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house, often past the very door. Sometimes they
heard Mr. Grigg's quick tread, and rough though
kindly voice in the passage. It was a comfort to
know there was some one who had their interest at
heart, attending to the sale — a friend who would not
see them wronged. As it grew later and the sha-
dows lengthened, the mother and son drew nearer
to each other, as they sat by the glowing grate,
and once more spoke of Mr. Edward Greville.

" I'm sure Mr. Grigg is much more like an
uncle, mamma, if he was only papa's man of busi
ness, and never saw us before. To think of his
ordering the luncheon himself this noon, because
he thought Thomas might forget it, and you woull



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46 CONTENTMENT BETTER

not like to cross the hall ; it's such little things
that show what a kind heart he has — hut then we
owe him so much. I hope Uncle Edward won't
even know where we are going ; I'm sorry he is
papa's brother — I'm sure they never could have
been alike."

Just then the handle of the door turned, and
voices were heard in the passage.

" I don't think this room was included in the
sale," some one said.

Arthur sprung forward to prevent the intru*
sion, but he was too late ; the door opened, and
Mr. Edward Greville himself, accompanied by
Mr. Anthon, were recognized. It was a most
uncomfortable meeting for all parties. The gen-
tlemen looked confused, and Mrs. Gbreville trem-
bled; for a moment they hesitated whether to
advance or retreat, but Mr. Anthon bowed, and
said something about '^ Not intending to intrude ;
had ridden over to secure a favorite picture — sup-
posed she had left ;" — ^and then Mr. Greville
came forward with him, and the door was shut.

" You have done a very sensible thing," he
said. He hoped in his heart that the sale had
been as humiliating to Mrs. (xreville, as it had



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THAN WEALTH. 41

been mortifying to him, to have it so publicly
known that his brother had died insolvent.
" Going to London, I hear — ^worst thing in the
world. You will waste every cent, mark my
words, and come back upon me after all."

" We shall never come to you for assistance,
sir," Arthur said, not angrily but firmly. " We
are not too proud to work, mamma and I ; but we
are too proud to be dependent."

" Try it, my young Hotspur, try it ; that's all
I can say. I wash my hands of the business,
since you choose to decline my assistance so
graciously."

"Assistance," echoed Mr. Anthon. "I un
derstand from your letter, madam, that your sov
George does not fancy the counting-house. I
wish the young gentleman and you, madam, suc-
cess wherever you go. My friendship for theii
late father, who was — "

" A reckless spendthrift," muttered Mr. Gr©
ville — ^fortunately so low that Arthur could not
distinguish it.

" A most devoted friend himself," said Mrs.
Greville, filling up the uncomfoi1;able pause ; " and
a generous, unselfish man. His children are left



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48 CONTENTMENT BETTER

io me, and I do not despair. I thank you fbr
your good wishes."

The gentlemen tnrned to go.

"Edward, one moment," Mrs. Greville said,
detaining her brother-in-law, as Mr. Anthon pass-
ed out first — " We may not meet again for many
years ; and I cannot forget you are poor Arthur's
only near relative. If Arthur or myself have
offended you, think of our many trials. Remem-
ber us kindly, Edward — ^

Mr. Greville faltered a moment before her
gentle voice and pleading look, but Mr. Grigg's
voice was heard approaching, and his face dark-
ened again.

" You have seen fit to forget our relationship,
and trust all your plans to a pitiful lawyer ; since
you choose strangers, go to them, and find out
how much they are worth at your leisure." He
shook o'ff her hand as it rested on his arm, and
was gone without one word of love or sympathy.
But riches, and the love of them, had hardened
his heart to the better feelings of our nature. It
was a wretched parting.

Mr. Grigg had come to tell them that all was
over. As they were to commence their journey



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THAN WEALTH. 49

to London the next day, nothing wotdd be removed
nntil their departure. His thoughtful stipnlatiion
with the purchasers had saved them from seeing
an empty home, and now they sat in the firelight
and discussed their final plans. Mr. G-rigg wodd
go up to London with them. ,He had business of
his own to attend to, and thus all preset anxiety
was spared. All the trouble of collecting, pur-
•basing the annuity, and even securing their berths
in the packet-ship, he could manage very well ;
but it was necessary for Mrs. Greville to wait in
London a few days to sign some papers. The
best thing of all was, that Nurse Long had de-
cided to emigrate too. Mrs. Greville had told
her that she could not afibrd to keep any maid,
but nurse would not hear of being left behind in
England, and had privately commissioned Mr.
Grigg to pay her passage-money from the little
saving-fund she had accumulated. This good
news was reserved for the evening of the sale ;
for the ugh nurse could not afford to live without
wages, and even her board would be a consider-
ation with Mrs. Greville, she would be in the
same place with them and they could see her
flbmetimes. All the children were delighted with
8



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50 CONTENTMENT BETTER

the arraugement, though they little dreamed what
it would be to lack her services. Mrs. Greville
felt that she could not be thankful enough, that
she was to hare her humble, but ever faithful
Mend, a sharer of her exile.

The children commenced their journey in fine
spirits. Even George and Arthur were bright-
ened by the prospect of so much novelty and ad-
venture; but Mrs. Ghreville leaned back in the
carriage as the lovely villas of Bath, her own
home among them, were hidden in the distance.
The world was all before these little ones, but to
her life had no other brightness.



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THAN WEALTH 51



CHAPTER IV.

LONDON AND LIVERPOOL.

In London ! with the unceasing roar and hum of
the busy multitude about them ! — ^Yet how unlike
the London Arthur had so often pictured. They
were far from the Gjtately palaces and gay shops,
in a retired and almost obscure lodging, such as
suited their now humble means. Mr. Grigg had
recommended the house to them, and the people
were decent and obliging. But the rooms were
low and old, and spantily furnished, as London
lodging-houses often are. There was nothing to
be seen from the windoys, the heavy atmos-
phere obscuring houses as old and dingy as Mrs.
Crump's, the name of their landlady. The only
green thing in sight was a dwarfed and sickly
elm in the little paved yard, that looked as if it



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62 CONTENTMENT BETTER*

was straggling in Tain against the smoky air
and the lack of sunshine. Their grounds, and
garden, and Mrs. Greville's conservatory, came
often to their remembrance. Even Nurse Long
said : — " She hoped they wouldn't have to stay,
for Ella and Theodore would waste away, she
knew, shut up in such a dismal place.''

Arthur and George were the only ones who
had any thing like enjoyment. They could bo
trusted with a guide-book, Mr. Grigg had given
ihem, to wander about all the morning ; and they
saw many wonderful things. St. Paul's first of
all — Arthur thought it would never do to go to
America without seeing that — and the Tower,
at least its frowning outer walls ; and once Mr.
Grigg found time to take them to the British
Museum, where they saw too many strange things
to think of remembering them all.

Thanks to Mr. Grigg, business progressed ex-
peditiously. The sale had brought more than
could be expected ; ^i. the annuity was pur-
chased, reserving a sufiScient sum for their passage,
and to establish them in New- York, until Mrs.
Greville and Arthur found employment. The
papers were all signed — Mrs. Greville trusting



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THAN WEALTH. 68

most implicitly to her new friend, ifho was not
unworthy of all her confidence.

Indeed he refused any kind of remuneration
for the trouble he had taken, when he was explain-
ing afifairs to Mrs. Greville, the morning before
they started for Liverpool.

"But your own charge, Mr. Grigg? I do
not see it, and I am sure it has not been ar-
ranged."

" Charge, indeed !" retorted Mr. (xrigg, pro-
ceeding to sort and tie up the papers oefore lim.
" I thought you were a sensible woman, madam —
always found you so before — only too happy to be
of service."

" I shall never be able to thank you, sir."

" I ask for thanks — expect thanks ? No, ma-
dam, not in the least — ^never do things in that
fashion — ^thanks — gratitude — humbug ! — ^as the
Americans say !"

And so Mr. Grigg parted with them at the
station in Euston Square, for he was to return to
Bath that evening. The same kind and thought-
ful friend to the last, taking off his hat and put-
ting his head into the car-window to give Arthur
the last directions for their embarkation, just as



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64 CONTENTMENT BETTEB*

the bell rang, and the train gave symptoms of
moving. Then back again with a quick jerk, and
a little flourish of the hand to Mrs. Oreville ;
while Arthur held up Ella for a last glance.

If the children were delighted with their rapid
railroad trip, their excitement was still greater
at the thought of really going to sea ; and in a
ship, with real sailors.

" Perhaps we shall see a whale !" said Theo-
dore to Ella, from his little bed at the foot of his
mamma's, at the Liverpool hoteL " Wouldn't you
be afraid, Ella?"

^ But I should rather see the waves all on fire,
or an iceberg," returned Ella, sitting up for very
sleeplessness and excitement. " Whales must be
so ugly !"

'^ I wonder if we shall pass India, where papa
used to be, and all those curious things came
from — don't you remember on the globe? and
when we begin to tip down to America, I'm afraid
I shall fall off the deck."

" Oh, Theo ! how funny ! and then we shall
see Indians in America, and bears, and — ^"

" Come, come. Miss Ella, this '11 never do !"

Ella was startled at Nurse Long's sudden ap-



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THAN WEALTH. 55

pearance, and took to her pillow again, very
much disconcerted by this unlocked for interrup-
tion to her catalogue of American wonders, gath-
ered indefinitely from pictures, story books, and
Louisa's narratives. The under nurse, Louisa,
had very limited ideas on all geographical matters.
Notwithstanding they both protested they should
not sleep till morning, there was soon good evi-
dence to the contrary. Both were too tired to
hold to such a resolution, when compelled to be
quiet.

The children supposed that they were to em-
bark on the ocean at once, and had very grand
idea9 of the ship lying out in the waves, and the
nice row-boats that would take them to it. But
Ella in particular was entirely disappointed in
their embarkation ; there was no ocean at all in
sight, and the ship lay crowded with many others
in one of the enormous docks, which line the river
Mersey, on which Liverpool is situated. These
docks seemed huge towers of solid masonry, and
Theodore thought the ship would never be able to
get out of one of them. It was a strange bustling
scene, and one from which Mrs. Greville shrank*
They had not been able to afford a passage by



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56 CONTENTMEirr BETTER

steamer; and Mr. Grigg had been advised to
secure berths m a returning merchant-vessel, that
could accommodate a few cabin-passengers ; but
was principally fitted up for the better class of
Scotch and Irish emigrants. At first Mrs. Gre-
ville did not like this, but there would be a saving
of seventy dollars ; which was no trifle in her
circumstances. Beside, their own accommodations
were as comfortable as if they had gone in a more
pretending packet.

The passengers were arriving in crowds, and
the wharves were thronged with seamen, porters,
draymen, and lookers-on of every description.
Piles of boxes and chests were strewn arovnd ;
and oaths and shouts of those endeavoring to
establish some order out of this confusion, re-
sounded in every spoken language it seemed ;
making a most uncomfortable Babel of sounds.
And through all this they gained their ship, named
the Christopher Columbus, the owners it may be,
thus thinking to insure successful voyages.

The decks were scarcely less uncomfortable.
Seamen were hurrying backwards and forwards,
running against groups of emigrants, huddled
together with their boxes and bundles. Their



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THA29 WEALTH, 67

friends almost doubled the number, bidding them
noisy farewells, or sobbing aloud as they came
back for the twentieth time, perhaps, for a last
message. Poor Ella was greatly disappointed
and confused. She had expected to see clean
white decks, and the sails all set, as in pictures.
This hubbub, and want of all neatness, troubled
her, and she was very glad to^go below, into the
'^nice cabin'' nurse had told them about. But
here was a fresh disappointment to the little ones ;
they thought the state-rooms were only closets at
first, like the store-rooms at home, and that they
should never be able to sleep in those little shelves
of berths.

It was not a very pleasant prospect, it is true,
to our young friends, accustomed to their large,
light nursery, and neat beds. But Ella told The-
odore that ^ Mamma and brother Arthur didn't
make any fuss, and if such big people could sleep
there they could." But they were glad to get on
deck again, noisy as it was, after the confined air
of the cabin.

As they had to wait for the tide, it was late
m the afternoon before they dropped down the
stream, past mile& of warehousesi and docks, ris-
8*



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68 CONTENTMENT SETTEE

ing before them. The emigrants were still clus-
tered on deck, although by the rules of the vessel
they were not allowed to come where the cabin
passengers stood. Ella thought they all looked
sorrowful and uncomfortable, as indeed I suppose
they did, as many of them were leaving their fam-
ily and friends for ever. Mrs. Greville was al-
most thankful as nli^e watched some of these sad
partings, that this trouble at least was spared to
her. She had all she loved around her.

It was a bright moonlight evening, and the
children begged to remain on deck. So nurse
brought them shawls and cloaks, and they gath-
ered closer to Mrs. Greville, who knew that they
might not be able to be out in the air again for
several days. But at length Ella grew weary,
and leaned so heavily on her mamma's arm that
she knew she must be asleep, and the little group
dispersed to their first sleep on shipboard.

Arthur, however, had little rest. The nar-
row berth seemed choking him, and if he fell into
an uneasy sleep, the straining of cordage, or the
tread of feet overhead, was sure to wake him
again. So long as Mr. Grigg had been with them
the charge had not seemed so great, but now he



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THAN WEALTH. 69'

Was the sole protector of his mother and the chil-
dren, and a thousand fears and doubts came into
his mind. His head fairly ached with the many
plans that came, one after the other, of their fu-
ture life, and at last, thinking it must be daylight,
though the cabin was still dark, he rose, and dress-
ing quietly so as not to disturb George, found his
way to the deck. He thought they were out at
sea at first, for the light was still misty and indis-
tinct, and he could see nothing of the ships that
had come down the river beside them. The ves-
sel rolled with a long undulating motion, and the
clouds seemed like a close dark canopy above
them, as if the sun was never to be visible again.
But they were only near the mouth of the Mersey,
which is, indeed, an arm of the sea., and the large
buoys that now and then rose and disappeared in
the waves beside them, served as guides to the
ship's course. Only one other passenger had ven-
tured on deck ; a gentleman whose face and figure
were almost entirely concealed in a boat cloak that
was wrapt around him, for in this early morning
the air was raw and chilly.

On the whole, it was a most depressing scene.
The crew were busy washing down the decks,



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60 COmrSNTMSNT BKTTEa

iQoldxig half aaleep^ and miaerable, for they had
just come fiom their berths to relieve the odier
watch. The wind flapped the sails heavily, and
as Arthur stood watching them, he heard a dis-
mal, booming sound, like the tolling of a bell.
He looked eagerly in the directiim fix>m which it
came, but there was neither land nor ship in sight.

He thought it might be fancy — ^but no, there
it came again) booming over the crested waves,
and startling the still morning air. It seemed
like a dirge, and Arthur, who had heard many
strange stories of shipwreck and phantom ships,
began to feel very uncomfortable.

^' I suppose that is the celebrated bell buoy,"
said the gentleman, for the first time uncovering
his face, and seeming to notice him.

Arthur's face brightened, though he never
had heard of the bell buoy, and told the gentle-
man so, who very kindly explained to him that it
Was a kind of alarm bell fastened on the rocks, as
a warning to seamen, and tolled by the motion 6t
the waves. When there was a storm it rang loud
and &st, as the waves beat over it, but in this
more quiet sea it had only a booming, melancholy
sound, mingling with the rush of the vessel throu^



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TRAK WEALTH. 61

the water. The gentleman did not speak again,
and Arthur listened and looked with a very sad
heart. But the mist began to &11 in fine, pene-
trating showers, and the rising wind gave token
of a stormy first day at sea, so that by the time
it was fiurly light, Arthur was glad to go below.
He was wet, and cold, and down-hearted. Oh, it
was a miserable day to all of them; Mrs. Ore-
yille, George, and Ella sufiering most of all firom
sea-sickness, while Theodore was glad to lie per-
fectiy still, he was so dizssy the moment he tried
to raise his head.

Nurse, who had been at sea before, was for-
tunately well enough to wait upon them, and told
the children they ought to be thankful they were
well taken care of instead of being shut up in the
steerage, as so many little children were at that
very moment, in a crowd of people all as sick as
themselves*



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CONTSNTMEITT BBTTEa



CHAPTER V.

THE VOYAGE.

The stonn lasted for two or three days. It was
not very violent, bat sufficiently so to make a
great deal of shouting and trampling overheadi
which, with the roll of the ship, the straining of
the timbers, and the dampness of every thing
around, made even the cabin passengers wish
themselves at home again.

Arthur was the first to grow better, when, on
the fourth day they were fairly out at sea, the
wind subsided and the waves grew smooth once
more. He was of very great assistance to nurse
in the care of the remaining invalids, for Mrs.
Ghreville had grown very weak. He sat hours by
the berth in which Ella was laid, bathing that
little wan face, almost as white as the pillow it



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THAN WEALTH. 68

was laid on, and her bright, tangled hair swept
back from her forehead. And Theodore had to
be amused to be kept quietly in bed, which he was
heartily tired of; but nurse thought it best. And
George had grown fretful and complaining, and
wished himself on shore again twenty times an
hour.

The first time Arthur ventured on deck he
found matters very much altered. It was noon,
and every thing was nicely washed and stowed
away, the decks were scrubbed as neatly as the
chamber-floor of « tidy country inn, and the sun
shone pleasantly on the white sails overhead.
Many of the emigrant passengers, thankful to
escape &om their confined quarters, were enjoying
the bright weather in the space assigned to them.
Two gentlemen, the only cabin passengers besides
themselves, were overlooking the Captain, who
was ^* making an observation," as it is called at
sea, a curious process, which I could scarcely ex-
plain to you, or you understand. It interested
the gentlemen very much apparently, and Ar-
thur's first acquaintance, who seemed inclined to
notice him, explained how by this means the Gap-
tain could tell any day just where they were at seal



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64 CONTENTMENT BETTER

^^ And the lady I saw come on board with joa
is your mother, I suppose/' he said afterwards ;
for on shipboard people make acquaintances very
easily. ^' And those were your little brothers and
sisters. I heard them call you Arthur. That is
my name too — Arthur King, or ^^ King Arthur,"
as they used to call me at school."

Arthur thought he should like Mr. Sing veiy
much. He seemed to be about twenty-five, and
had a smile now and then that gave his otherwise
plain fiice a most agreeable expression ; it was so
frank and trustworthy. The other gentleman was
a great deal older, and had an expression just the
opposite of Mr. King's. " Sour dipcontent " Ar-
thur called it, when he was describing the two to
his mother. " He talked about the horrid accom-
modations to Mr. King, and those 'filthy Irish,' and
a great deal that I'm sure he need not have said. '
And then Arthur stopped, for he knew from his
mother's warning smile that he too was finding
&ult, and saying things he need not have said.

When the children were well enough to go on
deck, they began to think the ship was not so dis-
agreeable after all. The Captain and Mr. King
were very kind to them, and George began to re*



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THAN WEALTH. 66

coyer his good nature. He liked the motion of the
vessel as she mounted one wave after anothei^
plunging oniv^ard, as a spirited horse would bound
along. Ar'^hur thought of this first as he stood
watching tae waves one morning, for he was an
excellent horseman, and enjoyed his rides very
much. H^ asked Mr. King if he did not think
so too, an'' Mr. King smiled, and asked him in re-
turn if ho had not read Ghilde Harold, and quoted
that beautiful verse : —

" Onoe more upon the waters 1 Yet onoe mere !
And the wave bounds beneath me as a steed
That knows its rider 1 Welcome to the roar 1
Swift be their guidance, wheresoever it lead 1
Though the strained mast should quiver as a reed.
And the rent canvas fluttering strew the gale.**

Arthur had never read Ghilde Harold, and Mr.
King good-naturedly repeated verses of it to him,
and many other descriptions of the sea, for he
seemed to have read and remembered a great deal
of poetry.

Mr. Eling and Mr. Wiley, the other passenger,
were very unlike each other. Mr. King seemed
always to be thinking of other people, Mr. Wil»^



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66 CONTENTMENT BETTEII

only about himself. Mr. King enjoyed the sun-
shine, and the neat decks, and even the heavy sea
they met with occasionally. Mr. Wiley found it
too hot, or too cold, or too blustering, and always
looked ill-natured when he happened to come up
while the sailors were busy in the morning wash*
ing down the decks. He fretted about the emi-
grants, said a dozen times that he was sure they
should all have ship fever, and he wondered how
he ever came to be such a fool as to let his old
firiend, Captain Williams, persuade him into the
voyage. If he had taken a steamer he would
have been at home long before this; to all of
which Mr. King listened very pleasantly, and
said he had never seen neater Irish people than
those on board, and the Scotch were proverbially
thrifby. And so far from being afraid of the ship
fever, he used to go every day among them, and
talk to those who seemed down-hearted, and some-
times even relieve the tired-looking women by
holding a sick child, or amusing a cross one.
Arthur liked Mr. King very much ; and George
thought he must be an artist, he knew so much
about pictures. He described a visit he had made
to the Vernon gallery, when he heard George say



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PUBJ.C LlBriAKi



AS'^OR, LTNOX AND



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THAN WEALTH. 67

something about a favorite print from one of them,
and told him that there were several in New- York
that were well worth seeing.

With all this he never intruded himself or his
affairs. He saw that Mrs. Greville liked to be
quiet^ and he did not even ask Arthur to intro-


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