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Alfred Edward Thomas Watson.

The Badminton magazine of sports and pastimes online

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long for reproduction, but we commend them to the attention of
readers ; as also this fine description from Kinglake's *' Eothen " : —
" You see often enough a fisherman's humble boat far away from
all shores, with an ugly black sky above and an angry sea beneath ;
you watch the grisly old man at the helm carrying his craft with
strange skill through the turmoil of waters, and the boy, supple-
limbed, yet weather-worn already, and with steady eyes that look
through the blast ; you see him understanding commandments from
the jerk of his father's white eyebrow, now belaying and now letting
go, now scrunching himself down into mere ballast, or bailing out
death with a pipkin. Familiar enough is the sight, and yet when I
see it I always stare anew, and with a kind of Titanic exultation,
because that a poor boat with the brain of a man, and the hands
of a boy on board, can match herself so bravely against black heaven
and ocean."



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456 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE

Tlie boatmen — builders and sail-makers — of all countries have
their own peculiarities. No stronger, finer sea-boats are to be
found in the world, Mr. Smyth declares, than some of the Swedish
fishing craft. The open boats used in the cod and herring net
fisheries are, in their way, perhaps the most remarkable craft afloat.
Their characteristics are monstrous beam and great strength. For
a length of 17 ft. some of them have a beam of 13 ft., and yet,
owing to the beautiful curves, there is no sense of awkwardness
about them. Of these and well-nigh every vessel mentioned there
are pictures, indeed the book is copiously illustrated, and with ex-
cellent judgment. The author describes Holland as the land of the
B2i\ling-ho3it par excellence. It is the Mecca of the modern yachts-
man. Certainly no Western race is so amphibious as the Dutch,
it is said, and no land animal except the duck takes so readily to
navigation.

'* Where do the English come in ? " it may be asked, and Mr.
Smyth with complete impartiality gives us our due. He has a special
admiration for the Cornish lug-sail, ** probably as near perfection in
cut as any sail upon the seas; and while the sail-maker has acquired
the art of cutting, the fisherman is no less successful in the art of
setting. . • . The clean-lined Cornish boat is a yacht not only in
appearance but in speed, and especially in the highest test to which
men or vessels can be put, beating to windward in a sea way. . . .
The most inspiriting thing that any man may see, or still more take
part in, is the beat out of the Newlyn fleet in half a gale of wind
from the eastward ; a hundred or more racing for the fishing-ground,
like a flock of hardy, brown-winged sea-birds.''

On the subject of foreign boats, Mr. Smyth does not quite
agree with writers who have credited the Malays with building craft
the lines of which are unsurpassed by European types, but their
boats are admirably suited for their coasts. He disagrees also with
the criticisms which are commonly passed on Chinese junks. As an
engine for carrying man and his commerce upon the high and
stormy seas the writer asserts that it is doubtful whether any class
of vessel could be more thoroughly adapted to its purpose. The
student of ships and shipping could have no better guide than the
author of this remarkable book.

Practical Rifle Shooting. By Walter Winans. G. P. Put-
nam's Sons. New York and London. 1906.

That the Vice-President of the National Rifle Association of
Great Britain is a master of his art is a matter of common know-
ledge, and he says what he has to say about it in effective fashion.
At the present time, when Rifle Clubs are springing up in all direc-



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BOOKS ON SPORT 457

tions, and adding continually to their membership, the appearance

of this little book is most opportune, and the task of compiling it

could not have been undertaken by abler hands. Mr. Winans writes

of target and of game shooting, to instruct the novice who aspires to

be an all-round shot, for to be good at one is far from necessarily to

be good at the other. On the contrary, indeed, Mr. Winans lays it

down that ** the better a man learns to shoot in slow shooting at a

fixed target, in the prone or back position, or even when kneeling, the

worse shot he will become for shooting at moving targets, or for quick

shooting and for shooting in the standing position and vice versa"

We should have thought this too sweeping, but one differs from the

author with well-founded hesitation. Not to overdo deliberate

shooting is a point on which he is emphatic, but surely there are

men who adapt themselves to circumstances and situations? We

have known not a few of them indeed.

In the matter of sport we cordially approve Mr. Winans's
humanity. " It should be a rule,** he writes, ** never to go on till
you have accounted for what you have shot at, in dead, or gone away
clean missed. A wounded animal ought always to be followed up and
killed if possible. Unfortunately it is only too common to hear men
say, * Let's get on ! There's no use in looking any longer ! ' when
the finding of a wounded animal or bird proves at all troublesome."
Jt is worse than a pity so to give up if there be evidence that any-
thing has been hit ; but it occasionally happens that a man who has
missed will believe, or sometimes we fear affect to believe, that he
has hit something which he has never touched, and which is safely
ensconced in the next parish. We like this little anecdote of a roe :
** Last year, at a big wild-boar drive in the Ardennes, I was next to
a man who has shot many boar and deer. A fine roe buck passed
slowly close to him and he did not even take up his gun, although
he had a pair, in the usual way, lying cocked on his * rest.' When
that beat was over I asked him why he did not shoot. He said that
the little buck came along skipping, and as the wind blew the dead
leaves about on the snow he played about and hit at them with his
fore- feet like a kitten, until he could not find it in his heart to kill
the little animal."

Xhe Game of Ju-Jitsu. By Taro Miyake and Yukio Tani.
Edited by L. F. Goblin and M. A. Grainger. Illustrated.
Published for the Japanese School, 305, Oxford Street, by
Hazell, Watson & Viney. 1906.

Ju-jitsu has of late been much discussed, and those who are
seeking information about it will find what they want skilfully — and
often naivery — set forth in this book. The **game," as the authors



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458 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE

call it, is recommended from every point of view. It is a practical
means of self-defence which may always prove of value, since it
enables the weak to overcome the uninstructed strong, and it is of
peculiar service in keeping its exponents fit. ** Nature does not
demand that a man should be a mass of fat and atrophied muscle
at fifty," the authors state, and to avoid such a distressing condition
of affairs the practice of ju-jitsu is held to be the best of all possible
ways.

The ** player " exerts himself, of course, but at the same time
it is, or should be, the great object to overcome his antagonist by
knack : to employ the full strength is bad ju-jitsu. A certain
amount of activity is essential, as will be understood when it is
observed that one of the first lessons is how to fall. The authors
admit that some people have what they consider a "strange dis-
like " to falling down. It is based on the notion that when they
fall they are apt to hurt themselves, and that idea is, some
readers will be inclined to imagine, not without justification, based
on experience. This, however, is only because they do not know
how to fall properly; when they have learnt, our instructors maintain
that the knowledge will " make falling as easy and as comfortable
as sitting on a chair." The authors are evidently masters of their
subject, and express themselves so clearly that by means of this
book, and of course with the aid of a companion, a great deal may
be learnt, though it is no doubt advisable to seek instruction from
the expert himself when possible.

Roberts' Billiards for Everybody. (Issued from Roberts'
Billiard Academy.)

This book was written by **The Author," no more definite
name being given. It may be assumed, however, that Roberts read
and approved, and the little volume therefore has a certain value.
It is rather ** made up," one chapter being the reprint of a sketch
by the late Mr. James Payn contributed to Household Words in 1859,
and though characteristic of the entertaining novelist's work, not
what one looks for in a volume of instructions. The chapter and
photograph of the ** Ladies at Billiards " might also have been
omitted ; but the diagrams are useful ; players bad and mediocre
may learn much from some of the pages, and those who are interested
in little facts concerning the game will find a summary, such as
that Peall made the record spot- in break of 3,304, starting on
November 6, 1890. He scored at the rate of 100 in five minutes,
and for over two days his unfortunate opponent never had a stroke.
His longest run of spots was 584.



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BOOKS ON SPORT 459

Motor Car Mechanism and Management. By W. Poynter Adams.

In three parts. Part I.: The Petrol Car. Illustrated.

London : Charles Griffin and Co. 1906.
Few things are more surprising at the present day than the
development of mechanical knowledge amongst a class of men who
a very few years ago were superlatively ignorant of the subject. This
is, of course, one of the results of the introduction of motor cars.
People naturally like to know something of the machines they drive.
A little acquaintance with them creates a desire for more, and so not
a few owners who take charge of their own motors are really
experts. The writer well remembers sitting in a car which was
about to start for a speed competition. The professional chauffeur
and another professional attached to the stable had been endeavour-
ing for a quarter of an hour to put right something that had gone
wrong, their endeavours being unsuccessful, whereupon the owner
of the car took the matter in his own hands, and in five minutes the
machinery was in perfect order. The owner in question was,
however, the present Lord Montagu of Beaulieu, and he is, needless
to say, an absolute master of the business ; but numberless other
men follow in his footsteps at a more or less respectful distance.

It is by means of such books as this that the requisite know-
ledge is acquired. The contents of the volume are derived from a
series of lectures which the author delivered at the Academy of
Motoring, 85, New Bond Street, and these practical addresses well
deserve reproduction in book form. The matter is clearly and
succinctly treated, with illustrative diagrams when necessary. This
particular volume, it will be perceived, deals with "The Petrol Car."
It is to be followed by others on " The Electrical Car '* and ** The
Steam Car."

The Complete Bridge Player. By " Cut Cavendish."
London : T. Warner Lawrie. 1906.

We have already noticed this work. On its first appearance we
had the pleasure of warmly commending it, and that the commenda-
tion was justified seems to be sufficiently proved by the fact that a
second edition of it was in requisition only a week after the publica-
tion of the first, in March last year. This is a third issue dated
February, 1906; and when one considers the multitude of Bridge
books which are coming from all directions, no further praise of
one which thus holds its own can be needed. A feature of the
new edition is the chapter on ** Misery Bridge," a variety of the
game which is steadily making its way. The author thinks that it
has only to become still better known to attract multitudes of.'
players.

NO. cxxix. VOL. XXII. — April 1906 I I



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"HUNTING IN LONDON."



It is proposed to start in the next — the May — number of the
Badminton Magazine

A NEW COMPETITION

entitled

''HUNTING IN LONDON."

Thousands of people every day pass unconsciously by objects
of interest without ever seeing them. Some years ago a book was
published under the title of ** Eyes and No Eyes " ; and that is
the notion we are adopting.

TWO PHOTOGRAPHS WILL BE PUBLISHED EVERY MONTH
REPRESENTING SOME CONSPICUOUS VIEW OR OBJECT
WITHIN FOUR MILES OF CHARING CROSS,

and competitors are invited to hunt for the subjects of the pictures,
to say what and where they are, and, tearing out the page con-
taining the views, to send them to 8, HENRIETTA STREET,
with the description beneath.

We probably shall not choose ** The Cross of St. Paul's," but
if we did, those words written under the photograph would be all
that is necessary.

To the successful competitor at the end of six months— when,
that is to say, he has hunted twelve scenes without a failure—

A PRIZE OF TEN GUINEAS

will be awarded, with a further prize of

FIVE GUINEAS FOR THE SECOND,

and
TWO GUINEAS FOR THE THIRD.

Jn the event of several competitors hunting without a slip the prizes

will be divided.

We shall make it a point to select fairly prominent "bits"
which multitudes of these who walk, ride, or drive about London
must continually see.

We may add that this will in no way interfere with the Photo-
graphic Competition, the popularity of which is proved by the well-
nigh daily receipt of photographs from all parts of the habitable
globe ; a phrase which perhaps sounds magniloquent, but is a
simple statement of fact.



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A PRIZE COMPETITION

The Proprietors of the Badminton Magazine offer a prize or prizes
to the value of Ten Guineas each month for the best original photo-
graph or photographs sent in representing any sporting subject.
Competitors may also send any photographs they have by them on
two conditions : that they have been taken by the sender, and that
they have never been previously published. A few lines explaining
when and where the photographs were taken should accompany
each subject. Residents in the country who have access to shooting-
parties, or who chance to be in the neighbourhood when hounds are
running, will doubtless find interesting subjects ; these will also be
provided at football or cricket matches, and wherever golf, cycling,
fishing, skating, polo, or athletics are practised. Racing and steeple-
chasing, including Hunt Meetings and Point-to-point contests,
should also supply excellent material. Photographs of Public School
interest will be specially welcome.

The size of the prints, the number of subjects sent, the date of
sending, the method of toning, printing, and mounting, are all
matters left entirely to the competitors.

The Proprietors are unable to return any rejected matter
except under special circumstances, and they reserve the right of
using anything of interest that may be sent in, even if it should not
receive a prize. They also reserve to themselves the copyright in
all photographs which shall receive a prize, and it is understood that
all photographs sent are offered on this condition.

The result of the April competition will be announced in the
June issue.

THE FEBRUARY COMPETITION

The Prize in the February competition has been divided among
the following competitors : — Mr. G. Romdenne, Brussels; Mr. F. H.
Hutton, Lincoln; Mr. A. Abrahams, Emmanuel College, Cambridge
(two guineas) ; Mr. G. Hailing, Broomland House, Cheltenham ;
Mr. G. A. Park Ross, M.B., Addiscombe Grove, Croydon; Mr.
E. H. H. D'Aeth, Folkestone; Mrs. Hughes, Dalchoolin, Craigavad,
Co. Down; Miss A. Dalton, St. Moritz; and Mr. F. Cecil Cobb,
Margate.

II 2



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462 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



A GOOD JUMP

Photograph by Mr. G. Romdenne, Brussels



THE QUANTOCK STAGHOUNDS

Photograph by Mr, F. H. Hutton, Lincoln



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PRIZE COMPETITION ^63



THE 1906 CAMBRIDGBflUNIVBRSITY BIGHT

An interesting feature of the photograph is that the positions are reversed throughout,
the boat stroke setting the time from bow side

Photograph by Mr. A. Abrahams, Emmanuel College, Cambridge



RUGBY FOOTBALL — CHELTENHAM COLLEGE V. CHELTENHAM TOWN
ON THE COLLEGE GROUND

Photograph by Mr. G. Hailing, Broomland House, Cheltenham



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464 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



BELGIAN officers' SPORTS

Photograph by Miss Lizzie Gully, Brussels



BOLSTER FIGHT ON WHITE STAR LINER " TEUTONIC," JULY 4, I905

Photograph by Mr. J. R. Barber, Westbourne Terrace, Hyde Park.



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PRIZE COMPETITION 465



•A GIBSON GIRL — SNOW MODEL COMPKTITION AT VILLARS, SWITZERLAND

Photograph by Mr. J. C. Barrett, Southport



THE ETON AND HARROW MATCH, I905 — FROM THE TOP OF THE PAVILION AT
lord's AFTER HARROW'S SECOND INNINGS

Photograph by Mr. J. J. Astor, Carlton House Terrace, SAV.



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466 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



THB PARADE FOR THE NATIONAL HUNT CUP. PUNCHRSTOWN

Photograph by Mrs, Hughes, Dakhoolin, Craigavad, Co, Down



A PONTOON FERRY ON THB MAZOE RIVER, MASHON ALAND, IMPROVISED FROM
WATER-DRUMS AND THB CAMP BATH

Photograph by Mr. G. A. Park Ross, M.B„ Addiscombe Grove, Croydon



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PRIZE COMPETITION 467



A CHECK — BAST KENT FOXHOUNDS

Photograph by Mr. E. H. H. D'Aeth, Folkestone



IBEX SHOT IN BALTISTAN

Photograph by Captain R. Tyndall, Ut Durham Light Infantry, Lucknow



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468 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



THE CAMBRIDGE EIGHT, 1906

Photograph by Mr. A. Abrahams, Emmanuel College, Cambridge



INTERNATIONAL TROTTING AT LE VAR — ROYAL NORMAN D BEATS TRICOLORB
IN THE PRIX MONTE CARLO

Photograph by Mr. P. T. Oyler, Monte Carlo



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PRIZE COMPETITION 469



SOUTH DEVON FOXHOUNDS AT CADEWELL NEAR TORQUAY, THE RESIDENCE OF
MR. J. C. CHAPMAN — MR. WASHINGTON SINGER. MASTER

Photograph by Mr. Carslahe Winter-Wood, Kenwick, Paignton, South Devon



SCOTCH TERRIER AND PUPPIES AT ABBOTTABAD, INDIA

Photograph by Major Lathbury, R.E.



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470 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



FIGURE SKATING, MONTANA LAKE

Photograph by Mr. J. A. French, St. Ann's, Donnybrook, Dublin



UNCARTING THE DEER WITH THE CO. DOWN STAGHOUNDS

Photograph by Mrs. Hughes, Dalchoolin, Craigavad, Co, Down



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PRIZE COMPETITION 471



; INTERNATIONAL HOCKEY TRIAL MATCH AT CHELTENHAM — WESTERN
COUNTIES V. SOUTHERN COUNTIES

Photograph by Mr. H. G. Swiney, Sand/or d Lawn, Cheltenham



A SMALL PHAETON DRAWN BY BLACK BUCK

This pair can trot eight miles an hour, and were trained by an old native In the
Alwar State, Rajputana

Photograph by Mrs. G. G. B. Commeline, Fyzabad, India



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472 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



THE RACE FOR THE ASHBOURNE CUP ON THE CRESTA RUN. ST. MORITZ.
FEBRUARY I7, I906

Photograph by Miss A. Dalton, St. Moritz



JUMPING ON THE SANDS

Photograph by Mr, F. Cecil Cobb, Margate



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ROYAL FLUSH
{From the painting by Wright Barker)



The Badminton Magazine

SPORTSMEN OP^ MARK
VII.— MR. W. F. LEE, J. P.

BY ALFRED E. T. WATSON

More than a century since, in the year 1801 to be strictly accurate,
the Edinburgh Cup, a much-coveted trophy, was won by Mr. William
Lee, of Grove Hall, Knottingley, Yorkshire. Just a hundred years
later the same race fell to his grandson, Mr. W. F. Lee, the present
master of Grove Hall, who will be best known to many readers as
one of the trio of handicappers. Mr. Lee's sporting performances
have been mainly confined to the North of England, so much so
that not a few people are unaware of the manner in which he
qualified for the important position he holds. Amateur handicap-
ping is all very well in its way ; on rare occasions it may be near the
mark, sometimes may even hit it ; but if anyone has horses of his
own, and especially if he rides them himself, it is remarkable what a
quantity of knowledge he picks up, how forcibly he begins to realise
what weight his animals should carry — this, of course, including an
appreciation of the weights that should be carried by the others.
NO. cxxx. VOL. nxu.—Afay 1906 K K



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474 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE

A man must be in the thick of it to understand thoroughly. He
has, we will say, only just 3 lb. too much, hopes for the best, but
the finish comes, the 3 lb. tells, and instead of winning a head he
is just beaten by that exasperating margin.

"Grove" Hall, which stands near to the historical town of
Pontefract, round which so many interesting and exciting associa-
tions cling, is supposed to be a corruption of "Greave" Hall,
and parts of the building are said to be over a thousand years old.
The '* Greave ** was a state, or perhaps it should rather be said a
county, functionary, whose mission was to defend his frontier from
attack — in this case from the incursions of the Picts and Scots ; and
the present owner's father, wishing to perpetuate the ancient name,
at one time proposed to revert to the original nomenclature and
called the place ** Greave,'* but his death put a melancholy end to the
project, and as ** Grove '* the place still stands. Mr. Fred Lee, as the
master of the estate is generally called, throws back to the winner
of the old Edinburgh Cup. The taste for racing seems to have
skipped a generation, the late proprietor of Grove not caring for the
Turf — disliking it, in fact, possibly because the sporting tastes of his
predecessors had made a serious hole in the revenues; but Mr. W. F.
Lee is an all-round sportsman, on horseback and on foot alike.
Devoted to his county, religiously entertaining the idea that
Yorkshire is at the head of the handicap, his sport was to a great
extent confined to the borders of that shire; though of course, if
opportunities for distinction arose elsewhere, further north or south,
they were not neglected.

Destined for the Army, Mr. Fred Lee abandoned the idea of
following the profession of arms when he succeeded to the estate on
the somewhat sudden death of his father. He had hunted from
boyhood, chiefly with the Badsworth Hounds, occasionally with the
York and Ainsty, the Holderness, and Lord Middleton's, and had
attained to years of discretion before he first tempted fortune be-
tween the flags. One of his hunters named Prophet was so ex-
cellent a jumper, and possessed such a nice turn of speed, that it
seemed a pity not to win a few races with him, and on Prophet he
accordingly turned out for the first time in a silk jacket. This was
in 1883, and part of the fun was to train the horses at home, as also
to train himself, for he had a constant tendency to get beyond con-
venient racing weights. The enterprise was successful, and when
a keen sportsman has won a race it is natural that he should want
to keep on winning. Mr. Lee had no vaulting ambitions. He did
not lay himself out for the National — it was always possible that he
might get hold of a good horse that would do something big some
day, but to do a bit more than hold his own at local meetings,



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MR. W. F. LBE



K K 2



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476 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE

and prepare and ride the winner of a decent sort of chase, was
practically then the summit of his aspirations.

His first win was on a mare called Jura, who did good service
for her owner, he himself performing on her. On Jura indeed he
won several races, one after meeting with much disaster by flood and
field, flood being represented in this connection by the water jump.
At the finish he had only one, Mogalore, to beat ; and Mogalore,
reaching the fence first, came down heavily. Jura followed, having
apparently won her race; but down she came likewise, though her
owner was speedily up again, and eager to repair the mishap by
setting off again with all speed. An affable stranger who was stand-
ing close to the jump gave him a leg up, but so clumsily that he
found the web of his iron twisted round his leg in a curiously com-
plicated fashion. With desperate haste and rather fumbling fingers
he attempted to put it right. ** No 'urry, sir, no *urry ! Take yer
time. The other bloke's dead ! " was the attempted encouragement
of his friend, who had probably not seen many riders knocked out;
for **the other bloke" was speedily on his legs again. Jura was
useful in her class. At Wetherby one day, owner up, she won;
the next race he also carried off on another of his little string, The
Widgeon. Jura came out the following day and won again, but



Online LibraryAlfred Edward Thomas WatsonThe Badminton magazine of sports and pastimes → online text (page 35 of 52)