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THE HI S TOIl Y



OF



METHODISM IN KENTUCKY.



BY THE REV. A. H. REDFORD, D.D.



VOLUME III.

FROM THE CONFERENCE OF 1820 TO THE CONFERENCE
OF 1832.



SOUTHERN METHODIST PUBLISHING HOUSE.

1870.



Entered, according to Act of Congress, in the year 1870, by

A. H. REDFORD,

in the District Court of the United States for the Middle District of Tennessee.



STEREOTYPED AT THE SOUTHERN METHODIST PUBLISHING HOUSE,
NASHVILLE, TENNESSEE.



CONTENTS.



CHAPTER I.

FROM THE TENNESSEE CONFERENCE OF 1820 TO THE KENTUCKY
CONFERENCE OF 1821.

The General Conference of 1820— The Presiding Elder ques-
tion — Joshua Soule elected Bishop — He declines consecration
— The Tennessee Conference meets at Hopkinsville, Kentucky
— No Bishop present — Marcus Lindsey elected President —
John Evans— "William Martin — Allen B. Dillard — David
Gray — Aquila W. Sampson — Isaac Reynolds — William Young
—William M. McReynolds— John W. McReynolds— Henry
Gregg— Luke P. Allen — John Denham — Edward Stevenson
— Benjamin M. Drake — John Brown— Samuel Brown — Allen
Elliott — George Locke — Burwell Spurlock — William Burke
— John Metcalf— Thomas S. Hinde— Abel Robbins — Dr. Sam-
uel Goslee — Maysville Station — Hopkinsville Station — Mis-
sionaries appointed to Jackson's Purchase — Increase in mem-
bership 13

CHAPTER II.

FROM THE KENTUCKY CONFERENCE OF 1821 TO THE CONFERENCE
OF 1822.

The Kentucky Conference meets in Lexington — Bishops Roberts
and George both present — Augusta College — William Farrow
— Caleb Crain — James Ross — James Browder — William Cham-
bers — Laban Hughey — Green Malone — Daniel H. Tevis —
Blachley C. Wood — Obadiah Harber — Thomas Atterbury —

(3)



4 CONTENTS.

John II. Tower— George W. Robbins — Peter Akers — Thomas
Joyner — John James — Richard D. Neale — Philip Kennerly —
Zadoc B. Thaxton — George C. Light — Thomas A. Morris —
"William B. Carpenter — Amos Smith — James Avis — Milton
Jamison — Thomas Robinson and his wife — New circuits
formed — Increase in membership 95

CHAPTER III.

FROM THE KENTUCKY CONFERENCE OF 1822 TO THE CONFERENCE
OF 1823.

The Conference of 1822 held in Lexington — Bishops McKendree
and George present — John Jones — James P. Milligan —
George Stevens — John P. Finley — Major Stanfield — Henry
W. Hunt — Edwin Ray — Uriel Haw — George Brown — Benja-
min T. Crouch — Lewis Parker — Simon L. Booker — Stephen
Harber — Esau Simmons — Elisha Simmons — Nathanael Har-
ris — Mrs. Hannah Hubbard Kavanaugh — George and Susan
Ivlinglesmith — New circuits — Increase in membership 151

CHAPTER IV.

FROM THE KENTUCKY CONFERENCE OF 1823 TO THE CONFERENCE
OF 1821.

The Conference held in Maysville — Bishops George and Roberts
both present — Nelson Dills — Daniel Black — Thompson J. Hol-
liman — David Wright — Clement L. Clifton — Richard I. Dun-
gan — George Richardson — Abram Long — John S. Larger —
Newton G. Berryman — Hubbard Hinde Kavanaugh — Har-
vey Sawyers — Methodism in Shelbyville — New circuits — In-
crease in membership 212

CHAPTER V.

FROM TnE KENTUCKY CONFERENCE OF 1821 TO THE CONFERENCE
OF 1825.

The Conference held in Shelbyville — Bishops McKendree, Rob-
erts, and Soule present — Caleb J.Taylor — John Watts —
George W. Shreaves — Joseph Carter — Nathanael Parker —
John M. S. Smith— William Grain— Thomas G. Reece— Wil-



CONTENTS. 5

liam H. Askins — John Sinclair — William Atherton— Fountain
E. Pitts— Benjamin Ogden — William McCommas — Samuel P.
V. Gillisj.ie — Mrs. Julia A. Tevis— Science Hill Female Acad-
emy—Caleb N. Bell— Jordan T. C. Moore— Hazel Petree—
Methodism in Todd county — Methodism in Logan county —
Richard Bibb— Benjamin and Eleanor Temple — Grigsby Rush
— John P. Moore — Littleberry Browder — Richard and Wil-
liam Browder— Thomas G. Gooch— Logan Female College-
Decrease in membership. 233

CHAPTER VI.

FEOM THE KENTUCKY CONFEEENCE OF 1825 TO THE CONFERENCE
OF 1826.

The Conference held in Russellville — Bishops McKendree and
Roberts present — Evan Stevenson — John Fisk — William
Brown — David Tunnell — John G. Denton — Benjamin Tevis —
John W. F. Tevis — James L. Greenup — Alexander H. Stem-
mons— Henry S. Duke— Michael S. Taylor— Joseph S. Tom-
linson— James C. Crow— Nathanael M. Talbot— Nehemiah A.
Cravens — Charles M. Holliday — William Gunn — Thomas
Browder— John P. Durbin— First Methodist Class in Bards-
town — Isaac G. and John S. Evans — Dr. Gabriel E. Cos and
wife — Elias Kincheloe — Isaac Miller — Joseph Hamilton Da-
veiss — First Methodist Class in Daveiss county — Methodism
introduced into Owensboro — John Daveiss — John Pinkston —
Joseph Miller— Mrs. Sally S. Wall— Increase in membership.. 281

CHAPTER VII.

FEOM THE KENTUCKY CONFERENCE OF 1826 TO THE CONFERENCE
OF 1827.

The Conference met in Louisville — Bishops Roberts and Soule
present— Peter Shelton— William Belt— Jefferson E. Parrish
— Abraham Norfleet — Lewis M. Woodson — Nathan S. John-
son—John W. Ellis— William Cundiff— John Redman— Hi-
ram Baker — Littleton Fowler — Silas Lee — Samuel Veach —
Charles Railey— Frances S. Railey— Methodism in Danville —
Dr. John W. Fleece— Mrs. Elizabeth Fleece— Methodism in



CONTENTS.

Newcastle — Methodism in Frankfort — John Perry and his
wife — Norburn Cooke — Mrs. Judith V. Cooke — John Smith-
Mrs. Mary S. Smith — Mrs. Elizabeth Smith — Frederick A.
Smith — Abram Funk and his wife — Joseph Gray — Increase
in membership 333

CHAPTER VIII.

FROil THE KENTUCKY CONFERENCE OF 1S27 TO THE CONFERENCE
OF 1828.

The Conference met in Versailles — Bishops McKendree, Eoberts,
and Soule present — First Tract Society formed in Kentucky —
Pleasant Hines — Jeremiah Hunt — Joseph Kelly — James M.
Culp — Samuel Kenyon — John F. Strother — Simpson Duty —
Abram Baker — William Phillips — Greenup Kelly — Horace
Brown — Moses Clampet — Joseph B. Power — George W. Mar-
tin — John K. Lacey — Thomas W. Chandler — Joseph Marsee
— Thomas N. Pvalston — George W. Fagg — Burr H. McCown
— Samuel Harrison — Methodism in Harrodsburg — Chris-
topher Chinn — Mrs. Sarah W. S. Chinn — First Sunday-school
in Harrodsburg — Mrs. Ann Harrod — James Taylor — Bartlett
A. Basham — Mrs. Charlotte Brashear — Methodism in Breck-
inridge county — First class formed in Hardinsburg — Method-
ism in Hancock county — Mr. and Mrs. Greathouse — William
Brown — Philemon and Catherine Davison— Dr. Lovick Pierce
— Methodism in Glasgow — Mrs. Elizabeth Lee — Methodism in
the Sandy River country — Cornelius McGuire — Henry Strat-
ton — William Buchanan and his wife — Harry B. Mayo —
Lewis Mayo — Philip Strawther — Stephen Spurlock — Increase
in membership 372

CHAPTER IX.

FROM THE KENTUCKY CONFERENCE OF 182S TO THE CONFERENCE
OF 1829.

The Conference met in Shelby ville — Bishops Roberts and Soule
present — Stephen G. Ptoszel — John D. Carrick — Leonard
George— Israel Lewis — Charles Haff— James Savage — Hamil-



CONTENTS. 7

ton C. Ulin — Isaac Malone — Samuel Julian — Hooper Evans —
Absalom Wooliscroft — Thomas Waring — George W. Brush —
Robert Y. McKeynolds — William B. Landrum — Joseph G.
Ward — Thomas Wallace — Andrew Peace — Richard Bird —
Joseph Carter — Martin Ruter — The first class in Branden-
burg—William Fairleigh — Mrs. Elizabeth Fairleigh — Mrs.
Jane Stewart — Methodism in Hardin count}' — Its introduc-
tion into Elizabethtown — Jacob Enlow — George L. Rogers —
Jesse and Jacob Bird — Lemuel Crandell — Mrs. Ann Thorpe —
Mrs. Rosanna Hardin — The first class in Henderson — Thomas
Evans— Mrs. Margaret Rudy — Thomas Beall — Mrs. Elizabeth
Hall— Mrs. Ann Dorsey — Increase in membership 418



CHAPTER X.

FROM THE KENTUCKY CONFERENCE OF 1829 TO THE CONFERENCE
OF 1830.

The Conference met in Lexington — Bishops McKendree and
Roberts present — Joel Grover — Harrison Goslin — Thomas M.
Rice — Elijah Knox — John Williams — Thomas C. Cropper —
Thomas P. Vance— William P. McKnight— Buford Henry-
Thomas P. Farmer — William A. H. Spratt — Wilson S. McMur-
ray — Buford Paris — William Helm — Thomas H. Gibbons —
Martin L. Eades — John F. Young — Jesse Sutton — John San-
dusky — Hooper Crews — Death of John Fisk — Asa Shinn —
The Gospel Herald — Oliver B. Ross — Methodism in Hopkins-
ville— Ira Ellis— Nicholas M. Ellis— Ira Ellis, Jr.— William S.
Talbot — William and Margaret Price — Henry, John, and
Neville Hobson — Jesse Harrison and his wife — Mrs. Preston
—Mrs. Caldwell— Mrs. Wilkerson— Mrs. Judith A. Woodson
— Mrs. Elizabeth Moore — Methodism in Louisville — William
Farquar— Samuel Dickinson — Coleman Daniel — William Sale
— Tarlton Cox — William T. Spurrier — James Harrison — Mrs.
Sophia J. New — Mrs. Juliet Spurrier — Mrs. Elizabeth W.
Ayres— James Augustus— Delaney Washburn— Daniel Rudy
—Harry and John P. Shiveley— Robert Miller— Mrs. Eliza-
beth Stewart— Mrs. Pollard— Mrs. Nancy Cooper— Increase
in membership 449



8 CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XI.

FROM THE KENTUCKY CONFERENCE OF 1830 TO THE CONFERENCE
OF 1831.

The Conference met in Russellville — Bishop Soule presided —
Pleasant Alverson — Micajah H. Clarke — Franklin Davis —
George B. Harlan — Daniel S. Capell — Robert F. Turner-
John Beatty — William S. Evans — James King — Hartwell J.
Perry — John Christian Harrison — Methodism in Mason county
— Shannon neighborhood — Methodism in Maysville — John
Reed — Mrs. Emily Reed — William Ingram — Mrs. Harriet
Ingram — Ferdinand Dora— William Dora — Mrs. Elizabeth
Bradford — Methodism in Fleming and Lewis counties — Dan-
iel K. Putman — First class in Newport — First class in Coving-
ton — Mrs. Margaret Tennis — Decrease in membership 494

CHAPTER XII.

FROM THE KENTUCKY CONFERENCE OF 1831 TO THE CONFERENCE
OF 1832.

The Conference met in Louisville — Bishops Roberts and Hed-
ding present — Edward L. Southgate — Minor M. Cosby — Wil-
liam Phillips — Lewell Campbell — Carlisle Babbitt — Thomas
Hall — Elijah Sutton — Learner B. Stateler — Joseph D. Barnett
— John Littlejohn — Methodism in Lexington — Spencer Cooper
— Mrs. Sarah Norton — Mrs. Nancy B. Buskett— Mrs. Catherine
Campbell — James Overstreet — Rice Harris — John Pace — Chris-
topher Clarke — Joshua McQueen — James B. Ballard and his
wife — Joseph Proctor — John O'Rear — James Hines — Mrs.
Elizabeth Briggs — Mrs. Albina Emerson — Increase in mem-
bership — Conclusion 518



PREFACE



TO THE HON. JAMES S. LITHGOW.

Dear Sir : — I beg leave to dedicate to you
the Third Volume of the History of Methodism
in Kentucky, with which my labors close. It was
my intention to bring this History down to a later
period; but finding myself among so many living
men, to whose labors a sense of delicacy will not
allow me to do justice, I deem it proper to refer
their names and achievements to the future his-
torian.

The task I have performed has been to me one
of great pleasure, although delicate and attended
with many difficulties. The memory of persons
advanced in age, especially in reference to dates,
is not always reliable, nor are the official records
of the Church free from errors. Besides, many
facts and incidents of importance have neither been
preserved in the tablet of memory, nor in the more
permanent journals of the Church.

(9)



10 PREFACE.

The present volume comes down to the year
1832. The name of every traveling preacher
from 178G, when Haw and Ogden entered Ken-
tucky, to the period with which this volume closes,
has been carefully preserved ; while sketches of
many local preachers, distinguished for their piety
and usefulness, and of men and women in the
laity, of whom you are so worthy a representative,
who were burning and shining lights, adorn these
pages.

The achievements of Methodism in the West
scarcely find a parallel in the history of the
Church. The small Society organized in 1783, in
Mercer county, Kentucky, by Francis Clark, a
pious and zealous local preacher, with less than a
dozen members, previous to the autumn of 1832
had grown to eight Annual Conferences, with six
hundred and sixty traveling preachers, comprising
a membership of one hundred and ninety-seven
thousand two hundred and thirty-five; while in
Kentucky alone there were one hundred and thirteen
traveling preachers, and twenty -six thousand nine
hundred and eighty-seven members.

The inheritance that has been bequeathed to us
by our fathers is rich with blessings to the present
generation, and cannot be preserved and guarded
with too much care; nor should we ever be forgetful



PREFACE. 11

of its cost. The sacrifices made by those who pre-
ceded us, the privations they suffered, the difficul-
ties that confronted them, and the labors they
performed, should not only make us grateful to
God for the success which crowned their ministry,
but should induce us to watch with vigilance every
departure from the doctrines of the gospel they so
faithfully preached, and to apply to our own expe-
rience "the many exceeding great and precious
promises " of the word of God, on which, through
the merits of Jesus Christ, they reposed their hope
of eternal life.

To us it is a source of peculiar pleasure that the
noble men who planted Methodism in Kentucky,
as well as those who contributed by their zeal and
their labors to its advancement and prosperity, not
only enjoyed in life the religion they professed, but
were sustained by its sweet consolations in their
last moments.

Of all whose names we have recorded, who con-
tinued in the itinerant field, whether their dust
reposes in Kentucky, or elsewhere, there is not
one who did not meet death with calmness or with
triumph.

In the local ranks of the Church, and in the
laity, the saving power of Christianity is equally
striking. The local preacher, called to the sacred



12 PREFACE.

work of the ministry, and impelled by the same
motives by which the itinerant is influenced, shares
in the same joys in the hour of death, while all
along the lines of the Church the humble followers
of Christ sound the notes of triumph, as the great
battle of life is closing. "Our people die well."

"With sincere prayer for your happiness in this
life, and your salvation in heaven, I am, truly your
brother in Christ,

A. H. BEDFORD.

Nashville, Tesn., April 1, 1870.



HISTORY

OF

METHODISM IN KENTUCKY.



CHAPTER I.

FROM THE TENNESSEE CONFERENCE OF 1820 TO THE
KENTUCKY CONFERENCE OF 1821.

The General Conference of 1820 — The Presiding Elder question —
Joshua Soule elected Bishop — He declines consecration — The Ten-
nessee Conference meets at Hopkinsville, Kentucky — No Bishop
present — Marcus Lindsey elected President — John Evans — "William
Martin — Allen B. Dillard — David Gray — Aquila W. Sampson —
Isaac Reynolds — William Young — William M. McReynolds — John
W. McReynolds — Henry Gregg — Luke P. Allen — John Denham —
Edward Stevenson — Benjamin M. Drake — John Brown — Samuel
Brown — Allen Elliott — George Locke — Burwell Spurlock — Wil-
liam Burke — John Metcalf — Thomas S. Hinde — Abel Bobbins —
Dr. Samuel Goslee — Maysville Station — Hopkinsville Station —
Missionaries appointed to Jackson's Purchase — Increase in mem-
bership.

The General Conference of 1820 was held in the
Eutaw Street Church, in Baltimore, commencing
on the first day of May. Among the many questions
that occupied the attention of the body at this ses-
sion, there was none so important, or that excited
so much interest, as that of the Presiding-elder-
vol. in. (13)



14 METHODISM

Bhip. Although the title docs not occur in the
General Minutes until 1T89, yet the office was co-
eval with the organization of the "Methodist Epis-
copal Church in America," and from that period
had existed in all its force. "When Mr. Wesley
drew up a plan of government for our Church in
America, he desired that no more elders should be
ordained in the first instance than were absolutely
necessary, and that the work on the Continent
should be divided between them, in respect to the
duties of the office. The General Conference ac-
cordingly elected twelve elders for the above pur-
poses." The Minutes for 1785 show that the work
was divided into thirteen Districts, twelve of which
were placed under the supervision of the elders who
had been elected and ordained, while the District
embracing Georgia, Charleston, and Georgetown, for
that year, had not the service of this officer.

In the Bishops' Notes on the Discipline they say :
" Bishop Asbury and the District Conferences after-
ward found that this order of men was so necessary
that they agreed to enlarge the number, and give
them the name by which they are at present
called, and which is perfectly scriptural, though
not the word used in our translation; and this pro-
ceeding afterward received the approbation of Mr.
Wesley."*

At the Conference of 1790 the term "Presiding"
was dropped, and preachers placed in charge of Dis-
tricts were simply styled Elders; but at the Confer-

* Emory on Discipline, p. 291.



IN KENTUCKY. 15

encc of 1797 it was again introduced, and has con-
tinued to be employed ever since.

This title and office received the full approbation
of Mr. "Wesley, who desired the American Method-
ists to follow the word of God and the Primitive
Church in their polity. The title is taken from 1
Tim. v. 17: "Let the elders that rule well"—
TTpoeartoreg rrpea(3vrepoi, the presiding elders — "be
counted worthy of double honor." In the New
Testament, and in the earliest ecclesiastical works,
the terms -npeofivTepoi, presbyters, and kmono-noh bish-
ops, are synonymous, denoting one and the same
order. The Presiding Elder, as his title imports,
presided in the coetus, or presbytery, by which all
the Christian assemblies of a city were governed.
In the second century, the title bishops was re-
stricted to such presidents, and their jurisdiction
gradually extended, so as to take in the suburban
region. Diocesan Episcopacy is of a later elate. The
fathers of American Methodism adopted in sub-
stance the primitive polity, and for the sake of con-
venience restricted the title Bishops to the General
Superintendents, and that of Presiding Elders to
their assistants in the oversight of the Church.

Mr. AVesley very aptly says "that the whole plan
of Methodism was introduced, step by step, by the
interference and openings of Divine Providence."
This is eminently apparent, as regards this office, as
its utility has fully demonstrated.

The Episcopal office in the Methodist Church is
not diocesan, but general in its character. The
Church, spreading over the entire Continent, was



16 METHODISM

too vast in its extent to be properly superintended
by the few men holding the office of a bishop, unless
they were assisted by other officers in the Church.

Indeed, in adopting the itinerant system of carry-
ing the gospel to every portion of the country,
however untiring and vigilant the chief shepherds
might be in devising plans, as well as in executing
them, for the advancement of the Church, it was
necessary that they should avail themselves of the
experience and advice of "true and tried" men,
who were familiar with the ground, and whose
fields of labor were more circumscribed than theirs.
Hence, according to the teaching of t]ie apostles
and the practice of the Primitive Church, the office
of Presiding; Elder was instituted.

The command of Christ to the apostles was,
" Go and teach all nations." The itinerant plan
that formed an essential feature in Methodism is
only the revival of the method for the spread of
Christianity that existed in the apostolic age.

The rapid growth of Methodism in America,
while it afforded unspeakable pleasure to the men
who were devoting their lives to its interest, at the
same time claimed the attention of other Christian
denominations, and was not without its influence in
inciting them to greater zeal in the cause of Christ.

The Episcopal Church, or the Church of England,
as it was then styled, was introduced into America
in 1607, with the colonizing of Virginia. In 1639
the Baptist Church was organized at Providence,
Rhode Island, by Ezckiel Holliman and Roger Wil-
liams, two names that will always be illustrious



IN KENTUCKY. 17

in that denomination. In 1705 the Presbyterian
Church was organized. In 1784, when the Method-
ist Episcopal Church in America was organized, the
Episcopal Church had been in existence in this
country one hundred and seventy-seven years, the Bap-
tist Church one hundred and forty-five years, and the
Presbyterian Church seventy-nine years. When the
first Methodist preachers appeared upon the Conti-
nent, the denominations to which we have just re-
ferred were in possession of the country, as the
guardians of its morals and religion. Without a lit-
erary institution under its care, or a single house
of worship, Methodism began its career, and in a
short period not only took rank with sister Churches,
but led in the van.

In 1820 eleven Annual Conferences, comprising a
membership of two hundred and eighty-one thou-
sand one hundred and forty-six, present an exhibit
of the success that had crowned the labors of
Asbury and his contemporaries. That for the pros-
perity of the Church, Methodism is chiefly indebted
to the purity of its doctrines, none can deny; but
that the missionary spirit which permeates every
fiber of its organization, embraced in its itinerant
features, has contributed largely to the development
of its strength, admits of no controversy.

While the General Superintenclency, found in the
Episcopal office, is the most prominent element in
our itinerant system, it is scarcely superior in im-
portance or utility to the Presiding-eldership.

We have already observed that, without the ex-
perience and counsel of men familiar with the



18 METHODISM

ground to be occupied, it would be impossible for
the Bishop to meet the wants of the Church. It
was necessary, too, that the Bishop should be
thoroughly acquainted with the gifts, grace, and
usefulness of each preacher before he could under-
standingly make a proper distribution of the min-
istry. This information could be obtained through
no other medium so easily as that adopted by the
Church. The Presiding-eldership fully met the
necessity. By this arrangement, on the one hand,
the ministry of the Church could communicate their
wants to the Bishop; and on the other, the Bishop
could learn the condition of the Church, while the
preachers could place him in possession of infor-
mation in regard to any peculiarities that might
exist in reference to themselves, and which should
have any controlling influence over their appoint-
ment.

In addition to the reasons we have assigned for
the institution of the office of Presiding Elder, there
are others to which we cannot be totally indifferent.

Bishops Coke and Asbury say in their i\"otes on
the Discipline :

" 1. It is a great help and blessing to the quarterly-
meetings respectively, through the Connection, to
have a man at their head who is experienced
not only iti the ways of God, but in men and man-
ners, and in all things appertaining to the order of
our Church. Appeals may be brought before the
quarterly-meeting from the judgment of the preacher
who has the oversight of the circuit, who certainly
would not be, in such cases, so proper to preside as



IN KENTUCKY. 19

the Ruling Elder. ISTor would any local preacher,
leader, or steward, be a suitable president of the
meeting, as his parent, his child, his brother, sis-
ter, or friend, might be more or less interested in
the appeals which came before him: besides, his
local situation would lead him almost unavoidably
to prejudge the case, and perhaps to enter warmly
into the interests of one or other of the parties,



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