Alain René Le Sage.

The adventures of Gil Blas of Santillana online

. (page 1 of 25)
Online LibraryAlain René Le SageThe adventures of Gil Blas of Santillana → online text (page 1 of 25)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


This is a digital copy of a book that was preserved for generations on library shelves before it was carefully scanned by Google as part of a project
to make the world's books discoverable online.

It has survived long enough for the copyright to expire and the book to enter the public domain. A public domain book is one that was never subject
to copyright or whose legal copyright term has expired. Whether a book is in the public domain may vary country to country. Public domain books
are our gateways to the past, representing a wealth of history, culture and knowledge that's often difficult to discover.

Marks, notations and other marginalia present in the original volume will appear in this file - a reminder of this book's long journey from the
publisher to a library and finally to you.

Usage guidelines

Google is proud to partner with libraries to digitize public domain materials and make them widely accessible. Public domain books belong to the
public and we are merely their custodians. Nevertheless, this work is expensive, so in order to keep providing this resource, we have taken steps to
prevent abuse by commercial parties, including placing technical restrictions on automated querying.

We also ask that you:

+ Make non-commercial use of the files We designed Google Book Search for use by individuals, and we request that you use these files for
personal, non-commercial purposes.

+ Refrain from automated querying Do not send automated queries of any sort to Google's system: If you are conducting research on machine
translation, optical character recognition or other areas where access to a large amount of text is helpful, please contact us. We encourage the
use of public domain materials for these purposes and may be able to help.

+ Maintain attribution The Google "watermark" you see on each file is essential for informing people about this project and helping them find
additional materials through Google Book Search. Please do not remove it.

+ Keep it legal Whatever your use, remember that you are responsible for ensuring that what you are doing is legal. Do not assume that just
because we believe a book is in the public domain for users in the United States, that the work is also in the public domain for users in other
countries. Whether a book is still in copyright varies from country to country, and we can't offer guidance on whether any specific use of
any specific book is allowed. Please do not assume that a book's appearance in Google Book Search means it can be used in any manner
anywhere in the world. Copyright infringement liability can be quite severe.

About Google Book Search

Google's mission is to organize the world's information and to make it universally accessible and useful. Google Book Search helps readers
discover the world's books while helping authors and publishers reach new audiences. You can search through the full text of this book on the web

at http : //books . google . com/|






jr.#^"



?^;



a






Tie adventures

of Gil Bias ofSantillana

Alain Rene Le Sage, Lesage, Henri Van
Laun, Adolphe Lalauze










Digitized by



Google



^IMM



Hfl



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google



THE ABYENTURES OF GIL BLAS
OF SANTILLA^TA.



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google



1

1



1



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google






*{ '< 'I s ' V , »



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google



d

THE ADVENTURES



OF



GIL B L A S

OF SAITTILLANA

RENDERED INTO ENGLISH

By HENRI VAN LAUN



WITH AN

INTRODUCTORY NOTICE, LIFE OF LESAGE, AND NOTES



-'_:>/



VOLUME SECOND



EDINBURGH: WILLIAM PATERSON

MDCCCLXXXVI



Digitized by



Google






'\X



Digitized by



Google



CONTENTS



BOOK IV.
CHAPTER I.



Page
GIL BLAS, UNABLB TO AOCOMMODATB HDfSBLF TO THB MORALS

OP THB ACTRESSES, QUITS THB SERVIOE OF AR8ENIA, AND

FINDS A PLAOB WITH A MORB RESPECTABLE FAMILY . 3

CHAPTER ir.

aurora's RBCBPTION of oil BLAS, and THEIR CONVERSATION . 11

CHAPTER III.

A GRBAT OHANOB AT DON VINCENT'S, AND THB STRANGE RESO-
LUTION WITH WHICH LOVE INSPIRED THE FAIR AURORA . 17

CHAPTER IV.

THB FATAL MARRIAGE. — A TALE 25

CHAPTER V.

AURORA DB GUZMAN's BEHAVIOUR ON ARRIVING AT SALAMANCA 66






Digitized by



Google



CONTENTS.



CHAPTER VL

Page

THE 8TRATAGBH8 RESORTBD TO BY AURORA TO MAKE DON

LEWIS PACHECO FALL IN LOVE WITH HER ... 80

CHAPTER VIL

GIL BLA8 LEAVES HIS PLAGE, AND GOES INTO THE SERVICE OF

DON GONZALES DE PACHECO 93

CHAPTER VIII.

THE CHARACTER OF THE MARCHIONESS DE CHAVES, AND WHAT

KIND OF PEOPLE USUALLY VISITED HER . . .109

CHAPTER IX.

AN INCIDENT WHICH LED TO GIL BLAS LEAVING THE
MARCHIONESS OF CHAVES, AND WHAT NEXT BECAME OF
HIM 116

CHAPTER X.

THE STORY OF DON ALPH0N80 AND OF THE FAIR SERAPHINA . 123

CHAPTER XI.

WHO THE OLD HERMIT WAS, AND HOW GIL BLAS FOUND HIM-
SELF AMONG OLD ACQUAINTANCES . . .144



»



Digitized by



Google



CONTENTS.



BOOK V.
CHAPTER I.



THB HISTORY OP DON RAPHAEL



Page
153



CHAPTER II.

THB CONSULTATION HELD BY DON RAPHAEL AND HIS FRIENDS,
AND THE ADVENTURE WHICH BEFEL THEM WHEN THEY
WERE PREPARING TO LEAVE THE WOOD ....



252



BOOK VI.
CHAPTER I.

WHAT OJL BLAS AND HIS COMPANIONS 'DID AFTER LEAVING THE
COUNT OF POLAN ; THE IMPORTANT PROJECT WHICH
AMBROSE FORMED, AND HOW IT WAS CARRIED OUT . . 261

CHAPTER IL

THE DETERMINATION TAKEN BY DON ALPH0N80 AND GIL BLAS

AFTER THIS ADVENTURE ...... 276



CHAPTER IIL

HOW AFTER AN UNPLEASANT ACCIDENT, DON ALPHONSO FOUND
HIS HIGHEST WISHES FULFILLED, AND HOW GIL BLAS
FOUND HIMSELF SUDDENLY IN A SUPERIOR SITUATION



282



Digitized by



Google



CONTENTS.

BOOK VII.

CHAPTER I.

Page
THB L0VB8 OF OIL BLAS AND DAME LORENZA 8EPH0BA . 289

CHAPTER n.

WHAT BECAME OF GIL BLAS AFTBB HE LEFT THB CASTLE OF
LETVA ; THE HAPPY CONSEQUENCES OP HIS BEING UNSUC-
CESSFUL IN HIS AMOURS 301

CHAPTER III.

GIL BLAS BECOMES THE AECHBISHOP OF GRENADA'S FAVOURITE,

AND THE DISPENSER OF HIS FAVOURS .31

CHAPTER IV.

THE ARCHBISHOP HAS A FIT OF APOPLEXY. GIL BLAS' DILEMMA

AND ITS RESULT 318

CHAPTER V.

THE COURSE WHICH GIL BLAS TOOK AFTER THB ARCHBISHOP
HAD DISMISSED HIM. HOW HE MET ACCIDENTALLY THE
UCENTIATB WHO WAS UNDER SO GREAT AN OBUGATION TO
HIM, AND THE TOKENS OF GRATITUDE WHICH BE RECEIVED
FROM THE LATTER 323



Digitized by



Google



CONTENTS.

CHAPTER VI.

Page

GIL BLA8 GOES TO THB THEATRE AT GRENADA. HIS ASTONISH-
MENT AT THE BIGHT OP A CERTAIN ACTRESS, AND WHAT
CAME OF IT . . . . . . . 328

CHAPTER YII.
Laura's story 338

CHAPTER VIII.

THE RECEPtlON OF GIL BLAS AMONG THE ACTORS OF GRENADA,
AND HOW BE MET AN OLD ACQUAINTANCE BEHIND THB
SCENES 359

CHAPTER IX.

OF THE EZTRAOBDINART MAN WITH WHOM GIL BLAS SUPPED

THAT EVENING, AND OF WHAT WENT ON BETWEEN THEM . 364

CHAPTER X.

THE MARQUIS OF MARIALVA GIYES A COMMISSION TO GIL BLAS,
AND HOW THIS FAITHFUL SECRETARY ACQUITS HIMSELF
OP IT 369

CHAPTER XT.

THE NEWS WHICH GIL BLAS HEARD, AND WHICH WAS A THUN-
DERBOLT FOR HIM 374



Digitized by



Google



CONTENTS.



CHAPTER XII.



Page



GIL BLA8 GOES TO LODGE AT A BOARDING-HOUSE. HE MAKES
THE ACQUAINTANCE OP CAPTAIN CHINCHILLA. THE
CHARACTER OF THIS OFFICER, AND WHAT HAD BROUGHT
HIM TO MADRID 379

CHAPTER XIII.

GIL BLA8 MEETS HIS DEAR FRIEND FABRICIO AT COURT. GREAT
JOY ON BOTH SIDES. THEY ADJOURN TOGETHER; AND
THE CURIOUS CONVERSATION* WHICH THEY HAD . . 391

CHAPTER XIV.

FABRICIO FINDS A SITUATION FOR GIL BLAS WITH COUNT

GALIANO, A SICILIAN NOBLEMAN .... 406

CHAPTER XV.

GIL BLAS IN THE EMPLOYMENT OF COUNT GALLANO'S HOUSE-
HOLD 412

CHAPTER XVI.

OF THE ACCIDENT WHICH HAPPENED TO COUNT GALLANO'S APE ;
. THAT nobleman's AFFUCTION ON THAT OCCASION. HOW
GIL BLAS FELL ILL; AND THE CONSEQUENCES OF HIS
MALADY 421



Digitized by



Google



LIST OF ILLUSTRATIONS.

Designed and Etched hy Ad. Lalauze.



I. The Accident to Aurora's Carriage To face Title.
II. Don Lewis at the feet of Aurora . . 92 ^

III. Gil Blas makes a discovery . . 104 '

IV. The Hermit 120 *

V. Gil Blas receives a box on the ear . 298 -

VI. The Archbishop dismisses Gil Blas . . 322 *

VII. The meeting between Gil Blas and Laura . 336 -



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google



BOOK IV.



II.



Digitized by



Google



Digitized by



Google



CHAPTER I.

GIL BLAS, UNABLE TO ACCOMMODATE HIMSELF TO
THE MORALS OP THE ACTRESSES, QUITS THE
SERVICE OP ARSENIA, AND FINDS A PLACE WITH
A MORE RESPECTABLE FAMILY.

A REMNANT of honour and religion, which I
had preserved amidst this moral corruption,
made me resolve not only to leave Arsenia,
but even to break oflf all intercourse with
Laura, whom, however, I could not cease to
love, though I knew that she was often
unfaithful to me. Happy is the man who can
thus profit by those rational moments which
interrupt the pleasures that engross him ! One
fine morning I packed up my things; and
without settling with Arsenia, who in fact
scarcely owed me anything, without taking
leave of my dear Laura, I left the house
wherein I only breathed an atmosphere of
vice. I had no sooner done this good deed
than Heaven rewarded me for it. I met the
steward of my late master Don Mathias, and
bowed to him. He recognised me, and
stopped to enquire in whose service I was. I
replied that I was just out of a situation, that
after living for about a month with Arsenia,



Digitized by



Google



4 THE ADVENTURES OF

whose morals did not suit me, I had suddenly
left her of my own free will, in order to pre-
serve my innocence. The steward, as though
he felt any scruples himself, commended my
delicacy of feeling, and said that he would
procure me a very good place, since I was such
an honourable young fellow. He ftilfiUed his
promise, and took me that very day to Don
Vincent de Guzman's house, whose man of
business he knew.

I could not have entered a better service;
nor did I ever repent of having gone there.
Don Vincent was a very rich old nobleman,
who had lived for several years without . a
lawsuit or a wife; the physicians having
removed the latter, in their attempts to rid her
of a cough which might have lasted for years
if she had not taken their remedies. Instead
of thinking of a second marriage he had
entirely devoted himself to the education of
his only daughter, Aurora, who was then
entering her twenty-sixth year. To an
uncommon beauty she added a fine and
cultivated intelligence. Her father, though
no genius, had a talent for managing his
affairs well. He had one fault which is
excusable in old men; he liked to talk, and
that chiefly of war and combats. If anyone
unluckily touched on these subjects in his
presence, he straightway blew the trumpet of
his heroism, and his hearers were only too



Digitized by



Google



GIL BLAS. 5

happy if they escaped with the narrative of
two sieges and three battles. As he had spent
two-thirds of his life in the army, his memory
was an inexhaustible source of anecdotes,
which were not always listened to with as
much pleasure as they were related. As, more-
over, he stammered, and was very prolix, he
was not the most agreeable of narrators. In
all other respects I never met with a nobleman
of a more amiable character. His temper was
always the same, and he was neither obstinate
nor capricious, which I admired in a man of
quality. Though lie was carefiil in his
expenses, he kept a liberal establishment.
His household consisted of several men-
servants and three women in waiting on
Aurora. I soon discovered that the steward of
Don Mathias had procured me a good place,
and my only anxiety was how to keep it. I
set myself to reconnoitre the ground under my
feet; to study the characters of the whole
household, and then, regulating my conduct
accordingly, I was not long in gaining the
good-will of my master and of all the servants.
I had been above a month in Don Vincent's
service when I thought I perceived that his
daughter took more notice of me than of the
other servants in the house. Whenever her
pyes met mine I seemed to observe a sort of
pleasure in her looks, which I did not remark
when she let them fall on the others. If I



Digitized by



Google



6 THE ADVENTURES OF

had not lived among young men of fashion and
actors it would never have entered into my
head that Aurora was thinking about me ; but
I had been somewhat spoiled amongst these
gentry, amongst whom even the reputation of
ladies of the highest rank is not always held
sacred. ** If some of those mummers are to
be believed," I said, ** ladies of quality some-
times take whims which they turn to account.
How do I know that my mistress may not have
those whims too? But no," I added, a moment
after, ** I cannot believe it. She is not one of
those Messalinas who, belying their pride of
birth, unworthily cast their glances on those
beneath them, and dishonour themselves with-
out a blush. She is rather one of those virtuous
but tender-hearted girls who, satisfied with the
limits in which virtue confines their inclinations,
feel no scruple in inspiring as well as entertain-
ing a refined passion which amuses them with-
out being dangerous."

It was thus I judged of my mistress, with-
out exactly knowing what to conclude. Mean-
while, whenever she met me, she always smiled
and seemed pleased. Any man might be
deceived by such flattering appearances without
being thought a coxcomb; and, for my part,
I could not resist them. I thought Aurora
was deeply smitten with my merits, and
regarded myself as one of those favoured
attendants to whom love makes servitude



Digitized by



Google



GIL BLAS. 7

sweet.^ To appear in some measure less
unworthy of the happiness which my good
fortune seemed to assure me, I began to take
more pains about my personal appearance than
I had hitherto done. I made it my business
to discover what made me look better. I
spent all the money I had in linen, pomades,
and scents. The first thing I did in the
morning was to dress and perftime myself, that
I might not appear slovenly if sent for by my
mistress. With these attentions to personal
appearance, and the other efforts I made to
please, I flattered myself that the moment of
my bliss was drawing near.

Amongst Aurora's women there was one
named Ortiz. She was an old creature who
had lived more than twenty years in Don
Vincent's house, had brought up his daughter,
and still served her as a duenna ; but she no
longer performed the most difficult of her
duties. On the contrary, instead of reporting
whatever Aurora did, as she formerly used to
do, she now only occupied herself in concealing
them ; and, in a word, enjoyed the entire con-
fidence of her mistress. One evening dame
Ortiz, having found an opportunity of speaking
to me without the chance of our being over-
heard, said to me in a low voice that, if I were

^ Jean Jacques Eoosseau in the tirst book of his Confessions,
mentions his having entertained similar feelings for the Countess de
Solar when he poured her out some water.



Digitized by



Google



8 THE ADVENTURES OP

discreet and prudent, I had only to be in the
garden at midnight, and that there would be
told me some things which I should not be
sorry to hear. I replied to the duenna, squeezing
her hand, that I would not fail to be there ;
and we quickly separated through fear of being
surprised. I had no doubt that I had made a
tender impression on the heart of Don Vincent's
daughter, and I had no little difficulty in
restraining my joy. How the time hung on my
hands from this moment till supper, though we
supped early ; and from supper till my master
went to bed ! How terribly slow the moments
dragged on in the house that night ! To add
to my vexation, when Don Vincent had retired
to his room, instead of going to sleep, he
began to fight over again his campaigns in
Portugal, which he had so often dinned into
my ears already. But a thing which he had
not done hitherto, and which was reserved for
that very evening, was to enumerate all the
officers who had distinguished themselves in
his time, and even to relate their exploits.
What did I not suffer before he was done!
However at last he left oflf speaking, and went
to sleep. I hastened at once into the little room
where I slept, and from which there was a way
into the garden by a private staircase. I per-
fumed myself all over, put on a clean shirt,
after having scented it thoroughly ; and, for-
getting nothing of what I thought might con-



Digitized by



Google



GIL BLAS. 9

tribute to encourage the passion of my mistress,
I went to the place of assignation.

Ortiz was not there. I concluded that, tired
of waiting for me, she had returned to her
room, and that the happy moment was gone.
I blamed Don Vincent for this ; but as I was
cursing his campaigns, I heard ten o'clock
strike. I thought the clock was wrong, and
that it could not be less than one in the
morning. .However, I was so far out that full
a quarter of an hour later, I heard another clock
strike ten again. " All right ! '' I said to myself;
" I have only two entire hours to dance attend-
ance here.^ At all events they shall not com-
plain of my want of punctuality. What shall
I do with myself till midnight ? I had better
take a walk in the garden, and think of the part
I am to play, which is quite new to me. I am
not yet accustomed to the whims of women of
rank, though I know how to behave to shop-
girls and actresses. You accost them familiarly,
and you come to the point without ceremony ;
but very different manners are needed with a
lady of position. It seems to me that in such
a case the gallant must be polite, complaisant,
tender and respectful, yet without being bashful;

' In the original garder U frndet, to keep the mule, because
the servant took care of the mules or horses while his master
was otherwise engaged. The Countess d'Aulnoy says in the
twelfth letter of her ReUUum : Pendant que Us cavaliers sont avec
kurs mattresses les laquais gardent leurs chevaux it quelqm distance
de lamaison.



Digitized by



Google



10 THE ADVENTURES OF

and that, instead of wishing to hasten his happi-
ness by his eagerness, he must expect it from
a moment of weakness/'

Thus I reasoned, and thus I proposed to
act with Aurora. I fancied that in a little
while I should have the joy of being at the feet
of this lovely lady, pouring forth a torrent of
impassioned sayings. I even recalled all the
passages in our stock-plays which might be
useful to me in our interview, and do me credit.
I flattered myself that I should bring them in
well, and hoped that, like certain actors of my
acquaintance, I too should owe my wit to my
memory. While engrossed by these thoughts,
which to me were a pleasanter distraction than
the martial stories of my master, I heard eleven
o'clock strike. ** All right ! " I exclaimed, ** I
have only sixty minutes more to wait ; so let
me arm myself with patience.'' This gave me
some encouragement, and I plunged again into
a reverie, sometimes sauntering up and down,
at other times seating myself in an arbour at
the further end of the garden. At length,
midnight, the hour that I had been so long
waiting for, struck. A few moments later,
Ortiz, as punctual as myself, but less impatient,
made her appearance. " Senor Gil Bias," she
said, accosting me, *' how long have you been
here ? " " Two hours," I answered. " Indeed,"
she replied, loudly laughing at me, " of a truth
you are very punctual ; it is a pleasure to make



Digitized by



Google



GIL BLAS. 11

a nocturnal assignation with you. Keally,"
she added, seriously, '*you cannot buy too
dearly the good fortune of which I am the
messenger. My mistress desires to have some
private conversation with you, and she has
bidden me take you to her room, where she
awaits you. I will say no more ; for you must
learn the secret from no lips but her own.
Follow me; I will show you to her apartment."
With these words the duenna took me by the
hand, and led me mysteriously to her mistress's
room, through a little door of which she had
the key.



CHAPTER II.

aurora's reception of GIL BLAS, AND THEIR
CONVERSATION.

I FOUND Aurora in dishabille ; and this pleased
me. I bowed to her very respectfully, and
with as much elegance as I was capable of.
She received me smiling, tmd insisted upon my
sitting down by her. Then to complete my
delight, she told her messenger to go into
another room and leave us alone. After that,
addressing herself to me, she said : — "Gil Bias,
you must have perceived how favourably I
regard you, and how I distinguish you from



Digitized by



Google



12 THE ADVENTURES OF

all the other servants of my father; if my
looks had not told you that I am well disposed
towards you, the step I have taken to-night
cannot leave you room to doubt if

I did not give her time to say anything more;
I thought that, as a gentleman, I ought to
spare her modesty the pain of explaining her-
self more distinctly. I rose with transport; and
casting myself at Aurora's feet, like a stage
hero falling at the knees of his mistress, I ex-
claimed in a theatrical tone: *'Ah, madam,
have I heard aright? Is it to me these words
are addressed? Is it possible that Gil Bias,
hitherto the sport of fortune, and the outcast
of nature, has had the happiness of inspiring
sentiments . . . ." " Do not speak so loud!"
my mistress broke in, with a laugh, " you will
wake my women, who sleep in the next room.
Get up again, resume your seat, and hear me
out without interrupting me. Yes, Gil Bias,''
she continued, resuming her gravity, " I wish
you well, and as a proof of my esteem, I am going
to entrust you with a secret on which the peace
of my life depends. I love a handsome young
gentleman, of comely appearance, and of illus-
trious birth. His name is Don Lewis Pacheco.
I see him occasionally in the public walks and
at the theatre, but I have never spoken to him;
I do not even know what his private character
may be, or whether he has any bad qualities.
This, however, is what I wish to learn. I need



Digitized by



Google



GIL BLAS. 13

a person who will carefully enquire into his
morals and manners, and give me a faithful
account of them. I choose you in preference
to all our other servants; and think I risk
nothing in entrusting you with this commis-
sion. 1 hope you will discharge it cleverly and
discreetly, and that I shall never repent of
having taken you into my confidence.''

Here my mistress stopped for my reply. I
was at first disconcerted by my having made
such an unpleasant mistake ; but I soon
recovered myself, and getting over the con-
fusion always caused by unlucky rashness, I
expressed so much zeal for the lady's inter-
ests, and such ardent devotion for her service
that, if I did not efiace from her mind the
foolish idea I had flattered myself with, of
having pleased her, I showed at all events that
I knew well how to make amends for my folly.
I only asked two days to bring her an account
of Don Lewis. After this. Dame Ortiz, whom
her mistress called, showed me the way back
into the garden; and as she quitted me said
with a mocking air : " Good night, Gil Bias, I
need not recommend you to be early at the
next interview, for I know your punctuality too
well to have any anxiety on that account."

I returned to my room, not without some
vexation at finding my expectations deceived.
Nevertheless, I was sensible enough to console
myself; and to reflect that it was better for me



Digitized by



Google



U THE ADVENTURES OF

to be the confidant of my mistress than her
lover. I even thought that this might turn
out to my advantage, for the messengers of love
are generally well paid for their trouble ; and
I went to bed fiilly resolved to do whatever
Aurora required of me. I went out next day
for this purpose. There was no difficulty in
learning where a gentleman so well-known as
Don Lewis dwelt. I enquired about him in
the neighbourhood ; but the person to whom I
addressed myself could not do much to satisfy
my curiosity ; and this obliged me to begin my
inquiries over again next day, when I was more
successful. I chanced to meet in the street
a young man of my acquaintance, and we
stopped for a little gossip together. At the
same moment one of his friends came by, who
addressed us, and told us that he had just been
dismissed by Don Joseph Pacheco, Don Lewis's
father, accused of having drunk an octave cask



Online LibraryAlain René Le SageThe adventures of Gil Blas of Santillana → online text (page 1 of 25)