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Alfred Edward Thomas Watson.

The Badminton magazine of sports and pastimes online

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where in this number in the sketch of Mr. A. G. Steel, that the
bowler is born and not made. "The inner genius of the art is
wholly incommunicable. Two bowlers will bowl with precisely the
same action, and drop the ball with similar flight on an identical
spot. One shall be a good ball, necessitating careful play on the
batsman's part, but the other shall be instinct with a life and sting
which worries a batsman. It is this life and sting from the pitch,
and a capacity to give a kind of vitality to the ball, which
characterises the bowling genius." Fielding receives due attention.



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BOOKS ON SPORT 683

and there is a special division on throwing. ** Watch an American
base-ball player throw to the base, he pauses for a second, and takes
a kind of gun-shot, deliberate, aim ere throwing the ball, which is
invariably returned at that height which combines pace with
accuracy to reach the base in such a manner as can best be dealt
with. The accuracy more than compensates for the slight but
evident delay in throwing." We do not quite understand whether
this is recommended as an example for the cricketer, but certainly
the best players do not take " gunshot deliberate aim; " they pick up
the ball and throw it in with one continuous action. Interlocking
the little fingers of each hand when catching is, it is said, the habit
of some players, and it is no doubt true that they are found to drop
just as many catches as others who hold their hands naturally, as
an open cup. The chapters on Captaincy and Umpiring are
enlivened by anecdotes. When a fellow bowler once ventured
to suggest to Giffen the advisability of a change, he replied, " Do
you think so ? Perhaps I had better go on to the other end.*' The
story of the umpire who, when appealed to for a catch at the
wicket, replied, " Not out, and I bet you a crown we win," is a
variation of the tale told of the racing judge who put up the number
of what everybody who was looking on thought was the second horse,
and on being asked by how much the alleged winner had scored,
answered, ** A neck, and it's the first bet I've won this meeting."

The photographs are with scarcely an exception excellent.
They show the best-known players making their characteristic
strokes, and bowlers each with his special action.

Rambles with a Fishing Rod. By E. S. Roscoe. Second
Edition. Illustrated. Edinburgh : George A. Morton ;
London : Simpkin, Marshall & Co. 1906.

Although this is called a second edition, seven of the seventeen
chapters are new. Mr. Roscoe has been far afield. He has fished
in a Kentish valley, a Welsh trout stream, a Midland brook, in
Connemara, in Western lochs, and one chapter is on " Sea Trout
Fishing in a Highland Estuary." Whenever he has gone abroad he
has taken his fishing-rod with him, and has used it in the Tyrol,
the Black Forest, the Bavarian Highlands, the Eastern Alps, in
Normandy, at Davos, and elsewhere. In the Black Forest his
quarry was the pike, and he found a sympathetic innkeeper who was
a great fisherman. The inn was well placed for sport, an Italian
prince had caught a 30 lb. pike near by, after a contest lasting for
three hours, and in seven days' fishing the captor took altogether
150 lb. weight of pike. As the angler reads he will feel tempted to
follow in Mr. Roscoe's footsteps. A good day on the lakes of



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684 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE

Connemara, he says, would be some three or four dozen trout with
several two or three pound white trout among them, and perhaps a
dozen and a half or more of the latter species of fish in all ; which
certainly sounds tempting ! As to the illustrations, the sketches are
fairly good, though for the most part very slight.

Lyra Venatica: A Collection of Hunting Songs. Compiled by
W. Sherard Reeve. London : Arthur Humphreys. 1906.

Mr. Reeve, late of the Grenadier Guards, dedicates this book to
the memory of his father. Col. John Reeve, late of the same regiment,
who before his death had collected more than half the contents of
the volume. They are for the most part descriptions of various
runs of a familiar type, footnotes giving the names of the persons
who are referred to in the verses. Many parts of England are visited,
though no fewer than three of the songs deal with the Old Surrey
Hounds. We are not going to say anything against Mr. Jorrocks's
old hunt, which as a matter of fact we have often followed, but per-
haps the Old Surrey would not be selected as exactly a representa-
tive pack. One of the notes which occur in ** The Race for the
Coplow," by the way, describes the late Mr. George Ede as " a very
fme rider," a comment which scarcely does justice to one of the most
perfect horsemen ever seen. The writer of the sort of verse here
quoted is not easily daunted by the exigencies of metre ; this, for
instance, is a daring way out of a difficulty : —

The " Bruiser " and " Alfred " their friends have delighted
With a feast that Lucullus himself ne'er'd have slighted.

It is not everyone who would have thought of "ne'er'd." Besides
the verses there are some letters from William Goodall of the Bel-
voir, and one from Frank Gillard, also huntsman to the Duke of
Rutland's Hounds, describing what he considered the best run he
ever saw. After an hour and twenty minutes the Quorn joined them
at Widmerpool, when both packs ran together for an hour and five
minutes more, and killed the fox first found. A man who wants
anything better than that must be greedy !

The Sporting Spaniel. By C. A. Phillips and R. Claude Cane.
Manchester: "Our Dogs" Publishing Company. 1906.

The authors admit that of the making of doggy books there
seems to be no end. They appear, however, to think that the
spaniel has not had proper attention paid to him, and their work has
evidently been a labour of love, for they are firm in the belief that
** of the many different varieties of man's best friend, no race is more
interesting or more worthy of affection " than that of which they
write. None either is of greater antiquity. They start with the



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BOOKS ON SPORT 685

earliest records. Amongst other interesting material is a quaint con-
tract made by John Harris, a Worcestershire yeoman, in 1685, who
for los. of lawful English money, and 30s. more of like money to be
hereafter paid, undertakes ** to well and sufficiently mayntayne and
keepe a spanill bitch named Quand for five months, and to fully and
effectually train up and teach the said bitch to sett partridges,
pheasants, and other game, as well and exactly as the best sitting
dogges usually sette the same. And furthermore if the said bitch
shall for want of use or practice or or'wise forgett to sett game as
aforesaid," to maintain her for a month or longer until she remem-
bers her lessons. The authors have sought information from abroad
as well as from home, for there is a Spaniel Club Fran9ais, whose
secretary has been good enough to furnish them with notes. The
various sub-varieties of the breed are elaborately described, and
there are photographs of varying merit representing well-known
animals. The subject is treated with remarkable completeness.

An Illustrated Treatise on the Art of Shooting. By
Charles Lancaster. London: McCorquodale & Co. 1906.
Mr. Lancaster, the well-known gunmaker, first published this
practical work in the year 1889. When it is said that this is
the seventh edition it will be understood that his labour has found
due recognition. It is natural that it should have done so, for
we find an undoubted authority speaking on a subject of which
he is evidently a master, and moreover well able to express his
meaning in clear and simple phrases. Hints are given as to how
various shots should be made, and they induce reflection, for many
men shoot instinctively, without quite knowing how or why. The
'* Angley Park Shooting Regulations,*' which are quoted, are
sensible enough, but seem to suggest that the men shooting do
not understand how to behave on the field, and that strikes us
as rather a slight on guests ? Illustrations elucidate the text.

Tales of the Fish Patrol. By Jack London. London :
Heinemann. 1906.
The Fish Patrol are nautical police who protect or seek to
protect the fisheries in San Francisco and San Pablo bays. They
have to deal with sea poachers of a singularly daring, reckless, and
extraordinarily artful description ; and these stories, told by a
youngster of sixteen who became a sort of deputy patrol man, relate
exciting adventures and the ingenious ways in which the marauders
were brought to book. It is a strong point in the volume that the
scenes and characters are new to fiction. The youthful hero and
his companions often find themselves in tight places, but they
always come out on top.



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BADMINTON NOTA BENE

As racing is the only test by which the merits of a horse can be
ascertained, so trials with motor cars furnish the most satisfactory
proof of their qualities. This being so, the Pilain is certainly not
to be overlooked. In a recent week of trials at Aix, two of these
cars were among the eighteen entries, and they finished second and
fourth, and in the Coupe des Pyr^n^es contest the Pilain carried off
a sp)ecial prize given by the Matin. A particularly complete and
instructive illustrated pamphlet on these cars has been published,
and can be obtained with any other information needed from the
English agent, Mr. E. D. Heinemann, 26, Cranley Mews, South
Kensington.

♦ * * *

Another car which is coming to the front is the " Standard "
six-cylinder motor. Details are procurable at the Agency, 63, Regent
House, Regent Street. That it is British-built by British workmen
is given as a reason for patronising these machines; but they have
other recommendations : the best workmanship and material, auto-
matic lubrication, a simplified carburettor having no delicate adjust-
ments to get out of order, and the Standard Patent Clutch. The
advantages of the six-cylinder engine are warmly emphasised in the
brochure which has been prepared to describe this car.

* * * *

We wrote last month of rifles, induced by the strength of the
recent movement to encourage practice and marksmanship. To
this end, the improvement of shooting, targets are a first essential,
and there must be something special about those which have already
been adopted on more than seventy ranges by the regular army,
volunteer force, and civilian rifle clubs. These are ** Paterson's
Patent," the firm of Paterson & Co., 74, Grand Parade, Harrin-
gay, N., being contractors to H.M. forces. The targets include
stationary, disappearing, and running man.

* * * *

At the opening of the polo season players will be considering
the diet best suited for their mounts during the period of hard and
trying work. Messrs. Bathgate's (Bristol) ** Gleba " Feed is spoken
of by hunting men, vets, and other experts as a food of the
highest quality. The great advantage of using a well-balanced food
of this kind is the avoidance of all injurious powders or drugs, as all
that is necessary for the great majority of horses is a properly con-
stituted food of antiseptic and digestive properties.



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"HUNTING IN LONDON."

We give the second instalment of this new competition which began
last month. Two photographs of well-known buildings or localities
are given : all the competitor has to do is to write underneath each
the name of the structure or place, tear out the leaf, and either send it,
addressed ** Hunting in London " Competition, Badminton Magazine,
to 8, Henrietta Street, CoveiNT Garden, at once, or keep it
till six months have elapsed and send the whole dozen together.

To the successful hunter who has named the entire twelve

A PRIZE OF TEN GUINEAS

will be awarded, together with further prizes of

FIVE GUINEAS FOR SECOND,

and
TWO GUINEAS FOR THIRD.

In the event of several competitors gaining an equal number of
marks, the money will have to be divided. Should no one name
the whole twelve, the first prize will be awarded to whoever comes
nearest.

The photographs for

**HUNT1NG IN LONDON,'^

we may perhaps as well repeat, will each represent some con-
spicuous View, House, or Object within four miles of Charing Cross.

It is not our intention to be unduly puzzling by selecting
out-of-the-way scenes. Each picture will be of some place which
thousands of people pass daily — how many of them really see
what they pass the competition will help to show.

[Copyright registered at Stationers' Hall.]
NO. cxxxi. VOL. xxu.^June 1906 3 ^



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A PRIZE COMPETITION

The Proprietors of the Badminton Magazine offer a prize or prizes
to the value of Ten Guineas each month for the best original photo-
graph or photographs sent in representing any sporting subjects
Competitors may also send any photographs they have by them on
two conditions : that they have been taken by the sender, and that
they have never been previously published. A few lines explaining
when and where the photographs were taken should accompany
each subject. Residents in the country who have access to shooting-
parties, or who chance to be in the neighbourhood when hounds are
running, will doubtless find interesting subjects ; these will also be
provided at football or cricket matches, and wherever golf, cycling,
fishing, skating, polo, or athletics are practised. Racing and steeple-
chasing, including Hunt Meetings and Point-to-point contests,
should also supply excellent material. Photographs of Public School
interest will be specially welcome.

The size of the prints, the number of subjects sent, the date of
sending, the method of toning, printing, and mounting, are all
matters left entirely to the competitors.

The Proprietors are unable to return any rejected matter
except under special circumstances, and they reserve the ri^ht of
using anything of interest that may be sent in, even if it should not
receive a prize. They also reserve to themselves the copyright in
all photographs which shall receive a prize, and it is understood that
all photographs sent are offered on this condition.

The result of the June competition will be announced in the
August issue.

THE APRIL COMPETITION

The Prize in the April competition has been divided among
the following competitors : — Captain \V. Kerr, Prestbury Court,
Gloucestershire ; Mr. A. Abrahams, Emmanuel College, Cambridge
(two guineas); Mr. F. D. Marsh, Northfield, near Birmingham;
Mrs. Hughes, Dalchoolin, Craigavad, County Down; Mr. P. H.
Lemon, Cheltenham; Miss G. Murray, Cheltenham; Mr. R. W.
Cole, Bexhill-on Sea ; Mr. C. E. Lloyd, Imtarfa Barracks, Malta;
and Mr. H. G. Swiney, Sandford Lawn, Cheltenham.

3 A 2



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690 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



BODINGTON HARRIERS* STKBPLECHASB—MR. BUFFS ROMANCE

Photograph by Captain IV. Kerr, Prestbury Court, Gloucestershire



RUGBY FOOTBALL AT BEDFORD— A CLEVER INTERCEPTION BY MR BROOKS
OF BEDFORD GRAMMAR SCHOOL

Photograph by Mr. A. Abrahams, Emmanuel College, Cambridge



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PRIZE COMPETITION 691



SHREWSBURY SCHOOL TRIAL BIGHTS ON THB SEVERN

Photograph by Mr. F. D. Marsh, North field, near Birmingham



THE EDINBURGH BEAGLES ON THE GOGAR BURN, GOGAR

Photograph by the Huntsman, Mr. A. Verden Anderson, Edinburgh



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692 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



CHELTENHAM COLLEGB ANNUAL SPORTS — THE THREB-LEGGBD RACE

Photograph by Miss G. Murray, Cheltenham



caught!— TUB ASHFORD VALLEY HARRIERS POINT-TO-POINT RACES

Photooraph by Mr. E. H. H. D Aeth Folkestone



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NATIVB CAVALRY POLO TOURNAMENT, UMBALLA

Photograph by Mr. F. Dcaty, Dilkusha, Oudh, India



THE HIGH JUMP AT BEDFORD MODERN SCHOOL

Photograph by Mr. A. Abrahams, Emmanuel College, Cambridge



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694 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



COUNTY DOWN STAGHOUNDS' POINT-TO-POINT RACES — MR. PATTOn's IVORY
FALLS IN THB FARMERS* RACB AND IS KILLED

Photograph by Mrs. Hughes, Dalchoolin, Craigavad, County Down



FINAL FOR THE CAMBRIDGE UNIVERSITY LACROSSE CUP — CLARE V. CHRIST'S

Photograph by Mr. J. T. Spittle, Pembroke College, Cambridge



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PRIZE COMPETITION 695



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696 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



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PRIZE COMPETITION 697



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698 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



THE GRBBK, NICHOLAS GBORGB, WHO IS WALKING ROUND THB WORLD IN THIRTY-
NINE MONTHS FOR A PRIZE OF ;^4,000. ARRIVING AT CAPE TOWN

Photograph by Mr. Arnold Keyzer, Cape Town



CHELTENHAM COLLEGE ANNUAL SPORTS — THE OPEN HURDLE-RACE

Photograph by Miss G. Murray, Cheltenham



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PRIZE COMPETITION 699



A PERILOUS PASSAGE

Photograph by Mr. R. W. Cole, Bexhill-on-Sea



FINISH FOR THE POLO CUP AT MALTA, WON BY CAPTAIN BELL's MARK "

Photograph by Mr. C. E. Lloyd, Imtarfa Barracks, Malta



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700 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



A FLIER — COTSWOLD HUNT POINT-TO-POINT

PhotoRvapk by Mr, H. G. Swiney, Sandford Lawn, Cheltenham



J. H. TAYLOR DRIVING IN FINAL OF LONDON FOURSOMB TOURNAMENT

Photograph by Mr. C. J. Waters, Epsom



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Online LibraryAlfred Edward Thomas WatsonThe Badminton magazine of sports and pastimes → online text (page 52 of 52)