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Alfred Edward Thomas Watson.

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subalterns should drive him out in his trap. The idea was taken up
with some enthusiasm, and at 7 a.m. on a cold winter's morning a
large field and a motley pack were assembled at a place about eight
miles away from the station; but unfortunately no jackal appeared.
After standing about for an hour in a bitter wind the last hopes of
his coming ebbed away, and horses' heads were turned disconsolately
homewards. It was the one and only meet. A shamefaced subaltern
told us the why and the wherefore when we returned. Just before
starting he had thought it necessary to open the door of the box to
make sure of the contents, when out jumped Master Jack, and away
he went, and with him all chance of a Rawal Pindi Hunt. It was
sad, for " the R. P. H." had sounded pleasantly in our ears.



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BOOKS ON SPORT

Seventy Years' Fishing. By Charles George Barrington, C.B.
London : Smith, Elder, & Co. igo6.
Mr. Barrington has led a busy and useful life. Amongst his
occupations he has acted as private secretary to both Lord Russell
and Lord Palmerston ; but, well as he has done his work as a Civil
Servant, he would probably not object to being described as a fisher-
man before all else. Seventy years ago he killed his first trout, and
there is a hale and hearty ring about his pages which supports the
hope that he may keep on killing trout — with salmon as interludes
— for many years to come.

The experiences of a veteran angler are of special interest, for
he is able to give his opinion as to the changing conditions of sport.
A much-discussed point is whether the natures and dispositions of
birds, beasts, and fishes have altered, and on this head Mr. Barring-
ton expresses his belief that " trout are more difficult to catch than
they used to be, that their nature has become different." Partridges,
according to the general opinion, are much harder to approach than
they were formerly, but in their case agricultural advance, the
employment of reaping machines instead of old-fashioned scythes
and sickles, suggests a cause. Water, however, remains practically
what it always was, and why should trout grow warier? The
question is one well worth consideration by the naturalist.

We are not sure that Mr. Barrington is right in his assertion
that " the angler relies more on his own exertions and skill than his
brother sportsman who goes hunting or shooting.*' What of the
wildfowler, who pursues his sport either afloat or ashore by himself?
He has a gun in place of a rod : for the rest, his success depends
absolutely and entirely on his own exertions, and if he uses a punt
he is more self-dependent than the angler who has a man to row his
boat while he tries his fortune ? The stalker, too, who does not
take a gillie — what of him ? It is, of course, diffierent for the man
who goes covert-shooting, who has a loader, perhaps an under-keeper
with a dog to mark and gather what falls, and the assistance of
beaters to pick up anything that drops in the wood through which
they are passing ; but there is shooting and shooting.

Mr. Barrington is doubtless correct in his belief that the ques-
tion whether it is better to strike instantaneously or to give a trout
just a moment before doing so will never be settled absolutely. It
never can be settled, for the simple reason that what succeeds in one
case will fail in another : circumstances alter cases. The author
had a curious experience one day on the Avon. He watched a
salmon leisurely ascending the stream, and taking no notice of his
presence it remained for a time almost stationary close to the bank.
The fish was afterwards ascertained to be blind, a thick film having



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572 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE

grown over its eyes ; but it was in good condition, its lack of sight
had not prevented its ability to obtain food, which again affords a
subject for thought. Where is the best place to try for fish ? is
a query which is always puzzling to answer. ** When the late
Lord Malmesbury was tenant of Achnacarry," the author says, "one
of his guests, a lady much given to fishing, said to the fisherman
one morning, ' Where are we to go to-day, John ? * * 'Deed, my
lady,' he answered, ' I cannot say. Them places that is the least
likdiest is often the most likeliest of all.' " The element of luck
comes in conspicuously.

On the subject of poaching Mr. Barrington discusses the furred
and feathered poacher as well as the human variety. Old trout are
often cannibals, and salmon help. Otters, in the author's opinion,
do less harm than is generally attributed to them. Eels devour
much spawn, herons do considerable mischief, as do dabchicks; and
there is point in the recommendation not to destroy the nests of
these birds, but to prick or blow the eggs. If the eggs are destroyed
the hen will lay others, if they have been pricked she will continue
to sit unsuspectingly — but later on perhaps wonderingly.

Mr. Harrington's best day on the Itchen yielded sixteen trout
over a pound each ; the biggest salmon he ever caught was on the
Royalty water, Christchurch, and weighed 36 lb. We like his selec-
tion of the flies which he has found to answer best in the North.
They include — Heckles : Red Tag, the best all-round fly he knows;
Red Heckle ; Black Heckle, ribbed with silver wire, red floss-silk
tail ; Cock-a-Bondhu ; Grouse Heckle ; Golden Plover Heckle.
Winged Flies : Duns, Olive and Pale, hare's-ear body, starling's
wing; March Brown ; Alder; Stone Fly; Watford Coachman, dark
body (good in the evening); Peacock's Herl; Light Grey Wing:
Black Gnat, silver body ; Hofland's Fancy.

The book is one which all anglers will read with pleasure, and
most of them with profit.

Game and Foxes. By F. W. Millard. London : Horace Cox,

Field Office. 1906.

Mr. Millard — a contributor to these pages — is secretary to the
Gamekeepers' Association, and has written this book to support
his contention that the protection of foxes is not incompatible with
the preservation of game. This little volume may be commended
to the attention of hunting men and of shooting men alike, and
certainly to the average gamekeeper. Mr. Millard is in sympathy
with sport of all descriptions. It has probably not occurred to
many hunting men that "game preservation is necessary to the
continuance of their sport," but the author points out that if foxes



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BOOKS ON SPORT 573

had not game and rabbits to live on, at least to a great extent,
hen-roosts would suffer so severely that the large majority of
farmers would certainly take active measures to exterminate the
robbers. Mr. Millard is a remarkably keen student of country life,
with an accurate and extensive knowledge of its denizens, and his
book is rich in useful hints. The merits of luminous paint are
becoming recognised, and landowners who may not be acquainted
with this simple and easy method of protecting nests may be
advised to try it. Small circles of tip treated with the paint will
effectually safeguard nests. Even half-tame cubs, who are at times
extraordinarily audacious, will be scared. As to the persistence of a
hungry fox, Mr. Millard says that he has actually chased one from
coop to coop at night, unable to drive it away.

That foxes can, as it were, mesmerise pheasants is, of course,
absurd, though some people believe in the theory. Mr. Millard
records having watched a fox gazing at a pheasant that, seeing its
enemy, had flown up on to a branch. " The bird did not lose its head,"
he notes, and surely no reasonable person would suppose that it did
so. It merely proclaimed in vigorous pheasant language that a fox
was on the alert, and presently the little beast walked away. He did
so, Mr. Millard says, ** with a grapes-are-sour kind of expression on
his face " ; but probably this last is imagination ?

The employment of steel traps for rabbits is a practice which
humanity forbids, and we are glad to note how much consideration
Mr. Millard shows for the objects of sport. He condemns partridge-
driving late in the day when foxes are numerous, as the coveys get
broken and mixed, the birds creep into fences and ditches, and fall
an easy prey to their artful enemy. The following fact is probably
little known : " Like sporting dogs, foxes vary as regards keenness
of scenting faculties, some having better noses than others. A
particular fox also will be found to have a nose for a particular
thing; for instance, taking pheasant nests and leaving those of
partridges alone. Others are keen at finding leverets, while some
are riverside hunters, which subsist largely on water-hens, water-
rats, and like delicacies. Foxes certainly entertain different ideas
of what is good." To hunting men and shooting men alike a study
of this extremely practical book may be recommended.

The Fur, Feather, and Fin Series, edited by Alfred E. T.
Watson. The Fox, by 1 homas F. Dale. With eight illus-
trations by Archibald Thorburn and G. D. Giles. London :
Longmans, Green & Co. 1906.

Mr. Thorburn's admirable pictures make such an attraction
that we are tempted to refer to them first. The illustration of the



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574 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE

cubs at play, '* When all is Quiet," is delightful; " Gleaning after
the Shooters," a fox creeping out to pick up a dead pheasant, is
wonderfully true, as is *' His Strength Exhausted and Wiles Ex-
pended," though we should have preferred choice of another subject
— a creature in distress is never a pleasant sight. Mr. Giles's hunt-
ing scenes are also, we should add, full of spirit. Mr. Dale has
done his work well. He has hunted for many years, fox in England,
jackal in India — there is a chapter devoted to " Cousin Jack ''—and
here he records his experience and observations, together with the
result of what has chiefly struck him in fox literature.

The fox is supposed to be the personification of cunning, a
theory, however, with which Mr. Dale does not agree. In many
ways he thinks that a fox is inferior in strategy to the red deer or
the hare. '* The fact that the fox invariably adopts the method of
escape that he has once found effectual shows, in spite of his cun-
ning, the limitation of his intelligence," it is said ; but does the fox
"invariably" adopt the same method? This is a matter that has
to be proved. One would greatly like to know why certain coverts,
spinneys, and gorses have such an irresistible attraction for a fox
that one is always to be found there ? Other spots which, so far as
human perceptions go, should be equally tempting as a vulpine
residence are frequently, it may be said almost always, drawn blank.
Mr. Dale gives the instance of a gorse in the West Somerset country
which has been drawn forty times in succession and a fox found
every time.

When any competent sportsman writes about fox-hunting one
naturally looks to see what he has to say about scent. In truth,
Somerville and Beckford knew just as much about it as is known
to-day. Mr. Dale adopts the view that a fox lying still emits no
scent at all, as he thinks is proved by the fact that a hound will sniff
at a bush under which a fox is lying, and pass it by. Of this we
are not certain. Some hounds are careless, others are keen. We
chance years ago to have seen an example of this. We were
watching a fox curled up in a plantation, observed a hound pass
quite near it and take no notice, but the next hound, passing no
nearer, at once made the discovery. As the fox runs, his scent
becomes stronger, Mr. Dale believes, but when he grows tired and
his strength fails he ceases to give out any scent at all, so that
hounds will usually follow the line of a freshly-roused quarry. It is
a comforting belief for the sympathetic that until the scent fails the
hunted fox feels no fear, and it is certainly true that in the course of
a run the fox will sometimes pick up a fowl or a duck. In the old
Berkshire country a fox, when hounds were running him, grabbed at
a chicken and disappeared with it into an earth. To how many



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BOOKS ON SPORT 575

persons would it occur that the chicken was an object of sym-
pathy ?

The subject of tame foxes is one of the many interesting
matters which Mr. Dale discusses. He quotes instances, notably
one of "Joe/' a resident in Co. Cork, though Joe only led a
'* half-domesticated " life, living in a covert in a steep and rocky
eminence at the back of a house. He came when his mistress
whistled for him, would take a piece of meat, bury it, and return
for other pieces, which he likewise buried ; and if hungry he would
appear at the kitchen window, without invitation, to be fed by the
cook. He was on excellent terms with the dogs, and would go
rabbiting with them ; also, it is alleged, he wagged his brush when
pleased. We have known several so-called tame foxes. The late
Mr. R. K. Mainwaring, the handicapper, kept one at Newmarket.
It had a run over which a wire extended, a ring attached to a chain
and collar round its neck allowing it to go backwards and forwards ;
but we have never known a fox that was really tame and could be
trusted with mankind, though not a few of them share Joe's
affability to dogs. The book is a welcome addition to the series.
Mr. Baxter — Sportsman. By Charles Fielding Marsh.

London : Smith, Elder, & Co. 1906.
Mr. Baxter's sport is shooting. He is a phenomenal shot,
thinks of it incessantly, and when away from his business in the
City refuses to talk about anything else. He goes to stay with
Colonel Absolom, a squire of the variety that is typical in fiction,
and takes a fancy to the squire's son Barry, who is a leading
personage in the book. Barry's father has an unduly poor opinion
of the youth, who falls in love in the wrong place, and gets into
various difficulties. The author understands sport. There are
scenes in field and covert well depicted, and sketches of rustic life
and character of an entertaining description. Of course all comes
right in the end. Barry's father recognises his merit, and he marries
Baxter's niece, that gentleman feeling confirmed in his opinion that
a man must be all right if he is " as keen as mustard and handles the
gun in a proper sportsmanlike manner."

Nisbet's Golf Year Book, 1906. Edited by John L. Low.
London : Nisbet & Co. 1906.
This annual is crammed with information which will be of
service to players of the '* royal and ancient " game. It opens with
the Rules of Golf, annotated ; there is a Club Directory with details ;
a golfing " Who's Who," amateur and professional ; there are
lists of winners, articles by competent hands on championships and
famous games ; indeed, on the whole, the volume will be such a con-
venience to golfers that it may almost be described as indispensable.



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BADMINTON NOTA BENE

Messrs. Voigtlander, 12, Charterhouse Street, E.C., claim to be
the oldest "Optical House" in the world, having started business
as long since as 1756, and they appeal to readers of this magazine in
two capacities : as makers of binoculars for race-goers and stalkers,
etc., and as manufacturers of cameras. As regards glasses, pur-
chasers have the choice of the old-fashioned variety, which some
persons still like best, and of the new prismatic description, which
many users greatly prefer. These latter range in price from £6.
What excellent results the cameras show — notabl}* the new metal
Heliar — numbers of amateur photographers are well aware. We find
that they are much employed by contributors to our competition.
* * * *

The mania for tattooing, or rather for being tattooed, seems to
spread. One of the most famous sportsmen of the generation had,
fur instance, a whole fox-hunt portrayed on his body ; and several
owners of yachts bear indelible pictures of their vessels on their
skins. The most popular professor of the art appears to be Mr. Tom
Riley, 432, Strand, who claims that by his antiseptic treatment all
sorts of colours can be utilised quite innocuously. You choose the
subject you wish to have delineated on you, write to Mr. Riley, and
he ** operates " at yoiir own home.

in * m i^

Mr. G. E. Lewis, of Birmingham, struck by Lord Roberts's
declaration of opinion that " every man and boy ought to know how
to shoot," has turned his attention to the manufacture of miniature
rifles of the cheapest varieties that can be produced consistently
with accuracy. He claims that the " Ideal Rifle " is the best
weapon obtainable for rifle-club purposes, and is sold for 48s. The
" Favourite " costs a sovereign less, 28s. ; and Stevens's " Crack
Shot " rifle is actually priced at i6s. 6d.

tt ^ * *

Whether money is to be made by poultry-keeping depends upon
the persons by whom the poultry is kept. Some fail, others succeed,
and in the former case the fault cannot justly be attributed to the
fowls. An aid to success must at any rate be a suitable house for
the birds, and these structures in great variety, as also dog kennels,
have been planned and are carried out by Messrs. Browne and Lilley,
who are anxious it should be known that the growth of their busi-
ness has obliged them to relieve their Reading establishment by
opening a branch at Chorlton-on-Medlock, Manchester. Messrs.
Browne and Lilley are, it need scarcely be said, most practical
people, and possess a peculiar knowledge of all requisites for their
business.



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"HUNTING IN LONDON."



Last month we announced particulars of this new competition, and
here it begins. Two photographs of well-known buildings are
^iven : all the competitor has to do is to write underneath each the
name of the structure, tear out the leaf, and either send it,
iiddressed ** Hunting in London " Competition, B adminton M agazine,
to 8, Henrietta Street, Covent Garden, at once, or keep it
till six months have elapsed and send the whole dozen together.

To the successful hunter who has named the entire twelve

A PRIZE OF ten guineas

will be awarded, together with further prizes of

FIVE GUINEAS FOR SECOND,

and
TWO GUINEAS FOR THIRD.

In the event of several competitors gaining an equal number of
marks, the money will have to be divided. Should no one name
the whole twelve, the first prize will be awarded to whoever comes
nearest.

The photographs for

^'HUNTING IN LONDON,"

we may perhaps as well repeat, will each represent some con-
spicuous View, House, or Object within four miles of Charing Cross.

It is not our intention to be unduly puzzling by selecting
out-of-the-way scenes. Each picture will be of some place which
thousands of people pass daily — how many of them really see
what they pass the competition will help to show.

NO. cxxx. VOL. XXII. — May 1906 R R



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A PRIZE COMPETITION

The Proprietors of the Badminton Magazine offer a prize or prizes
to the value of Ten Guineas each month for the best original photo-
graph or photographs sent in representing any sporting subject.
Competitors may also send any photographs they have by them on
two conditions : that they have been taken by the sender, and that
they have never been previously published. A few lines explaining
when and where the photographs were taken should accompany
each subject. Residents in the country who have access to shooting-
parties, or who chance to be in the neighbourhood when hounds are
running, will doubtless find interesting subjects ; these will also be
provided at football or cricket matches, and wherever golf, cycling,
fishing, skating, polo, or athletics are practised. Racing and steeple-
chasing, including Hunt Meetings and Point-to-point contests,
should also supply excellent material. Photographs of Public School
interest will be specially welcome.

The size of the prints, the number of subjects sent, the date of
sending, the method of toning, printing, and mounting, are all
matters left entirely to the competitors.

The Proprietors are unable to return any rejected matter
except under special circumstances, and they reserve the right of
using anything of interest that may be sent in, even if it should not
receive a prize. They also reserve to themselves the copyright in
all photographs which shall receive a prize, and it is understood that
all photographs sent are offered on this condition.

The result of the May competition will be announced in the
July issue.

THE MARCH COMPETITION

The Prize in the March competition has been divided amon^
the following competitors; — Mrs. Hughes, Dalchoolin, Craigavad,
Co. Down; Miss L. E. Bland, Rugby (two guineas); Mr. W. R.
Chawner, Hort»)n Crescent, Rugby School; Mr. W. J. Abrey,
Tonbridge ; Mr. A. Abrahams, Emmanuel College, Cambridge ;
Mr. H. G. Swiney, Sandford Lawn, Cheltenham; Mr. J. P. Tyrrell,
Maryborough, Queen's County; Mr. A. Bell, 2nd Batt. Dorsetshire
Regiment, Colchester; and Mr. H. C. Thwaits, Cape Town.

RR 2



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58o THE BADMINTON MAGAZIN'E



RUGBY FOOTBALL INTERNATIONAL MATCH — IRELAND V. WALES, AT BELFAST,

MARCH 10, 1906

Photograph by Mrs. Hughes, Dalchoolin, Craigavad, Co. Down



SOMERSET, A CELEBRATED AMERICAN MORSE, HUNTED DURING THE PAST
SEASON IN THE SHIRES

Photograph by Miss L. E. Bland, Rugby



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PRIZE COMPETITION 581



CAMBRIDGE LENT RACES — PEMBROKE "RUGGER" BOAT IMMEDIATELY AFTER

BUMPING CLARE III.

Photograph by Mr. J. T. Spittle, Pembroke College, Cambridge



RUGBY SCHOOL OPEN STEEPLECHASES — THE WINNER, W. F. W. HANCOCK,
AT THE LAST JUMP

Photograph by Mr. W . R. Chawner, Hot ton Crescent, Rugby School



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582 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



OLD SURREY STAGHOUNDS — OVER THE FIRST FENCE

Photograph by Mr. W. J. Ahrey, Tonhridge



PATHANS AND PANTHER

Photograph by Mr. C. H. StockUy, 66th Punjabis, Malakand, N.W.F. Province. Iniia^



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PRIZE COMPETITION 583



'SKIPPING BOV " WINNING THE METROPOLITAN HANDICAP OF £l,000 AT KENILWORTH,

CAPE COLONY

Photograph by Mr. Arnold Keyzer, Capetown



THE FIRST HEAT OF THE HALF-MILE RACE, CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY SPORTS, I906

Photograph by Mr. A. Abrahams, Emmanuel College, Cambridge



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584 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



ENGLAND V. IRELAND — INTERNATIONAL HOCKEY MATCH AT DUBLIN,
MARCH 17, 1906

Photograph by Mrs. Hughes, Dalchoolin, Craigavad, Co. Down



CHELTENHAM COLLEGE GYMNASTIC EIGHT WITH THEIR INSTRUCTOR — A SET PJECK
ON THE PARALLEL BARS

Photograph by Mr. II. G. Swincy, Sandford Lawn, Cheltenham



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PRIZE COMPETITION 585



THE START FOR A NURSFRY, CURRAGH RACES

Photograph by Mr. J. P. Tyrrell, Maryborough, Quern's Cnutity



WHAT NEHD FOR WINGS ?

Photograph by Mr, A. Abrahams, Emmauuel College, Cambridge



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586



IHE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



CAPTAIN F. FORESTER, MASTER OF THE QUORN HOUNDS, AT KEGWORTH STATION

Photograph by Miss K. H. Martin, Barrow-on-Soar, Loughborough



A REFUSAL

Photograph by Mr, A. Dell, 2nd Batt. Dorsetshire Regiment, CoUhestcr



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PRIZE COMPETITION



587



CURLING AT BRAEMAR — A MATCH BETWEEN THE PRESIDENT AND
VICE-PRESIDENT

Photograph by Dr, W. Brown, Bracniar, N.B.



ENLARGING THE DEER — OLD SURREY STAGHOUNDS

Photograph by Mr. IV. J. Abrcy, Tonbridge



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588 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



BUFFALO-SHOOTING AT CHANDA, CENTRAL PROVINCES, INDIA

Photograph by Mr. Claude F. Egerton, Easthourne



THE FARMERS* RACE — INGOLDSBY STEEPLECHASES (BELVOIR HUNT RACES)

Photograph by Mr. G. C. Whitmore, Apcthorpe, Wans/ord, Northamptonshire



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PRIZE COMPETITION 589



•• OVER THE BROOK

Photograph by Miss L. 11. Bland. Rughy



SHIKARI AND COOLIES SKINNING A lO-FT. CROCODILE SHOT ON THE BANKS
OF THE BHETWA RIVER ABOUT 24 MILES FROM JHANSI, INDIA

Photograph by Mr. R. D. C. Bell, Lieutenant R.F.A., Sanger, C. P. India



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590 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



RACING IN BOMBAY HARBOUR — MR. N. D. WADIA'S " EILEBN IV.** WINNING

Photograph by Captain W. B. Walker, R.A., Yacht Club, Bombjy



SCHOOLING HORSES AT MOWBRAY, NEAR CAPETOWN — THIS HORSE, CAKEWALK, WOS
THE JUMPING COMPETITION AT THE WESTERN PROVINCE AGRICULTURAL
SHOW IN FEBRUARY LAST

Photof;raph by Mr. H. C. Thwaits, Capetown



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LEAVING THB PAVILION AT FBNNBR S
{Photograph by Mr. A. Abrahams, Emmanuel College, Cambridge)



The Badminton Magazine

SPORTSMEN OF MARK
VIII.— MR. ALLAN G. STEEL, K.C.



Online LibraryAlfred Edward Thomas WatsonThe Badminton magazine of sports and pastimes → online text (page 44 of 52)