A. G Lucier.

Pictorial souvenir of Thermopolis, Wyoming online

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1417560



GENEALOGY



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THERMQPOLIS. WYOMING



COPYRIGHT. 1910

;y A. G. LUCIER

POWELL, WYO.



Tliermopolis — ".iterally. the Hot City — was so
named for the Hot Springs in close proximity.
It. was established in 1S97 when the portion of
the Wind River Indian Reservation on wliich it
stands, was opened to settlement. The town
was immediately incorporated and townsite
filed on by the corporate authorities, under the
United States land laws.

The story of Thermopolis is one of a thriv-
ing little city that has grown and prospered in
spite of its heretofore isolated situation, and
the story of the country round about is one of
limitless resources and vast oi)portun!ty. Witli
the passing of the public domain, the settler
has pushed back into the out-of-the-way places.
The history of the iieopling of the west has
proven, that the first settler passes on when
the neighbors become thick enough to touch
elbows with him, and that he gives way to the
man who really improves the country and
builds it up and becomes a part of the perma-
nent population.

The valley of the Big Horn, in North Cen-
tral Wyoming, has been little known to the
outside world, because it has been remote from
the great railway arteries that form the circu-
lation system of the country. The Burlington
System, has completed the northern end of the
connecting link (as far as Thermopolis) which
will connect the Gulf Coast and the Great
Northwest. The balance is under construction
and expected to be finished by .January, 1911.

BIG HORN HOT SPRINGS.

"Where Ponce De Leon's dream came true,"
might appropriately be given as the title of
an article on the Bi.g Horn Hot Springs. When
he came across the Atlantic with the early
explorers, seeking the Fountain of Perpetual
Youth, which legends told him he would find
in the unknown western world, and whose
waters held the magic property of giving to



him who drank of them immunity from the
physical ills to which mortals are heir, and
bid definance to the fight of time. Although
eternal youth is not given to us in this life,
jircbably nowhere else on earth is anything
so nearly approaching the ideal of the o\a
Sjianish oxplorrr as the Big Horn Hot Springs.
Carlsbiiil, Ai\ la Chapelle. Marienl)ad an:;
Tc|iliis :irr iii world-wide fame for their heal-
ini; pri)|"'rlii :s, and it is given as the opinion
of eminent authorities that none of tliem
contain more virtue than our own Siirings a;
Thermopolis. Some years ago Prof. }>\. P
Schuetzenberger, of the College de France at
Paris, analyzed the waters at the request of
Dr. J. A. Schueike and declared they repre-
sented the highest type known. Those who
have been accustomed to seeing hot .springs of
the class represented by standing pools or
trickling springs are amazed on visiting the
Big Horn Hot Springs, where the Hig Horn Hot
Spring alone flows a volume of 18,600.000 gal-
lons per 24 hours at a temperature of 135 de-
grees Fahr. This hot spring is about 25 feet
in diameter and boils as vigorously as any
housewife's kitchen pot, presenting a grand
and interesting spectacle, of which the visitor
never tires. On flowing from the spring, the
water wends its way about one-quarter of a
mile, through a channel it has cut across the
"formation" and tumbles into the Big Horn
River in a beautiful falls of about forty feet.
The magic charm of the springs, the falls ?nd
the formation can not well be described, but
must be seen to be aiipreciated. The forma-
tion spoken of consists of a snow white lied
of the consistency of soft rock, covering sev-
eral acres, and many feet in thickness. l)uilt
through countless ages by the precipitation
of the solids held in solution by the waters.
In places it is formed into handsome terraces,
while the walks from the bath-houses to the



springs are provided by nature over a surface
as smootli and firm as a cement floor.

Tlie remarkable efficacy of these waters in
the restoration of health is what commends
them chiefly to the consideration of the suffer-
ing public. The water is especially effective
in the cure of all blood and skin diseases,
rheumatism, and kidney complaints. People
come from hundreds of miles to take treatment
here and when the waters are more thoroughly
known they will draw their patrons from
everywhere on the continent. Innumerable
cases may be cited where other springs had
failed to effect a cure and the sufferer found
full and permanent relief here.

When the tract on which the springs are
located was bought by the government from
the Indians in 1S97, Washakie, chief of the
Shoshones, stipulated that a portion of the
water of the Big Spring should be reserved
forever for free public use. In the patent
from the National Government to the State of
Wyoming, of one mile square known as the
Big Horn Hot Springs Reserve, the same con-
dition was inserted, and it is thus assured that
'one-fourth of the water of the Big Spring will
J)e free for all time.

Besides the Big Spring, there are many
smaller ones, of various chemical properties
and any disease that will yield to the treat-
ment of hot water, will find its proper remedy
among them. The water, when bottled, makes
as fine a drink as any table water on the
market.

Below is an analysis of the water of the Big
Spring, made by Prof. Schuetzenberger:

Sulphuretted Hydrogen 0.026S

Sulphate of Lime 0.6367

Sulphate of Magnesium 0.3285

Alkaline Chlorides of Sodium and

Potassium 0.5583

(Of this latter the Chloride of
Sodium prevails four-fifths and
the Chloride of Potassium one-
fifth.)

Carbonate of Lime 0.5250

Oxide of Iron, Silica, Organic
Matter and Loss 0.101

Fixed Residue 2.1763

This is per Litre.
Temperature 135° F.

CLIMATE.

Climate is recognized as an important ele-
ment in the treatment of disease. Nowhere
on earth are climatic conditions more favor-
able for the cure of consumption than bee on
the slope of the Rockies. It is mild and im-
mune from storms by reason of the conforma-
tion of the nearby mountains, and charged



with the life-giving ozone that is death to the
germs of tuberculosis. He who suffers from
the depressing and enervating effect of lower
altitudes should not overlook the benefit to be
derived from a season of rest and recuperation
here. The altitude of Thermopolis is 4,350
feet above sea level.

The population of Thermopolis today is l,50ii
and is steadily increasing.

It possesses one of the finest schools in the
state, valued at $25,000. There are twelve
grades, inclflding High School, and a fully
equipped manual training department for work
in wood.

An up-to-date system of water works has
been installed at a cost of $50,000, the water
being taken by a filter system from the Big
Horn River, pumped into a reservoir at suffi-
cient elevation to give adequate pressure for
all needs and from there distributed through
a system of iron pipes.

The streets are broad and well graded and
the townsite has just enough slope to insure
admirable drainage.

A fine sewerage system is about to be in-
stalled, the contracts having already been let,
and the work will be under headway shortly.

The town is supplied with electric light and
power. The plant is situated nearby and run
by steam and water power from the river.

Of fraternal orders there are the Masonic,
Odd Fellows, Knights of Pythias, Modern
Woodmen of America, Modern Brotherhood of
America, Eastern Star, Rebekas and Royal
Neighbors. All have excellent organizations
and are in thriving condition.

COAL LANDS.

Within a radius of twenty miles are vast
coal lands, the extent of which has never been
determined. Much of this land still belongs
to the government and offers an attractive
field for speculation. The coal is or the best
quality found in the West and is clean from
foreign matter. At Gebo and Crosby, twelve
miles from Thermopolis, large companies are
mining this coal and find a ready market in the
mining camps of Montana and the entire North-
west.



SULPHUR.

Only four miles from Thermopolis is the re-
fining plant of the Wyoming Sulphur Company,
which has the most complete equipment of the
kind in the United States. Immense and inex-
haustible beds of this commodity are here, and
so pure is the quality of the output that the
present capacity of the mill is not sufficient
to supply the demand.



MINES AND MINERALS.

On Copper Mountain and Owl Creek Moun-
tains four miles south of Thermopolis, are vast,
highly mineralized deposits of metal-bearing
rock, carrying rich values in copper, gold and
silver in smaller quantities.



OTHER PRODUCTS OF THE EARTH.

In the immediate vicinity of the town are im-
mense quarries of superb building stone, in-
cluding white, gray, yellow and red sandstone,
a handsome reddish brown marble and many
other varieties. The excellence of these stones
may be judged by the illustrations of some of
the magnificent buildings, shown in this book-
let.

Limestone and gypsum, cement shale, excel-
lent brick and tile clays abound here and every
indication points to the existence of oil and
gas. Geographically we are in the center of
a great oil field that extends over Fremont
and Big Horn Counties, where many gushers
have been developed in the course of the last
few years.



STOCK RAISING.

In the early days of the state the chief in-
dustry was the growing of livestock. With
the establishment of other industries, there
has also been great advancement made In this
line. In all the broad expanse of the state
there is no better grazing field than the coun-
try surrounding Thermopolis. The lower val-
leys and broken lands furnish splendid winter
range, while the mountains support the flocks
and herds during summer months. Sheep,
cattle and horses are raised in vast numbers,
finding ample sustenance, in most cases, on
the open range throughout the entire year.



AGRICULTURE.

Many thousands of acres of as productive
land as lies out of doors have been reclaimed
along the Big Horn River. Owl Creek and



other of the smaller streams, and yet irngatea
farming is only in its infancy. Other thousands
of acres, perhaps a little more difficult to
water, are waiting for the man who would
build a home and reap the fruits of his labor.
An abundance of water flows in the Big Horn
River for the reclamation of many times the
amount of land tributary to it.

Alfalfa is the chief crop grown, conditions
being favorable to the growth of this wonderful
forage plant. Three crops are commonly cut
and the yield enormously heavy.

Small grain does exceptionally well.

All kinds of garden produce grow in abund-
ance. Fruits of the hardier varieties and ber-
ries thrive well and produce enormous crops.
Nearly all the orchards are young, but have
attained sufficient maturity to bear fruit, and
prove that horticulture is not an experiment,
but is destined to be an entire success.

Dry farming in Wyoming was not taken
seriously until the last year or two, but is now
making rapid headway.

FISH AND GAME.

The greatest big game hunting ground in
the United States is situated in the main range
of the Rockies, west of Thermopolis. Elk.
deer, mountain sheep, antelope and bear
abound. Splendid trout fishing can be found
in the Big Horn Mountains. Sportsmen will
find it convenient to outfit at Thermopolis for
a trip to the hunting and fishing .-egions.

CONCLUSION.

Any person wishing to better his worldly
condition, or searching for health and recrea-
tion, should not fail to visit Thermopolis, and
investigate the possibilities of the town, the
springs. End the surrounding country. This
may be said in all confidence, tor they will
stand the test of examination.

Inquiries addressed to the Secretary of the
Thermopolis Club will receive a prompt and
courteous reply.



1417560




BIRDSEYE VIEW, SHOWING BIG HORN HOT SPRING AND "FORMATION'



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Flows 18,600,000 Gallons ,



BIG HORN HOT SPRING

Water per 24 Hours at a Tempera



135 Degrees Fahr.




THE FOUNTAIN

FREE CAMPING GROUNDS. BIG HORN Kl\ EK
FALLS OF THE BIG HORN HOT SPRING
DEVIL'S PUNCH BOWL.




SULPHUR SPRING



Interesting and Peculiar Rock Formation
Near the Spring




BUNGALOW CAFE AND ICE CREAM PARLOR

H. E. ROGERS. Proprietor











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THE STAR PLUNGE

ROHR & HALM, Proprietors







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THE EMPIRE ABSTRACT, LOAN AND INVESTMENT CO.
FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING



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GENERAL BANKING WYOMING TRUST COMPANY SAVINGS DEPARTMENT

Capital Stock, $25,000.00

OFFICERS

DAVID DICKIE. President HENRY COTTLE, 2nd Vice-President

IRA E. JONES, 1st Vice-President A, J. LOWRY, Assl. Cashier




Curios. Fresh Fruit, Candies, Nuts CURT L. SIMMONS P'P«- Cigars, Tobacco

ICE CREAM PARLORS




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FRED E. HOLDREDGE & COMPANY
FURNITURE AND UNDERTAKING

Hotel Supplies, Office Furniture, Rugs and Carpels
Pictures, Que



Pljp^^



W. H. ENDERLY

General Haidware and Sporting Goods, Harness, Saddles, Queensware, Cutlery, Et(




JOHN A. THOMPSON
FURNITURE :: UNDERTAKING




HIGH SCHOOL
BAPTIST CHURCH
BROADWAY (Lookins East)



METHODIST FPISCOPAL CHURCH
ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH
BALL GROUNDS




PIONEER STABLE




THE PALACE CLOTHING COMPANY



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DR. J. R. rk:h.\rds block



BROADWAY POOL PARLORS




THE McMANlGAL ADDITION, located on ihe banks of the B.g H,
o( Thermopolis. Mr. F. S. McManigal was the first settler, having flf«
hundred acres of the original homestead has now become part of the
The first cabin in Thermopolis. built by Mr. F. S. McManigal on hi
McManigal's ranch near Thermopolis.



fine residentia
e homestead June II. 1897. One
residential section of Thermopolis.
Views of horses taken on Mr,




A. W. BEBB, Secretary



OFFICERS OF THE THERMOPOLIS CLUB, 1910

IRA E. JONES. President

COL. G EO. M . SLIN->-, V - Pres. w . J . SIbh., 1 r<



DIRECTORS

, L. OWEN MARTIN McGRATH HENRY COTTLE ARTHUR K LEE E. L. ERICKSON




COMPANY- L, 3rd REGIMEN 1 W. N. G.




A FEW OF THE COZY HOMES AROUND TOWN




THOROUGHBRED HEREFORD CATTLE. RAISED NEAR THERMOPOLIS




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rded first


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n his land.


This property


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rmopolls in


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Mr. G. B. Chase


has 320 acres


of land, on which are located val |


uable stone quariies


, cement shale


and gypsum. The


picture above


shows the limestone


and building


rock quarry.





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ALFALFA
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IN THE FAMOUS OWL

CREEK VALLEY, NEAR

THERMOPOLIS




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PALACE MARKET COMPANY




HERARD'S PHARMACY

THE BUSIEST PLACE IN TOWN

GEO. W. HERARD. Proprietor




THE FIRST NATIONAL DANK

CAPITAL. $25,000.00 SURPLUS AND UNDIVIDED PROFITS. $23.iH)i)0O

OFFICERS
H. P. ROTHWELL. President IRA E JONES. Cshier

JACOB PRICE. Vice.Presidenl W. T. BIVIN, Assl. Cashier



DEPOSITS, $250,000.00



1417560





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Online LibraryA. G LucierPictorial souvenir of Thermopolis, Wyoming → online text (page 1 of 1)