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Abby Morton Diaz.

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GIFT OF





MRS. DIAZ S WRITINGS.



THE KING S LILY AND ROSEBUD. Illustrated. i6mo .$1.50
THE WILLIAM HENRY LETTERS. Illustrated. i6mo . 1.50
WILLIAM HENRY AND HIS FRIENDS. Illustrated. i6mo, 1.50

LUCY MARIA. Illustrated. i6mo 1.50

A STORY-BOOK FOR YOUNG FOLKS. Illustrated. i6mo, 1.50
THE SCHOOLMASTER S TRUNK. Papers on Home Life.

Illustrated. i6mo Paper, 50 cts. ; cloth, 1.00

A DOMESTIC PROBLEM. i6mo . Paper, 50 cts. ; cloth, 1.00



#*# For sale by all Booksellers. Sent, postpaid, on receipt of Price, by

JAMES R. OSGOOD & CO.,

CATHEDRAL BUILDING, WINTHROP SQUARE,

Boston.




"HOW EASY SHE GOES! " See p. 17.



JIMMYJOHNS,



AND OTHEE STOKIES.



BY

MRS. A. M. DIAZ,

AUTHOK OF " THE WILLIAM HENRY LETTERS," " LUCY MAEIA," ETC.



Illustrated.




BOSTON:
JAMES R. OSGOOD AND COMPANY,

(Late TICKNOR & FIELDS, and FIELDS, OBGOOD, & Co.)
1878.



COPYEIGHT, 1877, BY
JAMES K. OSGOOD & CO.

ALL BIGHTS BESEBVED.



STEREOTYPED AND PRINTED BT

BAND, AVBBY, AND COMPANY,

117 FHANKLIN STBEET,

BOSTON.



CONTENTS.



THE JIMMY JOHNS: Pa & e>

I. A Morning with the Jimmy Johns . . .11

II. The Sad Fate of " Polly Cologne" . . 18

III. An Account of the Jimmyjohns Little Affair

with the Gulls 26

IV. The Jimmyjohns Sailor-Suits ... 35
V. A Leaf from a Little Girl s Diary ... 46

VI. A Little Girl s Story 50

VII. The Bad Luck of Bubby Cryaway ... 57

VIII. What made Mr. Tompkins laugh ... 66

IX. Mr. Tompkins s Small Story . . . .76

FLOWERS WAKING UP . . . . . . 80

THE LITTLE PULLWINGER S DREAM 85

How THE BARN CAME FROM JORULLO ... 95
A POTATO STORY WHICH BEGINS WITH A BEAN-POLE . 107
THE WAY MRS. MACGARRET S TEA-PARTY WAS BROKEN

UP 110

GETTING UP IN THE WORLD 114

THE STORY OF FLORINDA 118

THE HOUSE THAT JACK BUILT 134

A LITTLE GUESS-STORY 147

THE LITTLE BEGGAR-GIRL 152

WIDE-AWAKE >. . . .169

KEASONS WHY THE Cow TURNED HER HEAD AWAY . 173

5

54246.1



6 CONTENTS.

Page.

Two LITTLE KOGUES . 179

THE BELATED BUTTERFLY 182

THE MAPLE-TREE S CHILDREN 186

THE WHISPERER 189

A STRANGER IN PILGRIM-LAND, AND WHAT HE SAW . 191
DRAMAS AND DIALOGUES :

The Gypsies. A May-Day Drama .... 205
A December Charade. (Farewell.) . . . .221
The Little Visitors. A Play for Young Children . 233

The Bird Dialogue .242

Shopping. A Dialogue for the very Little Ones . 250
May-Day Indoors ; or, The Yotopski Family s Re
hearsal 255



LIST OF ILLUSTBATTOJsTS.



Page.

"How EASY SHE GOES !". . . . . . 2

JOEY MOONBEAM, DOROTHY BEESWAX, BETSEY GINGER,

AND POLLY COLOGNE .... .. 22

THE JlMMYJOHNS AND THE GULLS 33

" THE LITTLE BOYS, HALF CRYING, HELD FAST BY THE

SIDES OF THE BOAT" ^ 43
JOEY MOONBEAM S NEW HAT . . , . . .47

" OVER WENT THE BARREL, AND OVER WENT HE " . 63

FLOWERS WAKING UP 80

THE BARREL-MAN LOOKING AT HIS POSSESSIONS . 93
THE BARREL-MAN CUTS THE BRANCHES, AND THE

OWNER COMPLAINS . . . . . .97

THE HORSES AND THE OXEN APPEAR IN SIGHT . 101

THE FOURTEEN HUNGRY MEN SIT AROUND THE TABLE 105

"A-SHAKING THEIR CORN-POPPERS OVER THE COALS " 135

THE CAT THAT CAUGHT THE RAT 137

THE DOG THAT WAS TOSSED 138

THE Cow WITH THE CRUMPLED HORN . . . .139

THE MAIDEN ALL FORLORN 140

THE MAN ALL TATTERED AND TORN .... 142
" GOOD-MORROW, SIR PRIEST ! WILL You MARRY Us

Two?" 145

7



8 LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

Page.

THE LITTLE BEGGAR-GIRL 153

"NOW I LL PULL UP; NOW I M ALMOST UP " . . 171

"TAKE THIS WISP OF HAY" . . . . . . 174

" FOREFATHERS KOCK ". . . . . . 196

INDIAN DOLL 200



THE JIMMYJOHNS, AND OTHEK STOEIES.



THE JIMMYJOflNS,



CHAPTER I.

A MORNING WITH THE JIMMYJOHNS.

A PRETTY brown cottage, so small that the vines
have no need to hurry themselves in climbing
over it, but take plenty of time to creep along the
eaves, to peep in at the windows, and even to stop
and weave bowers over the doorways. Two "Bald
win " trees shade one end of the cottage, a silver-
oak the other. In its rather narrow frontward grow
damask rose-bushes, sweet syringas, and a snowball-
tree. In one corner of this front-yard a running-rose,
called a "pink prairie-rose," climbs to the cottage-
roof, where it has delightful times with the honey
suckle and woodbine. On either side, and round about
and far away, lie broad green meadows, apple-orchards,
fields of waving corn, and many a sloping, sunny hill
side, on which the earliest wild flowers bloom. Ah ! it
must be a pleasant thing to live where one can watch
the fields grow } T ellow with dandelions and buttercups,
or white with daisies, or pink with clover ; where sweet-
scented honeysuckles peep in at one window, roses at
another, and apple-blossoms at another ; where birds
sing night and morning, and sometimes all the day.

11



12 THJEl JIMMY JOHNS.

Between the hours of seven and eight, one lovely
morning in June, there might have been seen, turning
the corner of Prairie-rose Cottage, two travellers on
horseback, each of whom carried a huckleberry-basket
on his arm. These two travellers were of just the same
age, four years and ten months. The horses they
rode were of the kind called saw-horses, or, as some
call them, wood-horses. Both names are correct, be
cause they are made of wood, and wood is placed upon
them to be sawed.

Our young travellers were twin-brothers, and were
named the one, Jimmy Plummer ; the other, Johnny
Plummer. They were dressed exactly alike, and they
looked exactly alike. Both had chubby cheeks, twin
kling eyes, small noses, and dark, curly hair. Both
wore gray frocks belted round with leather belts, and
both belts were clasped with shining buckles. Their
collars were white as snow. Their trousers were short,
leaving off at the knee, where they were fastened with
three gilt buttons. Their stockings were striped, pink
and gray ; the gray stripe being much wider than the
pink. Their boots were button-boots. Their hats
were of speckled straw ; and in the hat-band of each
was stuck a long, narrow, greenish feather, which
looked exactly like a rooster s feather. Their whip-
handles were light blue, wound round with strips of
silver tinsel ; and at the end of each lash was a snap
per. Their bridles were pieces of clothes-line.

The travellers were bound to Boston, so they said, to
buy oranges. It was hard work to make those horses
of theirs go over the ground. There isn t very much
go in that kind of horse : they are sure-footed, but not



A MORNING WITH THE JIMMYJOHNS. 13

swift. But there was a great deal of make go in the
two travellers. They jerked that span of horses, they
pushed them, they pulled them, they made them rear
up, they tumbled off behind, they tumbled off the sides,
they pitched headforemost, but still did not give up ;
and at last came to Boston, which was, so they made
believe, on the outside cellar-door.

And, as they were playing on the cellar-door, the
funn} r man came along, and began to feel in his pockets
to see what he could find.

Halloo, Jimmyjohns ! " he cried. Don t you want
something ?

Jimmy and Joh nny Plummer were best known in the
neighborhood as "the Jimim Johns." And it seemed
very proper their being called by one name ; for they
looked, if not just like one boy, like the same boy twice
over, so that some members of their own family could
hardly tell them apart. They were always together :
what one did the other did, and what one had the other
had. If one asked for pudding four times, the other
asked for pudding four times ; and when one w r ould
have another spoonful of sauce, so would the other.
And it was quite wonderful, everybody said, that, in
playing together, they were never known to quarrel.
People often tried to guess which was Jimmy, and
which was Johnny ; but very few guessed rightly.

The funny man felt in every one of his pockets, and
found a piece of chalk. The Jimmyjohns laughed.
They had seen him feel in every one of his pockets
before, and knew that nothing better than chalk, or
buttons, or tack-nails, would come out of them.

"Now," said the funnyman, "I m going to guess



14 THE JIMMY JOHNS.

which is Jimmy, and which is Johnny. No, I can t
guess. But I ll tell you what I will do. I ll turn up a
cent. There it goes. See here : if it turns up head,
this sitting-down boy s Jimmy ; tail, he s Johnny.
Now then. Pick it up out of the grass. Head? Yes,
head. Then this sitting-down boy s Jimmy. Right?
Are you sitting-down boy Jimmy? "

" No, sir. Johnny."

" Johnny? How do you know you are Johnny? "

Johnny laughed, looked down, turned up the corner
of his frock, and showed there a bit of red flannel,
about the size of a red peppermint, stitched on the
wrong side. Mrs. Plummer, it seems, had put red
flannel peppermints on Johnny s clothes, and blue flan
nel peppermints on Jimmy s, so that each could tell his
own.

The funny man passed on, but had hardly gone ten
steps before he turned, and said to the Jimnryjohns,
"Why don t you go a-rowing?" They answered,
because they had no boat. He told them Dan took a
tub for a boat. Then they said they had no water.
The funny man was just at that moment stepping over
the fence ; but he answered back, speaking very loud,
" Dan plays grass is water. 1

The Jimmyjohns looked at each other.

" Ask him what oars Dan takes," said Johnny.

" You ask him too," said Jimmy.

So they called out both together, " What oars does
Dan take? " And then, the funny man being b} T that
time far along the road, they scampered to the fence,
scrambled up, leaned over the top-rail, and shouted
loud as they could, " WJiat oars does Dan take? "



A MOENING WITH THE JIMMYJOHNS. 15

The funny man turned, held one hand to one ear to
catch the sounds, and shouted back, speaking one word
at a time, " Can t hear what you sayl"

i What oars does DAN T- A-K-E ? bawled
the Jimmjjohns, holding on to the last word as long as
their breath lasted.

Takes brooms ! Dan takes BROOMS !
the funny man bawled back ; then walked away quite
fast.

" Cluck, cluck, cluck ! Cluck, cluck, cluck ! Cluck-
erty cluck! "

That was what it sounded like ; but in reality it was
pretty Banty White saying to her chickens, "Hurry
back ! Danger ! Boys ! Dreadful clanger ! "

Madam Banty White kept house under a tub at the
back of the house ; and it was her tub which was going
to be the boat.

" Over she goes ! " cried Jfimmy, giving it a knock.

4 Cluck, cluck, cluck ! Cluck, cluck, cluck ! Cluckerty
cluck ! " clucked Madam Banty. " Run for your lives !
For your lives ! "

" Sister, sister, sister ! " shouted the Jimmyjohns.

Annetta Plummer, six years old and almost seven,
was often called Sister, and " sometimes Sissy
Plummer." Hearing the shouts, sister ran to the
window, calling out, "What do you want, you little
Jimmies ?

Then curly-headed, three-years-old EfRe trotted to
the window, stood on her tiptoes, and shouted with her
cunning voice, " What oo want, oo ittle Dimmeys? "

" Throw down two brooms. Quick s }~ou can ! "

" Little boys must say Please, " said Annetta.



16 THE JIM MY JO HNS.

" Ittel boys say Pease, " repeated Effie.

" Please, please, please, please ! " shouted the Jim
mies. Then, k Oh, dear ! Oh ! ma ! Oh, dear! Ma!
ma ! Oh ! Oh, dear ! oh, dear ! " in quite a different
tone.

All the people came running to the window. ; Who s
hurt ? What s the matter ? Oh, they ve tumbled down !
they ve tumbled down ! "

The flour-barrel was at the bottom of it ah 1 . In their
hurry to get the brooms, the Jimmies climbed on a
flour-barrel which lay upon its side. It rolled over,
and they rolled over with it. It is plain, therefore,
that the fiour-barrel was at the bottom of it all.

The poor Jinimyjolms cried bitterly, arid the tears
ran streaming down. Still the} 7 were not hurt badly,
and the crying changed to kissing much sooner than
usual. To explain what this means, it must be told,
that when the Jimmies were little toddling things, just
beginning to walk, they were constantly tumbling down,
tipping over in their cradle, or bumping heads together ;
and Mrs. Plummer found that the best way to stop the
ciying at such times was to turn it into kissing. The
reason of this is very plain. In crying, the mouth flies
open ; in kissing, it shuts. Mrs. Plummer was a won
derful woman. She found out that shutting the mouth
would stop its crying, and to shut the mouth she con
trived that pretty kissing plan, and at the first sound of
a bump would catch up the little toddlers, put their
arms round each other s necks, and say, "Kiss Johnny,
Jimmy; kiss Jimmy, Johnny." And that was the
way the habit began. They had not quite outgrown it ;
and it was enough to make anybody laugh to see them,



A MORNING WITH THE JIMMYJOHNS. 17

in the midst of a crying spell, run toward each other,
their cheeks still wet with tears, and to see their poor
little twisted, crying mouths trying to shut up into a
Mss.

But now must be told the sad fate of Banty White s
tub. Alas for poor Banty ! Nevermore will she gather
chicks under its roof.

Mrs. Hummer, it seems, allowed the Jimmies to take
her third-best broom and the barn broom to row with.

" Let s go way over there, where there s some good
grass," said Jimmy.

" So I say," said Johnny. " How shall we get her
over?"

" Take the reins," said Jimmy.

" Oh, yes ! so I say," said Johnny.

The reins were then taken from the tiorses, and tied
to one tub-handle. The brooms were tied to the other
tub-handle, and so dragged behind. The Jimmies
hoisted the tub over the fence into the field of good
grass," squeezed themselves inside, put the broom-
handles through the tub-handles, and began to row.

After rowing a while, and finding "she didn t go
any," they thought they would try to find Dan, and
ask him how he "made her go." So the tub was
hoisted over the fence again, and the brooms tied on
for another pull. Both took hold of the reins ; and then
away they ran along the road, up hills and down hills,
to find Dan.

"How easy she goes!" cried Johnny at last as
they were rounding a corner.

Both turned to look, and, oh ! what did they see ?
Alas ! what did they see? two hoops, pieces of wood



18 THE JIMMYJOHNS.

scattered along the road, and the brooms far behind.
The tub had fallen apart, and the hoops that bound it
were rolling away.

The brothers Plummer stood still and gazed. It was
all they could do.

"And now won t it be a tub any more?" Johnny
asked at last very soberly.

"I don t I guess so," said Jimmy. "Maybe
pa can tub it up again."

Each boy took an armful of the pieces (leaving one
that neither of them saw) , hung a hoop over his shoul
der, and in this manner turned to go home, dragging
the brooms behind.

But, finding themselves quite near aunt Emily s,
they went that way, and made a call at the house. And
very good reasons they had for doing so. One reason
was a puppy ; one reason was a gold-fish ; but the
sweetest reason of all was aunt Emily s gingerbread.



CHAPTER II.

THE SAD FATE OF " POLLY COLOGNE."

HIGH times at Frame-rose Cottage, high times
indeed! For there is cousin Floy Plummer on
her tiptoes ; and there is little Effie Plummer hurrying
with might and main to climb to the top of the bureau ;
and there are the twins, the Jimmyjohn Plummers,
scrambling both at once into the -baby s dining-chair,
tumbling over the back like one boy, then dividing at



THE SAD FATE OF "POLLY COLOGNE." 19

the bottom and going up again like two boys : and all
these trying to pinch Annetta Plummer s ears, and to
pinch them seven times too ; for Annetta Plummer is
seven years old this very day.

Ever since morning, a little girl may have been seen
holding two hands to two ears, scampering up stairs
and down stairs, dodging into dark corners, behind
doors, behind curtains, behind people, racing through
the garden, hiding among the currant-bushes, among
the grass, among the waving corn, in the barn, in the
hen-house, up the apple-tree, up the ladder ; and always
have gone some of the pincliers after her, with seven
pinches apiece in their thumbs and fingers. And now,
will climbing that table save Miss Seven-year-old ?

Hark ! Rover is barking outside ! O Rover ! don t
you know any better than to bark at the party, An-
netta s birthday -party 9 Look at old Bose, and learn
how to behave. Old Bose never barks at company ;
and he is six times bigger than you are, you little,
noisy, capering, frisky, frolicsome Rover! Now the
Jimmyjohns run to call off their dog. " Here, Rover !
Here, ere, ere, ere ! Rove, Rove, Rove ! "

And now the company have come in, and have taken
off their things, and have told Mrs. Plummer how their
mothers do, and have sat down quietly in a row of
chairs. Seven of them, seven bright faces so rosy
and sweet ! seven heads of hair so smooth or so curly !
seven pairs of tidy boots, best ones, perhaps, who
knows but brand-new? The Jimmyjohns, too, have on
their new, slippery, smooth-bottomed button-boots ; and
that was the reason of their falling down Awhile they
stood almost still, or rather more than half still, watch
ing the seven little girls sitting in a row.



20 THE JIMMYJOHNS.

Ten minutes later. All out on the green spot, where
it is shady, playing " Little Sally Waters sitting in the
sun." Josephus the baby (called Josephus while wait
ing for his real name) stays in his baby-carriage, hear
ing them sing, watching the ring go round, laughing,
crowing, patting cakes by the dozen. When the Jim
mies choose the one that they love best before they
close their eyes to rest, Rover rushes into the middle,
barking, leaping high, as if he, too, were going to kiss
the one that he loved best.

Fifteen minutes later. The} 7 , are playing "Pretty
fair maid." Dear, dear! what a charming singsong
goes with this play ! What a lively, chirruping tune !
" Pretty fair maid, will you come up, will you come up,
will 3^ou come up, to join us in our dances." " And
now we ve got the Queen of May, the Queen of May,
the Queen of May, to join us in our dances." And
then the last part, " Green grow the rushes O ! Never
mind the blushes O ! " Ah ! who would not be a little
girl at a party, singing "Pretty fair maid" on the
green spot ?

Half an hour later. All out in the orchard, playing
"keep house." They divide themselves into " fami
lies." There is one very large flat rock in the orchard,
also several hollow places where rocks have been dug
out. Two of the families take each a hollow to
live in ; a third " keeps house " on the rock, a fourth
under a haycock. Oh, what good times ! Only two
families can have " fathers," because there are only
two boys. The other "fathers," cousin Floy says,
have gone to Boston. Cousin Floy manages this play.
She is ten years old, and knows how. Cousin Floy



THE SAD FATE OF "POLLY COLOGNE." 21

goes in to coax Mrs. Plummer for some things in which
to dress up the " fathers " and " mothers/ She says
it will do if the heads look like fathers and mothers
heads, and no matter about the clothes. Mrs. Plum
mer lends two head-dresses, also ribbons and laces.
Grandmother Plummer lends a cap and black ribbon.
Who ll be the " grandmother," I wonder. Minnie
Lowe, the little girl with the flossy curls. Oh, what a
cunning grandmother! Down, Rover, down! What!
barking at your grandmother, you saucy little puppy ?

"Ha, ha! He, he ! Ha, ha! He, he ! Ho, ho!"
And who wouldn t laugh at seeing Jimmy Plummer in.
a high dicky, black whiskers, and tall hat? The hat
touches his shoulders behind. Ah! that is better.
Cousin Floy has taken off the hat, and put on a great
deal of black hair pulled from an old cushion ; yes, a
great deal, as much as a quarter of a peck. It rises
high on his head, and What ails Rover ? Ha, ha !
Pretty good ! Rover doesn t know Jimmy !

Well, well, well ! Grandfather forever ! They are
going to have Johnny a grandfather ! Cousin Floy is
covering his head with cotton-wool for white hair.
Now she gives him a cane. Now go on the spectacles.
Now she is doing something I cannot * see
what. Oh, yes, yes, yes ! putting a hump under his
frock, between his shoulders, to give him a stoop. Bark
away, Rover ! Who wouldn t bark at a cotton-wool
grandfather ?

Annetta has been in to the house, and is bringing out
all her rag-babies. To be sure ; for now there can be a
baby in every family. One of these is very large, and
has a face as big round as a pint porringer ; but the



22



THE JIMMYJOHNS.




others are quite small. The large one is named Joey
Moonbeam. This is a true picture of Joey Moon
beam, copied from her like
ness now hanging in Annet-
ta Plummer s baby-house.
The largest of the small
rag-babies is named Doro
thy Beeswax. She is a
little taller than a knitting-
needle. This is a true pic
ture of Dorothy Beeswax.
The next largest is Betsey
Ginger. The next is Jenny
Popover. The next is Eudora N. Posy.
The "N." stands for Nightingale.
The next is Susan Sugarspoon. This
is a true picture of Betsey Ginger.
Susan Sugarspoon, and Jenny Popover,
and Eudora N. Posy, have not had their
pictures taken yet. The smallest of
all is Polly Cologne,
the smallest, the pret
tiest, and the cunning-
est. Her cheeks are painted pink, and
she wears a locket.
Her hair is of flax-
colored floss-silk, while
the hair of all the others
is stocking-ravellings.
She is the baby of the
baby-house, and this is her true and exact picture.
Polly Cologne has feet ; but the others stand on their
stiff petticoats.






THE SAD FATE OF "POLLY COLOGNE." 23

Now comes Mrs. Plummer, with seed-cakes for the
housekeepers to play supper with ; and behind her comes
cousin Floy, bringing cinnamon-water, and dishes from
the baby-house. The cinnamon-water is in four phials.
Each phial has in it sugar, and also rose-leaves.

What are the children laughing and whispering about ?
and why do they look at little Fanny Brimmer in such
a way? Mrs. Plummer has called Annetta aside with
one or two others, and is asking why they do so.

"Because," whispers little Lulu, u Fanny picked out
the biggest seed-cakes that had the most
sugar-plums on the tops."

Mrs. Plummer tells them, speaking very low, that
perhaps Fann} T did not know it was selfish to do so ;
that her mother might never have told her. Selfish
girls," sa3 s Mrs. Plummer, " should be pitied, not
laughed at ; and besides, perhaps every one of you may
be selfish in some other way."

Half-past four o clock. What is going on now ? Oh !
I see. The " family " at the rock are having a party,
and to this part} T have come the " families " from the
hollows and the ha} T cock. No, Rover, you were not
invited. Down, sir ! down !

The supper is laid out on the rock. The cinnamon-
water is poured into the cups, each cup holding half a
thimbleful. Grandfather Johnny and grandmother
Minnie sit at the head, and father Jimmy at the foot ;
while the mothers with their little girls fill the room be
tween. The mothers wear head-dresses. The little
girls wear dandelion-curls, and curls of shavings. Only
one of the babies is allowed to come to the table, and
that is Polly Cologne. The others sit on the floor, and



24 THE JIMMYJOHNS.

play with their playthings. Joey Moonbeam can come
to table, because she is big enough. They call Joey
Moonbeam a little girl three years old, that cannot walk,
because she has had a fever. Polly Cologne seems to
be a pet among all these mothers and little girls. They
all want to hold her. Why, by their talk, one might
suppose she was a live baby. Hear them. " O little
darling ! " " Just as cunning ! " " Dear ittle baby ! "
" Did zee want some payzings? " " Turn to oor moz-
zer, oo darling ! " " Do let me hold her ! " " No, let
me, let me!" "Me!" And so she is passed from one
to another, and kissed and stroked and patted, and
talked to. Really the birthday-party is having a good
time. Ah ! who would not be a little girl plajing sup
per on a rock, out among the apple-trees, and sipping
cinnamon-water ?

But, dear, dear ! what is the matter? Why do they
all jump down in a hurry, and scream and shout,*and
run after Rover ? What ! Polly Cologne ? Rover gone
off with Polly Cologne in his mouth? Yes, Rover has.
There he goes, scampering away, and all the children
after him, calling, "Here, here, ere, ere, ere! Back,
sir ! back ! " The Jimmyjohns slip with their smooth-
bottomed boots, and down they go ; and off go wigs,
whiskers, and all ! Now they re up again, shouting to
Rover, " Here, Rover ! here, Rover ! Drop it, drop
it ! Rove, Rove ! Come back ! "

But Rove won t hear, and won t come back. He s
out of the orchard, across the meadow, over the brook ;
and now and now he has gone into the woods ! Oh,


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Online LibraryAbby Morton DiazThe Jimmyjohns, and other stories → online text (page 1 of 13)