint township,
residing about two miles north of Cynthiana, Pike county, is a son of
the pioneer, Robert McXary. Robert was born at Cannonsburg,
Pa., October 30, 1800, was married in early manhood to Delena
Alloways, born in the same state, Jime 23, 1816, and came to Paint
township with his wife and children before 1833, making his home
at Xew Market, Highland county, Ohio. He was a wheelwright by
trade, and a man much respected, but his life was comparatively
brief, as he died October 4, 1846. His wife survived to January
31, 1872. They had six children : Ann Eliza, wife of John Watson ;
John, Robert, James, Margaret and David. James McXary wa^



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392 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

born March 22, 1842, in Highland county, and reared in this county.
Before he was of age he enlisted for the defense of the Union, in
the early part of the civil war, as a private in the Sixtieth regiment,
Ohio infantry, and served until honorably mustered out at the
expiration of his enlistment, November 11, 1862. Returning home,
he was married January 24, 1864, to Mary L., daughter of John
and Rebecca (Overman) Rains. Mr. McKary is a prosperous and
progressive farmer, owning 163 acres of land, in Highland, Pike and
Ross counties, and is held in high esteem by his neighbors. He and
his wife have had four children : Charles W., bom May 26, 1866 ;
Sannie L., bom June 7, 1868; Xellie D., born May 6, 1870, and
Maggie A., born October 6, 1874. The two last named died in
infancy, and Sannie makes her home with her parents. Charles W.
was married January 28, 1892, to Anna M. Rigdon, who was bom
September 18, 1874, daughter of John and tTane Rigdon, and they
have had five children : Elsie Delena, Edwin Lyle, Blanche, and two
sons who died in infancy. Mrs. Mary L. McXary was bom October
16, 1843, and is a descendant of prominent pioneer families. Her
father, John Rains, who was born in Randolph county, N. C, Feb-
ruary 14, 1804, and died August 6, 1852, was a son of George Rains,
a native of Randolph county, N. C, who moved from that state with
his wife and seven children to Tennessee, and thence in 1809 to Paint
township, where he purchased two hundred and ten acres of land,
including the site of the present town of Rainsboro, f or $1.25 per acre.
There he lived in the enjoyment of well-earned prosperity to the good



Online LibraryA. E. Hough J. W. KliseThe county of Highland: a history of Highland County, Ohio, from the ... → online text (page 45 of 63)