Alice Brown.

Children of earth; a play of New England online

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But now I wish 'twas earlier.

MARY ELLEN

I wished there was a train last night, so's we could
be miles away by daybreak. How long 'fore we start
from here?

PETER

'Most an hour. Can you wait a spell for break-
fast ?

MARY ELLEN

I ain't hungry. A drink o' water'll do for me.

[She kneels at the spring and drinks out of her hand. Peter

kneels beside her.]

PETER

Give me some out o' your hands.

[He drinks from her hand and they rise and look at each
other smilingly, like children playing.]

I might ha' thought to bring you somethin' to eat.
Or told you to.

MARY ELLEN

I had hard work to slip away as 'twas.



CHILDREN OP EARTH 1 4 I

PETER

D'you leave any word behind?

MARY ELLEN

I left a letter for Aaron. I put it by the lamp.

PETER
What d'you say in it?

MARY ELLEN

I told him I'd gone with you. I told him to break
it to Nita an' go straight off, same as they meant to.
So's they needn't face the neighbors.

PETER
The neighbors won't get hold on't yet.

MARY ELLEN

O Peter ! Yes, they will. I told Nathan Buell.

PETER

When?

MARY ELLEN

Last night when I was comin' here. When I got
to Cynthy Coleman's I thought how Nathan was layin'
there in her best bed, an' I stepped up to the winder
an' tapped on the screen, an' I says, "Here's somethin'
for you/' 'Twas his little ring an' chain. An' I laid



142 CHILDREN OF EARTH

it on the sill. "I'm goin' off," I says, "with Peter
Hale."

PETER

What d'you do that for ?

MARY ELLEN

I dunno. I felt so light an' free. An' 'twas moon-
light, an' you waitin' for me. An' I laughed,

PETER

Then he's begun to spread it. But he won't find
one o' the neighbors'll believe him.

MARY ELLEN

Why not?

PETER

They wouldn't believe you could. Anybody't had
lived the kind o' life you have.

MARY ELLEN
[Wistfully.]

Couldn't they, Peter? Couldn't they believe it?

PETER

Ye don't see what I mean. Nobody'd understand
what 'tis to us. They couldn't. I was afraid Aaron'd
keep ye up talkin'.

MARY ELLEN

He did. Till 'most midnight.



CHILDREN OF EARTH 143

PETER

About the land?

MARY ELLEN

Yes.

PETER

D'you sign it over?

MARY ELLEN

Yes.

PETER

Let him have his land. We don't want it.

MARY ELLEN

Peter, twenty-six years ago this spring father set
with me one whole night from ten to three, orderin'
me to give up my will to his.

PETER

About Nate Buell.

MARY ELLEN

Yes. An' I give up. At three o'clock. I can hear
that clock strike now. Jest as it struck a robin begun
to sing. I thought I never should hear a robin ag'in
without my heart stopped beatin'. But this mornin'
I heard one. An' I laughed.

PETER

When you come up to me here last night the clock
struck one. D'you notice?



1.44 CHILDREN OF EARTH

MARY ELLEN

Yes. I wondered if you did.

PETER

Course I did.

MARY ELLEN

I thought to myself, ' Tis one o'clock. It's a new
day."

PETER

An' here's the day.

MARY ELLEN

An' I ain't the same woman I was yesterday, nor
you ain't the same man.

PETER
I never see you look like this.

MARY ELLEN

It's mother's weddin' dress. Here's her bonnet, too.

PETER
Put it on.

[She does it shyly.]
A lily in a ring o' roses. That's what you be.

MARY ELLEN

Roses always light anybody up.



CHILDREN OF EARTH 145

PETER

It ain't the roses. 'Tis you. I couldn't see the roses
last night, could I? But I see your face under the
moon.

MARY ELLEN

[Laughing, with a timid coquetry and taking off the bonnet.}
You didn't hardly speak to me.

PETER

I was afraid. There was the moon an' you so
wonderful.

MARY ELLEN

Did you think I laid there all night on that blanket
in the sweet fern? I only stayed there till you'd set-
tled down. Then I crep' back ag'in. I knew where
you'd be. Under the pines, on that knoll.

PETER
Yes. That's where I was.

MARY ELLEN

I crep' up to the other side, an' laid down on the
pine needles, an' once I 'most laughed out to think
you didn't know how near I was.

PETER

O, yes, I did.

MARY ELLEN

You did? D'you see me?



146 CHILDREN OF EARTH

PETER

No. But I heard you breathe. An' I laid there
an' drew my breath with yours, an' I says, "That's
the way it'll always be, breathin' the same breath,
thinkin' the same thoughts."

MARY ELLEN

What'd you think about ?

PETER

You. All night long I thought o' you.

MARY ELLEN

An' I thought o' you.

PETER

An' the new day.

MARY ELLEN

Yes.

PETER

Not once of what we'd left behind?

MARY ELLEN

I did think of Nita. But Nita'll go away where
folks never heard o' me. Tell me what else you
thought.

PETER

I guess I thought of all the things I've saved for
you.



CHILDREN OF EARTH 147

MARY ELLEN

What are they, Peter?

[They sit by the spring.]

PETER

Things you never thought of. I didn't know I was
savin' 'em, but I was.

MARY ELLEN

Oh, what were they?

PETER

Pretty words, pretty things to do for you. You're
so fine an' soft an' sweet, you've got to have things
nicer 'n any woman ever had before. What d'you
make that wreath for?

MARY ELLEN

Somethin' to do 'fore I found you were awake.

PETER

You knew how you were goin' to look to me, so
you made this.

[He rises, crowns her with it and stands looking down at her.]
A crown.

MARY ELLEN

Mebbe I wa'n't goin' to be beholden to pink roses.
I took white blooms, so you could see me as I am.



148 CHILDREN OF EARTH

PETER

White blooms. Then you'll be the rose.

MARY ELLEN
[She rises.]
Peter, I never've concerned much about my looks.

PETER

If you see yourself as you are now, you couldn't
help it. There's somethin' come into your eyes
since yesterday an' you're different. O Mary Ellen,
you're like an apple tree in all her glory.

MARY ELLEN

You're different, too. I never see you like this.

PETER
It's because I've come alive.

MARY ELLEN

'Tain't only you an' me. You've made the whole
world come alive. You say you've saved things for
me. An' I've saved things for you. There never's
been a minute when I could show what's in me waitin'
to be born. I've kep' it all for you.

PETER

An' we'll speak out the thoughts we never've spoke
before



CHILDREN OF EARTH 149

MARY ELLEN

Some we never knew we had

PETER
An' we'll laugh

MARY ELLEN

Peter, the birds! the birds! I'll dance for you.

[She dances and then runs to him, shy and breathless, and
hides her face on his shoulder.]

PETER

Mary Ellen! Mary Ellen! I never knew you
danced.

MARY ELLEN

I ain't for years. One spell I used to dance alone,
down in my bedroom when f ather'd gone to bed. Once
he come to the door in his stockin' feet.

[She runs to the spring.]

But this ain't under anybody's roof. Tis the earth
an' the sky an' the trees.

PETER

'Tis your own house, Mary Ellen. God made it
for you.

[Mary Ellen, laughing, bends over the spring. She gives a
cry, draws back, snatches off the crown and throws it
from her.}

What is it, dear? What is it?



150 CHILDREN OF EARTH

MARY ELLEN

In the spring.

PETER

What's in there ?

MARY ELLEN
[Wildly.}

No! no! don't look. But 'tain't there now. My
face.

PETER
Why, yes, you see yourself. That's all.

MARY ELLEN

My face. I see my face.

[Shuddering.}

There was the crown, an' my face under it. Peter,
I'm old.

PETER

Don't ye look in lyin' water when there's my eyes
you can look into. Don't you tremble so.

MARY ELLEN

[Getting hold of herself and laughing in bravado.}
What if I am old? What if we were so old we
didn't even have much time together? Ain't this one
minute with you worth all the years I've lived?



CHILDREN OF EARTH 151

PETER

Don't look back. Look forrard.

[As if humoring a child.]

Now you listen while I tell you how it's all goin'
to be.

[They sit by the spring.]

MARY ELLEN

Tell me, Peter.

PETER

I know a town where I'm remembered. We'll hire
a little house, an' there we'll live.

MARY ELLEN

Live. In a house with you.

PETER

Yes. An' I shall be away all day workin', an' you'll
be workin' at home

MARY ELLEN

Home.

PETER

An' at night I shall open the gate an' come up the
path

MARY ELLEN

An' I shall hear you comin'



152 CHILDREN OF EARTH

PETER

An' you'll open the door, an' I shall call. An' you'll
run down the path oh, I can see you now betwixt the
rows o' larkspur an' I shall have the whole world in
my arms.

MARY ELLEN

Tell more about the house.

PETER

[In mock despair.]
She wants the house. She don't want me.

MARY ELLEN

Don't I my lord?

PETER

What make you call me that?

MARY ELLEN

They do in the Bible. It's what you are my
lord.

PETER

It is her house. An' it's her garden too.

MARY ELLEN

I never had much of a garden. Them long beds
o' mine were 'most too gravelly.

PETER
'Twon't be gravel where we're goin'.



CHILDREN OF EARTH 153

MARY ELLEN

I guess I shall want two long beds, anyways, same
as mine leadin' down to the gate. I admire long beds
each side the path.

PETER

Course you'll have long beds.

MARY ELLEN

Come five o'clock, d'you ever notice how nice the sun
lays acrost the pinks in them two beds o' mine?

PETER

It's goin' to lay in every corner o' your new garden
some part o' the day. There won't be a foot of it
that ain't a-bloom. Poppies can't you see 'em blowin'
in the wind? An' flower-de-luce. An' monkshood,
straight an' tall. An' hollyhocks. An' pinies, red as
blood. An' all June the roses. But no rose'll hold a
candle to you, you'll be so pink an' pretty.

MARY ELLEN

I sha'n't be like the roses.

PETER

No. You're too delicate an' fine. You're a madonna

lily, white as snow.

MARY ELLEN
{In rapt wonder.]
White as snow.



154 CHILDREN OF EARTH

PETER

But sweet. The scent of 'em's almost more'n a
man can bear. Now you tell.

MARY ELLEN

{Timidly.}
What shall I?

PETER

I've told the garden. You tell the house.

MARY ELLEN

[Reflecting.]
Well! We've made the garden, ain't we?

PETER
Yes. For you to walk in summer days.

MARY ELLEN

For you to look at when we have our suppers on
the porch.

PETER
For us to smell by night.

MARY ELLEN

The garden's ours. But the house is yours.

PETER

It's your house, Mary Ellen.



CHILDREN OF EARTH 155

MARY ELLEN

I dunno's I'd ask anything better'n the old house
I've took care of so many years if it had more closet
room. Or another cupboard by the pantry door.
What you laughin' at?

PETER

Here we are with the world before us an' we can't
think up anything better'n your old house an' garden.

MARY ELLEN

Why, yes, I guess the old house'd do well enough,
so fur's that goes. I can't think of anything better'n
livin' there with you-

[She stops, aghast, and then resolutely dismisses the picture

she has called up.]

Anyways, whatever house 'tis, everything I do in it's
done for you. All day long, while I'm makin' it nice,
I think of you. The floors can't be clean enough for
you to walk on. An' the winders can't be clear enough
for you to see through. An' your clo'es will be hangin'
round, an' when I go by the nail where your old coat
is, I'll put my cheek ag'inst it.

PETER

An' you'll sing at your work. An' sometimes when
I'm workin' near the house I shall hear you

MARY ELLEN

Sing ! I ain't sung for years.



156 CHILDREN OF EARTH

PETER

An' I'll say your name, an' drop my tools an' run,
an' there you'll be, singin'. An' you'll see me, an'
stop short, an' I'll hold out my arms

[Suddenly Jane's voice, strident, dreadful, comes from the
woods in a mad outcry. Mary Ellen and Peter rise.}

MARY ELLEN

What's that ?

PETER

You know who 'tis.

MARY ELLEN

Jane.

PETER

Yes.

MARY ELLEN

Where's she goin'?

PETER

Over to your house.

MARY ELLEN

By the short cut.

PETER

What's she goin' there for?

MARY ELLEN

I thought yesterday she never'd darken them doors
ag'in.



CHILDREN OF EARTH 157

PETER

Git out o' sight.

MARY ELLEN

No, Peter. I sha'n't hide.

PETER

Step in an' let her pass.

MARY ELLEN

No, Peter, no. What we're doin' we'll do in the
sight o' man as well as God.

PETER

You can't do her no good, an' 'twill do you both
harm. Hear it. When a woman screams like that
you'd better stan' from under.

MARY ELLEN

Is she

PETER

In liquor? No. But she'll have it 'fore night. I've
seen her crazed. But not like this.

[The cry ceases.]

MARY ELLEN

She's stopped.

PETER

She'll begin ag'in. Mary Ellen, I won't have you
meet. Ain't you goin' to mind me? If ye don't, I'll
carry ye by main force.



158 CHILDREN OF EARTH


MARY ELLEN

[Listening.]
Hark! There's somebody else.

PETER
Which way?

MARY ELLEN

There.

PETER

Git into the bushes.

[Jane, wild and haggard, comes through the woodpath. She
listens and then runs to the big pine by the spring and
throws herself upon it, her desperate hands clutching at
the bark like the claws of a climbing animal. She listens,
steps cautiously to the other side of the tree and
hides. Uncle Eph comes through the wood, absorbed in
pursuit of her. He listens and then steals up to the tree
and, with a childish laugh at his own cleverness, discovers
her.]

JANE

[Stepping out from hiding.]
,f

Ain't I got red o' you ? You've f ollered me all night
long, an' when I've shook you off there you'd be ag'in,
buzzin' round my ears.

EPH

[hi crack-brained delight at his own cunning.]
Time an' ag'in I thought I'd lost ye, ye kep' so still.
I'd get me laid down, but ye couldn't bust out singin'
afore I'd rise up an' foller ye. An' every time you'd
sing, I had to dance.



CHILDREN OF EARTH 159

JANE

You're enough to drive anybody crazy.

EPH

[Vaguely troubled.}
Don't ye say that word.

JANE

What do you s'pose I come out into the woods for,
if 'twa'n't to be by myself an' git a chance to breathe?

EPH

[Confidentially.]

Mebbe ye come to There's a terrible sight o'
trees in the woods if anybody only had a rope.

[He goes to the spring and, sitting, peers into it.]

An' there's this water here though I dunno's it's
deep enough.

JANE
Come, be off.

EPH

There's a lot o' ways folks can do it, if they only
thought so. I wish they would so's I could see. I
dunno how many years I've wanted to do it, an' I
dunno how it's done.

JANE

Be off. I won't have you taggin' me.

[She picks tip a stone and threatens him.]



160 CHILDREN OF EARTH

EPH

[He dodges instinctively and then, finding she really isn't
going to throw, calls in high delight.]

You throw an' I'll ketch.

[Jane drops the stone. He splashes the water with his hand,

in childish pleasure.]

Water! Water! I'll hold your head under 'f I git
the courage, an' you can drownd an' I'll see how it's
done.

JANE

Look here ! I'm goin' now, an' if I hear you fol-
lerin' me

EPH
[Going to her with his wistful air of wanting to "play".]

Ye goin'? Then ye sing as ye go, an' we'll both
dance.

JANE
I can't dance.

EPH

Then you sing for me.

JANE
I can't sing.

EPH

Wa'n't ye singin' jest now?

JANE
Yes. If you call it that.

[Her voice breaking, she goes to the pine and cowers

against it.]

To keep from screamin'.



CHILDREN OF EARTH 161

EPH

Oh, ye mustn't scream.

JANE
Why not?

EPH

If ye scream, they'll say ye're crazy, an' the boys'll
run after ye the little devils an' the womenfolks'll
say, Poor soul ! No, don't ye scream.

JANE

If you felt as I do, you'd have to scream.

[Leaving the pine, picking up the wreath and speaking

absently to herself.}
Look at this.

EPH

What is it ? A ring-a-round-a-rosy !

JANE

Some girl made it, an' wore it on her head. An'
she's got everything before her. An' here be I, an'
what have I got before me?

[She throws it down.]

EPH

I dunno what ye mean.

JANE

Course ye don't. D'ye s'pose I could open my lips
to anybody't did know?



162 CHILDREN OF EARTH

EPH

D'ye s'pose ye've got a broken heart?

JANE

No. I've got no heart to break. I've drowned it in
liquor. That's what I've done. It's drownded.

[She returns to the pine and stands leaning against it, ab-
sorbed in her thoughts and looking down into the spring.]

EPH

[Wisely.]

Then if ye ain't got no heart, there can't nothin'
hurt ye.

[He picks up the wreath.]

JANE

Can't it ?

EPH

So you put on the ring-a-round-a-rosy.

JANE
No.

EPH

An' we'll dance.

JANE
No.

EPH

An' sing

JANE
No, I tell you, no.






CHILDREN OF EARTH 163

EPH

[Dropping the wreath in a wistful discontent.]
If ye won't dance nor sing, what will ye do?

JANE

k

I dunno what I'm goin' to do. Git drunk or kill
myself.

EPH

[Eagerly.]

That's the talk ! That's what I said. Kill yourself.
You do it, an' I'll see how it's done. I've been kind o'
'fraid to do it, unless I knew the rules. An' here's
suthin' for you to do it with.

[He takes out a big clasp knife and opens it.]

It's my knife. I was goin' to cut rushes to make me
a hat.

[He offers it to her persuasively.]

JANE

You put that back in your pocket. Don't ye offer
it to me.

EPH

You do it. You do it.

[He lays it in her hand. The bushes move where Peter is

on guard.]

JANE

[Looking at the knife in an unwilling fascination.]
Is it sharp?



164 CHILDREN OF EARTH

EPH

God sakes ! I guess 'tis.

JANE
Would it cut right through ?

EPH

Bone an' all. You try it. On your broken heart.
If ye don't make out, 'twon't do ye no hurt. There's
no wuth to a broken heart. Here, I guess you better
give me suthin' to bind over my eyes, so's I sha'n't see
ye fall.

[He retreats from her, shielding his eyes with his lifted arm.]

[Jane comes awake, throws the knife to the ground, and

sinks at the foot of the tree in a violent sobbing.]

JANE

No! no! I can't. I can't.

EPH

[Aggrieved, picking up his knife and trying the edge.]

Well, ye needn't dull up my good knife. Now what
ye cryin' for? If ye'd put the knife into ye, ye couldn't
cry no more nor what ye're cryin' now.

JANE
[Rising to her knees.]

God A'mighty! what am I doin' here, anyway?
I've got to go back an' git Barstow's breakfast.

[She rises.]



CHILDREN OF EARTH 165

EPH

[Proffering the knife.]
You do it.

JANE

[She brushes off her dress and pats her hair into decency.]
I can't, I tell ye. I've got to go an' git breakfast.

EPH

Well, if you're goin', you sing as ye go, an' le'me
dance.

JANE

I sha'n't sing no more.

[She goes off by a woodpath and Uncle Eph, after a mo-
ment's puzzled consideration, trots happily after her.}

[Peter and Mary Ellen come out from hiding.}

MARY ELLEN

D'you ever see her cry like that?

PETER
No. She ain't a cry in' woman.

MARY ELLEN

She ain't looked so either. I dunno's I ever see her
look so.

PETER

Liquor'll be the next thing.

MARY ELLEN

She's bound for it now.



166 CHILDREN OF EARTH

PETER

Yes.

MARY ELLEN

After she's got breakfast. D'you hear that?

PETER
Yes.

MARY ELLEN

Then she'll feel free to wander away. An' drink.
How she cried!

PETER
God!

MARY ELLEN

D'you tell her last night?

PETER

Yes.

MARY ELLEN

What'd she say?

PETER

Not one word.

MARY ELLEN

An' now she's goin' to git breakfast. I hope she'll
have the house shut up 'fore Nathan's there. I never
thought maybe Nita'll hear it first from him.

PETER
You think Jane'll stay an' shut the house?



CHILDREN OF EARTH 167

MARY ELLEN

She's a real caretaker.

[Absently.]

I hope she'll put Trot out.

PETER
The cat'll be all right.

MARY ELLEN

Her kittens are up in the shed chamber. I guess
Jane'd remember to leave the door.

PETER

My God! Do you know what we're doin'? We're
standin' here talkin' about the chores, an' it's daylight
an' we're goin' off together

MARY ELLEN

An' Jane wants to git drunk or kill herself but
she's gone back to git breakfast.

PETER

Do you think for a minute this thing means to her
what it does to us?

MARY ELLEN

No.



l68 CHILDREN OF EARTH

PETER

Do you think she wants to kill herself because
she's left behind ?

MARY ELLEN

No. Not that. But it's everything together. It's
her cravin', like a devil inside her. An' there was you
an' me to fight the devil, an' we're gone. An' she's
alone. But she's hoein' out her row.

PETER
What's the matter with us ? Nothin' looks the same.

MARY ELLEN

Even this place don't look the same. The flowers
don't.

[She snatches up the wreath, tears it apart, and throws it

into the spring.]

PETER
What you doin' with that?

MARY ELLEN

Buryin' it where nobody'll see it die, an' where I
sha'n't see it. Even that looks different.

<

PETER

Do I look different?

MARY ELLEN

Do I?



CHILDREN OF EARTH 169

PETER

Don't you love me?

MARY ELLEN

Dearer'n my life.

PETER

Don't you want to be with me ?

MARY ELLEN

Not that way, the way we thought.

PETER
Don't you want our house?

MARY ELLEN

Not that way.

PETER

Nor the garden? An' you waitin' at the gate?

MARY ELLEN

Not if we have to walk over her to git it.

PETER

The first step's taken. We have walked over her.

MARY ELLEN

Yes. We've stepped right on her an' left her in the
dust. An' what's she done ? She's got up, all bruised
an' bleedin', an' gone to do the work she said she'd do.



1 70 CHILDREN OF EARTH

PETER

What's bruised her? She don't feel to me as a
woman feels to a man.

MARY ELLEN

She can't. The liquor's killed it out of her. But
she's got somethin' left. She stan's by. An' so must
we.

PETER

Have 1 got to see you go back there an' give up your
will to other folks?

MARY ELLEN

Tis because I've got a will I'm goin'.

PETER

To see you work an' slave

MARY ELLEN

The work's nothin'.

PETER

Never to have your life

MARY ELLEN

Why, Peter, we've both had our life. This one day.

PETER
Spring. An' no time for ripenin'. O my God !



CHILDREN OF EARTH 171

MARY ELLEN

Don't you tell me the world ain't mine as much as 't
was an hour ago. An' yours. Why, Peter, here we
be, free to go either way we say. Which way we
goin' ? You're the man. You've got to be the strong-
est.

PETER

Yes. I could make you go by main force, anyway.

[They look each other in the eyes, Peter in a fierce passion,

Mary Ellen unyieldingly.}

MARY ELLEN

Which way we goin'?

{She waits for him to answer.]
Ain't we goin' back ?

PETER

[With a long breath.]
Yes.

[They turn and he stops short.]

We can't go back.

MARY ELLEN

Why can't we?

PETER

There's Nate Buell. He's told folks.

MARY ELLEN

O my Lord!

PETER

You shaVt face it. 1 won't let you.



172



CHILDREN OF EARTH



MARY ELLEN



It never'll be forgotten, so long as we live nor
after. How Mary Ellen Barstow run away.

PETER

Damn 'em.

MARY ELLEN

They'll p'int us, out to strangers. In the Meetin'
House. "That was the woman that run away."

PETER
T won't mean to them what it does to us.

MARY ELLEN

No. Twill mean the worst.

PETER

They'll make it hell for you.

MARY ELLEN

Yes. There'd be nothin' like it

PETER

You can't face it. Nor I for you.

MARY ELLEN

Nor I for you.



CHILDREN OF EARTH 173

PETER

That settles it. Come.

[They turn to go, but Mary Ellen stops.]

MARY ELLEN

But Jane! Jane's facin' it. She's gone back there
to git breakfast. Peter, we're goin' back.

PETER
[After a moment's struggling thought.]

Yes, we're goin' back.

[They turn to the homeward path and go off, Mary Ellen

leading.]



CURTAIN



ACT IV

The same morning a little later, in the Bar stow sitting-
room. The shutters are still closed and the lamp is
on the table. Near the lamp is MARY ELLEN'S
note. The basket of pewter is by the sideboard, on
the floor. JANE comes in from the kitchen, goes to
MARY ELLEN'S bedroom door, listens, opens it a
crack and closes it. She goes to the table to take
the lamp to the sideboard, sees MARY ELLEN'S
note, looks at it and puts it in her pocket. As she
is setting the lamp on the sideboard a whistle is
heard outside. JANE goes out to the kitchen.
Again the zvhistle outside and ANITA comes in
from the hall, whistling an answer. She carries
a charming negligee over her arm. She runs to
the window and opens the shutter a little.

ANITA

That you, Adam ?

ADAM

[His tone is curt and anxious.]
Yes.

ANITA

I heard you whistling under my window. I came
as quick as I could.

175



176 CHILDREN OF EARTH

ADAM

I thought you'd know that whistle.

ANITA

Did you mean it for a serenade? Didn't you hear
me answer? I couldn't believe you'd let me go with-
out saying good-bye.

ADAM
Can I come in ?

ANITA

I'm not quite dressed.

[She slips on the negligee over her dress to make herself as

pretty as possible.}

Do you know what time it is? I came very near
seeing the sun rise.

ADAM
Is your father up ?

ANITA
Yes. Dressing.

ADAM

Hurry, Nita. Let me in.

ANITA


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