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Alfred Edward Thomas Watson.

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food may possibly be taken as the principal cause of their fete.
Perhaps another factor may be the comparatively recent intro-
duction of foxes into the country.

Being partially migratory, under certain conditions the wild
turkey moves down towards the coast and feeds by the. lower
reaches of the River Murray and its delta lakes, where it Is attracted
by the greener grass of the less dry climate.



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WILD TURKEYS IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA 335

It was on the shore of one of these lakes that I had my first
experience of Australian shooting. With its flat and open features
this district put me much in mind of a typical landscape in Argen-
tina, and oddly enough this peculiar comparison was further
intensified by a superficial resemblance between many of the birds ,-
the black-breasted plovers had a cry very similar to that of the
ubiquitous teru-terus of the River Plate; the bustards flew with a
slow beat of pinion like the crested screamers ; and the ducks plied
to and fro across the water in the mariner of the restless mobs that
fly between the shallow lagunas of the far-away pampas.

The morning of our first expedition, we started, early after



WOODS POINT, RIVER MURRAY



breakfast. The guns left the sheep-station in a small buggy and
proceeded slowly in the wake of two beaters, who were riding upon
horses, scouting a little way in advance. To a stranger it appears
curious that a couple of men should be sufficient to do what is
necessary to secure sport ; but I understand that their intimate
knowledge of the country and the flight of the birds renders them
nearly always successful in driving the turkeys over a required point.
With respect to this work, one man in particular — a long, rufous-
haired Colonial — possessed almost a genius, and locally it was said
that he could manage the bustards as easily as he could a flock
of sheep.



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336 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE

We travelled several miles before we came to the most frequented
ground, and then three birds were seen and marked down by the
two outriders. A halt was consequently called, and after some
discussion a definite understanding was finally arrived at and we
went our several ways. The first beat was not productive, but it
*2:ained one important object in driving the birds to a favoured head-
land which at this point projected into the lake. With renewed
care to avoid mistakes a second drive was arranged, and we again
took up our positions in the form of a wide semi-circle. We were
placed equidistant from one another in what is colloquially known
as a "hide.'' Some of these '* hides '' were natural, but others
had to be hurriedly erected by gathering together either lumps ot



WAITING FOR THE TURKBYS



grass or loose bunches of samphire, and building them up in the
shape of a low butt. Personally, upon this occasion I took my
place behind a dead and partially dislimbed she-oak, where, without
any shelter, I had to remain crouching for some time in the cold
bite of the wind. In the chill of that breeze there was ever)'
prospect of the long-wished-for rain, and indeed soon it sputtered
down upon us as cold as a moorland shower.

But I had not to wait very long, for soon the turkeys began to
rise from the plain-land in front. First one and then another
mounted into the air, until seventeen in all came flapping slowly m
the direction of the ambushed guns. Those who have been fortunate
enough to participate in a grouse, or even a partridge, drive, in a



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WILD TURKEYS IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA 337

sense can appreciate the glow of expectancy that accompanied the

approach of these huge birds. Beating up with a side wind, their

flight proved to be very erratic, and several broke away wide of the

guns along the shore of the lake. The first impression that they

were moving low, and not very swiftly, soon proved incorrect, for as

they came nearer it became evident that they were really -flyirtg"

higher than their custom, and at a considerable speed. As they

passed overhead, therefore, making an awkward lee-way with the

wind, it was not surprising that our shots had little effect upon them ;

and although we could distinctly hear the lead rattle against their

feathers, only one fell to the ground, while the others went on without

much apparent discomfort. The game was now so scattered over

the country that only one other drive could be organised, which

resulted in a single addition to our bag, but later another wounded

bird was picked up, making in all a total of three.

Although this ended our day's sport with the Australian Bustard,

several hours of light still remained, so it was decided to use them

along the lake-side in pursuit of duck, and despite their cunning we

succeeded in taking a few from the hundreds that were feeding upon

the water.

The flesh of the wild turkey is very excellent eating, and the
bird's reputation as a comestible is by no means undeserved*



AFTER DUCK



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BOOKS ON SPORT

School and Sport. By Tom Collins. London : Elliot Stock.

1906.

Mr. Collins — grandson and great-grandson of old members for
Warwick — was lately head master of Newport (Salop) School, and
we should imagine that the boys who found themselves in his charge
were lucky. A man's character may often be judged correctly from
his writing, especia^lly when it takes the form of an autobiography,
and readers cannot well fail to arrive at the conclusion that the
author is a good sportsman and a good fellow, the consequence being
that he has produced a remarkably cheery and interesting book.

Mr. Collins was beaten for an open scholarship at Trinity Hall
by the present Lord Justice Romer, afterwards, however, being suc-
cessful at Christ's, where he captained the cricket eleven. His work
began at King Edward's School, Birmingham, he having been elected
classical master at the age of twenty-two But it is rather the latter
half of his title, sport, that will appeal to readers, and indeed this
subject occupies the greater part of the volume, shooting and fishing
particularly, though he has something to say about other things,
including billiards, which used to be regarded as a discreditable
game, and was once forbidden at the University. Mr. Collins, how-
ever, played, and got into the final for the *' silver cue."

Before applying for his appointment the authtr visited Norway,
and had excellent sport there. He and his friends took out three
dogs who were fed exclusively on game, which it need scarcely be
said many dogs will not touch. *' Old Don, the bulldog pointer,
was not averse from grouse— even' when uncooked. He was a
wonderfully good dog in many wafys," the author says, but in one
respect, which he goes on to describe, he was a very bad dog? " 1
have seen him get into a lot of joung blackgame and point them
one after another steady as a rock while your eye was on him.
When he thought" you were not looking I have seen him dash in,
seize and bolt a young blackcock, feathers and all, almost before
you could wink your eye." By the way, you could not easily wink
anything else? ** When you came up tq him he would look as
innocent as a newborn babe." Surely a very bad dog indeed !

Incidentally Mr. Collins introduces a ^ittle disquisition on
Bridge, the drawback to which he considers is that you are so abso-
lutely in the hands of your partner. The writer is artful, for he
makes the statement that in his time at Birmingham, 1863, there
was no golf an excuse for telling some golf slories. One is of
the rector who was shocked to find his golf-playing curate using goH



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BOOKS ON SPORT 339

language. The incumbent suggested that whenever the culprit so
far forgot himself as to say a bad word he should put a pebble in his
p>ocket, and one day, after a long turn at the Hnks, he met the young
man with his coat bulging out on both sides. The rector shook his
head in reproof, and said it was '* very, very bad," to which the
ever-truthful curate replied that these were only the "dash its!'*
and ** hang its ! " *' There is a wagon-load of ' damns ! * coming up
the road," he confessed.

Mr. Collins does not seem to have missed many opportunities
of a day's shooting, and has naturally met with companions of vary-
ing degrees of skill. Once he asked a sporting parson how the
young son of a neighbouring baronet got on. His reverence re-
plied, ** Oh, only middling. The first day he was out he had ninety-
five shots and hit his father, his uncle, and one bird." The author
himself made a better average and a less mixed bag. He was out
one day when ** suddenly six partridges rose on the other side of a
gate and flew over two tall trees. I fired one shot just when they
were at the top, and to my astonishment, as I was waiting to get in
the second barrel, the whole six fell dead at the bottom of the tree.
You might have covered them with a tablecloth. I at first thought
I was responsible for the whole six, but afterwards found that
Christopher Burne had fired simultaneously with myself." In any
case it was an average of three a barrel.

For many years Mr. Collins had 1,000 acres of rough shooting
close to Newport. He had no keeper, yet in one year he killed
426 partridges, 90 wild pheasants, 40 hares, and about 70 rabbits.
Of course he Hkes to see dogs work — most people do; but as to
walking up and driving, he declares that he ** would rather kill three
brace of fast-flying driven birds than double the number by walking
them up." Years ago 6d. an acre used to be considered a fair price
for partridge-shooting; many readers will wish it were so now, but
the increase is no doubt natural. Mr. CoUins writes pleasantly,
though we are surprised to find a head master saying '* different to."

Poultry Farming : Some Facts and Some Conclusions.
By *' Home Counties." London : John Murray. 1906.

"It is difficult to think of any subject upon which more nonsense
has been talked and written than poultry keeping." So the author
begins by saying, and he goes on to discuss the question in all its
branches with evident knowledge and experience. No less a sum
than £7,000,000 per annum is paid for imported eggs, and another
- ttrillion for dead poultry. Cannot this be kept in the United
Kingdom for the profit of poultry farmers ? That is the point.



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340 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE

" Home Counties " does not appear to be particularly sanguine ot
great results. At present the patronage of poultry keeping by agri-
cultural societies' shows is largely bestowed in the wrong way, he
says, and most of the poultry shows have little relation to com-
mercial poultry keeping. It is far frqm being everybody's business.
What it all comes to is that under favourable conditions certain
people who possess special advantages may make poultry yield a
profit, but buckets of cold water are thrown on the uninstructed
enthusiast.

The American Sportsman's Library: Rowing and Track Ath-
letics. *' Rowing," by Samuel Crowther ; ** Track Athletics,"
by Arthur Ruhl. New York and London : Macmillan. 1905.

It is difficult to understand why interest in rowing and sculling
should have decreased so markedly of late years, but there can be
no doubt about the fact. The names of Chambers, Kelley, Reofortb,
and others used to be familiar to everybody, and a match between
Thames and Tyne created general excitement. Nowadays, how
many readers can name the champion sculler ? At the University
Boat-race season papers do contain accounts of the spins done by
the crews and criticisms of individuals, Henley is an attraction to
many, and local regattas draw their crowds. But interest in the
sport of boat-racing has waned, and though this book is well done
by a competent hand, we doubt whether it will appeal to a large
class, particularly as it of course deals for the most part with
Transatlantic exponents of rowing and athletics. The frontispiece,
indeed, is of a Diamond Sculls winner, E. H. Ten Eyck, who
carried off the trophy in 1897, but the circumstances were not
altogether agreeable. Ten Eyck, described as ** perhaps the fastest
amateur who has ever handled a scull," was the son of a profes-
sional, his amateur status was not admitted, and in 1898 his entr)'
was refused.

It might have been supposed that the introduction of the sliding
seat would have given a fresh impetus to rowing, though it can
hardly be said to have done so. On this subject the author has
some well-considered remarks. On fixed seats English and
Americans rowed in much the same way, the British only having
more swing. When the slide was introduced the forms diverged.
The American stroke had the slide for a basis, the English retained
the swing which the others steadily cut down. At Henley the
Americans have, as a rule, fared badly, but it is urged that their
crews have usually met Leander, which is undoubtedly strong.

As for athletics, how excellent many Americans are has been
demonstrated on both sides of the Atlantic.



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BOOKS ON SPORT 341

Fate's Intruder. By Frank Savile and Alfred E. T. Watson.

London : Heinemann. igo6.

This is a novel containing sporting incidents which cannot be
reviewed in these pages, seeing that authors are the editor of the
magazine and a frequent contributor. The bare mention of the
publication must suffice.

13ADMINTON Library : Billiards. New Edition. London : Long-
mans, Green & Co. 1906.

A new edition of the Badminton Billiards book has just been
issued, in accordance with the publishers' practice of keeping the
books as much as possible up to date; and it may be added that a
new edition of ** Motoring " is nearly ready, the latter subject
requiring constant attention, for the industry moves with speed.

A Farmer's Year. By H. Rider Haggard. London : Longmans,

Green & Co. 1906.

This is a re-issue of the famous novelist's labour of love, the
original of which we reviewed in due course. It appeals forcibly
to every dweller in the country, we can scarcely say whether more
so to the person who knows little of the march of the seasons, what
flowers, crops, etc., to look for, or to the practical agriculturist, who
will be interested to note how his own experiences agree with the
author's.

Who's Who. London : A. and C. Black. 1906.

What can be said of *' Who's Who " ? It would be useless to
repeat that it is indispensable, for of this everybody is aware. It
could scarcely be better done, and the new volume, we may add,
extends to 1,878 pages.

Who's Who Year Book. (Same Publishers.)

This is in a measure a convenient summary of ** Who's Who,"
but it is much more than that, and we cannot imagine the man who
lives in the world and does not constantly find it more than a
convenience.

The Writers' and Artists' Year Book, 1906.
(Same Publishers.)

This is — need it be said ? — a directory for writers, artists, and
photographers, and is of special value to the author or draughtsman
>vho has MS. or pictures to dispose of and is in doubt where they
-^vill have the best chance of acceptance.

HO. cxxviir. VOL. xxu.—March 1906 A A



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BADMINTON NOTA BENE

So far as we know this is absolutely a new idea — a sporting
tour through India by automobile. Mr. P. E. Narraway is respon-
sible for the notion, and has negotiated with the Officers' Employ-
ment Bureau, 133, Jermyn Street, London, S.W., to assist in
carrying out the scheme. The latter have made all arrangements,
which especially include tiger and big game shooting, pig-sticking,
etc. A powerful car has been built with every convenience, also
a second for servants and luggage. The route has been carefully
mapped out for nearly the whole of Southern India, all places of
interest being visited. A retired army officer who knows the ropes
is to be in charge. The tour will start from Poona, November ist,
and will extend from three to six months.

4t 4t ♦ ♦ ♦

To not a few ears the sound of a hunting horn is the pleasantest
of music, and though the local saddler may have such instruments
in stock, the chances are that they are not very satisfactory speci-
mens of the article. To Masters and huntsmen in search of a horn
the Stainer Manufacturing Company, of 92, St. Martin's Lane,
Charing Cross, may be recommended. They are not, indeed,
particularly specialists in these horns, all sorts of other instruments
being on sale, as also gramophones, from 50s. to whatever price the
purchaser chooses to give.

* * ♦ ♦ ♦

On other pages in this number is a description of how a man
with a taste for sport may lead a pleasurable existence in Canada
on an almost microscopic income. Should he prefer California he
can, with fair average luck, make an income on an Orange Orchard.
It is declared that no better start in life can be given to a young
man, and as for sport, at West Riverside, Los Angelos, there is
excellent shooting, fishing of the very best, besides polo, golf, and
lawn-tennis clubs. Full particulars of this fascinating country may
be obtained at the California Real Estate Agency and Inquir>'
Bureau, 21, Copthall Avenue, E.C.

*****

Whether myopia — short-sightedness — is curable has long been
a subject of argument. M. Dion, of the Ophthalmic Institute,
191, Rue de TUniversit^, Paris, asserts that there is no doubt. At
most one per cent, of cases treated by him are failures, and if the
cure be not complete, considerable improvement is guaranteed.
Numerous testimonials from the most authentic sources bear unmis-
takably testimony to the contention, and at present M. Dion may
be consulted at 94, Queen's Road, Bayswater.



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A PRIZE COMPETITION

The Proprietors of the Badminton Magazine offer a prize or prizes
to the value of Ten Guineas each month for the best original photo-
graph or photographs sent in representing any sporting subject.
Competitors may also send any photographs they have by them on
two conditions : that they have been taken by the sender, and that
they have never been previously published. A few lines explaining
when and where the photographs were taken should accompany
each subject. Residents in the country who have access to shooting-
parties, or who chance to be in the neighbourhood when hounds are
running, will doubtless find interesting subjects ; these will also be
provided at football or cricket matches, and wherever golf, cycling,
fishing, skating, polo, or athletics are practised. Racing and steeple-
chasing, including Hunt Meetings and Point-to-point contests,
should also supply excellent material. Photographs of Public School
interest will be specially welcome.

The size of the prints, the number of subjects sent, the date of
sending, the method of toning, printing, and mounting, are all
matters left entirely to the competitors.

The Proprietors are unable to return any rejected matter
except under special circumstances, and they reserve the right of
using anything of interest that may be sent in, even if it should not
receive a prize. They also reserve to themselves the copyright in
all photographs which shall receive a prize, and it is understood that
all photographs sent are offered on this condition.

The result of the March competition will be announced in the
May issue.

THE JANUARY COMPETITION
The Prize in the January competition has been divided among
the following competitors : — Mr. G. W. Whitmore, Apethorpe,
Wansford, Northamptonshire; Mr. F. H. Hutton, Lincoln; Major
G. F. Mockler, 43rd Light Infantry, Deolali, Bombay Presidency;
Mr. Philip Haswell, The School House, Dunstable; Mr. A. Abrahams,
Emmanuel College, Cambridge; Mr. J. P. Tyrrell, Maryborough,
Queen's County; Mr. Robert W. Hillcoat, H.M. Transport Plassy ;
Sergeant A. V. Cable, Royal Engineers, Gibraltar; Mr. G. Rom-
denne, Brussels; and Mrs. G. B. B. Commeline, Fyzabad, U.P.,
India.

A A 2



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344 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



WVNNSTAY HUNT POINT-TO-POINT — THB OPEN WATER JUMP IN THE FARMER' ' RACE

Photograph by Mr. G. W. Whitmore, Apethorpe, Wans/ord, Northamptont ire



A SOUTHERN FOUR-IN-HAND

Photograph by Mr. Geo. B. Kemp, Watertown, New York



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PRIZE COMPETITION 345



A THROW OUT FROM THE TOUCH LINK — CHELTENHAM COLLEGE V. BLACKHEATH
ON THE COLLEGE GROUND

Photograph by Mr. //. G. Swiney, Sand ford Lawn, Cheltenham



f



THE gUANTOCK STAGHOUNDS

Photograph by Mr. F, H. Hutton, Lincoln



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346 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



HUNTERS CROSSING A FERRY IN THE BEDALB COUNTRY

Photograph by Mrs. L. B. Morris, Thornton-in-Craven, Leeds



THE M.C.C. TEAM PRACTISING SLIP CATCHING ON THE " KINFAUNS CASTLE '

Photograph by Captain J. C. Har^.cy, Hastings



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PRIZE COMPETITION



347



H



TIGER-SHOOTING IN THB KHERI TKRAI, ODDH, U.P.

Photograph by Major G. F. Mockler, 43rd Light Infantry, Dcolali, Bombay Presidency



WATER LEAP-FRO'" IN THE DUNSTABLE SCHOOL BATHS

Photograph by Mr. Philip Hasivell, The School House, Dunstable



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348 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



off!
Photograph by Mr. A. Abrahams, Emmanuel College, Cambridge



TAME RED-DEER CALF AND BORZOI

Photograph by Miss M. Maclean, Ardgour, N.B.



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PRIZE COMPETITION 349



THE RACK FOR THE GRAND MILITARY, PUNCHKSTOWN, I905

Photograph by Mr, J. P. Tyrrell, Maryhorvufrh, Queen's Ccunty



A MANIPURI POLO PLAYER

Photograph by Major A. B. Harvey, 16th Rajputs, Manipur, Assam, India



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350 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



KILDARE HUNT POINT-TO-POINT, I905 — JUMPING THR WALL ON TO THE ROAD

Phctograph hy Mr. J. P. Tyrrell, Maryborough, Queen^s County



MEET OF THE CATTISTOCK HUNT

Photograph by Miss H. Pope, South Court, Dorchester



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PRIZE COMPETITION 351



B^NDY PLAYING AT ST. MORITZ

Photograph by Lady Joan Verney, Rutland Gardens, S, IV.



pillow fighting on a greasy pole over a sailcloth, h.m. transport
"plassy" sports

Photograph by Mr. Robert W. Hillcoat, H.M. Transport '*PIa5sy"



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352 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



A LADIES RACE AT ALMORIAMA, SPAIN

Photograph by Sergeant A. V Cable, Royal Engineers, Gibraltar



IMPALA SHOT NEAR NAIROBI



Shot and Photograph taken by Mr. R. P. Lewis, Lieutenant 1st King's
Afiican Ri^es, Nairobi, East Africa



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PRIZE COMPETITION 353



THE GUIDES PAPER HUNT

Photograph by Mr. G. Romdenne, Brussels



MEET OP H.M.S. "BRITANNIA" BEAGLES. DARTMOUTH, AT WADDETON COURT
MASTER, COMMANDER THE HON. HUBERT G. BRAND, R.N.

Photograph by Mr. Carslake Winter-Wood, Ken wick, Paignton, South Devon



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GONE ! ! !

Photograph }hy Mrs. G. B. B. Commeline, Fyzabad, C/.P„ India



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V



[



POLEBROOR, THB RESIDENCE OF CAPTAIN HOPE-JOHNSTONE



The Badminton Magazine

SPORTSMEN OF MARK
VI.— CAPTAIN WENTWORTH HOPE-JOHNSTONE

BY ALFRED E. T. WATSON

The seventies and eighties were perhaps the palmy days of the
soldier-jockey, and conspicuous among those who distinguished
themselves at that epoch was the subject of the present sketch.
Wentworth Hope-Johnstone comes of a sporting family. His father
and grandfather figured in the saddle before him, so that race-riding
was in the blood, and it is natural that the friends of the family
should have been sportsmen likewise. When a boy young Hope-
Johnstone used to stay for weeks at a time at Knockhill, Dumfries-
shire, with old Mr. Sharpe of Hoddon, one of the best-known men
in his generation ; and the place was a paradise to the lad, being
thronged with racehorses, mares and foals, greyhounds, piebald
sheep, fancy dogs and cats, curious birds, and endless objects of
interest. There he used to " do " a horse and ride work, studying

NO. czzix. VOL xniu- April 1906 B B



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356 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE

indeed the elements of the art of which he was to become a master.
It was at Knockhill that Christopher Sly was bred, a winner of
several races, including the Gold Vase at Ascot in 1871. Christopher
Sly was an example of the fact that no one knows how a yearling
will turn out. He was a shapeless and ungainly little creature, so
much so that he was run in an old orchard so as to be out of sight,
and there he had a habit of standing for hours together in the same
place, under the branches of an old tree, which got him the name
among the lads of '* Crabtree Jock." Mr. Sharpe had a mare called



Online LibraryAlfred Edward Thomas WatsonThe Badminton magazine of sports and pastimes → online text (page 26 of 52)