A. J. H. (Augustine Joseph Hickey) Duganne.

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NYPL RESEARCH LIBRARIES



3 3433 08191897 5



/ / \



Entered According to Act of Congress, in the year 1866, by

LOCKWOOD L. DOTY,

In the Clerk'8 Office of the District Court of the United States, for the

Southern District of New York.



THE



FIGHTING QUAKERS,



A TRUE STORY OF




^^^^L^'



THE WAR FOR OUR UNION.



By A. J. H. DUGANNE.



WITH L ETTERS FROM THE BROTHERS TO THEIR MOTHER : AND A FUNERAL SERMON BY

IfEV. O. ^. FlfOTHIK&HJjyL



BY AUTHORITY OF THE BUREAU OP MILITARY RECOR

New-York :
J. P. PtOBENS, 37 PARK. ROW.

Hay V9U pijl




.•r? :• -



• , • r J • I



p^oihetis of lew yi>x[h $tate,

WHO GAVE

THEIR SONS TQ THE UNION,

t$h,h P^emoiti

IS REVERENTLY INSCRIBED.



tNDEX OF CHAPTERS



CHAPTER I. War 13

CHAPIER II Calling TO Battle 23

CHAPTER III. Entering the Service 30

CHAPTER IV. On THE March 37

CHAPTER V. A Soldier's Spirit 45

CHAPTER VI. " Brother Jack " 49

CHAPTER VII. Words of Patriotism 57

CHAPTER VIII. Notes on A March 63

CHAPTER IX. John in Service 66

CHAPTER X. A Gallant Kinsman 69

CHAPTER XL Gettysburg 74

CHAPTER XII. Influence of Patriotism .'. 81

CHAPTER XIII. The Prisoner of War 92



EDWARD HALLOCK KETCHAM.



boen in milton, n. y., december twenty-
seventh, eighteen hundred and thirty-five,
entered the service of his country, at
kingston, august nineteenth, eighteen
hundred and sixty-two ; commissioned
second lieutenant, co. a., one
hundred and twentieth regi-
ment, infantry, n. y. v. ; killed
at gettysburg, july second,
eighteen hundred and six-
ty-three ; buried on the
battle-field ;
remains subsequently exhumed,
and re-interred in the
friends' burial ground.,
at milton, n. y.



JOHN TOWNSEND KETCHAM.



BORN IN JERICHO, L. I., JANUARY TWELFTH, EIGH-
TEEN HUNDRED AND THIRTY-EIGHT ; ENTERED
THE SERVICE OP HIS COUNTRY, IN NEW
YORK CITY, FEBRUARY SIXTH, EIGHTEEN
HUNDRED AND SIXTY-THREE ; COMMIS-
SIONED SECOND LIEUTENANT, CO. M.,
FOURTH REGIMENT CAVALRY, N. Y.
V. ; TAKEN PRISONER, AND DIED
IN LIBBY PRISON OCTOBER
EIGHTH, EIGHTEEN HUN-
DRED AND SIXTY-THREE ;
REMAINS RETURNED TO HIS FRIENDS,
AND RE-INTERRED IN THE
friends' BURIAL GROUND,
AT MILTON, N. Y.



tutorial



In the long roll of names made immortal by the
war recently closed, there are few around which
more interest clusters than those of the brothers
Ketcham. Not that their services were more
arduous, or their deaths more heroic, than were
those of thousands of others in the Federal ranks?
but that they were representatives of a Society
which for two centuries has opposed war, strife and
bloodshed — the Society of Friends ; and that their
names will Hve as " The Fighting Quakers."

Edwaed H. and John Ketcham were the sons
of David Ketcham, a native of Long Island, de-
ceased April 2d, 1860, and Martha Townsend
Hallock, a native of Milton, N. Y., and still a
resident of that village. Their ancestors, as far
back as the family have records, were Friends, or
Quakers, and bore their testimony consistently
and zealously to all the peculiarities of that
Society. They were-well educated and well-read
young men, and especially so for what the world
would call " mere farmers." With home and
plenty around them, and a loving mother to lead
them, they grew up to manhood, strong in the
faith of their fathers. Thus peacefully pursuing



12 MEMORIAL.

their rural occupations, the youths dwelt with
their mother. Thus the rebellion found them.
They were opposed to war — ^they were opposed to
slavery ; but from the outset their convictions
were firm that the war was from God, for the
extermination of slavery. Both wished to enlist ;
but they were loving brothers, and each thought
that the other should remain on the farm with
their mother. This amicable dispute was gravely
and privately settled between themselves, by lot,
and Edward, the eldest, gave in his name to the
new regiment then being raised iq Ulster county.

But, the conscience of John was not satisfied.
He felt and wrote, " I ought to give my life, if it
be my lot, for the cause of law and liberty in its
need ;" and, with this impression, he speedily fol-
lowed his brother as a soldier in the ranks of what
to his enthusiastic spirit, was indeed " the army of
the Lord."

There is something noble in a faith — ^no matter
what that faith may be — ^which leads its followers
to the stake of the martyr, or impels them to ex-
change the comforts of home for the privations of
the camp and the dangers of the battle-field.
It was a faith hke this that inspired the Quaker
Brothers ; leading them ia aU their marches, sus-
tauung them in all their privations ; nerving their
hearts on the field of battle, and brighteniag over
their names on the roll of fame, Kke the fight of
stars in heaven.



THE FIGHTING QUAKERS.



CHAPTEE I.

WAR.



When tlie Kebellion's defiance was hurled from
beleagruiag cannon against the ramparts of Fort
Sumter ; when the flag that surmounted the Fed-
eral fortress was lowered before exultant treason ;
there was but one response from loyal citizens
throughout the Republic.

Alike, in mansion and cottage ; at the loom of
manufacture, the artisan's bench, the student's
desk ; aUke in field and highway, on shore or sea ;
there was a quick throbbing of pulses, a compres-



14 THE FIGHTING QUAKERS.

sion of lips, a bending of brows, as with the
spontaneous thrill of an electric current.

Lucifer, as of old, had flung down his gauntlet
at the gates of earthly happiness; but Michael,
the angel, was ready for the conflict. The evil
spirit of Secession was bom, but the soul of Union
arose to overcome it.

So it was, that while the lightning yet quivered
on the wires which bore its intelligence to North,
and East, and West, there were "minute-men"
aheady buckling theu' arms, as in Revolutionary
days, there were musterings on village-greens,
and marchings to fields of rendezvous, and a hun-
dred thousand brave lives tendered, as offerings on
their country's altar.

Then it was, that the valiant " Sixth Regiment
of Massachusetts," answering our President's call,
strode through the streets of Baltimore, and left
its priceless blood upon her pavements.

Then it was, that the brave " Seventh" of New
York City — representative of wealth and com-
merce ; and the gallant " Sixty-Ninth," composed
of loyal Irish ; and the stalwart " Seventy-Ninth,"
wearing thek Scottish tartan; and the bold
" Eighth," with the flower of our youth ; and the
stout Firemen, mth Ellsworth at their head ; and
the noble " Seventy-Fu'st," with their dying com-
mander, Yosburgh ; and around these, a hundred'
other generous regiments, from the Hudson to the
Lakes, gathered and mustered, with music and



THE FIGHTING QUAKERS. 15

banners, until the blue sky of our Empire State
was thick mth clustering stars, and the winds from
an our hills, and the streams in all our vales were
vocal with one cry :

" We co^ie !"

For the word rang forth that the city of our
government was abeady imperilled by the advance
of rebel forces. " The Capitol is in danger !" was
the startling news which flashed fi^om telegraph to
press, and from press to people, in all the borders
of our Union. " The Capitol is in danger !" was
passed fi'om lip to Up, and from heart to heart,
until every house-porch, and every hearthstone,
and every church, and every school-room echoed
the burthen, and the faithful milhons of our Nation
responded, as with one great voice —
" To ARMS ! to arms !"

President Lincoln had asked for seventy-five
thousand soldiers. He could have enrolled a
million, and the EebeUion might, perhaps, have
been strangled at its bu^th. But an all-wise Prov-
idence had its o^TL purposes to develop through
trial and suffering to the nation. It was necessary
that our Eepubhc should pass through a fiery-
ordeal. Slavery had taken the sword ; it was to
" perish by the sword." War was ordained as the
crucible of our nation, to purge its dross, and to
refine its gold.

I have listened often, with hushed heart, to that
angelic gospel which was heard of old by the shep-



16 THE FIGHTING QUAKERS.

herds of Bethlehem, "keeping watch over their
flocks by night;" that tender song of Heaven's
sweet messengers, who brought " glad tidings of
great joy, " proclaiming " on Earth Peace — Good
Wm to men! "

In all the centuries there have been whisperings
of this celestial strain ; soft rhythms of perfect
love, flowing on like rippling brooks through
stormy battle-plains ; but, alas! these melodies are
evermore drowned by ti-umpet-blasts, and by the
jar and the clash of war-armor.

Thus, from the da,js when Abram marched forth
against banded kings, and when the hand of his
first-bom Ishmael was against every man ; thus,
when the Egyptians followed after fugitive Israel ;
thus, when the trumpets of Joshua were sounded
around the ramparts of Jericho ; thus, when the
Hebrew giant made war on the lords of PhiHstia ;
and the Hebrew king lay in wait for the exile
David ; for ever more the tramp of soldiers echoes
from halls of history, and rivers of human blood roll
down through the vaUey of ages !

Thus, I behold in solemn march an endless col-
umn of martial spectres ; multitudinous armies of
all climes and centuries ranged under mouldy ban-
ners, keeping step to the monotoned drum-beat of
a requiem. Innumerable hosts of humanity,
treading in foot-prints of other hosts, Hkewise in-
computable, but all flanked and guide-marked by



THE FIGHTING QUAKERS. 17

grave-hillocks and th^ ridges and furrows of war
fields.

Funereal march! — appalling procession !

Tramp ! tramp ! through measureless sequences
of recorded Time; onward marshaled over forgot-
ten fields of conquest ! I hear the hollow resonance
of dead foot-falls on causeways paved with ghsten-
ing skulls, muffled by dust of crumbhng bone.

I hear the heavy flap of standards, sodden and
crusted with blood. I hsten to the dull rumble of
war-cars and cannon wheels, to the hoof stamps of
chargers, to the creaking of ambulances, to the
slow drag of chaius on captive feet.

From the East, with Samiel, the desert-wind;
swarming like locusts, blackening the white sands,
like myriads of grasshoppers ! Nimrod, and Belus,
and Semiramis, Tsdth the armies of AssjTia and
Babylon ; Sethos, and Eamses, and Sesostris, with
hosts of triumphing Egyptians ; Darius, Cyrus,
Cambyses and Xerxes, with numberless Medes
and Persians ; Hannibals, Alexanders, Constan-
tines, and Mahomets, and Amuraths, with
Carthaginians, and Greeks, and Byzantines, and
Turkmen; their battling legions banner-led by
yellow and green, by arrow and cross, and crescent ;
traversing grave mounds of drifted sands ; climbing
mummy-heaps ; tumbling over sarcophagi; camping
amid stony ruins of empire.

From the West, with chanting of Druid songs,
blare of ox-horns, death-dance of yellow-haired



18 THE FIGHTING QUAKERS.

Gauls, and Cjmbri, and Ostro-Goths ! Brennns and
Herrmann ; Roman Caesars and Antonies ; Frankish
Martels and Charlemagnes ; crusading hosts ; red-
handed regicides ; Corsican Bonapartes ; tyrants,
conquerors, peoples, and despotisms !

From the North, with crash of runic harps, war-
songs of vi-kings, hammer-strokes of Thor, and
beacon-lights of boreal-auroras; Sweyns and Si-
gurds, Hengists and Harfargars ; Tartars and
Buss; iron-booted Swedes; following the battle-
tracks of Scythian Attilas, and Muscovite Buries
and Hungarian Arpads, and Sclavonian Sobieskis.
From the South ; great di'oves of captives, and
caravans of war-spoils ; ivory and gold and spices;
borne by men slaves, burdened and scourged,
and evermore marking their pathways with blood-
drippings ; myriads of black-skins, and red-skins,
and tawny-skins, branded on breast and backs with
tribe-mark and token of foredoomed servitude ;
and endlessly crying unto the winds and the waves,
and the skies — "How long? how long?"

And the frightful procession — never ending,
never haltiag ; fights on, toils on, through all climes
and ages ! Neither from the North, nor the South,
nor the East, nor the West, cometh one short hour
of respite — one moment's pause in the death-march
of warfare and ruin. Century striving after cen-
tury ; nation crowding upon nation ; blows inces-
santly falliag ; blood always flowiag ; human feet
forever trampling on human hearts; fingers



THE FIGHITNG QUAKERS. 19

clutching sword-hilts ; eyes peering along musket-
tubes ; hands busy with bullet-moulds, and cart-
ridges, and bomb-shells.

" As it was in the beginning, is now, and shall
be, forever and ever !"

O, Father in Heaven ! is this indeed Thine or-
dinance ?

It is not for us to answer a question so momen-
tous. God ruleth War; but it was His voice?
also, by the lips of angels, that spake unto the
Shepherds of Galilee, and promised them " Peace
on Earth— Good WiU to Men !"

For it may be, that, in the fathomless design of
Infinite Wisdom, these marches and counter-
marches of mortals have all their place and sig-
nificance. In the Eternal Harmony of countless
spheres, our earthly discords may have rythmic
purpose.

Storm-winds and thunders, lik-e flails, beat out
the malaria of tropics. War-fields are the thresh-
ing-floors of nations, where chaff is parted from
wheat, and the grain is made fit for Humanity's
garners.

To him who hears aright, the jarring discords
of war are not void of harmonious meaning. The
crash of shells and roar of cannonry ; the clashing
of swords and bayonets ; the blare of bugles and
the rattle of drums ; are they not all great chords
and stops in the wonderful music of a Divine
opera ?



20 THE FIGHTING QUAKERS.

I sometimes fancy that vrlien, at last, the day of
our national bridal shall come; when the soul
of Freedom shall be married to the body of Union
for all time ; and when our Repubhc's anthem,
rolling up from chanting millions, shall thrill afar
through Old "World nations ; I sometimes fancy
that so grand an oratorio will be hailed by angel-
choirs, as a fitting unison of the Eternal " music of
the spheres" — which times (as poets tell) the
swinging of each new-born world in Heaven's re-
splendent arches.

Therefore, let us accept even "War as an instru-
ment of Omnipotence. If we receive it in Punish-
ment, it is nobler than Pestilence ; if it cometh as
a Penalty, it is more merciful than the Deluge.
But in the Providence of God it may have higher
aims and ends than the mere infliction of mortal
chastisement. It may work, indeed, through its
throes and \iolences, toward the birth of that pure
and perfect Day, when " men shall learn war no
more ;" when "the sword shall be turned into the
plough-share, and the spear into the pruning-
hook;" when the "Hon shall He down with the
lamb, and a young child shall lead them !"

So, then, abiding still that promised millennium,
we may glean from the mighty and terrible en-
gines of war and revolution — from the upper and
nether millstones which grind out bloody grain
for the Future's sustenance; we may glean, I
say, some sweet examples of ripe manhood — even



THE FIGHTING QUAKERS. 21

while we tread beneath our feet the dross of mere
brutal ambition.

It was thus that the great lesson of Wae de-
scended upon that peaceful homestead, where Mar-
tha T. Ejetcham, the " Quaker" mother, dwelt with
her two boys, Edward and John. They were the
only sons of their mother, "and she was a widow."

For the father, who had reared their infancy —
the plain Ulster County husbandman, who kept his
testimony through life to the simple faith of
"Friends" — had been called to his eternal rest,
while yet no presage of her coming trials was re-
vealed to his native country. He had lain down
to sleep with "kings and prophets," leaving
behind him the record of an upright man, whose
humble life and unobtrusive mien were recalled
Avith tender regard, while he was equally remem-
bered for the steadfast rule of righteous dealing
which had made him as inflexible in justice as he
was quiet in manners.

David Ketcham slept with his ancestry, and the
representatives of his name and virtues remained
with their beloved mother, whose dechning years
they hoped to bless by their fihal affection and
untiring service.

Well educated and of refined feelings, tenderly
attached to each other, devoted to their surviving
parent, the brothers were fitted to adorn and
gladden their home. Tilling the soil of their farm
together, and daily interchanging acts of fraternal



22 THE FIGHTING QUAKERS.

kindness, these boys were knit together in soul,
Hke Da\id and Jonathan. In comfortable, though
moderate circustances, they were enabled to devote
due time to mutual improvement, and to cultivate
their individual tastes beyond the usual scope of
young men in the country. They had inherited
honesty, truth and conscientiousness. They
added to these virtues whatever their hours of
leisure could secure, in mental growth and action.



THE FIGHTIJsG QUAKEES. 23



CHAPTEE II.

CALLING TO BATTLE.

Going back from the Present, with its fresh
laurels and green graves, to the Past, with its
thorns of trial and blossoms of victory.

Through all these bewildering footprints that
cross and recross in the dust of our pavements, I
retrace the ancient pathways trodden by sires of
the KepubHc. Out of this maze of masonry which
we call the.metrox^ohs, I go into " the fields," where
McDougal of old spoke burning words to the
" Sons of Liberty" — words that became counter-
signs of Eevolution.

In those days there were no "Wall-street brokers
to proffer brave loans to a new-born nation ; but
there were stalwart men of toil, to beat back the
bayonets of hireling soldiery at "Golden Hill."
There was no " Committee of Union Defence," to
endow an army with the panoply of war; but
there were "minute men," each ^\ath his trusty
gun, to lay both hfe and goods upon the altar of
patriotism.

So fi'om the gallant legions of Our Union, whose
tramp yet shakes the massive warehouses of Broad-



24 THE FIGHTING QUAKERS.

way, I go back, in spirit, to the muster of that first
devoted Eegiment of New York, whereof Alexan-
der McDouGAL was colonel, in the days of 76 —
McDougal, master-spirit of Liberty on Manhattan
Island — a brave, unselfish man, of whom Wash-
ington said, "His zeal is unquestionable ;" a loyal
soul, whose voice rang forth from prison walls, in
fiery vindication of his country's cause.

" I rejoice," said the brave McDougal, " that I
am the first sufferer for Liberty, since the com-
mencement of our glorious struggle !"

O Liberty! when shall the man arise whose
liapj)iness it shall be to proclaim — " I am the last
sufierer for American Freedom !"

For, indeed, there are many battles yet to be
waged, and many heroes to fight, and martyrs to
die, ere the great bell of our Lidependence shall
find tongue to peal the real meaning of its old
inscription :

"Proclaim Liberty throughout the Land, and to
all the Lihabitants thereof !"

Li the days of our first Eevolution, men were
moulded in the matrix of a month, and born in an
hour, out of the lap of danger. Heroes sprang up
full-armed, Hke fabled offspring of dragon's blood.
Therefore it was that, while McDougal was whis-
pering bold thoughts to his Manhattan neighbors,
Warren was counseling with friends at Boston, and
the wife of Knox was hiding her sword under her
robe, that it might be ready for Bunker Hill battle.



THE FIGHTING QUAKERS. 25

And far away in the Carolinas, Maeion and Sumter,
and MooKE, and the boy Andrew Jackson, were
listening for Northern echoes to their hearts;
while the broad sword of Mercer was unsheathed
on Virginian hills, and the claymore of McIntosh
v/as di'awn on the plains of Georgia.

It was then that Marblehead, in Massachusetts,
(now dwindled to a fishing toAvn) was rich enough
to send her thousand loyal hearts, under bold John
Glover, to the camp at Cambridge.

Then young Otho Williams hastened from loyal
Mar^iand, and drew his maiden sword, that was to
flash thereafter on the field of Eutaw, waving the
bloody sickle of a bayonet charge, to reap the
harvest of victory.

Wayne and Thompson of Pennsylvania ; Pomroy
and Nixon of the Bay State ; Putnam and Wooster
of Connecticut ; Stark, and "Light Infantry Poor'*
of New Hampsliire; stout Ethan Allen of Ver-
mont ; Schuyler of New York ; Sullivan of Maine ;
Greene of Rhode Island; are not these noble
names still music to our ears ? Is not the memory
of their bearers still sweet in the garden of glory?

And let us thank God, that everywhere, in the
bloody years of our rightful war against treason,
the names of such faithful soldiers are recorded
upon the pages of impartial history. Not among
Generals only — ^brave and venturous through they
be — ^need we look for examples and models of
patriotism. The hero of a knapsack is grand as



26 THE FIGHTING QUAKERS.

the hero of a baton. Martyrs ascend to Heaven
from rank and file as luminously as from the field
and staff. Poor Plummer Tidd, who fought with
John Brown at Harper's Ferry, and who lay dying
on his cot with deadly fever, while the batteries of
Fort Donelson thundered in his ears, was no less
a hero than if he had fallen at his sergeant's
post in battle. " Is our side winning ?" he gasped,
as the gunboat rocked beneath him ; and when his
chaplain answered "Yes," the brave man said
"Thank God rand died.

John Beman, the humble watchman of a steam-
boat, hanged by rebels to a tree in Mississippi,
because of being a loyal man, deserves his place
upon the hero tablet, not less then our martyred
Abraham Lincoln. " I will die before I take the
Southern oath !" this bold Norwegian cried ; and
they swung liis body upward ; but his soul soared
higher than traitors could reach.

" Don't mind me, boys ! Go on with the fight !
Don't stop for me !" said Orderly-Sergeant Good-
fellow, at Bethel's fight. He gave his musket to
a comrade, and sank dying in his place ; a hero-
soldier, promoted in death to a rank with Greble
and Winthrop, who fell not far from him.

Of such as these are our heroes ; and the altars
whereon we inscribe their names and modest rec-
ords are as wide as the battle-fields of our Repub-
Hc. We are wealthy in these monuments of nation-
ality — these shrines of hberty. The EepubHc is a
temple, based upon, and columned, and walled, and



THE FIGHTING QUAKERS. 27

arclied, by such lofty and enduring stones of loy-
alty. Under and above, and in the midst of de-
parted heroism, our Hving heroes walk gloriously.

I find no dearth of hero-men in our EepubHc's
Past ; and when the annahsts of its latest struggle
shall record the deeds of those who fell, and those
who survived, through the bloody years of Eebel-
hon, there will be columns of fame inscribed with
loyal names that shall blaze like a beacon through
all the Future.

So, then, to the homestead which had descend-
ed to them, from maternal ancestors, through a
hundred years ; to the widow, who wept over her
husband's recent grave ; and to the orphans who
cherished her reverent years ; thus, to these " plain
people," and to the simple scenes around them,
our Wab came, with its lessons of mortal and
immortal significance. The same overruling
Providence, that was to summon generals and
admirals to their proud responsibilities, spoke low
into the ears and hearts of two young men, " of
the people called Quakers," and impelled them
away from home and kindred, to render up their
hves in the battles of Liberty.

These "people called Quakers," have done loyal
service heretofore in battles that forever consecra-
ted the soil of our land to freedom. There was a
Quaker, of Rhode Island — Greene the blacksmith,
" who went forth conquering and to conquer" in
that same South thi'ough which many of his de-
scendants have marched to overcome Rebellion.



28 THE FIGHTING QUAKEKS.

There were Quakers in Pennsylvania, who sealed
with their blood the holy testimony of rehgion to
patriotism. And history has embalmed the mem-
ory of those New Jersey "Friends," who knelt
beside Hugh Mercer, after the fight at Princeton,
and received the last sigh of that gallant Scotch-
man, as he died for American Independence.

There are promptings of conscience and mov-
ings of "the Sphit," that are above all method or
professions of rehgion. Blessed as is the creed of
*'Peace," there may come occasions to its followers,
when the voice of duty will thrill them as with a
trumpet blast, and thek souls must leap responsive
to the mandate:


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Online LibraryA. J. H. (Augustine Joseph Hickey) DuganneThe fighting Quakers; a true story of the war for our union → online text (page 1 of 6)