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These three cities, founded by the old native, races, were never
colonized by the Greeks, although the influence of the Greek
artists is seen in the types of their coinage. The deities also
represented on the coins are purely Greek, as for instance Artemis at
Consentia, Apollo at Nuceria and Demeter at Petelia.

The artistic work of the-;e three mints is probably quite as good
as that of the same period in the cities of the Greek Colonists.



— 190 —



CONSENTIA.



On the coins ot this city we find only the first three letters of its
ancient native name Kfl2, and we can only conjecture what it may
have been, for the name Consentia is only the Latizined form of an
Oenotrian name.

If the cNT is part of the original name we may conjecture the
Oenotrians called it Kwcrsv-uiJ. and compare it with Tarentum,
Uxentum, Buxentum.

In inscriptions, found at Polla, the name is spelt KoGvnix and
this also is the spelling of Strabo. The date of the inscriptions found
at Polla is not recorded in any work easily seen, so their evidence
is valueless for our purpose. Appian and Ptolemy spell the name
with N, KojvasvTia.

The coins of this city are interesting as having been struck before
the rise of the Bruttians to power, and while the city was still under
its own native government, but as Consentia became the principal
seat of the Bruttian government its coinage is also interesting as
that used by them. Strabo (Lib. VI, p. 256, Casaub) says : " Next in
order comes Cosentia, the metropolis of the Bruttii. "

Livy (VIII, 24) tells the story of how Alexander of Epirus fled
from the Greek Pandosia and Acheron only to meet his fate in Italy
at Pandosia in Bruttium ; " after having often defeated the armies 01
Bruttians and Lucanians, and taken Heraclea, a colony of the
Tarentines, Consentia, and Metapontum from the Lucanians, Terina
from the Bruttians "... then follows the stoiy of his death in the
Acheron.

During the second Punic War Consentia at first was loyal to the
Romans, but was taken by Hamilco. Livy (XXIII, 30) says : " having
thus recovered Petilia the Carthaginian general marched his army
to Consentia. The place was less obstinately defended, and in a few
days he received its submission.

Their more ready submission is just what we should expect from
the character given to the citizens by Lucilius, who alludes to them
as possessingsuperior refinement to the rest of the Bruttii and as.
being more like the Tarentines and Sicilians (apud Cicero de fin

^- 3.0
Livy describin gthe events ot 213 B.C. says " at the same time



— 191 —

in Bruttium out of twelve communities which in the previous year
had gone over to the Carthaginians, two, Consentia and Thurii,
returned to their loyalty to Rome ". He then explains why more
did not follow their example viz. owing to the stupidity of a had
man named Pomponius Veientanus (Lib. XXV, i).

Livy also tells us how in the year 206 B.C. the Consul Q_. Civc'i- .
lius led an army "in Consentinum agrum "' and how after the flight
of the people " Ea sine certamine tota gens in ditionem populi
Romani rediit. " The ultimate victory gained in 204 B.C. is briefly
related by Livy (XXIX, c. 38)"eadem instate in Bruttiis Clampetia
a consule vi capta, Consentia et Pandosia et ignobiles aliaecivitates
voluntate in ditionem venerunt. "

BRONZE COINAGE OF CONSENTIA BEFORE 350. B.C.

L Size .75. Obv. Head of Mars to right, wearing crested Corinth-
ian helmet; above O or N.

Rev. KHZ. A thunderbolt ; beneath, three crescents with the
horns downwards.

IL Size .75. Obv. A youthful male head to right, crowned with
reeds, and having a small horn in front; above O ; behind, a
crescent.

Rev. Kfl2. A crab, above, two crescents, back to back, vertiailly
placed.

IIL Size. 85. Obv. Head of Artemis, to right, her hair bound
with a cord passing four times round it.

Rev. A strung bow, string downwards ; beneath, a crescent,
horns downwards ; above, to right, another crescent.

In the British Museum Catalogue there is the mark of question ?
to this attribution.




ARTEMIS.

Dr. L. R. Farnell in his " Cults of the Greek States " says of
Artemis " perhaps no other flgure in the Greek Pantheon is so
difficult to understand and explain " because the ideas connected
with her cult are at first sight confusing and contradictory, " most
of her cult is genuinely Hellenic. " The cult is found in its most
primitive form in Attica, Laconia, and Arcadia.



— 192 —

Dr. Farnell also says " it was more widely spread than that of any
other Hellenic goddess, and was established in the Greek Colonies
of Sicily especially at Syracuse ". Her most primitive cult was that
of an independent goddess, connected with the waters, and with
wild vegetation and beasts, reflecting in her character the wild life
of the primitive men who lived by hunting and fishing rather
than by agriculture.

She was Af.;j.va-cir ' the lady of the lake ', and 'EX$'.a, the goddess
of the marsh ; and we find her at Syracuse with this character. In
Magna Graecia, where Aristaeus and Pan were so popular, it is
surprising that Artemis should not have received greater attention
than the coins and the literature show to have been given to her.

Her head appears on the coins of Metapontum Ai. no 19 (p. 80,
Coins of M. Graecia).

Tarentum JE. type XI, 212-209 B.C. (ibid., p. 52).

Thurium iE. no 17 (ibid., p. 128).

Her figure is represented walking and with her dog, on a coin of
Thurium no 16.

In the Hist. NnmonimY)r. B. V. Head says concerning the staters
of Syracuse issued before 500 B.C. : " The head in the centre of the
Reverse may be assumed to be that of the presiding goddess of the
island of Ortygia, Artemis, who is identified with the water nymph
Arethusa. "

Artemis is represented in the literature connected with Magna
Graecia only apparently in the pages of Athenaeus, Theocritus,
Pindar, and Diodorus. The first writer speaks of a cup dedicated
to Artemis at Capua (lib. XI, § 77, p. 489 A). " And we may to
this dav see a cup of that fashion at Capua, a city of Campania,
consecrated to Artemis, and the Capuans assert that that is the
identical cup which belonged to Nestor. " Theocritus speaks of a
grove of Artemis at Syracuse (II, (>€),

Athenaeus also says Artemis was surnamed Xuojv^ at Syracuse
(p. 629 E). "^

Pindar in his second Pythian ode speaks ot Ortygia the island off
Syracuse as " the residence of the river-goddess Artemis ".

Diodorus Siculus (V, 3) tells us that Artemis received from the
gods the island of Syracusa which oracles and men have named
Ortygia from the name of this goddess.



— 193 —



NUCERIA



There were two cities called Nuceria, one in Campania called
Nuceria Aliaterna, the coins of which all bear Oscean legends, and
the other a city of Bruttium, near Terina, no^v called Nocera.

It is situated on a hill about four miles from the Tyrrhenian sea,
and the mouth of the river Savuto. Considerable remains of an ancient
city are still to be seen at Nocera, and by some scholars have been
thought to be those of Terina (Millingen, p. 25, Ancient Coins and,
p. 58 of his A^//7//. de Fane. ItaL).

Stephanus of Byzantium mentions a citv called Nsuy.pi'a as a city
of Tyrrhenia, but he must mean on the Tyrrhenian sea.

BRONZE COIN OF NUCERIA. CIRCA 3 00 B.C.

Size .85. Obv. Heaa of Apollo, to right, laureated, beneath, an
ear of barley : border of dots.

Rev. N-YKP INON. A horse standing to left; beneath, a penta-
gram : plain border.

Only one type is found in the British Museum.



15



— 194 —



PERIPOLIUM



In the British Museum Catalogue on p. 398 a silver coin of
Peripolium is described under Samnium. It weighs 9.8 grs. and in
size it is .45.

Obv. Head of Hera to left wearing stephane, and earring;
behind, /E : border ol dots.

r,^,. riTANATAN

^ PEPIPOAHN

Heracles kneeling to right and strangling the lion with both arms.

Mommsen attributes these coins to Samnium on the strength or
a passage in Strabo (V, p. 250).

" It is also said that certain Lacedaemonians came and lived among
them (Samnites), and that this is the reason of their affection for
the Greeks, and that certain of them are called Pitanata;.

The whole of this however appears to be a mere fabrication ot
the Tarentini interested in flattering and conciliating a neighbouring
people so powerful &c.

But no town named Peripolium is known in Samnium.

In the " Historia Nunwnim " D' B. \\ Head says (p. 91) Peri-
polium was an outpost of the Locrians on the frontier of their
territory towards Rhegium.

It appears to have been occupied late in the fourth century (the
date of its coins) bv a colony of Pitanativ, presumably from Pitane
in Laconia. Peripolium is not mentioned in Smith's Geographical
Dictionar3\

D' B. V. Head has kindly informed mc that as two specimens of
these coins have been found in Samnium ; it is quite likely that
Peripolium from which the coins were issued was situated in that
region. The types of these early coins arc naturally unlike those ot
the Samnium bronze coins which belong to a later period i. e. after
290 B.C.

We must therefore no longer consider Peripolium as one ot the
Bruttian cities.



— 195



PETELIA



Petelia is situated about twelve miles north of Croton, and three
miles from the coast. It was piohably looked upon as part of the
territory of Croton, and the citizens of Petelia used the coins of that
city. Petelia was originally however an ancient stronghold of the
Chones, a tribe of the Oenotrians.

The city Chone in the same neighbourhood, and Petelia, are both
said to have been founded by Philoctetes after the Trojan war.

Strabo thus describes the city (VI, p. 25^, Casaub).

" Petelia is considered as the metropolis of the Lucaniand is still
well populated. It owes its foundation to Philoctetes who was
compelled to quit Meliboea on account of civil dissensions. Its
position is so strong that the Samnites were formerly obliged to
construct forts around it for the defence of their territory. "

Virgil (A^neid, III, 400, 481) refers to the same legend : " Here
stands that little city Petilia defended by the walls of Philoctetes, the
Meliboean chief. "

The long note by Servius is interesting but adds nothing of
numismatic interest.

Petelia is never mentioned as a Greek city probably because it was
regarded as belonging to Croton. When however the Lucanians
invaded the land, about 368 B.C., Petelia fell into their hands,
and became their principal stronghold in the South. Petelia first
became conspicuous in the second Punic War, when the citizens
remained faithful to the Romans in 216 B. C. although the Bruttians
threw off their allegiance. The city was besieged by the Bruttians,
and by Hamilco, and was abandoned to its fate by the Romans.

Livy tells the story (XXIII, 20) of how the envoys from Petelia
who came to ask help in Rome were moved to tears when assured
that it was beyond the power of Rome to give them help. In another
chapter (30) Livy describes the siege, etc. its horrors, famine reduced
their strength so that they could not lift their arms : from the same
passage we learn that Croton was invested by a Bruttian army, and
fell, being defended by only 2000 citizens of all ages ; these however



— 196 —

were not pure Greeks, for the old Greek city had been destroyed
152 years before.

The loyalty of the Petelians was recorded by Valerias Maximus
who concluded with a striking sentence. " Itaque Annibali non
Petelliam, sed fidei Petellin:t sepulchrumcapere contigit. "(Lib. VI,
c. vi).

(So it came to pass that Hannibal did not take Petelia but the
grave of Petelian fidelity).

Silius Italicus introduces a legend also noted by Servius

Fumabat versis iiicensa Petilia intectis
Infelix fidei, miserseque secunda Sagunto
At quondam Herculeam servare superba pharetram.
(Lib. XII, 431, p. 366, ed. Nisard.)

He notices how once the old city was proud of preserving the
quiver of Heracles. Appian (Annib. 29) records that those citizens
who escaped were restored by the Romans, and we have seen that
Strabo was able to call it well populated.

From inscriptions discovered on the site we learn that the city
prospered during the Roman Empire. The modern name of the town
on the old site is Strongoli and it is said to contain 7000 inhab-
itants, but it contains no ruins of the old cit}' besides the inscrip-
tions and minor objects of antiquity. Confer Lenormant " Lagrande
Grece ", p. 383 ssq.

COINS OF PETELIA CIRCA. 2 5 0-200 B.C.

Quadrans.

I. Size .65. Obv. Head of Jupiter, to right, laureated; behind g :
border of dots.

Rev. riETH.M NflN. Jupiter standing to right naked, hurling
thunderbolt, and holding sceptre ; behind, a monogram H • plain
border.

Oncia.

II. Size .6. Obv. Head of Mars, to right, wearing a crested
Corinthian helmet ; border of dots.




Rev. '?F.Tj?.,. A wreath-bearing Nike, standing to left.
AINilN



— 197



COINS WITHOUT MARKS OF VALUE.

III. Size .45. Obv. Head of bearded Heracles, to right, wearing
wreath : border of dots.

^ - AmnN -'"i^' " '^■''-

IV. Size .8. Obv. Head of Demeter, to right, wearing veil and
wreath of barlev : border of dots.

Rev. nETHAlNHN. Jupiter, naked, facing and standing to left,




hurling thunderbolt, and holding sceptre ; in field to left a star ot
six rays : in field to right H or or K or A.
The star sometimes has only five rays.

Uncertain city of Apulia.

Bronze coin of Side or Sidis.

Size .55. Obv. Head of Zeus, to right, laureated, behind, an ear
of barley : border of dots

Rev. IIAINflN. Heracles, to right, leaning on his club which
rests under his left shoulder, from which hangs his lion-skin : plain
border.

A similar type is found on the uncia of Mateola described above
among the coins of that city.



GENERAL INDEX



Acerrae, 7, 9.

Alliba or Allifae, 9.

Alphabet, Oscan, i.

Antoninus Liberalis, iii.

Apulia, loi.

Apulia or Calabria, 109.

Arpi, 103.

Artemis, 191, 192.

Atella Coins of, 13, 14, 15.

Aurunca, 7.

Aurunci, 54.

Ausculum, 107.

Azetini, 109.



Baletium, 149.
Barium, in.
Bellona, 172.
Brundusium, 151.
Bruttii, 176.
Butuntum, 113.



Caelia, 115.

Caiatia, 16.

Calabria, 145.

Caiatia, 18.

Cales, 20.

Campanians, 5.

Campanian cities, list of, 2.

Canna;, 1 19.

Canusium, 118.

Capua, 25.

Caudine Forks, 123.

Compulteria, 37.

Consentia, 190.

Copia, 174.

Cumont, Franz, 88.



Fensernia, 44.



Graxa, 155.

Gold Coins of the Bruttii, 179.

H

Haeberlin on the Libral As, 87,

Hyria, 42.

Hyria or Orra, 157.



lapygians, 145.
Irthne, 45.
Isis, 175.



Legend of the quiver of Hercules, 196.
Lucania, 167.
Luceria, 12^.



M



Mars, 171.
Marrucini, 1 56.
Mateola, 128.
Messapians, 146.
Mithras, 88.



N



Neapolis of Apulia, 129.
Neretum, 160.
Nola, 58.
Nuceria, 193.
Nuceria Alfaterna, 46.



Dasius, 103.
Diomedes, 103.



Oenotrians, 167,
Orra, 157.



— 200 —



Petelia, 195.

Peripolium, 194.

Phistelia, 50.

Pounds, the Six, of Italy, 89.

Pullus, 103.

R

Romano Campanian Coins, 61.

Rubi, 1 30.

Rubi and Silveum, 132.



Sturnium, 162.
Suessa, 54.



Table of relation of bronze to silver, 66.
Teanum Sidicinum, 57.
Teate, 136.

U

Unidentified coins, 166:
Urium or Hyria of Apulia, 121.
Uxentum, 163.



Samadi, 135.

Sidicini, 57.

Silvium and Rubi, 152.



Velecha, 45.
Venusia, 140.



INDEX OF TYPES



AMPHITRITE.
Bruttii, 179, 181, 187.

AMPHORA.
Canusium, 1 19.

APOLLO.

Aurunca, 7.
Alliba, II.
Gales, 23.
Capua, 34.
Compulteria, 37.
Nuceria, 49.
Suessa, 54.
Teanum, 59.
Rom. Camp., 62.
Arpi, 106.
Luceria, 127.
Salapia, 134.
Neretum, 160.
Bruttii, 84.
Nuceria, 193.

APHRODITE,
Orra, 159.

ARCHAIC IDOLS.

Capua, 34.

ARTEMIS.

Bruttii, 183. Consentia, 191.

ASTRAGALOS.
Luceria, 125, 126.



BELLONA.

Lucania, 170.
Bruttii, 184, li

BOAR.

Capua, 33, 34.
Arpi, 106.



Auscuium, 108.
Salapia, 154.
Venusia, 141, 143.

BOW-STRUNG.

Consentia, 191.

BULL.
Capua, 32.
Arpi, lOt".

BULL, MAN-HEADED.
Cales, 24.
Compulteria, 37.
Hyria, 42-43.
Irthne, 45.
Phistelia, 5 1 .
Suessa, 56.
Teanum, 59.
Teate, 138.

BULL'S HEAD FACING.
Rubi, 131.

BULL AND SERPENT.
Rom. Camp., 84.



CERBEKUS.

Capua, 34.

CERES.
Capua, 32.
Rom. Camp, 86.

CLUB.

Caelia, 117.
Luceria, 127.
Rubi, 131. ,

COCK.

Caiatia, 16.
Cales, 22, 23.
Suessa, 56.
Teanum, 60.



— 202 —



COCK AND MAN-HEADED BULL.
Capua, 36.

COCKLE-SHELL.

Butuntum, 114.
Luceria, 125, 126, 127.
Venusia, 142.
Graxa, 156.
Sturnium, 162.

CORNUCOPIA.
Copia, 174.

CONICAL HELMET on head of Hero .
Orra, 159.

CRAB.

Butuntum, 114.
Luceria, 126.
Venusia, 144.
Bruttii, 187.
Consentia, 191.

CRESCENT.

Rom. Camp, 86.

Caelia, 1 16.

Luceria, 125.

Samadi, 135.

Venusia, 141, 142, 143, 14^.

Baletium, 150.

Consentia, 191.



DEMETER ?

Neapolis, 129.
Petelia, 197.

DESULTOR.
Suessa, 55.

DIANA.
Calatia, 19.
Capua, 33.

DIOMEDES?

Canusium, 120.

DIONE.

Luceria, 127.

DIONYSOS.

Neapolis, 129.
Venusia, 143.

DIOSCURI.

Nuceria, 45.



Caelia, 117.
Bruttii, 180.

DOE SUCKLING TELEPHUS.
Capua, 28, 35.

DOE OF CERYNEIA.
Rom. Camp. 86.

HEAD OF DOG OR WOLF.

Venusia, 141.

DOLPHIN.

Luceria, 125, 127.
Salapia, 134.
Venusia, 142, 143.
Graxa, 156.

DOVE FLYING WITH WREATH.
Orra, 159.



EAGLE.
Capua, 32, 35.
Rom. Camp., 80, 85.
Azetini, no.
Caelia, 1 16.
Rubi, 131.
Salapia, 134.
Teate, 138.
Venusia, 143.
Graxa, 155.
Orra, 157.
Lucania, 170.
Bruttii, 182, 186.
Sturnium, 162.
Uxentum, 164.

EAR OF BARLEY.

Capua, 34.
Arpi, 106.
Ausculum, 107.
Azetini, 1 10.
Butuntum, 115, 114.
Luceria, 125, 126.
Neapolis, 129.
Rubi, 130.

ELEPHANT.
Capua, 35.
Velecha, 45.

EROS ON PROW.
Barium, 1 12.



20^ —



EROS WALKING.
Orra, 159.



FULMEN.
Capua, 35.

Rubi, 131, 116.
Luceria, 126.
Consentia, 191.



GORGON'S HEAD.
Caelia, 1 16.

GRAPES.
Arpi, 106.
Neapolis, 129.

H

HEAD WEARING WOLF'S SKIN

CAP
Rom. Camp., 84.
HEBE.

Hyria, 45.

HELIOS.
Atella, 15,
Velecha, 45.
Rom. Camp., 86.
Rubi, 131.
Venusia, 14^.

HERA.
Hyria, 43.
Fensernia, 44.
Phistelia, 5 1.
Venusia, 143.
Peripolium, 194.

HERACLES.
Capua, 33, 34, 35.
Suessa, 56.
Teanum, 59.
Rom. Camp., 84, 86.
Ausculum, !08.
Caelia, 115.
Luceria, 125, 126.
Mateola, 128.
Rubi, 131.
Teate, 137.

Venusia, 141, 143, 144.
Uxentum, 164, 165.
Lucania, 170.



Copia, 175.
Bruttii, 179, 185.
Peripolium, 194.
Petelia, 197.

HERMES.
Teanum, 60.
Venusia, 144.

HERO, NUDE.

Nuceria, 48.

HOOK, REAPING.
Arpi, 105.

HORSEMAN.
Capua, 32.
Rom. Camp., 86.
Canusium, 120.
Teate, 137.

HORSE.

Calatia, 19.

Rom. Camp., 62, 63, 81.

Arpi, 105, 106.

Ausculum, 107.

Luceria, 125.

Salapia, 1 34.

Nuceria, 193.

HOUND, RUNNING.
Nuceria, 49.
Ausculum, 108.



ISIS.

Copia, 174, 175.



JANUS.
Capua, 32, 35.
Rom. Camp., 63.
Uxentum, 165.

JUNO.

Capua, 54, 35.
Rom. Camp., 84.

JUNO ami JUPITER.
Capua, 33.



LION.
Capua, 33.



204 —



Phistelia, 53 .
Rom. Camp., 81.
Arpi, 106.
Mateola, 128.
Teate, 139.
Venusia, 143, 144.

LYRE.
Capua, 34.
Canusium, 1 19.
Venusia, 141.
Neretum, 160.

M

MALE HEAD, HAIR LONG.

Nuceria, 48.

MALE HEAD, RAM'S HORNS.

Nuceria, 48.

MALE HEAD BEARDLESS.
Phistelia, 5 1 .

MALE FIGURE, HOLDING PALM.

Caelia, 116.

MARS.

Rom. Camp., 62, 63.
Arpi, 106.
Lucania, 170.
Bruttii, 184.
Consentia, 191.
Petelia, 196.

MERCURY.

Suessa, 54.

MUSSEL SHELL.
Trthne, 45.
Phistelia, 51.



N



NIKE.
Calatia, 19.
Cales, 20, 23.
Capua, 33, 34.
Teanum, 59.
Rom. Camp., 62.
Ausculum, 108.
Caelia, 116.
Rubi, 131.
Lucania, 170.
Bruttii, 184, 185.



NYMPH.
Hyria, 42.
Phistelia, 51.



OWL.

Azetini, 1 10.
Butuntum, 114.
Rubi, 131.

Teate, 137, 138, 139.
Venusia, 141, 145, 144.
Lucania, 170.



PALLAS.
Alliba, II.
Caiatia, 16.
Cales, 21, 23.
Capua, 32, 33, 35.
Hyria, 42,43-
Phistelia, 52.
Suessa, 56.
Rom. Camp., 80.
Arpi, 105, 106.
Azetini, no.
Butuntum, 113.
Caelia, 115.
Urium, 121.
Luceria, 126.
Mateola, 128.
Rubi, 130, 131.
Samadi, 135.
Teate, 137.

Venusia, 141, 142, 144.
Orra, 157.
Uxentum, 164.
Copia, 175.
Bruttii, 182.

PAN.
Capua, 34.
Salapia, 134.

PEGASUS.

Capua, 52.
Fensernia, 44.

PERSEPHONE.

Arpi, 105, 106.

PHRYGIAN HELMETED HEAD.
Rom. Camp., 62.

POSEIDON.
Luceria, 127.



— 20



Teate, 139.
Brundusium, 155.
Bruttii, 179, 181.



R



RIVER-GOD, HEAD OF.
Consentia, 191.

RUDDER.

Urium, 121.

S

STAR.

Luceria, 125.
Unidentified, 166.



TARAS ON DOLPHIN.

Butuntum, 114.
Teate, 139.
Baletium, 1 50.
Brundusium, 153.

TELEPHUS, HEAD OF.
Capua, 35.

THYRSOS.

Luceria, 125,

TOAD.

Luceria, 125, 126, 127.
Venusia, 144.

TRIDENT.
Neapolis, 129.

TROPHY.
Capua, 35.
Caelia, 1 16.

TYCHE.
Capua,* 32.

TURRETED DIADEMED HEAD.
Rom. Camp., 86.



TWO WARRIORS AND PIG.
Capua, 33.

V

VINE BRANCH AND GRAPES.

Neapolis, 129.

VASE AND STARS.

Uxentum, 164.

w

WHEEL.
Phistelia, 53.
Luceria, 125, 126.

WOLF & TWINS.
Rom. Camp., 62, 85.

WOLF'S HEAD.
Lucania, 170.



ZEUS OR JUPITER.

Atella, 14, 15.

Calatia, 18, 19.

Capua, 31, 32, 33, 34> 36.

Rom. Camp., 63.

Arpi, 106.

Barium, in.

Caelia, 116.

Urium, 121.

Rubi, 131.

Salapia, 134.

Teate, 138.

Venusia, 142, 143.

Graxa, 155.

Luceria, 170.

Bruttii. 186.

Petelia, 196.

Note there are no less than eighty-
eight different types on this series of
coins, among which thirty divinities
are represented.



INDEX OF CLASSICAL AUTHORS aUOTED



Antoninus Liberalis, 70, in.

Apollodorus, 84.

Athenaeus, 147.

Cato, 21.

Caesar (Civ. Bell.), 174.

Cicero, 14, 21, 47, 72.

Diodorus Sicuius, 16, 27, 44, 58, 84,
86, 124, 132, 136;, 147, 168, 177, 178.

Dion. Halicarnasus, 58, 75, 102.

Eutropius, 61.

Florus, 61, 107, 147.

Gellius, Aulus, 39.

Herodotus, 145, 147, 157.

Horace, 21, 119, 130, 140.

Jornandes, 178.

Justin, 38, 151, 177.

Juvenal, 21 .

Livy, 8, 9 10, 13, 16, 18, 20, 25, 28,
30, 37. 58, 41, 46, 47. SO, 54, 57.
58,65, 67, 68, 73, loi, 102, 103,
104, III, 119, 123, 124, 133, 15b,
140, 147, 152, 168, 169, 172, 174,
179, 190, 195.

Lycophron (Schol), 28.



Ovid, 70, 172.

Paulus Diaconus, 178.

Pausanias, 29, 146.

Pindar, 44, 103.

Pliny, 46, 77, 82, 88, 109, 113, 132,

149, 160, 163.
Plutarch, 75, 107.
Poiybius, 64, 146.
Pomponius Mela, 121, 149, 155.
Ptolemy, 162, 163, 190.
Silius Italicus, 10, 14, 20, 28, 58, 196.
Statius, 88.

Stephanus of Byzantium, 178, 195.
Strabo, 9, 57, 103, 109, 118, 121, 123,

132, 133, 145. 151, 163, 167, 171,

174, 176, 190, 194, 195.
Tacitus, III.
Thucydides, 72, 163.
Valerius iMaximus, 61, 104.
Varro, 76, 82.

Velleius Paterculus, 38, 72, 140.
Virgil, 20, 28, 39, 54, 75, 145, 146,

172, 195.
Zonarus, 102, 152.



PROTAT BROTHERS, PRINTERS, MACON (FRANCE)



ERRATA



Page 8^, line 7 : derived, but read : derived; hut

Page 121, line 7 : to the hay formed hy the headland Urias
Sinus read : to the bay Urias Sinus.

Page iji, line 14 : (about 1323 B.C.) read: (about iioo

B.C.)....

Page 16), line ij : Kramer prefers O'Jupia read : Kramer

prefers O'jpia



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