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THE LIBRARY

OF

THE UNIVERSITY
OF CALIFORNIA

LOS ANGELES



V





LOVE-BOUND

AND OTHER POEMS



THE FIRST EDITION OF THIS
LITTLE BOOK IS LIMITED TO
FIVE HUNDRED COPIES.



LOVE-BOUND
AND OTHER POEMS



BY

ADALINE TALCOTT EMERSON



PRINTED AT

THE UNIVERSITY PRESS

CAMBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS

MDCCCXCIV



COPYRIGHT 1894 BY

ADALINB TALCOTT EMERSON



FS
;<??



TO

MY BLESSED HUSBAND,

THE INSPIRATION OF MY LIFE, AND THE
DEAR CHILDREN, THE FRUIT OF OUR LOVE,
I DEDICATE THIS VOLUME, THE OUTCOME
OF MANY EXPERIENCES, THE RIPENING
THOUGHT OF MANY YEARS.



J



V-






A FORE-WORD AND FOR- WORD.



POETRY is, among other things, the universal ex
pression of individual emotion. This gives verse
its importance and its audacity. There is a
sense in which each essay in verse challenges all
the past, and enters the list with the great of
all time. But there comes a season, both early
and late, in all tongues, when verse is common to
all. Once early, when speech is still fluid, in
the days of the ballad, and once late, as in our
own day, when the field of verse is once more
open to all, because the seeds of rhyme have been
sown in every soul. At such a time in each
tongue, verse becomes the frequent resource of per-



A FORE-WORD AND FOR-WORD.

this verse, to a special circle, and some, now
and then one in a century, to the world. In the
just weight of worth, the last does not still the
second. One

Sings to the wide world, and she to her nest;
In the nice ear of Nature -which song is the best ?



TALCOTT WILLIAMS.



PHILADELPHIA,

September the Seventh,



A TABLE OF THE CONTENTS OF
LOVE-BOUND

" LOVE-BOUND," 1 1

TO MY LOVE, 14

THE OFFICE, l6

LOVE'S DREAM, 17

BONDAGE, 2O

COUNT THE WEEKS BY SUNDAYS, 23

SUNSHINE ON THE CHAMBER CEILING, 2J

SUMMER CLOUDS, 30

SNOW-FLAKES, 3!

THE SONG OF THE OCEAN, 34

ANSWER TO H. H.'S QUESTION, 38

THE ENGADINE VILLAGES, 4!

SMOKE OF THE CITY, 42

THE THUNDER, 44

AUTUMN, 45

NOVEMBER, 46

TO-MORROW, 47

PICTURES, 49

THE OCEAN'S LULLABY, 51

SUNRISE ON LAKE SUPERIOR, 53

THE NIGHT WINDS, 55

STORM IN CALIFORNIA, 58

COMING SNOW-STORM, 6l

SEA-SHELLS, 63

OHO! YE WINDS, 65

MOTHERHOOD, 69

THE FIRST BABY, 72

HELEN, 74

CHILDHOOD PASSING, 79

INTO YOUTH, 8l

"TO A YOUNG .CHILD," 83

"COUNT LIFE BY DEEDS," 85

FRIENDSHIP, 87

REVERIES, 88

-SAVED, 89

REMEMBRANCE, 92

DREAMS, 94

A FRAGMENT, 95

1776-1876, 99

JAMES A. GARFIELD, 102



NUREMBERG'S GABLES, 105

THE REV. JOSEPH HAVEN, D.D., IO8

TO WHITTIER, I IO

FAIR DRYBURGH ABBEY, 112

COURAGE BY THE WAY, 121

GOD'S WILL, 123

THE BODY'S REST, 127

UNREST, 129

CALL FOR HELP, 130

CLING NOT TO THE PAST, 132

QUESTIONINGS, 134

IN THE END, 136

SHIELDING, 138

SHADOWS, I4O

" REST FOR THE WEARY," 142

EASTER BELLS, 143

LIGHT AHEAD, 145

GUIDANCE, 147

TO MY MOTHER, 149

A FAREWELL, 151

INTO THE SILENCE, 154

WITHERED LEAVES, 157

CHRISTMAS' AMEN, 158

THE DYING YEAR, I $9

HOLIDAYS OF 1873, I5

A VALENTINE, 169

LITTLE CHILDREN, 171

AN APRIL DAY, 173

BABY ADALYN, 175

BABY BELLE HINCHLIFF, 177

KISSES, 179

WATCHING FOR MAMMA, l8o

TO THE LINNET, l8l

THE DIAMOND NECKLACE, 183

A JINGLE, l86

LAMBKIN, 187

NATURE'S UNDERTONES, 188
THE FUTURE, 192



Not to the skillful critic,
Nor to the public throng,

To you my inmost thoughts I bring,
To you my simple lays belong.



" LOVE-BOUND.'



HPHE shy partridge calls to his loved mate,
" More wet,"

The nightingale sings in the fen,
The bobolink carols to all his Wee Babes,

And sweet is the song of the wren.

The kine in the meadow, the sheep in the fold ;

The chanticleer's voice on the wind ;
From each to the other sweet music we hear,

" Oh, Love-bound are we to our kind."

The clapping of leaves will express their mute joy,
So airily waving in ease,



1 2 "LOVE-BO UND."

And from the dense forests, oh, " Love-bound,"

" Love-bound,"
Comes floating along on the breeze.

The stars in their courses, the waves of the sea,

All join in the chorus, Love-bound.
Sweet lily-bells scatter their perfume afar,

And pansies the glad notes resound.

The child's merry laughter 's a ripple of glee ;

A necklace of pearls are its tears,
As Love-bound through all the sweet joys of its
life

And Love-bound through all of its fears.

The unwritten music of Nature in song

A love-note for lovers to hear,
So sweetly it sings from the heart to the heart,

" If Love-bound, you Ve nothing to fear."



"L O VE-B O UND." 1 3

But treasured for aye in the depths of the soul,

A great wealth of love. We agree,
More strong bound are they, who most truly are
free.

My Lover, I 'm Love-bound to thee.

OAKLAND, 1875.



TO MY LOVE.

MAY 3d, 1874.

IWfY love loves me, and I love him ;

Our lives in unison we trim,
To joy or sorrow, weal or woe,
As onward through life's path we go.

We note the birthdays, not aghast ;
Each finds us older than the last
Only in name : our hearts keep young ;
The notes of age we leave unsung.

Count not the years, so swift they fly,
They drop, as withered leaves, to die ;
Their purpose having served for all,
' T were well they like the leaves should fall ;



TO MY LOVE. 15

But by our love to count the years,
Much stronger, then, life's work appears ;
By higher aims, expanding thought,
And deeds not in our own strength wrought.

Ah ! tell me not you 're forty-four ;
Across the threshold, through the door,
I see thy youth in manhood's hour,
Crowning thy life with greater power.

Still keener grows the mind with years ;
Thy soul no question asks of fears ;
The vision, with its longer range,
Will grasp still greater truths and strange.

Then tell me not you 're forty-four,
For I will know almost a score
Of years has borne us on the wing,
Since first our plighted troth did sing.



THE OFFICE.

T WITHIN your office walls,

A nameless rest, of quiet and repose,

Broods like a spirit great.
A living, loving, human tenderness,

Within your breast finds vent,
And wafts its fragrance, on the air you breathe,

To all humanity,
And thus distils a sweeter perfume's dawn,

Than upturned violets,
Kissed daily with the dews of early morn.



LOVE'S DREAM.

, give me your dream, Love,
Your love dream of me.
With thought drifting far

To my home by the sea,
As, wrapt in the arms of the night,

You feel on your cheek
The sweet breath of a rose,
Entwining your heart
In its' soft velvet close ;
Believing you 're roaming the wide world with

me,
Are roaming the wide world with me.



1 8 LOVE'S DREAM.

Oh, give me your dream, Love ;

A vision it grows
To charming white lilies,

So unlike the rose.
Look into their beautiful depths,

For over your senses
A fragrance is thrown,

Surpassing the perfume

Of flowers unknown,

Enfolding your heart in its fancies so free,
Your heart in its fancies so free.

But in the gray dawning,

As o'er you may hover
The phantom-like presence

Of me, your " One-Lover,"
The rustling of nature's wakening

Will scatter the shadowy

Forms of your dreams,



LOVE'S DREAM. 19

Possessing the spirit

In raptures supreme,
Like some unseen things, they will fly on their

wings,
Away they will fly on their wings.

O'er crag and o'er hillside,

And far down the glen
Through thicket and forest,

Through river and fen,
You come to a beautiful lake :

You dream it is fleeing ;

To catch it you spring,

Swift as antelopes fly

Too late, too late it wings.
You are awake, and no more of joy will it bring,
Ay, no more of joy will it bring.



BONDAGE.

'T'HERE are great degrees of bondage

Caused by life's surging tide ;
Very many are the fancies

Which in the soul abide,
And yield a subtle influence

That love is sure to gain
Sooner or later o'er the hearts

Of all mankind in twain.
For Cupid hurls his fiery darts,

And dances with delight
At the sure havoc that attends

His arrows in their flight.
Up to some lonely cabin door

On mountain side he rides,
From his quiver draws his arrow,

From bow it quickly glides.



BONDAGE. 21

Bound hand and foot the maiden cries,

Nor knows from whence her thraldom comes.

She feels the magnet in his eyes,

She fears the force that from him flies,

And yet she yields in sweet dismay ^

Her own sweet will to his own way.

Each moment as a flash of light,
Each fleeting hour a twinkling star,
Kindling for aye life's darkest night
With all that 's good if used aright ;
Crowning the future of her life
With all that 's precious to a wife.

Oh, how sweet the wifely pledge of love !

How holy ! how divine !
As it draws its nature from above,

It will both hearts entwine.
But to love, and then to part ! Well nigh

The fountains of the heart



22 BONDAGE.

Will burst in twain, as friends must die,

And from our lives depart.
From such deep grief while here we dwell,

Oh, is there no surcease?
And must our hearts with sorrow swell,

Till death shall bring release ?



COUNT THE WEEKS BY SUNDAYS.



not the days of absence,
v^.

As they go dragging on,

r> j.
So wearily the moments pass, \

When those we love are gone.



But count the time by Sundays,

More swiftly will it fly ;
Of all the many weeks from home,
have gone by.



Count not the days of absence,
One day one day agone ;

Count by the fleeting Sabbaths :
A week will then have flown.



'V ^HERE are murmuring brooks.

Traversing life through shady nooks,
Where never a ray of the sun peers through,
To gladden the sound with its cheerful hue.
There are gladsome rivulets scattered round,
Kissing and washing the pebbly ground,
Over which they flow with such merry glee,
Thoughts of grief from the listeners flee.



SUNSHINE ON THE CHAMBER CEILING.

/CREEPING into our houses,
Through the window-pane,
Slanting through the blinds ajar,
Sunlight gleams again.

Sparkling in its liquid light,

In flows the morning,
Filling full our sleeping-rooms

With the gay dawning.

Watch the rays so swift they glide,

With their stencil train,
Tracing, with an artist's hand,

Pictures that enchain.



28 SUNSHINE ON THE CHAMBER CEILING.

Now they 're sketching maple boughs,

Swaying to and fro ;
Out and in, among the trees,

Birds are singing low.

Look ! our neighbor's chimney-top,

One can there define,
Quite an ancient castle tower,

From the sunny Rhine.

Onward, through the Gothic blinds,

Comes a vessel sailing,
Prow and stern and mizzen-mast

Frescoing the ceiling.

See the proudly sailing craft ;

Swings the sun around ;
One can see the billows heave,

With her every bound.



SUNSHINE ON THE CHAMBER CEILING. 29

Look ! a cloud is passing now ;

Watch it rise and fall,
O'er our pretty landscape fair,

Like a sable pall.

Pictures of the sunshine,
You have chased our dreams

From off our sleepy couches,
By your golden beams.



SUMMER CLOUDS.

OOFT fleecy clouds dot the sky here and there,

Tripping like fairies, through the summer air ;
Swiftly they move across the azure blue,
Piling o'er each other, floating in dew.

Oh, ye snowy mountain peaks, drifting high,
Castellated pictures making in the sky,
Whence do you come, and whither do you go ?
Tell me, snowy, fleecy clouds, floating low ?



SNOW-FLAKES.

r\ H, watch the tiny snow-flakes,
Falling, falling thro' the air,
The many million snow-flakes,
With upturned faces fair.

How they jostle one another,
Career and tumble all around,

O'er and o'er each other falling,
Till they cover all the ground.

See the children's happy faces,
Pressed against the window-pane,

Listening to the muffled music
Of the snow-flakes in the lane.



32 SNOW-FLAKES.

Higher, higher, frozen raindrops,
Spreading out in feathery foam,

Piles a fairy, glistening blanket
Over all so close and warm.

But we older ones are thinking,
Of the million stifling cares,

Falling, falling all around us,
Constant burden of our prayers.

How they jostle one another,
To and fro the whole day long,

O'er and o'er each other tumbling,
Till we know not right from wrong ;

Till our hearts grow weary, weary,
And the living, working brain,

Bending 'neath the growing burden,
Shrinks from life's unrest in vain.



SNO W-FLA KES. 33

But, as 'neath the piling snow-flakes,

Every germ of Nature lies
Dormant, restful, till the Springtime

Calls it gladly to arise ;

So the soul in heavenly pureness,
From the cares of life shall come,

Singing songs of resurrection,
Winging upward to its home.

June 23, 1876.



THE SONG OF THE OCEAN.

'"THE song of the ocean is merry or sad,

As hearts of its hearers are weary or glad ;
But all the night through and for all the day long
It breathes the same cadence, it sings the same
song.

" Roll on, my dusky waves, roll on,
And break your crests yon shore upon ;
Your mates shall follow in your wake.
Roll on, my dusky waves, and break"

To children, it 's sweet as the songs of the dove ;
To maiden, it is always singing of love ;
To manhood, whose spirit is full of desire,
The ocean has power his soul to inspire.



THE SONG OF THE OCEAN. 35

" Roll on, my dusky waves, roll on,
And break your crests yon shore upon ;
Your mates shall follow in your wake.
Roll on, my dusky waves, and break."

The song of the ocean is more importune,

When storm winds are howling their deep notes in

June,
When lightnings flash bright, and the loud thunder

raves,
And great waters surge from their innermost caves.

" Roll on, my dusky waves, roll on,
And break your crests yon shore upon ;
Your mates shall follow in your wake.
Roll on, my dusky waves, and break"

The waves that are raging, no longer will take
To far-distant beaches their white caps to break,



36 THE SONG OF THE OCEAN.

But high over mountains of billowy foam,
Away in mid-ocean, they '11 dash to their home.

" Roll on, my dusky waves, roll on,
And break your crests yon shore upon ;
Your mates shall follow in your wake.
Roll on, my dusky waves, and break"

The song of the ocean is full of despair ;
Deep moanings it utters upon the night air,
Such moanings, oh, what are the thoughts that they

stir,
What depths do they rouse, in my soul's lethargy !

" Roll on, my dusky waves, roll on,
And break your crests yon shore upon ;
Your mates shall follow in your wake.
Roll on, my dusky waves, and break"

Like yonder waves dashing, they rush o'er my brain,
And fill me with courage their truth to attain ;



THE SONG OF THE OCEAN. 37

They roll back the trammels from off of the soul ;
The spirit grows stronger its life to control.

Then thought surge on, forever surge ,
The heart from all of evil purge,
As pure and white as ocean shore
Is washed by waves forevermore.



TO H. H.'S QUESTION, "WHICH WAY
WENT SUMMER?"

T 1ST ! the voice of the Red-Rose :

" These flowers must decay,
For north winds are blowing

Their petals away ;
But warm is my heart in the

Cherishing ground,
And summer is with me, far

Under the mound.
Again to your world we will

Come by and by ;
New roses will bloom to me,

Death to belie.
Oh, life of my life, and sweet

Breath of my breath,



TO H. H:S QUESTION. 39

Together we flee winter's
Semblance of death."

But what saith the Honey- Bee :

" Frozen ? Nay ! nay !
In cosey cells dormant with

Summer I stay ;
Together we 're nestling the

Whole winter through,
Renewing our strength and our

Beauty for you,
Where violets, mayflowers, and

Even the clover,
In sweet-scented perfumes, all

Over us hover.
We 're resting and dreaming

Of gladness, of spring,
When, friend, to your world again

Summer we '11 bring."



40 TO H. WS QUESTION.

And nestled beneath the soft

Wings of the Bird,
The chirpings of summer

May always be heard :
" Though winter shall drive us

Afar from the north,
She cannot compel us to

Stifle our mirth ;
But sweeter than ever the

Songs and the flowers
When the birds and the summer

Return to these bowers."
Thus answered the Song-Bird,

The Blossom, the Bee,
" I keep the bright summer

Forever with me."



THE ENGADINE VILLAGES.

HTHE Engadine ! Beautiful Engadine !

Many of Switzerland's most treasured peaks,

Standing around thy villages, still keep
A watch over thy lakes and river Inn ;
Their lofty heads, covered with snow, are seen

Glistening in sunlight, or in clouds asleep ;

And, like a Gordian knot tied fast, bespeak
The full protection of their stately mien.



Piz-Languard, monarch of the chain, a seer :
" Oh, Engadine, nothing shall enter here

To mar the beauty of thy hidden grace ;
These mountain homes, to us so very dear,
These homes of honest folk of sturdy race,
Most tenderly we hold in strong embrace."



SMOKE OF THE CITY.

TTAVE you ever watched a city,

In the early morn,
And seen the smoke go circling up
To catch the early dawn ?

Higher, higher, watched it rising,

Floating to the skies,
Lost in yonder atmosphere, go

From your wondering eyes ?

Have you listened for the carols,

Song-birds flying there,
Thought within those vapory clouds

Are angels' dwellings fair?



SMOKE OF THE CITY. 43

Looked on palace, mill, and hamlet,

Watched it rise and fall,
Till wakened from your revery

By the breakfast call ?

Then you do not know the pleasure

Of chambers in your house,
Which overlook the city homes

From windows east and south.



THE THUNDER.

) hark ! in the distance
Comes crashing and rumbling

The thunder ;
It bids me take warning.
You are not in earnest,

Artillery ?

For see, the bright sunshine
Belies your prediction

Of rain.

But still you are talking ;
Your roaring around me,

Oh, thunder,
Disturbs meditation,
And bids me take warning.



AUTUMN.

JV/TY chamber resembles

Arcadian bowers,
With its long trailing vines

And autumnal flowers.
But the bright glowing coals,

In the blackened grate,
Are laughing at beauty

For blooming so late.



NOVEMBER.

U IE thee, bleak and dull November !

Thou art too rude for song ;
Such piercing wails of wind and rain
Create a sense of wrong.

For song of birds I list in vain,

For humming of the bee ;
Instead, thou meanest piteously,

Afar o'er land and sea.

As wilder blows the north wind's wrath,

The little laughing rill
Gives up its ripple to the frost,

And lies so cold and still.



NOVEMBER. 47

Rivers are wrapped in winding-sheets,

The lakes are frozen fast,
When deeper grow thy mutterings,

When wilder blows the blast.

Thus Mother Earth reluctant yields

Her heart to thy embrace,
And daily sees the life depart

Of beauty from her face.

So hie thee, chill November, hie !

Away with clouds and rain !
Give us the sparkling feath'ry flakes,

Of cold December's reign,

To shield the tender germs of earth

From all the winds that blow,
While bringing us the pleasures, rare,

Born of the drifting snow.



TO-MORROW.

'"PHERE is no to-morrow ;
Like a phantom it flies,
On the wings of the morning,
From our longing eyes.

For the gray dawn is stealing,
While in slumber we rest,

And to-day smiles upon us ;
It endeth our quest.



PICTURES.

A DARK, sequestered vale,

Where whippoorwills, and larks, and

robins gay

Play hide-go-seek whene'er the branches sway ;
Music of little brooks, trickling anew
Through latticed fern leaves, wet with morning dew.

Bright visions to the eye,
Of green fields, waving with the summer grain ;
Of herds, now lowing in the meadow lane.
Far off the gently flowing river winds,
As here and there its level bed it finds.

A sandy, rolling beach

Basks in the sunshine when old Ocean sleeps,
Then when the tide comes creeping from the deeps.
4



50 PICTURES.

Unlike the rushing tides of life, we find
A dreamy listlessness steals o'er the mind.

A pebbly, glistening beach,
Washed by the surging, mighty, roaring waves,
Breaking their snowy crests, as o'er it raves
The foaming cataract of the stormy sea,
Lashed by the furious winds from o'er the lea.

A cloudy, threatening sky ;
The thunders roar and through the valleys crash,
Echoing afar : the lightning's vivid flash
Reveals the sky, leaden with rain and mist,
Flooding mountain heights with lights of amethyst

Bold, rocky cliffs stand forth,

Their sides adorned with hemlock, spruce, and vine,
Waving their topmost boughs, to rhythmic line
Of plunging waterfalls, anear their feet :
Thus do the wildest scenes in nature meet



THE OCEAN'S LULLABY.

ID OCK me

To sleep, waves,
And over me roll
The tenderest music from out of your soul

Rock me
To sleep, waves,
And over me keep
The strictest of vigils, the while that I sleep.

Keep me
Asleep, waves,
While nature shall rest
This brain that is weary upon your great breast



52 THE OCEAN'S LULLABY.

Keep me
Asleep, waves,
And over me weep
The tears of your raindrops, at times while I sleep.

Wake me

From sleep, waves,
And let my soul hear
The song of the ocean when storm-clouds appear.

Wake me

From sleep, waves ;
Its music will keep
My heart full of courage, life's harvest to reap.

SQUIBNOCKET.



SUNRISE ON LAKE SUPERIOR.

HPHE rosy tints that lie along

The eastern shore at break of dawn
Are brighter than the maiden's blush,
And deeper than the evening's flush.

A moment, and they mount, they fly
Across the azure of the sky,
Dispersing from the night the shades.
Glorious light the earth pervades,

With songs of welcome, from the lips
Of roses red, from lily tips ;
From insects, beasts, and birds that sing,
To make the morning welkin ring ;






54 SUNKISE ON LAKE SUPERIOR.

From rolling, rippling, sparkling waves,
As sunshine with its glory laves ;
From glistening shafts of pearly beams,
Piercing beneath the mountain streams.

All human voices, tuned to praise,
Should listen to this call, and raise
Their heartfelt thanks to make replete
The welcome to the day complete.

Oh, rich indeed the sun's foresight,
To herald thus the day aright,
Waking to life the heart of earth,
Making each morning a new birth.

STEAMER PEERLESS, Aug. 13, 1872.






THE NIGHT WINDS.



T^HE night winds !

What are they saying,
Twisting the branches from off the trees,

Knocking the bricks

From the chimneys ?
Will their voices let nothing appease ?

Not the same sweet

Tale they are telling ;
It depends on the listener's ear :

To some wailing

And dire destruction ;
But to others they breathe of good cheer.



5 6 THE NIGHT WINDS.

Some, in dreaming,

Think they are zephyrs,
Sighing so sweetly, floating in air ;

Some feel the tread

Of the Storm King,
As he marches from out of his lair.

Listen, as he

Gathers his forces,
And encircles some poor stricken sail ;

Over the waves

Tossing his victim,
When caught in a " midsummer-night's " gale.

Thus to travel

With eager swiftness,
To be borne on the wings of the wind,

What freedom,

What wonder, delight,
Oh, what pleasure we mortals could find !



THE NIGHT WINDS. 57

Comes the morning,

Night winds are dying
And decreasing as shades fly away ;

Round the corners,

Soft winds whispering,
A good-morning to all, and good-day.



STORM IN CALIFORNIA.

1875-

OO wild the storm to-night !

Whence comes such unutterable grief ?
Borne on the breath of this
Tempestuous sea of wind and rain,
A spirit's moaning piteously.
A passionate gush of weeping
Comes against the window-pane ;
Then a louder, wilder wailing
Is heard above the gale.
Whence comest thou ? O spirit,
What is thy thought to night ?
Tell us thy purpose and thy aim ;
Why weepest thou against the pane ?



STORM IN CALIFORNIA. 59

Against the earth, and sea, and air,

Against our hearts, so full of care,

Against all laughter, joy, and mirth,

To which thy happier hours gave birth,

Are thy tears so unavailing?

Hast thou no power to save

The sinking ones upon the deep?

No power to help the struggling

Or suffering ones of earth ?

No power to shield the homeless waif,

Nor protection to vouchsafe ?

Whence comest thou ? Oh, spirit,

Wild, wild, thy voice to-night ;

Whence comest thou ? Oh, tell us,

Or we perish by thy might !

But the darkness gathered blackness,

At the moaning and the crying

Of the raging storm.

Our minds were filled with terror,



60 STORM IN CALIFORNIA.

At the wild winds' deep implore \
We shuddered as we listened,
And the rattling casements drear
Filled our hearts with inward fear,
When nearer came a furious blast,
Of the tempest rushing past.

A lull ! we feel our hearts cease beating :

In the stillness ;
We hear the eucalyptus-trees
Shaking out their willow leaves ;
And in the distance, sobbing, sobbing out its pain,
Wings the storm departing,
With its trailing garments, heavy with the rain,


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Online LibraryAdaline Talcott EmersonLove-bound and other poems → online text (page 1 of 4)