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Alfred Edward Thomas Watson.

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promises to become the prime favourite among some true-hearted
sportsmen who love sport for its own sake and not from a desire to
kill, Mirthfulness and dignity seem to seek expression in every
movement of the quaint, old-fashioned little hound and in every
line of his face. As for his music — who would expect such a deep,
bell-like note from this queer midget, standing not much higher than
the second button of the huntsman's leggings ? ''

Those who desire to learn the ways and habits of the denizens
of field, wood, and stream could not find a more admirable guide
than Mr. Rees.

Peterkins. The Story of a Dog. Translated from the German of
Ossip Schubin by Mrs. John Lane. With numerous drawings
by CoUington Taylor. London : John Lane, The Bodley
Head. 1906.
Mrs. Lane has done well to introduce Peterkins to English
readers ; for, as she says, "We owe to his genial creator, Ossip Schu-
bin, a new and delightful friendship, even if it is only a little dog's."
The German author's reputation as a novelist is well known to many
English readers, and to more Americans, for her books are widely
popular across the Atlantic. This history is a new departure for
her, but it is written with an affectionate regard for the subject
which cannot fail to be shared by her readers. Poor little Peter-
kins had very varied experiences — slight as is Mrs. Taylor's sketch
of him at the beginning of the book, one can realise that he is
** wondering why no one loves him," as he is said to be. Soon,
however, someone does, a dear little girl called Betty, whose com-
panionship he mightily enjoyed. He has other friends, too, to-
gether with some unappreciative enemies whom the reader will
hate, and it is by means of one of these that he falls into the posses-
sion of a travelling acrobat who wants a performing dog. With
this man and his associates he has a cruel time till he runs away.
How he finds his beloved Betty and saves her life is set forth in
quite an exciting chapter ; and then, of course, he is made the pet
of the castle where Betty lives, and has the best of good times ever
after. Peterkins is entirely delightful.



A Shooting Catechism. By Col. R. F. Meysey-Thompson. 1

London : Edward Arnold. 1905. I
Is there " a vacant place in sporting literature " ? We are not by

any means sure, but Col. Meysey-Thompson thinks that there is, ^



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222 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE

and that he may have filled it. In lately noticing his "Fishing
Catechism " we expressed a certain amount of wonder why he had
chosen the form of question and answer. Izaak Walton did it, but
then he was — Izaak Walton. When lesser men attempt the same
thing the result is different. There is almost necessarily a lack of
ease and flow, of literary style ; and then again, while many pertinent
queries are omitted, some of the replies leave lingering doubt.
" What is the most comfortable costume for the moors or for
partridge-shooting ? " the author makes his unknown interrogator
inquire. " Of what kind of leather should the garters be ? " " Are
boots or shoes the most comfortable ? " Well ! these are all little
matters which men decide for themselves. Some like knickerbockers ;
others abhor them, and always wear breeches. " Is there any
particular kind of overcoat that is better than another ? " Here
again who can lay down a general law? Similarly the novice is
supposed to seek information about shooting seats, cartridge bags,
etc. Col. Meysey-Thompson speaks from experience ; but his ways
may not always be the best.

In one thing we cordially agree with the author. If a man be
asked to shoot he should accept or refuse at the earliest possible
moment. To delay is unfair to the host, who cannot arrange his
party, and may destroy a pleasant week for somebody else who would
be asked if the guest first invited said that he could not go. The
writer's style is not all that it might be, and sometimes he is
puzzling. " Are the different hawks very prejudicial ? " he makes
his novice ask, and we really do not understand what he means ?
At times the author abandons his catechism and writes straight-
forwardly, the consequence being no little relief to the reader. Col.
Meysey-Thompson, however, is a sportsman of wide experience, and
what he has to say is always worth consideration.

The Why and Wherefore of Bridge. By G. T. Atchison and
A. J. G. Lindsell. London: Longmans, Green & Co. 1906.

The authors think it safe to assert that " never in the annals of
card-playing has any game attained such a speedy and widespread
popularity as Bridge," and they are probably correct, even if the
game be not quite of the overwhelming importance they imagine. The
literature of Bridge is certainly something stupendous, and a good
excuse is necessary for adding a volume to it ; but this the authors
have. Most writers, they point out, have their own pet theories, and
naturally wish to enforce them on their readers. Messrs. Atchison and
Lindsell have endeavoured to collate these dicta, and while indicat-
ing their own preferences— not to do so is well-nigh impossible — to



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BOOKS ON SPORT 223

state fairly the case for other views, leaving the final decision to the
reader.

Their interpretation of the unwritten laws of the game is some-
what severe. ** To declare or to pass at first sight is a distinct
intimation to your partner that your hand is either obviously strong
or weak ; while to hesitate and show perplexity is tantamount to
telHng your partner that you hold cards upon which you are nearly,
but not quite, strong enough to declare." You must therefore be
neither too abrupt nor too tardy ; but that is a counsel of perfec-
tion, for some men are impulsive, others constitutionally slow and
undecided. **Above all. Do not hesitate about doubling,'' is their
charge, printed in italics. ** Unless you finally do so it is grossly
unfair to give the slightest indication of such an intention." Certain
players will always be grossly unfair, it is to be apprehended, though
without meaning it, for the reason stated : they are slow in making
up their minds. On one point, however, we are glad to see a
criticism, and that is condemnation of the exasperating habit some
people have of playing a winning card **with a bang by way of
emphasising its calibre." For the rest, it must suffice to say that
the writers carry out the scheme they have laid down for themselves
with lucidity, and Bridge-players will find much to interest them.

Beauty of Figure : How to Acquire and Retain it by Means of
Easy and Practical Home Exercises. By Deborah Primrose.
Illustrated. London : William Heinemann. igo6.

These are the days of physical culture, and Miss Primrose's
contribution is entirely to the purpose. Her little preliminary essay
goes back to before the Stone Age, she touches on Egypt 7,000 years
ago, and glances at classic Greece, but speedily becomes practical,
and in no fewer than seventy-two figures — photographs of girls and
children — shows how her ideal may be reached, or at any rate
approached. There can be no doubt that a careful observance and
practice of Miss Primrose's rules will vastly benefit the health and
general well-being of those who follow her instructions.

My System : Fifteen Minutes' Work a Day for Health's Sake. By
J. P. Miiller. With forty-four illustrations from photographs.
London : The Anglo-Danish Publishing Company.

This is a book on the lines of the foregoing, the translation
being made from the fifth edition, the thirtieth thousand, of the
Danish original. Of the cheap edition 21,200 copies are printed,

figures which show beyond question the popularity and value of the

work.

NO. cxxvii. VOL xxii.^ February 1906 Q



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BADMINTON NOTA BENE

In sending: a youth to college the great question, of course, is,
To what will it lead ? In the case of the Kensington College, the
London Chamber of Commerce Examination Centre, it leads to an
appointment as soon as the student is qualified. The institution
was established in 1887 for the sons and daughters of gentlemen,
they are trained for various secretarial duties, one or two foreign
languages being specially recommended as part of the guaranteed
appointment course, and taught on a system devised by the
Principal. The College is situated at 143 and 145, Queen's Road,

Bayswater, where all particulars may be learned from the Secretary.

* * * * *

A really good hunting scene is one of the rarest of pictures.
Why it should be so it is difficult to say, for incidents of all kinds in
connection with the chase seem to lend themselves to illustration.
Few artists, however, can draw horses at all, fewer still can effec-
tively portray them in action, and there are some painters who can
do justice to the horse, but appear unable to put the man or woman
correctly on the creature's back. Among the few who do succeed
Mr. George Wright stands high, and we are indebted to Messrs.
E. W. Savory, Ltd., of Bristol, for permission to publish the spirited
drawing which does duty this month on the cover of the magazine.
Messrs. Savory have in their collection so many admirable pictures
that it was a difficult task to choose; but *' The Draw" is a good speci-
men of Mr. George Wright's excellent work.

♦ * * * ♦

The extraordmary interest taken in the collecting of stamps is
shown by the issue of the sixth edition of the ** Universal Standard
Catalogue of Postage Stamps,'* compiled by Messrs. Whitfield, King
and Co., of Ipswich. This is now quite a thick volume, and is
rendered of particular value by the 3,000 illustrations of stamps,
printed by special permission of the Board of Inlnnd Revenue. The
total number of stamps issued to date, as included in the catalogue,
it is interesting to note, is 19,778, of which 6,059 ^^e apportioned to
the British Empire, and only a little more than twice as many,
13,719, to the rest of the world.

The Editor is much gratified to announce that in the
March number of The BADMINTON MAGAZINE
there will appear a story by

Mr. LAWRENCE MOTT.
whose wonderfully vivid study of wild life in the far north
of Canada, given in his novel

J\iles of the Gree^t Heart*
has secured such brilliant and deserved success on both
sides of the Atlantic. The story is entitled

THE LIGHT OF A MATCH.



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A PRIZE COMPETITION

The Proprietors of the Badminton Magazine offer a prize or prizes
to the value of Ten Guineas each month for the best original photo-
graph or photographs sent in representing any sporting subject.
Competitors may also send any photographs they have by them on
two conditions : that they have been taken by the sender, and that
they have never been previously published. A few lines explaining
when and where the photographs were taken should accompany
each subject. Residents in the country who have access to shooting-
parties, or who chance to be in the neighbourhood when hounds are
running, will doubtless find interesting subjects ; these will also ht
provided at football or cricket matches, and wherever golf, cycling,
fishing, skating, polo, or athletics are practised. Racing and steeple-
chasing, including Hunt Meetings and Point-to-point contests,
should also supply excellent material. Photographs of Public School
interest will be specially welcome. j

The size of the prints, the number of subjects sent, the date of ,

sending, the method of toning, printing, and mounting, are all
matters left entirely to the competitors.

The Proprietors are unable to return any rejected matter
except under special circumstances, and they reserve the right of (

using anything of interest that may be sent in, even if it should not
receive a prize. They also reserve to themselves the copyright in
all photographs which shall receive a prize, and it is understood that «

all photographs sent are offered on this condition. .

The result of the February competition will be annoimced in the
April issue. ]

THE DECEMBER COMPETITION j

The Prize in the December competition has been divided among j

the following competitors: — Mr. K. E. Maclean, Labuan, B.N.
Borneo; Mr. Arnold Keyzer, Capetown; Lt. -Col. Crawford McFall, |

Brownestown House, Kilkenny; Mr. Shirley Stewart, Toronto, ^

Canada: Mr C. B. H. Mansfield, Lieutenant 8th Cavalry, Indian j

Army, Nowshera; Mr. J. T. Spittle, Pembroke College, Cambrid^^e; |

Mr. Stanley SeA^ell, Hexham-on-Tyne ; Mr. Charles J. Hankin.son, |

Bournemouth ; Mr. R. W. Cole, The College of Agriculture,
Downton, Salisbury; and Mr. A. Abrahams, Emmanuel College,
Cambridge.



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226 THE HADMINTON MAGAZINE



HADLOW HARRIERS HUNTING ON A COLD SCENT

Photograph by Mr. IV. J. Abrey, Tonbridge



FINISH OF THE KERBAN RACE AT THE LABDAN NEW YEAR SPORTS, I905

Photograph by Mr. K. E. Maclean, Labuan, B.N. Borneo



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PRIZE COMPKTITION



227



H. N. SIMSON'S cades WINNING THE GRAND METROPOLITAN HANDICAP AT
KENILWORTH, SOUTH AFRICA

Photograph by Mr. Arnold Keyzer, Capetown



FERRETING AT KILFERA, KILKENNY

Photograph by Lt.-Col. Crawford McFall, Brownestown House, Kilkenny



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228 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



HURDLE RACK, CHELTENHAM

Photograph by Miss G. Murray, Holmains, Cheltenham



BOB-WHITE QUAIL FEEDING — ONE OF THE PRINCIPAL GAME BIRDS OF AMERICA

Photograph taken in Western Ontario hy Mr. Shirley Stewart, Toronto, Canada



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PRIZE COMPETITION



229



CHILDKBN BATHING, MUSKOKA LAKHS, CANADA

Phntnutath by Mr. Shirley Stewart, Toronto, Canada



READY TO GO

Photograph by Mr. F. H, Ilutton, Lincoln



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230



THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



SOWARS IN THE 8tH CAVALRY, INDIAN ARMY, TRICK RIDING

PJwtosraph by Mr. C. B. II. Mansfichi, Lieutenant Sth Cavalry, Indian Army, Sowshera



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PRIZE COMPETITION



231



NEWCASTLK EXCHANGK WALK TO H ALTWH ISTLE, 40J MILES

Photoiifath bv Mr H. F. Sen ell. Mount I'Uasunt, Hexhamon-Tyne



TWO KEEN SPORTSMEN ON TnE BANKS OF THE LYN, NORTH DEVON

Photograph by Mr. IT. 0. E. Muuie-King, Maidenhead



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232 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



freshmen's sports at CAVIhRID(iE— the mUNDKKO YARDS

Photograph by Mr. J. T. Sfittle, Pembroke College, Camhrif^e



LADIES CURLlN(i RINK, ST. MORllZ — AN hXClTING MOMENT

t'ht'to^raph by Mrs. Aubrey Le Blond, Taynton, Gloucester



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PRIZE COMPETITION



2.5.5



THE THORNYCROFT MOTOR-BOAT RACING AT COWES RKGATTA

Photograph by Miss Dean, Yarmouth, Isle of IVif^ht



MR. C. ROBTNS'S LRPANTO, WINNER OF THE GRAND NATIONAL STEEPLECHASK
AT KENILWORTH, SOUTH AFRICA

Photograph by Mr. Arnold Keyzer, Cape to un



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234 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



A FLYER — HEXHAM STEEPLECHASES

Photograph by Mr. Stanley Scwfll, Hexham-on-Tyme



A PRIZE LITTER

f'hotograph hy Mr. Charles J. Hankinson. Hournemouth



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PRIZE COMPETITION 235



PUNTING ON THE AVON UNDER DIFFICULTIES

Photograph by Mr. R. W. Cole, The College of Agriculture, Downton, Salisbury



BXTRACTING A JAMMED LIVE CARTRIDGE WITH AN AXE AT ONE OF THE PORTAGES
OF THE NIPIGON RIVER, CANADA

Photograph by Mr. A. R. MacGregor, Anerley



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236 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



NttWMARKET AND THURLOW FOXHOUNDS

Photograph by Mr. Thos. E. Grant, Leytonstone



A GARDEN STEEPLKCHASR

Photograph by Mr. A. Abrahams, Emmamul College, Cambridge



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GOING OUT FOR THB NATIONAL ON SAPPER



The Badminton Magazine

SPORTSMEN OF MARK
v.— MR. GWYN SAUNDERS-DAVIES

BY ALFRED E. T. WATSON

Of late years no one has done more to uphold the reputation of the
gentleman-rider, as representing each half of that compound word,
than Mr. Gwyn Saunders-Davies. To compliment a gentleman on
his integrity is practically an insult, and nothing need therefore be
said of the manner in which Mr. Saunders-Davies has conducted his
Turf lifie ; whilst as to his capacity in the saddle, it may be doubted
whether any horseman, amateur or professional, has ever equalled
his recoird of races ridden and won under National Hunt Rules. In
all, from 1882 when he began, till 1903 when he abandoned the
saddle, he had taken part in 1,068 events, and had carried off 332
of thenn ; but this is looking at the wrong end of Gwyn Davies's
career, and we must begin at the beginning.

Descended from an old Welsh family, the subject of this sketch
was born in 1865, and at the age of nine went to the well-known
school near Slough, kept by the father of Charles Hawtrey, the
popular comedian and best of good fellows. I am inclined to fancy
that it was rather out of doors than in the schoolroom that the
youthful Gwyn chiefly distinguished himself. Among his ambitions,
NO. cxxviii. VOL XXII. March 1906 ^



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2^8 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE

to be Senior Wrangler can never have been included, though he has
always had a head for figures. If he gained many prizes they are
not obtrusively conspicuous on the shelves of his bookcase at Myrtle
Grove, but two years after bis entrance he was captain of cricket.
In 1878 he went to Winchester, and played in the school eleven in
1881 and 1882, with such good men as J. W. Mansfield, Ruggles
Brise, A. R. Cobb, and G. W. Ricketts. ]

The Army was the career that Tiad been mapped out for him,
and as French was one of the subjects he had to take up, he was
put in charge of a tutor at Dinard, where, however, after being in
training for six months and starting for the event, he could not
quite draw the weight in the preliminary examination in that
language, and what he should do next became a question. It was
in this same year, 1882, that Gwyn Davies first rode between the
flags. The race was the Lawrenny Hunt Cup, at a meeting origi-
nated and supported entirely by Mr. Lort Phillips. This Lawrenny
Hunt Cup was the race of the day. Entries were made by invi-
tation ; that is to say, only those invited to enter could compete,
so that none but personal friends of Mr. Lort Phillips were among
the starters, and the horses were chiefly ridden by their owners. The
course was a very stiff one, a deep and formidable natural brook
being one of the obstacles, and into this two of the riders disap-
peared. One head presently emerged from the surface of the water,
and as its owner was crawling to land he heard a cry from behind
him of ** Halloa, Bertie !" Turning round, he saw the other victim
of a bad mistake scrambling ashore. ** Halloa, Marteine ! " he ex-
claimed, and they both roared with laughter, each at the ridiculous
plight of his half-drowned friend, than which nothing could have
looked more comic in the estimation of either.

Mr. Lort Phillips won his own race himself. His young friend
was making the running, and as they galloped along the cheery
host called out encouragingly, " Go it, Gwyn ! " It was merely
a friendly cheer, but Gwyn fancied it meant that he was not going
fast enough, put on more steam, and, going in fact too fast, rode his
horse down, finishing only a bad fourth. The first race he won was
at the Tivyside Hunt during the next season, three miles over
banks, on Colonel Howell's Jane Shore.

The Army idea was not given up, however, and in 1883 the
possible future field -marshal went to gain further instruction from
Mr. Faithful, a tutor at Storrington, who was deservedly in great
vogue; and by his assistance his pupil's preliminary was successfully
accomplished.

In January 1884 the Saunders-Davies family chanced to be
staying at Tenby during the race week, and Gwyn had a ride



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MR. GWYN SAUNDERS-DAVIES



R 2



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240 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE

or two. A redoubtable opponent in one race was that present ener-
getic member of the National Hunt Committee, Captain " Wenty "
Hope-Johnstone, who, however, had the bad luck to come down
heavily and break his collar-bone. He had a horse called Master
Ronald in a race next day, and to the great delight of Gwyn Davies,
who cordially appreciated the compliment from such a source, asked
him to ride it. He donned the black, cherry cap, as proud as a
couple of kings. Amongst other things a beginner has to learn in
race riding, however, is that if he chooses to come up on the inside
he must do so at his own risk. The young amateur made such an
attempt, not realising that Joe Rudd, who was in those days a famous
jockey, was not very likely to be obliging enough to pull out for him,
and the consequence was that Gwyn Davies found himself flying
over the wing of a fence, that "wing " being a full-grown and formid-
able Welsh bank. No particular damage was done, his pride as
aforesaid being chiefly injured, because he realised that he had
dorie a stupid thing; and be was equally surprised and
delighted therefore when Captain Hope-Johnstone, running up to
see if he was hurt, and finding that no damage Was done, with
characteristic kindness asked Gwyn if he would ride a mare
called Constance in the next race. How he jumped at the
chance need not be said. While the owner was giving him a leg up
he quietly observed : " Look here, you'd better jump every fence in
the middle; don't bother about the inside," and carrying out these
instructions, Constance was enabled to win in a canter. There was
a Consolation Stakes to wind up with, and just as Master Ronald
was being led off" home it occurred to Captain Hope-Johnstone that
he might as well have a go for this prize, as the horse was none the
worse for his tumble. Gwyn Davies rode him, and won easily; and
that afternoon practically decided his future. ' Praise from Captain
Hope-Johnstone was praise indeed, and he said such nice things to his
successful jockey that Gwyn Davies began to hesitate about joining
a service the duties of which would be likely to interfere with his
passion for the saddle — though twenty years ago leave, was much
more easily obtained by soldiers who wanted to go 'chasing than it
is in these stricter days, which goes far to account for the lack of
gentlemen-riders in the service.

It happened about this time that a friend of the family was a
lady whose son was making a lot of money in America, and Mrs.
Saunders- Davies saw no reason why her son should not go and do
likewise if he were not keen about a military career. The choice
was between America and a return to Storrington, and in June 1884
he sailed for South America, to discover that money might be lost
as well as made in that part of the world. Two years and a half



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MR. GWYN SAUNDERS-DAVIES 241

found him plus a great deil of experience, minus the capital with
which he had started ; so he returned home and sought occupation
in training and riding steeplechase horses, chiefly for one of his
brothers. Of the animals which he had to take care of, a mare called
Fairj- Queen, a grey daughter of Happy Land and Ethelreda, proved
about the best, and was more than useful in her own class. This
was not the highest, as owner and trainer discovered when after a
series of successes at small meetings she was occasionally produced
at Sando^vn or Kempton. She won little races at country meetings
with such ease that it struck them she must be capable of holding
her own in higher company, but at the Parks better animals ran
away from her. The mare won no fewer than forty-two races, in
forty-one of which her trainer rode her ; on the other occasion he



THB BIRTHPLACE OF MR. G SAUNDBRS-DAVIBS

missed his train, and a substitute had to be found at the last minute;
that is to say, the boy who " did " her at home was put up.

By this time Mr. Saunders-Davies's reputation had grown so
high that he was naturally ambitious of finding an extended scope
for his work, and in 1896 he left Wales to train privately for his
friend Mr. Reid Walker in Staffordshire. That engagement lasted
only a year, however, and he then started as a public trainer at
Clewe Hill near Cheltenham. Another friend. Sir Peter Walker,
was one of his supporters ; Missionary was among the animals sent,
and on this useful son of Timothy and Sahara Mr. Saunders-Davies
took several races, in one of them beating Hidden Mystery, who was
prominent among t e best steeplechase horses of modern times.
Missionary had only 2 lb. the best of the weights, and won by three



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242 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE

lengths. He was a desperately hard puller, and one day a friend of
Sir Peter's and of the trainer's, having remarked that he "could



Online LibraryAlfred Edward Thomas WatsonThe Badminton magazine of sports and pastimes → online text (page 18 of 52)