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Albert Welles.

The pedigree and history of the Washington family : derived from Odin, the founder of Scandinavia, B.C. 70, involving a period of eighteen centuries, and including fifty-five generations, down to General George Washington, first president of the United States online

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Online LibraryAlbert WellesThe pedigree and history of the Washington family : derived from Odin, the founder of Scandinavia, B.C. 70, involving a period of eighteen centuries, and including fifty-five generations, down to General George Washington, first president of the United States → online text (page 1 of 29)
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THE

PEDIGREE AND HISTORY



WASHINGT ON FAMILY:

DERIVED FROM

ODIN, THE FOUNDER OF SCANDINAVIA, B. C. 70.

INVOLVING A PERIOD OF

EIGHTEEN CENTURIES, AND INCLUDING
/j7 / FIFTY-FIVE GENERATIONS,

GENERAL GEORGE WASHINGTON

FIRST PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES.



ALBERT WELLES.



President of the American College for Genealogical Registry and Jlerahlij.



NEW-YORK :
SOCIETY LIBRARY.

1879.



Entered uccoiding tn Acl of Congress, in the year 1S79, b\

ALBERT WELLES,

In the OtTice of the Librari.in of Congress, at Washington, D. C.






^^



PREFACE, ^^^^gg^



MY position as President of the "American College
for Genealogical Registry and Heraldry " enables
me to obtain correct pedigrees and history of For-
eign Families, and as the English history of the Washing-
ton Family, by several authors, has been confessedly suppos-
ititious, it is deemed important that a correct and authentic
volume should be written that would become the standard
for reference on the subject.

My C(jrrespondent in London, from whom I have ob-
tained the material for the Washington Pedigree in Etig-
land, is a lineal descendant of the progenitor in England,
and has been engaged over thirty years in gathering evi-
dence. He thus writes : " If I had not taken upon myself
the great labor of examining those inestimable Records,
the ' Common Pleas Rolls,' the truth of that great man's
lineage would not have been revealed. They are of im-
mense value, and I hope you will make them known to
your countrymen by the publication of the Washington
History. The pedigree I now send I can establisli by legal
evidence"

The uncertainty hitlu-rt.. existing in regard to the English
progenitors of the Washingjon Family, which has led to
the numberless and fruitless controversies among the
Genealogists, will be entirely removed and cleared up by
this volume. Beginning with Odin, the Founder of Scan-
dinavia, B. c. 70, the history is followed down through the

[iii]



IV PREFACE.

Royal line of Denmark in the thirty-two generations to
" Thorfin the Dane," nat. circa a. d. iooo, whose ances-
tors were of Schleswig, Denmark. He settled in York-
shire, England, prior to the Norman Conquest. The
descent is traced in Denmark and England, from father to
son, down through the centuries, including branches in
different shires, to John Washington, the great-grand-
father of General George Washington, in twenty genera-
tions from Thorfin ; with interesting personal matter
regarding nearly 500 members of the Family and their
alliances in England and America.

The Family of Washington derives its name from the
Village of Wassington, juxta Ravensworth (now called
Wharleton), in the Parish of Kirkby-Ravensworth, in the
North Riding of Yorkshire. Originally Evervicscire — the
Eboricure of the Romans, or Evereux, — afterwards Ebor,
at the time of the Conquest, and lastly Yorkshire.

The people of this part of the country were all of Scan-
dinavian descent, and spoke the same language with the
Normans themselves, which was the language of the
Ancient Angles. The Saxons never settled here, and were
of a different race. The City of York having been long
before that time especially 7\.' Danish City, and the Chief
City in all England.

With respect to the ^^/g/ii-Saxons, there were no Sa.xons
in these parts, which was settled by the Angles, who spoke
the same language as is spoken this day in these parts of
Yorkshire ; and all those Sa.xon inscriptions, about which
so many wonders are made, is simply plain Yorkshire. The
Angles were a branch of the Danes, who lived in Schleswig
(a seaport town of Denmark), and came over to England,
men, women, children, beasts, &c., and left that country
desolate for 300 years, as is confirmed by the Sa.xon chron-
icles.

The 174 manors given to Earl Alan by the Conqueror,
were only so many shadows. There were only about six



PREFACE. V

manors really attached to the Earldom of Richmondshire ;
of all the others he was merely nominally the Chief Lord ;
and each was held by an owner whose ancestors held for
many generations before the Conquest.

There was never in Richmondshire above six families
descended from Norman Ancestors ; and they acquired
their lands by marrying heiresses.

The growing importance and value of such a work as
this, is illustrated by the increasing interest in everything
pertaining to General Washington, and it is, in fact, the
only genealogy and Family History of national importance
in this country.

The Bible, is a History of the earliest races of Mankind ;
and a Record of the Jewish Lineage — Religion, the Science
of Immortality — Genealogy cognate with both, inasmuch
as it is a study embracing the present life, combined with
departed generations, giving results of vast import in the
fiiture, and may therefore be considered next only in im-
portance to Religion and Bible History.

The Songs with which the Northern Bards regaled the
Her(jes at their " Feasts of Shells " were but versified
chronicles of each Ancestral line, symphonied by their
stirring deeds.

Through the oak fire's uncertain flame, the Chieftain saw
descend the shadowy forms of his Fathers ; they came from
the Halls of Odin, as the harper swept the strings, and
deployed before their descendant, rejoicing in the sound of
their praise. No parchment told his Lineage to the Warrior
of those days, but the Heroic Names were branded each
night upon his swelling heart by the burning numbers of
the Bards.

Thus did the Northman chronicle his Ancestry in those
unlettered times. Afterward, when the oak fire was extin-_
guished, the shell thrown by, and the night came no more
with songs ; when we reach the age of Records we find this
i'lve of Lineage availing itsolf of the new meth ^d i.f com-



vi PREFACE.

memoration. This strong Ancestral spirit of the Northman
may traced, partly to the profound sentiment of perpetuitj-
which formed the principal and noblest element of his
character, and partly to the nature of the property to which
he was linked by immemorial customs of the race.

The Family History, or Record, of the Sovereigns of the
World before Christ, furnish almost the only Histories of
the Countries over which they reigned, as Egypt, Clialdea,
Babylonia, Greece, &c. The Chinese annals, the most
ancient known, were written with the most perfect exact-
ness, and preserved with the greatest care ; composed
originally by order of the Emperors — each of wlium on his
accession to the throne, commanded the acts of his predeces-
sors to be lorittcn by some learned philosopher — so that the
whole form one uniform continued series of the History of
the Ancient Chinese Empire, from the beginning of the mon-
archy (Fo Hi B. c. 2538), for some thousands of years.
And thiis was the history oi China obtained a.xi6. presenied more
correctly, a.ndi for a longer period t\\a.n that of any other nation
in the luorld. Had not the Hebrew race cherished this love
of Kindred and Lineage we should not have anj- Bible
to-day, and to this feeling we owe our knowledge of the
Historj- of the most ancient Kingdoms of the World and
most of our Modern History. The English Registers have,
for upwards of a thousand years, been the protection and
authority of many families ; and the means oi presen'ing large
property interests. A. W

AVe are indebted to Mr. Hexrv J. Johnson for the use of
several of the beautiful steel-plate illustrations from his
publication, entitled " The Life and Times of Washington."
Also to Messrs. G. P. Putnam's Sons for similar favors ;
and to John C. Buttre, Esq., Steel-plate engraver. Also
to J.AMKS Phillippe, Esq., of London, for the English
Pedigree.



DERIVATION

OF

"THORFIN, THE DANE,"

EARL OF THE ORKNEY ISLES,

FOUNDER OF THE WASHINGTON FAMILY IN ENGLAND,

CIRCA A. D. 1030-35,

FROM

ODIN,

FIRST KING OF SCANDINAVIA, B. C. ^0.



Page V. Odin, the son of Fridulf, supreme ruler of the
Scythians, in Asaland, or Asaheim, Turkestan, between
the Euxine and Caspian Seas, in Asia. He reigned at
Asgard. whence he removed in the year b. c. 70, and
became the first King of Scandinavia. He died in the
year b. c. 50, and was succeeded by his sons, who
reigned in different parts of Scandinavia. His son

Page vii. Skiold became King of Zealand and Jutland,
B. c. 50, and died b. c. 40. His son was :

Page viii. Fridleif, who became the first King of Den-
mark, B. c. 40. He died b. c. 23. His son was :

Page viii. Frode Fredigod, who became King of Den-
mark, B. c. 23. He died a. d. 35. His son was ;

Page viii. Frode H., who became King of Denmark, a. d.
59. He died a. d. 87. His son was :

Page viii. Vermund, the Sage, who became King of
Denmark, a. d. 87, and died a. d. 140. His son was :

Page viii. Olaf, the Mild, who became King of Den-
mark, A. d. 140. Obit a. d. 190. His

Page viii. Daughter, became Queen of Denmark, — and
" Dan Mvkillati, her husband, became King of
7



DERIVATION OF THORFIN.

Denmark, a. d. 190. lie died a. d. 270. His son

was :
Page ix. Frode III., who became King of Denmark, a. d.

270. He died a. d. 310. His son was :
Page ix. Halfdan, who became King of Denmark, a. d.

310. Obit A. D. 324. His son was :
Page ix. Frtdleif III., who became King of Denmark,

A. D. 324. He died a. d. 348 His son was :
Page ix. Frode IV., who became King of Denmark, a. d.

348. He died a. d. 407. His son was :
Page IX. Halfdan II., who became King of Denmark

a. d. 456. Obit A. D. 457. His son was :
Page ix. Roe, who became King of Denmark, a. d. 460,

He died a. d. 494. His son was :
Page X. Frode VI., who became King of Denm.irk, a. d,

494. He died a. d. 510. His son was :
Page X. Frode VII., who became King of Denmark, a. d

522. He died a. d. 548. His son was :
Page X. Halfdan III., who became King of Denmark

A. D. 548. He died a. d. 580. His son was :
Page xi. IvAR Vidfadme, who became King of Denmark

A. D. 588. Obit A. D. 647. His daughter.
Page xi. AuDA Diuphraudza. Queen of Holmgard, mar

ried Rerick, King of Holmgard. Her son was :
Page xi. Harald Hildetand, who became King of Den

mark, a. d. 647. Obit a. d. 735. His son was :
Page XV. Throud, King of Frondheim, who married a. d,

750, a daughter of Sigurd Hring. His son was :
Page XV. EiSTEN, King of Frondheim, born about a. d

755. Married a. d. 780. His son was :
Page XV. Halfdan, King of Frondheim, born about a. d

785. Married a. d. 810. His son was :
Page XV. EiSTEN Glumru, King of Thrandia, born about

A. D. 815, became King of Thrandia, a. d. 840. His
Page XV. Daughter married, a. d. 850, Ivar, Earl of
Upland. Their son was :



DERIVATION OF THORFIN.

Page XV. EisTEN Glumru. He was living a. d. 870. His
son was :

Page XV. RoGVALD, who was Earl of Moere, a. d. 885.
His son was :

Page XX. EiNAR, Earl of the Orkney Isles. His son was :

Page XX. ToRFiDUR, who was Earl of the Orkney Isles,
A. D. 942. His son was :

Page XX. LoDVER, who was Earl of the Orkney Isles.
His son was :

Page XX. Sigurd, who was Earl of the Orkney Isles.
His son was :

Page xxii. "Thorfin, the Dane," Earl of the Orkney
Isles, also called Torkill, of Richmondshire, England,
Baron, and Lord of Tanfield, Founder of the Wash-
ington Family of England.



DERIVATION



GEORGE WASHINGTON,



FIRST PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES,



"THORFIN, THE DANE."



Page I. " Thorfin, the Dane," Earl of the Orkney Isles,

also called Torkill, of Richmondshire, England, Baron

and Lord of Tanfield, Founder of the Washington

Family in England, was born about a. d. ioio, and

settled in Yorkshire, England, about 1030-35. Obit

about A. D. 1080. His son was :
Page 4. Bardolf fil Thorfin, born about a. d. 1035.

Obit about a. d. 1120. His son was :
Page 5. Akaris fil Bardolf, born about a. d. 1080.

Obit a. d. 1 161. His son was :
Page II. BoNDO fil Akaris, born about a. d. 1122. Obit

about A. D. 1200. His son was :
Page 14. Walter fil Bondo de Washington, born about

A. D. 1 160. Obit about a. d. 1245. His son was :
Page 17. Robert de Washington, born about a. d. 1195.

Obit about a. d. 1260. His son was :
Page 25. Robert de Washington, born about a. d. 1230.

Obit about a. d. 1300. His son was :
Page 31.. Robert Washington, born about a. d. 1265.

Obit about a. d. 1325. His son was :
Page 36. John Washington, born about a. d. 1305. He

died before a. d. 1386. His son was :



DERIVATION OF WASHINGTON.

Page 38. John Washington, born about a. d. 1330. He

died about a. d. 1405. His son was :
Page 41. John Washington, born about a. d. 1365. He

died about a. u. 1425. His son was :
Page 43. Robert Washington, born about a. d. 1400.

He died about a. d. 1479. ^'s son was :
Page 44. John Washington, born about a. d. 1430. He

died 4 May, a. d. 1501. His son was :
Page 47. Robert Washington, born a. jj. 1467. He died

20 September, a. d. 15 17. His son was :
Page 51. Thomas Washington, born a. d. 1493. He died

about A. D. 1560. His son was :
Page 65. Laurence Washington, born about a. d. 15 15.

He was living a. d. 1543. His son was :
Page 77. Laurence Washington, born about a. d. 1540.

He was living a. d. 1588. His son was :
Page 86. Laurence Washington, born a. d. 1569. He

was living a. d. 1629. His son was :
Page 96. Leonard Washington, born about a. d. 1595.

He died a. d. 1657. His son was :
Page 105. Colonel John Washington, born a. d. 1627.

He died in January, a. d. 1677. His son was :
Page III. Laurence Washington, born about a. d. 1661.

He died a. d. 1697. His son was :
Page 114. Augustine Washington, born a. d. 1694. He

died 12 April, a. D. 1743. His son was :
Page 126. GENERAL GEORGE WASHINGTON, first

President of the United States, born February 22, a. d.

1732, and died 14 December, a. d. 1799.



INTRODUCTION.



All the Ancient Records of England are written in abbreviated Latin,
and in writing varying in character from Hebrew, or Arabic to Greek, so
that very few can read or understand them properly.

An attempt was made some years ago to publish some of these Record-,
but the parties employed to trai.scribe them coidd not read the originals cor-
rectly and left out much of the most important information.

With respect to the " Domesday Book," it is simply a schedule of the
lands belonging to the King's Geld, and does not include any of the inde-
pendent freeholders of the period, and is therefore not of that importance,
ignorantly attributed to it. William the Conqueror, aIthoiig]i he confis-
cated some of the great fiefs of the Anglo-Saxon nobles, yet he did not
touch the lands belonging to any of the tenants holding feudally under
them. It embraces the whole of Yorkshire, with which is included part of
Lancashire and Westmoreland.

YORKSHIRE.
The County of York gave William tlie Conqueror more trouble than
any other of the shires. The eminent Cleneral Ilerreward le Wake, \vh
sisted the Norman invasion more successfully than even Harold, was a
tive of what was then the North Riding. The Eboricans, after the country
was subdued, allied themselves with the Angles, and were in constant re
volt. The original Anglo-Saxon families disgusted with Norman severities
letired into Scotland, and it is from the " Ragged Roll" that the investiga
tor can find trace of these families, after their removal. In view of this
there is good ground for tlie statement made by several writers, tliat ther<
was actually no Survey made in the County of York at llie period of thi



Conquest. The '• Ragged Roll," copied by Nesbit, was returned to Scotland
by Edward III.

The Saxons settled in the middle and southern portions of England,
and were of a different race, the city of York having been long before that
time especially a Danish city, and the chief city in all England.

The uncertainty hitherto existing in regard to the early progenitors of
the Washington Family in England, which has led to the numberless and
endless controversies among the English and American genealogists, will be
entirely removed and cleared up by this History, which is based upon and
compiled mainly from the " Common Pleas Rolls " of England.

These Rolls run over 2,000 skins of parchment for every year, and are
closely written on both sides in abbreviated Latin. They contain every-
thing relating to law, both civil and criminal, in all parts of England, with
the Coronors' Rolls, &c. They form an extensive and valuable historical
depository, and have been the means of clearing up and correcting a vast
amount of the early history of the country at the time of, and subsequenl In
the Norman Conquest.

This Washington Family History therefore being authentic, must be-
come important and valuable in England and America. The above Rolls
having been inaccessible because inscrutable, have never been used by other
Genealogists who have attempted to compile a " Washington Pedigree,"
and their disputes and controversies have been bitter and fruitless. General
Washington's ancestors for many generations before they emigrated to
America were agriculturists, and the reason that the names of the two
brothers, Laurence and John, wlio came in 1659, do not appear in the piih-
/isAeJ lists, was because they were not "siiisii/y iiiirn," but farmers of good
estate, and this accounts also for the fact that the Genealogists were unable
to trace the pedigree of the Washington Family in England, as it could not
be found in any of the Public Records, except the "Common Pleas Rolls,"
all of which may be plainly seen in tliis History of the Family.

Washington Irving states that the progenitor of the Washington Family
in England, from whom was derived George Washington, first President of
the United States, was William de Hertburn, of Durham, 11S3 who ex-
changed his village of Hertburn for the manor and village of Wessyngon,
in Durham, and changed his nanif with the estate to de Wessyngton, and
cites the " ISolden Book " to prove him the ancestor of the Washington Fam-



INTRODUCTION. 111.

;ly, which the said book fails to do, but only recites that de Hertburn made
■;he exchange. As Irving does not give account of the descendants of above
William, he fails to prove him the ancestor of the American Washingtons.

He mentions next a William de Wessyngton who was at the battle of
Lewes in 1264, inferentially son or grandson of said William de Hertburn.
which he was not, as he was son of Walter fil Bondo de Wessington of Rav-
ensworth, Yorkshire. He next mentions Sir Stephen de Wessyngton, of Dur.
ham, 1334, but does not state who he was. And next in 1350 a * William de
Wessyngton, manifestly also descended from above William de Hertburn—
as being lord of the manor of Wessyngton in Durham, and died 1367, whose
son William succeeded to the estate, and as he left no male heir., the name
and line died out, being merged into the Tempest (not Temple) family by
marriage of his daughter with Sir William Tempest, of Studley in York-
shire, who gave up the manor, and it passed to the family of Blackstone.
Thus it is seen by Irving's own showing that William de Hertburn cotiki
not have been the ancestor of the American W'ashingtons.

He next refers to a John de Wessyngton, Prior of the Benedictine Con-
vent in Durham, 141 5. He does not state who he -was, but that lie died in
1446. Having abandoned the de Hertbicrn founders, he next takes up for an-
cestor the Hon Laurence Washington, Mayor of Northampton, and states
that he was son of John Washington, of Warton, Co. Lancaster. The
above Laurence was son of John Washington, of Tuwhitfield, Co. Lancaster,
who was derived from Robert de Washington, of MiUeburn, Westmoreland,
but General W'ashington was not derived from said Laurence. He next
states that "John and Andrew Washington were great grandsons of above
Laurence, and emigrated to Virginia in 1657." The two brothers Laurence
and John, who emigrated in 1659, were sons of Leonard Washington, of
Warton, Co. Lancaster, who died at Warton in 1657. His father and grand-
father were named Laurence, born and died at Warton, Co. Lancaster.

Irving winds up the English pedigree thus : " We have entered with
some minuteness into this genealogical detail, tracing the family step by
step through the pages of historical documents, forupvvaids of six centuries."

• Above William, who died in 1367 was descended from William de Washington,
son of Walter fil Bondo, of Wessington, juxta Ravensworth, Yorkshire. As there were
several vUlageii in different parts of England named Wes,syngton, either might have served
for ancestors.



IV. INTROD CTION.

Those who will read the first chapter of his book may see the length of the

steps, and the genealogical detail.

I have taken Irving as a type of the class. Many others have made
similiar derivations. If any of these gentlemen had traced the lineage of the
Washington Family /rom William de Hertburn, down through the genera-
tions from father to son, they might have named him as the progenitor in
England, but as they have all failed in this, it is simply absurd to have
adopted him. Furthermore the family was founded in England nearly two-
centuries prior to the time of said William de Hertburn.

WASHINGTON.

Of all the noble families of EngLind, that of Washington i> the most
ancient and one of the most illustrious. Tracing back through the Royal
line of Denmark to that great hero King Odin, the Founder of Scandinavia.
B. C. 70, whose life and character were so great and glorious that his people
deified himself and family, and thus established a Scandinavian mythology
of equal magnitude and grandeur with that of ancient Greece and Egypt,
and of such minuteness in detail as to have confused some historians who
were unable to separate the real from the mythological history.

The remarkable resemblance of character between Odin and his de-
scendant Washington, separated by a period of eighteen centuries, is so
great as to excite the profound and devout astonishment of the genealogical
student — one the Founder of the most eminent race of Kings and Conquerors,
and the other of the Grand Republic uf America.

SC.VNDIN.WIA.

There is a nation, even now e.\tant, possessing a history as brave as that
of the Romans, as poetic as that of the Greeks — a nation that has con-
trolled the world's history in many things and at many times, and whose
achievements in war and in letters, are worthy the most heroic age of
Rome and the most finished period of Greece ; a nation whose philosophy
outran their age and anticipated results that have been slowly occurring
ever since. This reference can be true of but one people, the Norsemen,
the dwellers in Scandinavia, who lived as heroes, lords and conquerors ;
who, sailing out of the ice and desolation in which they were born and nur-
tured, conquered England, Scotland and Ireland, ravaged Brittany and



INTRODUCTION. v.

Normandy, discovered and colonized Iceland and Greenland, and crossed
the Atlantic in their crazy barks and discovered this very continent long
before Columbus; anchored in Vineland Sound, and left a monument behind,
them ; and wheresoever they went they were lords and rulers.

And then their religion — what a wild, massive, manly mythology !!
With nothing of the soft sentimentalities of more southern people, but con-
tinent of much that revelation has assured us to be true in doctrine — present-
ing ever the necessity of right and doing right — of manliness, honesty and
responsibility ; rewards and punishments.

All the ancient traditions of the North agree in describing the first in-
habitants of Scandinavia as men of colossal stature and incredible strength.
These giants (or trolls as they were called by the Eddas) were alleged to-
have been a remnant of the Canaanitish Anakim (descendants of Anek, de-
rived from Canaan, the son of Ham, the son of Noah), whom Caleb and.
Joshua, by Divine command, drove out of Palestine, and who ultimately
settled in ScanJia after fighting many battles with the Scythian emigrants,
from Asia.

1. ODTN.

The most important epoch in the historical antiquities of the North, ani
the most memorable from the extraordinary revolutions it accomplished, is.
the arrival of Odin, the Mars as well as the Mohammed of Scandinavia, the-
founder of those religious and political institutions which universally pre-
vailed there until the introduction of Christianity.*

The account of the historical Odin, as narrated by Snorre in the Yng-
lina Saga, states that he came from Asaland or Asaheim, a district east-



Online LibraryAlbert WellesThe pedigree and history of the Washington family : derived from Odin, the founder of Scandinavia, B.C. 70, involving a period of eighteen centuries, and including fifty-five generations, down to General George Washington, first president of the United States → online text (page 1 of 29)