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Alfred Edward Thomas Watson.

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and responsibilities, and those responsibilities seem opposed to
the sports I have attempted to describe.



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BOOKS ON SPORT

Outdoor Pastimes of an American Hunter. By Theodore
Roosevelt. Illustrated. London : Longmans, Green & Qq
1905.

The proportion of big-game hunters who write about their
sport is extraordinarily large— a fact that is continually impressed
on those who are connected with sporting magazines ; but few of
them are so good alike in the field and with the pen as the energetic
President of the United States. This book is a record of his out-
door pastimes during the last five years, and includes the chase of the
cougar, bear, wolf, wapiti, various other deer, and sheep. Enthu-
siasm and equanimity are notable points about the President. " In
mid-winter, hunting on horseback in the Rockies is apt to be cold
work," he remarks, further noting that it was eighteen degrees below
zero when he started on a five-weeks' cougar hunt in North-west
Colorado, and the deep snow shown in the first photograph certainly
does suggest chilliness; but the President evidently cared little for
the weather, and thoroughly enjoyed himself. The cougar is pur-
sued by dogs, and Mr. Roosevelt's description of the pack, if so it
may be called, is amusing. Jim was the most useful of the lot, and
after him an animal called Boxer, who was bitten through one of his
hind legs by the first cougar, so that for the remainder of the trip
he had only three to go on — a fact which did not interfere with his
appetite, his endurance, or his desire for the chase. Here is a bit
of description: ** Both Boxer and Jim had enormous appetites.
Boxer was a small dog and Jim a very large one, and as the rela-
tions of the pack among themselves were those of brutal wild-beast
selfishness, Boxer had to eat very quickly if he expected to get
anything when Jim was around. He never ventured to fight Jim,
but in deep-toned voice appealed to Heaven against the unrighteous-
ness with which he was treated ; and time and again such appeal
caused me to sally out and rescue his dinner from Jim's highway



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I02 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE

robbery. Once when Boxer was given a biscuit, which he tried to
bolt whole, Jim simply took his entire head in his jaws, and
convinced him that be had his choice of surrendering the biscuit
or sharing its passage down Jim's capacious throat. Boxer promptly
gave up the biscuit, then lay on his back and wailed in protest of
Fate."

The pack had many interesting peculiarities, the author re-
marks, the most extraordinary being that four of them climbed
trees. There is a photograph of one dog, called Turk, who has
pursued a bobcat to what is stated to be an altitude of thirty feet
above the ground. The climbers do not seem to have been by any
means safe in the branches. A dog, indeed, would often lose his
footing and "come down with a whack which sounded as if he must
be disabled, but after a growl and a shake he would start up the tree
again.'* The pack was certainly game, and so likewise were the
President's companions. One of them had a trick of seizing a wolf
by the lower jaw, the performance of which for the first time might
well make a brave man hesitate. Wolves are coursed, and one day
the quarry bit the greyhound which overtook it. ** At the same
moment Abernethy, who had ridden his horse right on them as they
struggled, leapt off and sprang on top of the wolf. He held the
reins of the horse with one hand, and thrust the other, with a
rapidity and precision even greater than the rapidity of the wolfs
snap, into the wolf's mouth, jamming his hands down crosswise
between the jaws, seizing the lower jaw and bending it so that the
wolf could not bite him. He had a stout glove on his hand, but
this would have been of no avail whatever had he not seized the
animal just as he did— that is, behind the canines while his hand
pressed the lips against the teeth. With his knees he kept the wolf
from using its forepaws to break the hold until it gave up struggling.
When he thus leapt on and captured this coyote it was entirely free,
the dog having let go of it, and he was obliged to keep hold of the
reins of his horse with one hand. I was not twenty yards distant at
the time, and as I leaped off the horse he was sitting placidly on the
live wolf, his hand between its jaws, the greyhound standing beside
him, and his horse standing by as placid as he was." The President
thinks this *'a remarkable feat," and there will be few who do not
agree with him.

Abernethy threw the wolf across in front of the saddle, still
holding it, then mounted and rode off. He caught others in the
same fashion, and the author notes the curious fact that they never
strove to fight, seeming resigned to their fate, and looking about with
their ears pricked. A photograph is given of Abernethy holding
the wolf, and another with one he caught subsequently, alive in



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BOOKS ON SPORT

front of him on his horse, a dead one being fastened on behind
Some of the ** punchers " must also have been extraordinarily good
riders. One of them the President noted on a young and partially *
broken horse with no bridle, simply a rope round the animal's
neck.

Some interesting remarks are made on a fact which must have
struck many readers of volumes on sport : that is the way in which
birds and beasts often come to be known by the familiar titles of
creatures that they do not resemble. Unscientific people do not
like to invent names if they can by any possibility employ those
already in use; thus, it is pointed out, the Americans "have no
distinctive name at all for the group of peculiarly American game
birds, of which the bobwhite is the typical representative; when we
could not use the words quail, partridge, or pheasant," Mr. Roosevelt
observes, ** we went for our terminology to the barnyard, and called
our fine grouse fool-hens, sage-hens, and prairie-chickens.*' The
American true elk and reindeer were called moose and caribou, but
for this there is the excellent excuse that the names are Indian. In
South America cougars and jaguars are described as lions and
tigers, and, indeed, all over the world similar confusion exists.

Not the least interesting chapter is that about wapiti, which
the President describes as ** the largest and stateliest deer in the
world." He is evidently a great reader, as well as an admirable
writer, and one of his chapters deals with " Books on Big Game,"
which contains a remark we cannot refrain from quoting. ** If we
could choose but one work," he says, '* it would have to be the
volume on * Big-Game Shooting * in the Badminton Library."

Not only in consequence of the distinguished authorship, but
for its intrinsic merit, the President's book is one which can on
no account be omitted from any sporting librarj^ which has the
least pretension to completeness.

Jules of the Great Heart. By Laurence Mott. London:
William Heinemann. 1905.

This book deserves special mention as one of the most striking
and original novels that has been published for a long time past.
The scene is laid in the little-known region of Hudson Bay.
The characters, new to fiction, as they are here drawn, because of
their reaHty, are filled in with singular force, and the author conveys
the impression — few critics will possess sufficient knowledge to
speak with certainty — that he is thoroughly familiar with the
strange life he depicts. Jules is essentially a man, indomitably
brave, self-reliant, resourceful, absolutely honest — a wonderfully fine



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104 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE

character. He is a trapper, what is called a ** free trapper" indeed,
and so a thorn in the factor's side, the factor being superintendent
of the post ; for the honesty which has just been mentioned did not
prevent Jules from taking fur wherever he found it, as he could not
see that it really belonged to the Hudson Bay Company if the
animal which grew it had accidentally diverted its steps from one
of Jules's traps to one of the Company's. For this and for other
reasons a great many men's hands were against him ; Jules was,
indeed, in constant danger of his life, but no one was ever better
able to take care of himself. Early in the book he is pursued by
one of his special enemies, Le Grand by name, and the way in
which the tables are turned is a characteristic adventure. The
dialect employed— a mixture of English and French — adds peculiar
quaintness to the conversations.

In spite of his phenomenal wariness, Jules is captured and
taken to the factor, who has put a price on his head. Jules believes
that his death is inevitable, and is prepared to meet his fate with
Indian stoicism, which so appeals to the factor that his life is spared
on condition that he hunts for the Company ; and he accepts the
terms, faithfully serving his masters until he feels that he has paid
the debt. Jules has a wife whom he tenderly loves — one does not
understand, indeed, why he is separated from her so long — but
finally he sets off with Le Grand, who has now become his most
faithful friend, on a journey to the place where she is. Le Grand
is captured, tortured, and killed, the murderer meeting with a
most hideous fate at the hands of Jules, the avenger. What that
fate is, and how, having broken his leg, Jules drags himself on
his hands and one knee for the last fifteen miles of his journey to
meet Marie, readers may be left to discover for themselves. This
is essentially a book to be read, and to be remembered.

Nature in Eastern Norfolk. By Arthur H. Patterson. Illus-
trated. Methuen & Co., London. 1905.

Mr. Patterson may be described as a born naturalist, who, one
perceives from his autobiographical chapter, could by no possibility
have passed his life otherwise than he has done. His father was a
shoemaker in humble circumstances, and the boy had to work as
soon as he could earn money, fate leading him to the humblest
position in a chandler's shop, the proprietor of which sold coals as
well as tea, bread, and candles. But every hour the budding
chandler could seize for himself he devoted to the living creatures in
the fields, hedges, and ditches around him, and the first twopence
he saved went in the purchase of a little paper-covered book called



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BOOKS ON SPORT 105

** Gleanings from Natural History." Soon after he came of age
young Patterson obtained a position as supernumerary postman, but
he had previously contributed to the press, an article on Kingfishers
having been published by a London daily paper. For a short time
Patterson seemed to have found his true career, for he was made
manager of a small zoological gardens near Manchester; but the
affair came to grief, and returning to Yarmouth, his native town, he
obtained employment as a draper's warehouseman. From 8 a.m.
to 8.30 p.m. he served his master, but he was up before the house-
martins which were twittering with their heads outside their doors
at three o'clock in the morning, and he stole forth to watch the life of
the creatures he loved so well.

It will readily be understood that the observations of such a
student as this are worth the most careful attention. He writes of
nothing that he has not seen, and the conclusions he draws are not
derived from books — though he sometimes checks the statements of
other authors — but from the birds and beasts themselves. To a great
extent the volume is a catalogue, with notes and comments, of the
birds, fishes, mammals, reptilia, amphibia, of the country he has
ranged. What sort of pets Mr. Patterson has kept will be guessed.
Otters have been among the number, and he says that their disposi-
tions vary. One he had was so tame that it used to run about the
house and play on the hearthrug with the children. He has had
badgers, too, but has found them generally '* very intractable,
differing greatly in this respect from the fox and the otter,'*
creatures which are capable of exhibiting traits of strong affection.

It is rather curious to come across a note to the effect that the
fox in 1834 was very seldom seen in East Norfolk. *' Probably the
indigenous local race is extinct," Mr. Patterson says, and it is
thought worth special record that one was seen crossing the river
at Haddiscoe in 1834. We most cordially agree with Mr. Pat-
terson in thinking it a great pity that gamekeepers do not turn
their attention to the destruction of rats rather than to that of their
enemies — stoats, owls, etc. Rats, as he truly remarks, will un-
doubtedly increase in proportion to the extirpation of the Mustelida.
The criminal neglect which is enabling rats to thrive and grow
in town and country alike is a blunder for which we shall all
have to pay.



HO. cxxvi. VOL xxu.-^Jamufy 1906



H



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BADMINTON NOTA BENE

At the present mcment multitudes of people are suffering from
perplexity as to what they can give for Christmas and New Year's
gifts. A visit to the Royal School of Art Needlework should at once
solve the difficulty. The \Nord ** art " in this connection is not a
misnomer, though the productions of the school are far from being
limited to ** needlework." That is only one part of the business, for
here can be purchased antique pottery, furniture, metal work, and
various other objects which are precisely what the seeker after
Christmas presents requires. Visitors need not fear that the prices
of the articles are beyond the reach of modest purses ; one can,
indeed, spend a great deal of money, and the temptation is doubtless
great, but there are all sorts of cheap little things also.

***** *

Ladies' clubs are a feature of the period, and one which should
prove avast comfort and convenience to residents in Kensington and
the vicinity is the Ladies* Park Club, the premises being situated at
Wilton House, 87, Knightsbridge, opposite the French Embassy and
Albert Gate. The social position of the committee and vice-
presidents is beyond all question, and affords a guarantee of the most
unimpeachable character; but the tariff is remarkably low, a hot
luncheon, for instance, being served for is. Sd , and a dinner of five
courses for half a crown. The club is intended to be ** quiet and
exclusive without being dull or dowdy,*' and everything seems to
have been thought of and provided for in the carefully compiled

rules.

ij- * * * * *

Steadily and surely the motor as applied to the water is going
ahead. The Marine Motor Co. of 2, Army and Navy Mansions,
Victoria Street, London, S.W., have just completed some im-
portant Government contracts, and are building just now a 40-foot
cruiser for Mr. Foster, of Bradford, which is to be fitted with a
sixty horse-power engine. This should certainly travel ! They also
have in hand an order for a very large paraffin motor for the
Imperial Japanese Government, for Japan is nowadays to the fore
in everything that is new.



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A PRIZE COMPETITION

The Proprietors of the Badminton Magazine offer a prize or prizes
to the vahie of Ten Guineas each month for the best original photo-
graph or photographs sent in representing any sporting subject.
Competitors may also send any photographs they have by them on
two conditions : that they have been taken by the sender, and that
they have never been previously published. A few lines explaining
when and where the photographs were taken should accompany
each subject. Residents in the country who have access to shooting-
parties, or who chance to be in the neighbourhood when hounds are
running, will doubtless find interesting subjects ; these will also be
provided at football or cricket matches, and wherever golf, cycling,
fishing, skating, polo, or athletics are practised. Racing and steeple-
chasing, including Hunt Meetings and Point-to-point contests,
should also supply excellent material. Photographs of Public School
interest will be specially welcome.

The size of the prints, the number of subjects sent, the date of
sending, the method of toning, printing, and mounting, are all
matters left entirely to the competitors.

The Proprietors are unable to return any rejected matter
except under special circumstances, and they reserve the right of
using anything of interest that may be sent in, even if it should not
receive a prize. They also reserve to themselves the copyright in
all photographs which shall receive a prize, and it is understood that
all photographs sent are offered on this condition.

The result of the January competition will be announced in the
March issue.

THE NOVEMBER COMPETITION

The Prize in the November competition has been divided among ij

the following competitors: — Mr. C. F. Shaw, Nottingham; Mr. R. %



I



F. Smith, Montreal; Mr. John A. Douglas, Montreal; Mr. W

Pfleiderer, New Maiden, Surrey; Mr. Robert W. Hillcoat, H.M.

Transport Plassy, Southampton ; Mr. P. T. F. Oyler, Durie, Leven, ^(\

N.B.; Mr. R. H. Martyn, Cheltenham; Mr. R. W. Cole, Bexhill- .j

on-Sea (two guineas) ; and Mr. G. Romdenne, Brussels. *]

H 2 '^



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loS THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



OVER !

Photograph by Mr, C. F. Shaw, Nottingham



CHAMPIONSHIP MATCH BETWEEN MONTREAL AND OTTAWA

Photograph by Mr. R. F. Smith, Montreal



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PRIZE COMPETITION 109



QUORN HOUNDS AT KIRBY GATE

Photograph by Mr. John Day, Leicfster



A JDMP OP TEN FEET BY A SALMON ON THE MINGAW RIVER

Photograph by Mr. John A. Dcu^Ias, Montreal



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no THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



PRESTBURY PARK AUTUMN RACES, I905

Photograph hy Captain W . J. W. Kerr, Prestbury Court, Gloucestershire



A DIVE FROM LIFEBOAT OF P. AND O. STEAM YACHT " VECTIS " IN FUNCHAL
HARBOUR, MADEIRA

Photograph by Mr. \V. Pfleiderer, New Maiden, Surrey



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FRIZl:: r(3M PETITION iii



A START — CALPB TURF CLUB MBBTING. NORTH FRONT, GIBRALTAR

rhifinntiiph hv Mr. .-i . Smith, 1)2 H2, Crutchetts Ramp, Gibraltar



SRMI-FINAL OF THE MIDDLE-WEIGHT CHAMPIONSHIP OF H.M. TRANSPORT "PLASSY,"
OUTWARD BOUND WITH THE WEST RIDINGS (33RD REGT.) AND DETAILS, OCTOBER 1905

Pkotograhh by Mr. Robert \V. Hillcoat, H.M. Transport " Plassy," Southampton



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112 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



A SHOOTING PARTY IN MAURITIUS

Photograph by Mr. A. A. Lucas, Garden Court, Temple



ON THE AIGUILLE AT THE GRANDS MULETS, MONT BLANC

Photograph by Mr, R. W, Stuart, Brasenose College, Oxford



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PRIZE COMPETITION ii3



i

if



START OF A HURDLE RACE AT WORCESTER, MAY I905

Photograph by Captain E. C. Jennings, Royal Fusiliers, Peking



SHOOTINC, A CROSSINC; PARTRIDGE

Photograph by Mr, P, T, F. Oyler. Diirie, Leveu, N.B.



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114 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



FINALS OF THE HCAVY WEIGHTS — ASSAULT-AT-ARMS, H.M.S. "BRITANNIA," 1905

Photograph by Miss /If. N. Waller, Beenham Court, Newbury



A CUB-HUNTING MEET

Photograph by Mr. F. H. Mutton, Lincoln



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PRIZE COMPETITION ,i^



Photograph by Mr. R. H. Martyn, Cheltenham



WHO CALLED THE OFFICBR ?

of the Koyal Sussex Keglmeni whi
ten I as a sunshade

Photograph by Mr. /. M. Hulton, 2nd Royal Sussex Regiment, Candia, Crete



Pet donkey of a detachment of the Royal Sussex Regiment which always used the officers

tent as a sunshade



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ii6 THK BADMINTON MAGAZINE



A MAHOUT MOUNTING HIS ELEPHANT BY HHIDING THE EARS AND STEPPING

ON THE TRUNK

Photograph by Captain W. G. Thompson. R.H.A., Lvcknow



WATER POLO — A CORNER OF THE "FIELD"

Photograph by Mr. R. W. Cole. Bexhill-on-Sea



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PRIZE COMPETITION 117



EXRRCISING THE DOGS

Photograph by Mr. H. L. Hoyle, Todmontcn



A GOOD JUMP

Photograph by Mr. G. Romdenne, Brussels



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ii.S THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE



ESSEX OTTER HOUNDS— "A CASE OF TERRIERS*

Photoataph by Mr. ]\\ J. Abrey, Tonbridge



PUSH BALL MATCH BETWEEN THE OFFICERS OF THE WEST YORKSHIRE RBGIMBNT
AND THE 87TH ROYAL IRISH FUSILIERS

Hhotograph by Mr. C. E. Kinahan, Syth Royal Irish Fusilurs, Wellington
Barracks, Dublin



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MR. ARTHUR COVENTRY STARTING A RACK AT LINCOLN SPRING MBBTING



The Badminton Magazine

SPORTSMEN OF MARK
IV.— MR. ARTHUR COVENTRY

BY ALFRED E. T. WATSON

For a great many years past, I should be inclined to say from time
immemorial, the name of Coventry has been associated with sport.
It seemed quite in accordance with the eternal fitness of things, for
instance, that in the early sixties the sisters Emblem and Em-
blematic should have carried off the Grand National in the colours
of that most respected of sportsmen the present Earl, and that his
name should be recorded as a Master of the Buckhounds. Pro-
minent among hunting men in the Shires more than a decade before
the consecutive Liverpool victories was another member of the
family, the Hon. Henry Amelius, son of the eighth earl, whose
second son, Arthur, was born at Melton Mowbray in 1852, to prove
HO. czxvii. VOL. JOLiu—Ftbruary zgo6 I



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I20 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE

himself in the course of time in all ways a most worthy representa-
tive of the famous house.

I once in conversation asked Mr. Coventry at what age he first
began to ride a pony, and the question fairly puzzled him, for he
could not remember a time when he did not ride, or indeed when
he did not hunt. Another query I inquisitively put to him was
what made him take to race-riding, and this also gave him serious
pause, until after a while he hazarded the opinion that he "sup-
posed it was natural instinct," which one can well understand to
have been the case.

As it happened, his elder brother, ** Bee," was one of the finest
amateur horsemen ever known — indeed, the word " amateur " need
not be employed, for Captain '* Bee " Coventry held his own with
the very best of the professional horsemen, and his finish on Alci-
biade for the Grand National of 1865 was among the most brilliant
efforts in the history of that exciting contest. Arthur, rising four-
teen at the time, may well have been inspired, particularly seeing
that the family colours, as just remarked, had been borne to victory
in the two previous years. A desire to emulate the feats of the
brother who was the object of his devoted admiration could not
fail to influence the boy; and so it befell that at Croxton Park
in 1874 he wore silk for the first time, a four-year-old named Billy
Button having been entrusted to his guidance. Three months later,
at the Worcester Meeting, he won his first race, the Worcester
Cup, 5 years, 10 st. sib. (carried 10 st. 81b.), on Baby (and was
nicknamed " Baby " accordingly), the horse, which started at
100 to 8, beating a red-hot 7 to 4 favourite. The Druid, ridden
by R. Wyatt, a short head. In the year following at Melton
he won his first steeplechase on a mare of Lord Carrington's
called Amy, beating Captain Riddell, an experienced rider, to get
the better of whom was decidedly a feather in the young amateur's
cap, especially as behind him were such men as Lord Queensberry
third. Captains W. Hope-Johnstone and ** Doggy " Smith, Col. Har-
ford and Mr. ** Roily." It was chiefly in jump races that Arthur
Coventry performed ; and though in these early days he does not
appear to have stood out prominently — for race-riding is a business
which essentially requires practice and experience — he was suffi-
ciently good to be entrusted with the handling of Mr. Vyner's Bell-
ringer in the Grand National Hunt Steeplechase of 1879. A note
by the late Duke of Beaufort in the Badminton Library Steeple-
chase volume may here be quoted : " The course at Derby, where the
meeting took place that year, was an extremely severe one, so much
so that a protest against its severity was made by some of those
interested in the event. Mr. Arthur Coventry, on being consulted,



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MR. ARTHUR COVENTRY



I 2



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122 THE BADMINTON MAGAZINE

declared it to be in his opinion an excellent course, which any
alteration would tend to destroy ; and the result proved that he, at
least, found it suitable.'*

It was about this time that Tom Cannon was attracted by the
neatness and skill of which he perceived the more than promise in
Mr. Coventry, who on his part had begun to entertain that enthu-
siastic admiration for the great jockey which grew in intensity so
long as he continued to figure in the saddle. Tom Cannon at this



Online LibraryAlfred Edward Thomas WatsonThe Badminton magazine of sports and pastimes → online text (page 9 of 52)