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CHAPTER XVII.—RIZPAH THE ANCIENT MOTHER OF SORROWS.

After many years, Rizpah dwells in Bozrah with her
three children—Rizpah of Bozrah fascinated by Rizpah of
Gibeah—Miriamne the daughter of Rizpah—The daughter appalled
by her mother’s mysterious hallucinations—The wonders of
mother-love—The story of the ancient, Jewish “Mother of
Sorrows”—The omen of the bat and the parable of the stars. Page 245

CHAPTER XVIII.—THE QUEEN PROCLAIMED IN THE GIANT CITY.

The old and the young Jews—The old Christian priest and
his Jewess proselyte—Attacked by Mamelukes—The “Old Clock
Man”—The Balsam Band—Miriamne, the Jewess proselyte, questions
concerning the queen of the old priest’s heart—The miraculous
picture of Mary at Damascus—Silver hands and feet—Crown
jewels. Page 264

CHAPTER XIX.—THE STORY OF MARY’S CHILDHOOD. Page 282

CHAPTER XX.—THE WEDDING—THE BIRTH AND THE FLIGHT.

The birth of Jesus and the flight to Egypt—Miriamne reads
to her mother a Christian account of Mary’s espousal—Rizpah
curious but doubtful. Page 293

CHAPTER XXI.—THE QUEEN AND HER FAMILY IN EGYPT.

Father Adolphus and Miriamne converse of the Holy Family’s
sojourn in Egypt—Heliopolis and the Temple of the
Sun—Fire-worshipers—At Memphis, the shrine of Apis the
sacred bull—The red heifer of Israel—The Holy Family rescued
in Egypt by a robber who afterward died on the cross next
to the Savior—The legend of a gipsy’s prophecy concerning
Jesus—Zingarella won by the Virgin. Page 312

CHAPTER XXII.—THE SHADOW OF THE CROSS.

Rizpah dreading heresy yet charmed by the story of the “Girl
Wife”—“Behold my mother and brethren”—Christ’s message to his
widowed mother—The “Church of the Terror”—Rizpah’s vision
of “Glad Tidings.” Rizpah of Bozrah allured from Rizpah of
Gibeah—A hot-chase after an old love—The sword that pierced
Mary—The shadow of the cross horrifies Rizpah—The faith of the
Nazarene denounced—Miriamne driven from home by her mother.
Page 322

CHAPTER XXIII.—THE MISERERE AND THE EASTER ANTHEM.

Miriamne alone at night in the giant city—A refuge at the
Christian priest’s—The midnight Miserere—Penitents—Easter at
Bozrah—Finding the mother-love in God’s heart. Page 337

CHAPTER XXIV.—A HEROINE’S PILGRIMAGE.

The convert’s yearnings—“Go and tell”—When parents oppose each
other which shall the child follow?—A child of the kingdom
in a new family circle—Jesus, Mary and the elect—Miriamne’s
two great ambitions—Living apart may be as sinful as actual
divorcement—Father Adolphus encourages and Rizpah opposes
Miriamne—Rizpah recounts to Miriamne the story of her love for
Sir Charleroy, his madness and her own futile visit to London
in the effort to win him back—The curse of heredity—“I’ll
disown thee with tears in my voice and kisses in my heart.” Page 351

CHAPTER XXV.—CONSOLATRIX AFFLICTORUM.

Miriamne’s welcome by the London Palestineans—The daughter
meets her father in a mad-house—Disappointment—The flight—The
search—The White Madonna of the Asylum Park—Love the remedy
of minds perturbed by hate—Pallas-Athene the virgin of the
heathen—Miriamne’s letter to her mother and its grim answer. Page 367

CHAPTER XXVI.—THE WEDDING AT CANA.

Sir Charleroy giving signs of recovery under Miriamne’s
Ministries—A remarkable service in the chapel of the
Palestineans—The knight interested in the story of Cana—The
address of Cornelius, on “Home” and “Marriage”—“Is this
London or Bozrah?”—Sir Charleroy’s sudden relapse—Miriamne’s
adroit ministries—Memories that awaken hopes—The clouds again
lifting—Mary’s life motto. Page 381

CHAPTER XXVII.—THE STAR OF THE SEA.

Sir Charleroy, partially restored, with Miriamne and Cornelius
journeying toward Syria—Passing Cyprus—Olympus—A storm rising
on the Mediterranean—Cornelius presses his love suit on
Miriamne—Miriamne pledges love, but pleads her mission as a
barrier to marriage—Conflicts below, tempests aloft—A dream;
Venus’s court and Mary’s triumph—Sir Charleroy in frenzy
defying the billows—An hour of peril—The “Lightning Song” of
the sailors—The twin stars—“Mary, Star of the Sea”—The victims
of fabricated consciences—Parting. Page 397

CHAPTER XXVIII.—THE QUEEN IN THE VALLEY OF SORROWS.

Father and daughter at Acre—The mysterious Hospitaler—From
Acre to Joppa—“The myths are as full of women as the
women are full of myths”—The wars of men about women—At
Jerusalem—The wonderful words of the Knight-Hospitaler, turned
preacher—The _Via Dolorosa_—The Valley of Jehosaphat—The
mountain outlook—“Soldiers Speed the Cross”—Mary, the sun
of women, rising in moral grandeur above the women of the
grove-shrines—The panorama of the ages, passing before Mary’s
mind. Page 419

CHAPTER XXIX.—TWO DEAD HEARTS UNITING TWO LIVING ONES.

From Jerusalem to Bozrah—The tomb of Ichabod—Sir Charleroy
argues against meeting Rizpah—Miriamne’s strong argument
in behalf of the lasting obligations of marriage—A husband
reaching the climax of revenges—Joseph by kindness kept Mary
in sweet mood and so blessed the unborn Christ—“Miriamne,
I am a bundle of contradictions!”—The news-rider—A plague
at Bozrah—De Griffin’s twins nigh death—Miriamne meets her
mother—Reconciliation—A strange funeral; only two women as
mourners and pall-bearers. Page 437

CHAPTER XXX.—THE “KNIGHT OF SAINT MARY” AND RIZPAH AT THE
GRAVE OF THEIR SONS.

Father Adolphus and Sir Charleroy—A ruined temple and a
ruined man—“A woman, a woman leading in religion!”—Jesus and
Magdalena—The twelve appearings of the lingering Christ—The
Savior’s love-letter from heaven to His mother—Lucifer’s
attempt at suicide—The kiss befouled by treason—The meeting
of Sir Charleroy and Rizpah—“The tomb of giant-love grown to
mad-hate.” Page 453

CHAPTER XXXI.—THE ROSE, QUEEN OF HEARTS IN BOZRAH.

A scene of domestic happiness—Love the vassal of the
will—Neb-ta in the “Judgment Hall of Truth”—The lambs that
are offered by sectarian hates—The Arcana of glorious wedded
love—Rizpah transformed—Miriamne’s public profession of
Christ—Cornelius Woelfkin again appeals for union in wedlock—An
inner and an outer Miriamne—The coronation of love—The solemn
espousal. Page 467

CHAPTER XXXII.—THE QUEEN AND THE GRAIL-SEEKERS.

“The gold of my heart to the man that piloted me to
happiness”—Miriamne yearns for a world in sin—Has the Church
or God failed?—A revolutionary reformer—The story of the
grail quest—The quest of a heavenly cure for human ills—The
triumphant Adam and Eve—The queenly women of patriarchal
times—The mother of the Savior as the wife of a carpenter—What
kept her young heart from breaking—Miriamne’s farewell to
Bozrah. Page 484

CHAPTER XXXIII.—THE HOSPITALER’S ORATION.

The secret meeting of the Knights at the house of Phebe—Swords
bent sickle-like and spears crossed—After war, social
victories—Sunrise at midnight—Each career determined by the
life that gives life—The girdle of Venus—Next after God, Mary
chiefly instrumental in giving the world a Savior. Page 498

CHAPTER XXXIV.—MEMORIALS AT BOZRAH.

The death of Dorothea—The priest of the wayside—The wedding of
Cornelius and Miriamne—A pilgrimage to the tombs of Adolphus,
Charleroy and Rizpah. Backlook, and outlooks. Page 510

CHAPTER XXXV.—THE SISTERS OF BETHANY.

The Missioners at Bethany—The site of the Home of
Jesus—Miriamne’s ideal society—The miracle age—A home, not a
throne, the place of Ascension—Will Jesus so return?—The angel
bivouac. Page 522

CHAPTER XXXVI.—THE QUEEN OF THE HOUSE OF DAVID.

The Knight’s Pentecost—In the upper room of Joseph of
Arimathæa—Mary’s title and realm—Luke, the word-painter—The
smoke side and the fire side of Pentecost. Page 529

CHAPTER XXXVII.—THE CORONATION OF THE QUEEN.

The Hospitaler deemed a prophet at Bethany. The legitimacy of
Jesus as the “son of David” assured through His mother—“The
reign of blood”—First born—Pagan Rome made sponsor for Mary’s
son—Doomsday books and royal charters. Page 538

CHAPTER XXXVIII.—THE “LIGHT OF THE HAREM” IN THE “TEMPLE OF
ALLEGORY.”

The old church at Bethany—A dedication—The wonders of
symbolism—Idolatry and Mariolatry. Page 548

CHAPTER XXXIX.—CROWN JEWELS.

The Hospitaler warns the Missioners of the Sheik of Jerusalem’s
designs—The son of Azrael—Immunity purchased—The wedding of
Beulah, Nourahmal’s grand-daughter to a Jewish convert—The
wedding address—Juno-Moneta—Crown jewels of maidens and
mothers—Mary sounding the depths of woman’s miseries—A
malediction for lust—“Knights of the White Cross”—The lost
woman dreaming of how it seems to have a mother’s arms
infolding her—The Virgin’s potent example. Page 568

CHAPTER XL.—THE QUEEN’S VISION OF THE AGE OF GOLD AND FIRE.

Nourahmal wed to the Druse camel-driver—the Druse converted—The
Hospitaler’s message—Ezekiel prophecies fulfilled at Olivet—The
“Mother’s pillow”—Gabriel, the “Angel of Mothers and of
Victories.” Page 581

CHAPTER XLI.—A CHIME AND A DIRGE AT CHRISTMAS-TIME.

“Motherhood priced”—“Thou shalt be saved in
child-bearing”—Sylvan gods of Rome—“The Miriamites,”—“In
Rama, weeping and great mourning”—Joachim’s bleating lamb
slain—Woman’s supreme hour—Maternity’s crucifixion—“The
Cæsarian Section”—The ebbing tide and the stranded wreck,
at midnight. Page 595

CHAPTER XLII.—THE MOTHER OF SORROWS TRIUMPHANT AT LAST.

The funeral of Miriamne—The Hospitaler tells the traditions of
Mary’s death and assumption—What the Druse convert said to his
camel—“The beatings of mighty wings”—The tomb of Miriamne in
Gethsemane. Page 611

CHAPTER XLIII.—A COFFIN FULL OF FLOWERS, AND A GIRDLE WITH
WINGS.

Cornelius and his son at Bethany—Changed scenes—Under the
lights and shadows of Chemosh—A widower’s grief—Azrael’s
putative son razes to the ground Miriamne’s home and temple—The
legend of Mary’s coffin and girdle—The last of the new
grail-knights—A sad and dramatic tableau. Page 618





LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.


I.

MARY AND THE INFANT JESUS, Frontispiece

(The original painted by GOODALL.)

PAGE

II.

THE BIRTH OF MARY 60

(The original painted by MURILLO.)

III.

RIZPAH DEFENDING THE DEAD BODIES OF HER RELATIONS, 250

(The original painted by BECKER.)

IV.

THE EDUCATION OF MARY, 282

(The original painted by CARL MULLER.)

V.

THE MARRIAGE OF MARY AND JOSEPH, 294

(The original painted by RAPHAEL.)

VI.

THE SHADOW OF THE CROSS, 332

(The original painted by MORRIS.)

VII.

JESUS AT THE AGE OF TWELVE WITH MARY AND JOSEPH ON THEIR WAY
TO JERUSALEM, 350

(The original painted by MENGELBURG.)

VIII.

THE YOUTH JESUS YIELDING TO THE WISHES OF HIS MOTHER, 366

(The original painted by W. HOLMAN HUNT.)

IX.

THE WEDDING AT CANA, 380

(The original painted by PAUL VERONESE.)

X.

MARY AND ST. JOHN, 433

(The original painted by PLOCKHORST.)




THE QUEEN OF THE HOUSE OF DAVID




CHAPTER I.

THE QUEEN’S PORTRAIT.

“And breaking as from distant gloom,
A face comes painted on the air;
A presence walks the haunted room,
Or sits within the vacant chair.
And every object that I feel
Seems charged by some enchanter’s wand.
And keen the dizzy senses thrill,
As with the touch of spirit hand.
A form beloved comes again,
A voice beside me seems to start,
While eager fancies fill the brain,
And eager passions hold the heart.”


_Master, we would see a sign from Thee_, was the cunning challenge of
the Scribes and Pharisees. They were certain that, in this at least, the
hearts of the people would be with them. A sign, a scene, a symbol, were
the constant demand and quest of the olden times, as of all times. Even
Jehovah led forth to victory and trust, as necessity was upon Him in
leading human followers, “with an _outstretched arm_, and with _signs_
and with _wonders_.” The Jews, seemingly so doubtful and so querulous,
after all articulated the longings of the universal humanity. The longing
stimulated the effort to gratify it, and forthwith the artist became the
teacher of the people. Presentments of Mary, as she might have been, and
as she was imagined to have been by those most devout, were multiplied.
Piety sought to express its regard for her by making her more real to
faith through the instrumentality of the speaking canvas, but beyond this
there was the desire to embody certain charms and virtues of character
dear to all pure and devout ones. These were expressed by pictured faces,
ideally perfect. They called each such “Mary”; and if there had never
been a real Mary, still these handiworks would have had no small value.
Who can say that those consecrated artists were in no degree moved by
the Spirit which guided David when “he opened dark sayings on the harp,”
and rapturously extolled that other Beloved of God, the Church? Music
and painting—twin sisters—equal in merit, and both from Him who displays
form, color and harmony as among the chief rewards and glories of His
upper kingdom. These also meet a want in human nature as God created
it. The artists did not beget this desire for presentments through form
and color of the woman deemed most blessed; the desire rather begot the
artists. Stately theology has never ceased truly to proclaim from the day
Christ cried “_It is finished!_” that “_in Him all fullness dwells_;” but
no theology, has been able to silence the cry of woman’s heart in woman
and woman’s nature in man which pleads through the long years, “_Show us
the mother and it sufficeth us_.” It has happened sometimes that gross
minds have strayed from the ideal or spiritual imports of Mary’s life and
fallen into idolizing her effigies. That was their fault, and must not be
taken as full proof that nothing but evil came from the portrayings of
our queen. The facts are conclusively otherwise. The painters that made
glorious ideals shine forth from the canvas unconsciously painted the
shadows largely out of the conditions of all women. Before this second
advent of the Virgin, the paganish idea that women were the “weaker sex,”
the inferiors of men, at best only useful, handsome animals, prevailed.
The renaissance of Mary, as the ideal woman, was an event seeded with
the germs of revolutionary impulses socially. Like sunrise it began in
the East, at first dimly manifest, then it became effulgent and quickly
coursed westward along the pathways of Christianity’s conquests. Like
sweet, grateful light then there came to the hearts of men the braver
true persuasion, that the woman who not only bore the Christ but won His
reverent love must have been morally beautiful and great. In the track
of this persuasion, and as its sequence, there came the conviction that
the sex, of which Mary was one, had within it possibilities beyond what
its sturdier companions had dreamed. After this it came about that the
painters, often the interpreters of human feelings, began to represent
all goodness under the form of a Madonna. Not knowing the contour
of Mary’s face they began gathering here and there, from the women
they knew, features of beauty. They combined these in one harmonious
presentment. They set out to represent the ideal woman, but had to go
to women to find her parts. It became a tribute to womankind to do this.
It was like a voyage of discovery, and the artist voyagers depicted not
only the best things in womankind, but by putting these things together
illustrated what woman could be and should be at her best.

It was thus that Guido produced a picture of the Madonna which enravished
all that beheld it. Once he had said, “I wish I’d the wings of an angel
to behold the beatified spirits, which I might have copied.” After, here
and there, he picked out fragments of color and form on earth; then put
them into one ideal composition. It was a heart-expanding work; the work
of a prophet, since it told of what might be in woman wholly at her
best. Then he said, “the beautiful and pure idea must be in the head”
of the artist. It was a deep saying. Given the ideal, and the worker
will need only proper ambition to present a grand composition, whether
on canvas or in the patternings of the inner life. The presentments of
the Virgin rose in fineness when priests turned from their exegesis to
kneel and paint for men. The great Saint Augustine, held in high honor
by Christians of every name, redeemed from a youth of darkest sinning,
revered as his guiding star two lovely women, Monica, his mother, and
Mary, the mother of Jesus. He argues, in stalwart polemics, that through
the acknowledgment of Mary’s pre-eminence all womankind was elevated.
Her presentment, so as to be fully comprehended, was in the beginning a
blessing to every soul in being an inspiration to purer, sweeter living.
So far as such presentment now conserves the same results the work is
worthy and profitable. In all times the representations of the Virgin,
whether by the historian or the master of the studio, varied; but the
piety they awakened always seemed to be of one type, and that lofty.
Thus we have “the stern, awful quietude of the old Mosaics, the hard
lifelessness of the degenerate Greeks, the pensive sentiment of the
Siena, the stately elegance of the Florentine Madonnas, the intellectual
Milanese, with their large foreheads and thoughtful eyes, the tender,
refined mysticism of the Umbrian, the sumptuous loveliness of the
Venetian; the quaint, characteristic simplicity of the early German, so
stamped with their nationality that I never looked round me in a room
full of German girls without thinking of Albert Durer’s Virgins; the
intense, life-like feeling of the Spanish, the prosaic, portrait-like
nature of the Flemish schools, and so on.” Each time and place produced
its own ideal, but all tried to express the one thought uppermost; pious
regard for the Queen and model. All seemed to feel that in this devotion
there was somehow comfort and exaltation—and there generally were both.

The writer of the foregoing quotation, a woman of widest culture and
admirable good sense, attested the need that many feel by her own
rapturous description of the Madonna of Raphael in the Dresden Gallery.
“I have seen my own ideal once where Raphael—inspired, if ever painter
was inspired—projected on the space before him that wonderful creation.”
“There she stands, the transfigured woman; at once completely human and
completely divine, an abstraction of power, purity and love; poised on
the empurpled air, and requiring no other support; with melancholy,
loving mouth, her slightly dilated sibylline eyes looking out quite
through the universe to the end and consummation of all things; sad, as
if she beheld afar off the visionary sword that was to reach her heart
through HIM, now resting as enthroned on that heart; yet already exalted
through the homage of the redeemed generations who were to salute her
as blessed. Is it so indeed? Is she so divine? or does not rather the
imagination lend a grace that is not there? I have stood before it and
confessed that there is more in that form and face than I have ever
yet conceived. The _Madonna di San Sisto_ is an abstract of _all_ the
attributes of Mary.”

The foregoing representation marked a step forward in things spiritual.
Before Raphael, painters numberless, under the influence of the luxurious
and vicious Medici, had filled the churches of Florence with painted
presentments of the Virgin, characterized by an alluring beauty which
seemed next door to blasphemy. Then came that Luther of his times,
Savonarola. He thundered for purity, simplicity and reform; aiming his
blows at the depraving, sensuous conceptions of the grosser artists. He
made a bonfire in the Piazza of Florence, there consuming these false
madonnas. He was, for this, persecuted to death by the Borgia family.
They could not bear his trumpet call to Florentines, “Your sins make me
a prophet; I have been a Jonah warning Nineveh; I shall be a Jeremiah
weeping over the ruins; for God will renew His church and that will not
take place without blood—” Art heard his voice, the painters became
disgusted with their meaner handiwork, the rude, the obscene, the
mischievous was obliterated; finer, more spiritual and loftier concepts
of the Virgin appeared as proof of a reformation of morals. And Raphael,
later on, seeing these productions, felt the influence that begot them,
and then produced that masterpiece. Tradition says Saint Luke painted
a picture of the Virgin from life. The picture, reputed to have been
so painted, was found by the Turks in Constantinople when that city
fell into their conquering hands. They despoiled it of its princely
jewel-decorations, then tramped it contemptuously beneath their feet. The
latter act was typical, and the Turk still lives to trample in contempt
on honest efforts to portray with amplitude and finished details this
splendid character, whose outlines alone are presented by the Gospels.
But though the Vandal spirit survives, there survives also the strong
yearning for the representation of that woman beyond compare, and some



Online LibraryA. Stewart (Alexander Stewart) WalshMary: The Queen of the House of David and Mother of Jesus → online text (page 2 of 40)