A. E. Hough J. W. Klise.

The county of Highland: a history of Highland County, Ohio, from the ... online

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Laura Josephine Britton, one of the most substantial of Highland
county families. Her grandfather, Jonah Britton, came with his
wife and six children from Frederick county, Virginia, in 1832, and
four years later bought a farm in Union township, where he died in
1865. His son Jonah, who married Annie Kibler and settled a short
distance north of W^illettsville, was the father of Mrs. Oldaker and
one of the most popular citizens of the township. The household of
Mr. and Mrs. Oldaker includes two adopted children, to whom they
have given the names of Eddie and Jennie Oldaker. The family's
religious affiliations are with the Methodist Episcopal church at
Russell.

George E. Orebaugh, M. D., a popular young physician at Ne^\
Petersburg, is regarded as one of the rising professional men of the
county. With the exception of the absence made necessary- in the
acquirement of his professional education he has spent his whole life
within the limits of Highland county. His place of nativity is Dod-
son township and his birth occurred in the vicinity of Lynchburg,
Ohio, July 25, 1871. He attended the public schools of the village
and in addition took a special course in Latin under Professor Will-
iams. In early, manhood he was engaged, in association with his
brother, in conducting a printing establishment at Lynchburg.
When twenty-four years of age he entered the office of Dr. Theo-



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426 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

dore F. Scott, at Lynchburg, where he spent three and a half years
in preparatory medical studies and learning practical details con-
nected with the professional work. After this preliminary, he
matriculated at Starling Medical college, in Columbus, where he
spent the session of 1895-6 in attendance upon lectures. This was
followed by entrance as a student at the famous College of Medicine
and Surgery, at Cincirmati, where he was graduated with the degree
of doctor of medicine in the class of April, 1898. During his resi-
dence in Cincinnati, both before and after graduation. Dr. Orebaugh
did considerable work at different hospitals as interne, which proved
valuable as a practical addition to his college course. In the spring
of 1898, he settled at Xew Petersburg, where he has since been
actively engaged in the practice of his profession and has met with
flattering success. He is a member of the State Medical association,
Kjiights of Pythias lodge, Xo. 337, at Lynchburg, and the Modem
Woodmen of the World. June 24, 1897, he was married to Hattie
X. West, of Clinton county, and th'ey have one child, Rebekah Mary.
The family are communicants of the Methodist Episcopal church.

Morgan B. Park, one of the representative farmers of Paint town-
ship, is a good example of what may be accomplished by a man under
adverse circumstances if possessed of the necessary pluck and energy.
When he arrived in Highland county over fifty-six years ago he had
only three cents in his pocket which was expended in sending a letter
to his Virginia home. He had neither friends nor acquaintances
and was compelled for years to work as a day laborer on farms at
meager wages to get the ordinary means of subsistence. A glance
now at his hundreds of acres of well cultivated and highly improved
land and other evidences of prosperity will disclose a contrast with
his "first settlement" that is highly cre<litable to ^fr. Park's lifelong
industry and excellent management. His parents were Samuel and
Elizabeth (McKee) Park who lived in Hampshire county. West
Virginia, and there i*eared a family of eight children, of whom
Joseph, Lemuel, Jonathan, William H. and Alice have passed away.
Elizabeth C. is the wife of William George, who lives in Indiana,
and Mary, who married Thomas T^ckard, is a resident of Xewcom-
erstown, Ohio. Morgan B. Park, third of the children in age, was
bom in Hampshire county, W. Va., near Capon Bridge, Decem-
ber 28, 1835. His first work as a boy, in the days before railroads
in his part of the country, was as assistant in driving cattle over the
West Virginia mountains to the various marketv«^, often at great dis-
tances. In 1855, realizing that there was little opportimity for
advancement in his native hills, he set out on a tour of observation
in the West and eventually found himself in the limits of Highland
county, Ohio. He spent one summer in farm work, cultivated a



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 427

rented place for a while and later came to Paint township where he
secured employment by the month. After several years of daily
drudgery on other people's farms, he was married January 26, 1866,
to Hannah, daughter of Jesse George, and became a farmer on his
own behalf. He located on a place of 112 acres, of which he sub-
sequently became the owner and here he carried on farming opera-
tions with success for ten years. They then removed to the f ann in
Paint township where he now resides but which has been greatly
improved since he took possession. At one time he owned 455 acres,
but his holdings have been reduced to 335 acres, over two-thirds of
which is imder cultivation. His improvements, which have been
numerous, embody the best results in agricultural architecture and
in every way the farms of Mr. Park show that they are under pro-
gressive and up-to-date management. He is a Prohibitionist in poli-
tics and an enemy of inunorality in all its forms, especially that
phase of evil that results from the drink traffic and indulgence of
intoxicating liquors. By his first marriage he had three children, of
whom Mary K and Lewis H. are dead, and Hannah is the wife of
John Watts of Paint township. The mother of this family died on
Christmas night of 1889 and April 1, 1897, Mr. Park married Anni^
Taylor, by whom he has two children, Layton B. and Leonard M.
Mr. Park is a member of the Methodist Episcopal church at Xew
Petersburg and in past years has held the offices of steward, superin-
tendent of Sunday school, class leader and trustee.

Joseph J. Parker, a popular citizen of Lynchburg, is of French
parentage and has the happy temperament and vivacious spirits so
characteristic of the children of sunny France. It has been remarked
that the people of no nationality are so averse to leaving their native
land as the French and none suffer so much from hohiesickness.
Hence, as a rule, they do not seek to become colonizers, but John and
Mary (Bulport) Parker proved to be exceptions, as they left their
native country' in early life and crossed over to the L^nited States
with their parents, who settled in Brown county, Ohio, and there
ended their days. When John Parker grew up he learned the coop-
er's trade and has followed that occupation during the ^reat portion
of his life. In politics he is Democratic and his only fraternal con-
nection is with the Ancient Order of United Workmen. At the
present time, he lives with his wife at Lynchburg and their family
consists of three sons. Joseph J. Parker, one of the latter, was bom
April 6, 1854, while his parents were living in Clermont county,
Ohio. He was brought by his parents to Lynchburg when six years
old and has resided all his life in that pretty Hie^hland county town.
After obtaining a fair English education in the high school, Mr.
Farker followed the example of his father by learning the cooper's



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428 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

trade, which engaged his attention for seventeen years after he
reached the working age. In 1888 he embarked in the business of
saloon-keeping, to which he has since given his time and met with
a fair measure of success. He is independent in politics, votes
according to his best judgment and has never asked any party for
office. He is a member of Lynchburg lodge, Ko. 15, Independent
Order of Odd Fellows. Mr. Parker was married in 1874 to Annie
Halloday, of Highland county, by whom he has one daughter, named
Luella, bom March 25, 1878, who grew up to be quite an accom-
plished young lady, having graduated with credit at the Lynchburg
High School and subsequently married A. L. Bobbitt, by whom she
has two children, Beatrice and Vivian.

Charles R. Patterson k Sons is the name of a popular and widely
known firm of carriage manufacturers at Greenfield which is one of
the largest concerns of the kind in Ohio and does an interstate busi-
ness. As at present constituted it was established in 1893, prior
to which time the firm name was Lowe & Patterson, under which
title the business had been conducted for more than twenty years.
Besides carriages, they manufacture buggies, road wagons and other
wheeled vehicles, being equipped to do any class of work that falls
in their line. Aside from Cincinnati, Columbus and Springfield,
this plant in the lively little city of Greenfield yields to no other in
Southern Ohio as to size or amount and quality of work or extent of
trade. The finn ships goods to every part of Kentucky, deals exten-
sively in distant Texas and in fact does more or less business in a
score of states. Charles R. Patterson is not only the head of the
firm but he is also the father of the sons who constitute the company.
A native of Virginia, he has spent practically all of his life at Green-
field in the manufacturing business, and is a mechanic of the Very
first order in his line, having no superior as a smith. He is besides
an excellent business man, sound in judgment and full of enterprise
and push. The two sons of this popular establishment were Fred-
erick D. and S. C. Patterson (deceased), both bom and bred in
Greenfield and, so far as the literary part of their education goes,,
products of its fine common school system. Frederick D. Patter-
son, the elder brotlier, after graduating in the high school of his
native city, took a course at the Ohio State university. The next
five years he occupied the chair as professor of history in the Louis-
ville Central high school, but eventually concluded to abandon the
business of teaching to enter the carriage business in which lay his
principal financial interests. With a view, therefore, of returning to
Greenfield and joining his father in the manufacturing establish-
ment he resigned his professorship at Louisville. Aside from busi-
ness, he is quite conspicuous in politics on the Republican side, being



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 429

connected with the party clubs and a delegate to their last meeting
in Springfield. He is looked upon as a rising young man, whose
popularity aided by his marked ability promises for him high hon-
ors in the ranks of his party. The Foraker club at Greenfield, of
which he is an esteemed member, recently honored him by selection
as the orator at one of their meetings. He takes great interest in
the grand work of Booker T. Washington, and is associated with that
famous educator in his efforts to establish the National Business
League. In his religious affiliations Mr. Patterson is an Episcopa-
lian and his fraternal connections are confined to Freemasonry in
which he has reached the degree of master mason. He was married
in 1901 to Estelline Postill, an accomplished young lady of Hopkins-
ville, Ky., and with his wife occupies a front rank in Greenfield's
social circles.

Louis Pausch, a veteran railroad employe, is one of the most public-
spirited citizens of Leesburg, of which place he has long been a
resident He belongs to that industrious army of adopted citizens to
whom the country is under so many obligations for the building of its
vast and invaluable transportation system. Mr. Papsch bore his full
share in the hardest of tliat work, the part devoted to the digging,
track-laying and other features of the construction department, but
whatever he was put to do he did it so well as to invite commendation
and insure steady if slow reward. Louis Pausch was bom in Bavaria,
Germany, December 27, 1834, and fifteen years afterward was on his
way to America in search of that fortune which has been the lodestone
of so many eager ettnigrants. He tarried awhile in the cities of Xew
York and Philadelphia but eventually found his way to the land of
promise in Ohio, where he called a halt and looked around for employ-
ment. It was in 1852, whe^ about eighteen years of age, that thi^
venturesome young German secured work at Chillicothe in the con-
struction department of the old Marietta & Cincinnati railroad. He
put in about a year at various odd jobs and then helped lay the first
track for this road into the city of Chillicothe. In the same year he
was engaged in building the railroad through Ross into His^hland
county and in 1854 assisted in the track-laying from Greenfield to
Le^esburg on to the Clinton county line. After three years of service
in the construction department, he was appointed section foreman ; in
1866 he was acting supervisor and two years later he was made
supervisor, a position which he has held up to the present time, having
charge of different divisions at various times. He is the oldest
employe of the railroad in the department where he is engafi:ed and
can look back with pardonable pride on his long career, which began
in poverty and has ended in substantial independence. Since locating
at Leesburfi^ Mr.. Pausch has been a prominent factor in the town's
growth and improvement. As a member of the board of education he



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430 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

has looked earnestly after the interests of the schools and in the city
his services were invaluable during the era of street improvement,
owing to his energy and skill as an expert road builder. He was made
chairman of the committee on streets and pushed with intelligent
vigor the work which resulted in such great benefit to the town's
appearance and desirability as a place of residence. For the same
reasons that always recommended him as the leader when any enter-
prise was on hand requiring public spirit, Mr. Pausch was made
chairman of the building committer that had charge of the construc-
tion of the city hall, which has proved such a convenience and
ornament to Leesburg. In 1857, he was married to Susan Koth,
member of an old German family of Xew York state, who shares with
him the esteem of a %vide social acquaintance.

Wesley Pence, owner of a large and highly improved farm in Xew
Market township and an extensive breeder of fine stock, is of the
third generation removed from one of the first settlers of Highland
coimty. The founders of the western branch of the family came from
Virginia to Ohio in the early part of the last century and settled in
Adams county, where they remained until about 1810. In that year
they removed to Highland county, bringing their son Henry, who
married Catherine, daughter of Isaac and Mary Layman, immigrants
who came from Virginia in 1800. Henry Pence and wife located
in what is now Hamer township, spent their lives in clearing and
cultivating a pioneer farm and became the parents of fourteen chil-
dren, all of whom are now dead except John, Henry and Mahala, now
Mrs. McKee. George Pence, fourth of the children in age, was bom
in Xew Market township, February 28, 1816, and remained with his
parents until he had passed his majority. .He married Catherine,
daughter of Philip and Polly Wilkin, located on a farm and in time
became a large land-owner, and passed away at the age of eighty-four
years after becoming the father of the following children : Margaret,
deceased ; Wesley, subject of this sketch ; Franklin, of Xew Market
township; Ellis, of Columbus; Andrew W., of Xew Market; Polly,
Sarah and Alice, deceased. Wesley Pence, second of the children,
was bom in New Market township. Highland county, Ohio, April 13,
1842, on the farm adjoining his present home place. In the simamer
of 1862 he enlisted in Company A, Eighty-ninth regiment Ohio Vol-
unteer infantry, which was first sent to Kentucky and from there
to West Virginia, where it went into winter quarters. Later it was
ordered to Tennessee and participated actively in the campaigns
which culminated in the battle of Chickamauga. Mr. Pence was
discharged on account of disability and returned ho&ne, where he
remained until the spring of 1864, and then re-enlisted in Company
A, Hhmdred and Sixty-eighth regiment Ohio l^ational Guard. Th^
command was sent to Kentucky and after a hot fight at Cynthiana



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 431

was mostly captured but soon aftenvard paroled. Later the regiment
did guard duty at Cincinnati and in September was sent to Camp
Dennison, where it was discharged from the service. When Mr.
Pence returned home the second time in the fall of 1864, he resumed
his occupation on the farm and shortly- afterward was married to
Susannah J., daughter of Carey and Sarah (Trop) DuckwaJl,
descendant of one of the oldest families in the! county. For awhile
after man*iage Mr. Pence resided in Liberty to\\Taship, then pur-
chased a place of 136 acres in New Market township, where he has
since made his home. His original holdings have b^n increased to
530 acres, on which he has erected modern buildings of all kinds and
in e\'ery way so improved it that it is now regarded as the best
equipped farm in the township. He raises stock extensively, making
a specialty of Shorthorn cattle, of which he has one of the handsomest
herds in the county. As a farmer he is progi'essive and enterprising,
keeping well abreast of all modem improvements and well informed
in all that concerns advanced agriculture. He is a member of Golden
Ridge grange, No. 230, at Xew Market, and HiDsboro post, No. 205,
Grand Army of the Republic. His religious affiliations are with the
Mount Zion Reformed church and his political views are those of the
Republican party. Mr. and Mrs. Pence have four children:
Carey A., of Liberty township; William H., of Hillsboro; Sarah H.,
wife of Urban Orebaugh, and General George O., now at home.

Lewis Pence, postmaster, and a citizen of general usefulness and
popularity at the village of Ne\dn in the township of Hamer, has a
pioneer ancestry going back to the first decade of Highland county's
history. His father, Peter Pence, was one of that remarkable family
of fourteen children of Henry and Catherine (Layman) Pence, who
are mentioned in more detail above. All save one of this large family
reached maturity, married and had children of their own, thus
making the name Pence one of quite frequent appearance in the
annals of N'ew Market and other townships framed out of that orig-
inal territory. Peter Pence, who was third in order of birth of the
family of fourteen, learned the blacksmith's trade and earned the
reputation of being the most expert mechanic in his line in Highland
county. In 1833 he married Mary Ann. Wilkin, bom March 27,
1817, in New Market township, and daughter of Philip and Polly
Wilkin of early pioneer fame. His first location after marriage was
on the place now owned by George W. Robinson, and about 1856 he
purchased the place where his widow still resides. Although his main
business after that was farming, he did not abandon his trade but
devoted much time to his old calling as a horseshoer and wagon
repairer and was so engaged until his death at the age of seventy-
seven years. Peter Pence's marriage rivaled that of his father in
f ruitf ulness, as it resulted in the birth of thirteen children. Of these



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432 THE COUNTY OF HIGHLAND.

Catherine, Mahala, Peter, Sallie, Thomas H., Andrew, Mary J. and
Philip have" passed away, the last mentioned being killed in the anny.
The children still living are Rachel, wife of George Fawley, of Dan-
ville, Ohio; John, of Liberty, and David, of Xew Market township;
Lydia, wife of Jefferson Fawley, of Danville, and Lewis Pence, suli-
ject of this sketch. The latter was born in Xew Market township.
Highland county, Ohio, January 29, 1846, and remained at home
until the twenty-fifth year of his age. Shortly after that period he
was married to Mary Jane, daughter of John and Isabella Lemon,
who had removed from Highland to Allen county, Ohio. After mar-
rying, Mr. Pence lived about one yeai* on the old home place and then
removed to a farm in Liberty township, where he spent eighteen
months. Subsequently he' returned to the home place and spent
several years in different locations in Hamer township, after which
he settled permanently at Xe\4n. He had learned from his father the
useful and honorable trade of blacksmithing, and this he has steadily
followed during the most of his life. At present he combines the two
important roles of village blacksmith and postmaster, in addition to
dealing in groceries and confectionery, and owns a small tract of land
near the village, besides his home and other town property. He has
served as township trustee and constable, and is much esteemed in all
the relations of life. Of his four children, Emma: L. is dead ; Ella is
assistant in the postoffice ; Ellis lives at Hillsboro and Ira at Dayton,
Ohio. Mr. and Mrs. Pence, as well as their children, are members of
the Reformed church.

Henry A. Pence, meml)er of the board of trustees of Hamer town-
ship, derives his origin from the old Virginia family mentioned in
the preceding sketches, who journeyed to Ohio when it was still full
of wild beasts and wilder men. Allen Pence was the sixth in age
of the children of Henry and Catherine (Layman) Pence, and his
birtli occurred on the old home farm in 1826. When he ri^ached
matrimonial age he was united in wedlock with Margaret Strange, of
a substantial Highland county family, and located on a farm of 100
acres, w^hich is still in his possession. Sul>sequently he purchased a
considerably larger farm to which he removed and has since made his
place of residence. He prospered in his affairs and at one time owned
400 acres of land, most of which, however, he gave to members of his
immediate family. Of his five children two died in infancy and
John A., the youngest, passed away after reaching mature years.. The
two survivors are Mary E., wdfe of John Knupp of Hamer township,
and Henry A. Pence, who was born on his father's farm in Highland
coimty, Ohio, July 24, 1854. Shortly after reaching legal age he
married Laura, daughter of Richard and Caroline Holt, and located
on a farm of 1 80 acre§, w^here he resided twenty years, since which
time he has lived with his father on the homestead place. Mr. Pence



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BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCHES. 433

lias farmed in the usual way, cultivating the standard crops, raising
stock and attending to the multifarious work incident to his calling.
He has for some time been a meflnber of the board of trustees of
Hamer township and is serving his second term in that capacity. His
fraternal relations are with Lynchburg lodge, Xo. 151, of the Odd
Fellows, and the Modem Woodmen of America, at Lynchburg. His
only child, Richard A., resides in Dodson township, and the family
are communicants of the Christian church.

Lewis S. Pittser, one of th^ esteemed citizens of Dodson township,
<»mes of an old pioneer family and has many interesting stories to
tell of the achievements and characteristics of his ancestors. The first
of the name in America was John Pitzer (for so it was originally
spelled), who came from Baden, Germany, about 1770, with his
brother Michael, who was the father of twenty-four children by two
marriages. John Pitzer settled in Berkeley county, W. Va., where
he followed farming and weaving, reared a family and passed away.
Among his ten children was John Pittser, bom in January, 1777,
who married Elizabeth Pifer and by her had two sons, Mathias and
Jacob, and by a second marriage three children, Rachel, Adam and
Andrew. Jacob Pittser, the second son of John and Elizabeth, was
born in Berkeley county, W. Va., August 19, 1800, and in September,
1828, married Catherine Speagh. She was a daughter of Lewis
Speagh, bom about 1756 of German parentage, who settled in Wash-
ington coimty, Md., followed farming and shoemaking, and by his
marriage to Elizabeth Cramer about 1797 had the following children:
John, George, David, Michael, Nancy, Catharine (born June 11,
1801), Mary, Charlotte, Rachel, Margaret and Sarah, all of whom
except Michael, who died in infancy, lived to be more than sixty years
old, and three reached the age of nearly ninety years. About
1824, Lewis Speag^h migrated to Licking county, Ohio, and ten years
later settled in Highland county^ where he died October 26, 1855, at
the asre of ninety-six years. A very large Gertn,an Bible, formerly
owned by him, bearing date of publication, 1737, is now treasured by



Online LibraryA. E. Hough J. W. KliseThe county of Highland: a history of Highland County, Ohio, from the ... → online text (page 50 of 63)