Almaric Rumsey.

The way to prove a will and to take out administration : containing full instructions where, how, and when to apply, with alphabetical tables, forms of oaths, bonds, etc., rules for personal applications and other information required for obtaining probate or administration online

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All Inforhiation Required for

ING PROBATE OR ADMINISTRATES
th Rules for Personal Applications




HE WAY TO PROVE

A WILL

AND TO TAKE OUT

! ADMINISTRATION



Containing Full Instructions
WHERE, HOW, AND WHEN TO APPLY

gBlg
ALMARIC RUMSEY

Harris ter-at-Law
Author of 'Will-Making Hade Safe and Easy." &c.



JOHN HOGG, 13 PATERNOSTER ROW

"%nfF >?_ . i.' _-, . . j ^^






Ex Libra
C. K. OGDEN



I 3



OK fcF. LIBRARY, LOS AHGELES



fmtom * JBfer



THE WAY TO PROVE A WILL



TO TAKE OUT ADMINISTRATION.



THE

WAY TO PROVE A WILL

AND

TO TAKE OUT ADMINISTRATION

CONTAINING FULL INSTRUCTIONS

laabere, 1bo\v, an& Xdben to Bpplg

\V1TH

ALPHABETICAL TABLES, FORMS OF OATHS, BONDS, ETC.
RULES FOR PERSONAL APPLICATIONS



OTHER INFORMATION REQUIRED FOR OBTAINING
PROBATE OR ADMINISTRATION



BY

ALMARIC RUMSEY

BARRISTER-AT-LAW

Professor of Indian Jurisprudence at Kings College, London; Author

of " The Moohn'itniudan Law of Inheritance" " Al Sirdjiyyah

Reprinted," " Will-making made Safe and Easy," etc.



' It must be proved, and probated, and swore to, and all manner o' formalities."

J'ostlintnous Papers of the Pickwick Club,



LONDON
JOHN HOGG, 13 PATERNOSTER ROW

1898

[All rights reserved.]



Sftbiu & JBUr






PREFACE.



THE extremely cordial reception which was given to
my little work " Will-making made Safe and Easy "
on its publication has convinced me that the attempt
to write a legal work popularly, and yet with a view
to accuracy and to completeness within defined limits,
was not a rash one ; and I therefore venture to appear
again before the public and the legal profession in
order to discourse to them on a subject connected with
wills. Some of my readers may be good enough to
remember that " Will-making " was addressed to three
classes of readers, and I address myself, practically, to
the same three classes now. It may happen to any
reader of these lines to have been appointed an executor
by, or to be next-of-kin of, a deceased person of small
means, and such a reader may readily obtain probate
or letters of administration without burdening the
little estate with unnecessary expenses, if he attends to
the directions contained in the body of this book, and
to the " Rules as to Personal Applications " reprinted
in the Appendix, A clergyman may, in like manner,



1C9C893



VI PREFACE.

either act for himself or assist a less erudite parishioner
in shaping his course correctly. Lastly, a solicitor
will find here, compressed into a small compass, all the
information required for ordinary cases of probate and
administration, information which he would otherwise
have to seek in a scattered form in much larger works.
Much care has been taken as to the arrangement, both
of the book generally, and of the particular facts
within themselves, in order that the reader's time may
be economized as much as possible. With a similar
object the considerable amount of matter which lends
itself to tabular treatment has not been left as I found
it, but has been arranged, alphabetically or otherwise,
in such manner as appeared in each instance to be
most conducive to facility of reference. I feel con-
fident that an author does not labour in vain who thus
spends his individual time liberally in order to spare
that which is much more important, the aggregate
time of a large body of readers !

It would be a great advantage to the public if some
reforming M.P. would introduce a Bill to consolidate
the numerous and confused enactments as to exemp-
tions from probate. 1

I have the pleasure of offering my sincere thanks
for kind advice and assistance given to me during the
progress of my labours by C. J. Middleton, Esq.,

1 These are so voluminous that I am only able to touch slightly
upon them ; see p. 16.



PREFACE. Vll

senior registrar of the Probate Division ; R. Hankins,
Esq., of the Queen's Remembrancer's Department;
H. M. Chapman, Esq., district registrar at Canter-
bury ; and my nephew, L. LI. N. C. Rumsey, Esq., of
the General Post Office.

As in the case of the earlier work above alluded to,
I have thought it unnecessary to supply a table of
abbreviations, 1 and, as in the case of that work, I have
placed the decisions and Acts of Parliament, not in
separate tables, but under the titles " Cases " and
" Statutes " in the Index.

A. R,

9 STONE BUILDINGS, LINCOLN'S INN,
March 1890.



1 Observe, however, that "Ru. 1862" indicates the great body
of rules now in force in the principal registry; " Eu. 1863," in
district registries.



TABLE OF CONTENTS.



PAGE

PREFACE V

TERMS IN COMMON USE XI

PRELIMINARY REMARKS 13

PROBATE : OF WHAT WILLS ; WHERE; HOW, WHEN . . 14

SEVERAL EXECUTORS ; NO EXECUTOR 31

ADMINISTRATION PRELIMINARY ; WHERE ; WHO ; WHEN . 32

WHO SHALL BE EXECUTOR ; RENUNCIATION OF PROBATE . . 39
WHO SHALL BE ADMINISTRATOR J ADMINISTRATOR UNDER 2O &

21 VICT. c. 77, s. 73 ; RENUNCIATION OF ADMINISTRATION 43

LIMITED OR SPECIAL PROBATE J LIMITED OR SPECIAL ADMINI-
STRATION 51

RIGHTS BEFORE PROBATE OR ADMINISTRATION . . 54

REVOCATION OF GRANT J OATHS AND AFFIRMATIONS, BEFORE
WHOM ; ABSENCE FOR SEVEN YEARS J FOREIGN DOMICILE ;

FEES AND COSTS 55

FORMS. PRELIMINARY REMARKS', FORMS IN PRINCIPAL REGIS-
TRY ; ADAPTATION TO DISTRICT REGISTRIES J REMARKS ON

FORMS "A" AND "B"' (ALL REGISTRIES) . . . 60



X TABLE OF CONTENTS.

APPENDIX A.

PAGE
PRINCIPAL KINDS OF PERSONAL PROPERTY . -77

APPENDIX IJ.

DIVISIONS OF COUNTIES 79

PLACES FOR APPLICATIONS UNDER 44 VICT. C. 12, 88. 33-36
(INCLUDING PLACES OF DISTRICT REGISTRIES, PRINTED IN
CAPITALS) 81

APPENDIX C.

RULES AS TO PERSONAL APPLICATIONS 86

SCALE OF ADDITIONAL FEES ON PERSONAL APPLICATIONS . 90

APPENDIX D.

ADDITIONAL FOItMS . IOO



107



Uotf to I'roc.e a Will."



ADDENDA.

.Turn, 1895.

Note to p. 26 e t seq. and p. 75.

The Finance Act of 1894 (57 & 58 Viet. c. 30) has,
in the case of persons dying on or after tlte 2nd
August, 1894, effected great changes in the Death
Duties. It Jias abolished probate duty and several
other duties, and has created a new estate duty and
a new settlement estate duty.



ERRATA.

Page ix (Contents), line 6, for "WHO" read "HOW."
, , 36, second line from bottom (Notes), for " Paxlon ' '

read " Paxton."

113, line 17, for "Paxon" read " Paxton."
117, 14 from bottom, for

" attorney guardian . . 103,105"

read ' attorney ..... 103 "

"guardian ... 106"



is payable thereon, the fixed duty of 30*. or 50*.
is to be paid.

Accounts :

C i. (In duplicate.) Account of property which
passed at the death, but the Estate Duty whereon
was not paid on the Inland Revenue Affidavit.
C 2. (In duplicate.) Account of Settlement Estiuo

Duty.

All these forms and Form A 2 (below) can be
obtained of any Collector of Inland Revenue, or by
personal application at the Legacy and Succession
Duty Oftice, Somerset House. They can also be



X TABLE OF CONTENTS.

APPENDIX A.

PAGE
PRINCIPAL KINDS OF PERSONAL PROPERTY . -77

APPENDIX B.

DIVISIONS OF COUNTIES 79

PLACES FOR APPLICATIONS UNDER 44 VIGT. C. 12. . ??-">



/Jon- to Prove a Will."



ADDENDA.

June, 1895.

Note to p. 26 ft xeq. and p. 75.

The Finance Act of 1894 (57 & 58 Viet. c. 30) has,
in the case of persons dying on or after tJtc 2nd
August, 1894, effected great changes in the Death
Duties. It .has abolished probate duty and several
other duties, and has created a new as tat c duty and
a new settlement estate duty.

Forms of Affidavits and Accounts have been issued
under this Act ; those most likely to be requii-ed are
the following :

Affidavits :

A i. Inland Revenue Affidavit for Probate or Ad-
ministration, except where A 4 or B i is
applicable.

No. 17. Summary of Duty and Interest : To ac-
company Form A I.

A 4. Inland Revenue Affidavit where the whole of
the estate consists exclusively of personal
property under the Deceased's will or intestacy,
situate in the United Kingdom, except where
B i is applicable.

No. 16. Summary of Duty or Interest : To ac-
company Form A 4.

B i. Inland Revenue Affidavit where the Gross
principal value of the property, real and personal,
in respect of which Estate Duty is leviable on
the death of the deceased,' exclusive of property
settled otherwise than by the will of the deceased,
does not exceed ^500, and, if any Estate Duty
is payable thereon, the fixed duty of 30*. or 50*.
is to be paid.

Accounts :

C i. (In duplicate.) Account of property which
passed at the death, but the Estate Duty whereon
was not paid on the Inland Revenue Affidavit.
C 2. (In duplicate.) Account of Settlement Estate

Duty.

All these forms and Form A 2 (below) can be
obtained of any Collector of Inland Revenue, or by
personal application at the Legacy and Succession
Duty Office, Somerset House. They can also be



obtained at any Money Order Post Office outside the
Metropolitan Postal District.

The executor or administrator should also obtain
Form A 2 (Inland Revenue Instructions as to Estate
Duty). These Instructions contain full details as to
rates of Duty, time and mode of payment. &c.

The executor or administrator must carefully fill
in the affidavit and accounts ; but the only duty he
is bound to pay is Estate Duty on personal property
(wheresoever situate) of which the deceased was
competent -to dispose at his death (either by virtue of
his ownership or by virtue of a general power of
appointment). This duty he must be prepared to pay
on delivery of the Inland Revenue affidavit.

p. 58.

The Colonial Probates Act, 1892 (55 Viet. c. 6)
provides for the sealing of probates and letters of
administration granted by the Courts of British
Possessions to which the Act applies, so as to give
them the same effect as if granted by a Court of
Probate in the United Kingdom.

Page 85. List of Places for Applications, &c. :

Strike out Bishop Auckland, Blandford, Bodmin,
Bradford-on-Avon, Brighouse, Buckingham, Campden.
Carmarthen, Conway, Crewkerne, Daventry, Denbigh,
Durham, Eye, Faringdon, Hexham, Ironbridge,
Knaresborough, Llandaff, Llangefni, Newnham.
Newton Abbot, North Walsham, Odiham, Ormskirk,
Pontypool, Redbridge, Royston, Runcorn, Ruthin.
Shaftesbury, Sherborne, St. Asaph, Stockport, Stoke-
on-Trent, Stony Stratford, Ware, Warminster, Well*.
Welshpool, Williton, Witney, Wotton-under-Edge.

Insert Aberayron, Aberdare, Acton, Aldershot,
Bakewell, Basingstoke, Blakeney, Bournemouth,
Builth, Chapel-en-le-Frith, Croydon, Enfield, Fron-
goch, Gillingham, Guildford, Hartlepool (West).
Hat field, High Barnct , Kilburn, Knighton, Launces-
ton, Leighton Buzzard, Lewisham, Leytonstone,
Llanidloes, Machynlleth, Madeley, Middlesborough,
Neath, Okehampton, Orpington, Parracombe, Ponty-
pridd, Presteign, Rochester, Ryde, Sawbridgeworth,
Sonthport, Staines, St. Albans, Stratford, Swiudon,
Tipton, Tregaron, Trowbridge, Uxbridpc, Watford,
Wavertree, Wickwar, Windsor, Woolwich. Worthing.



TERMS IN COMMON USE.



The following words and expressions are used frequently, and
may therefore with advantage be explained here :

Testator. A man who makes a will ; but, generally, whatever is

stated as to a testator applies also to a
Testatrix. A woman who makes, &c.
Intestate. A person who dies and leaves no will.
Legatee. A person to whom personal property is left by will.
Legatee, residuary. A person to whom, after other dispositions,

a testator leaves the rest of his personal property.
Real property. All property that is not personal.
Personal property. Generally, leasehold land and property not

consisting of land. A list of the principal kinds is given

later. 1
Witt. Generally, a disposition of property to take effect only after

death of person making it.

Codicil. Generally, an instrument making additions to, or altera-
tions in the provisions of, a will.
Executor. A person appointed to prove a will and carry out its

provisions.
Administrator. A person appointed to carry out the provisions

of a will, or to distribute the personal property of a deceased

person, according to law, wben there is no executor.
Probate An order or authority of the Court, declaring the

validity of a will, and confirming the appointment of an

executor.



1 See Appendix A., p. 77.



Xll TERMS IN COMMON USE.

Administration. In a wide sense, the management and distribu-
tion of personal property by an executor or administrator ;
in a narrower sense, the management, &c., by an admini-
strator. N.B. The word "administration" is often used,
for brevity, in the sense of letters of administration (de-
fined below).

Administration, letters of. An order or authority of the Court,
appointing a person administrator (see this word defined
above).

Estate, or Estate and effects. In connection with probate and
administration, the whole personal property of a deceased
testator or intestate.

Citation. As used in this work, a document from the Probate
Division calling upon a person to appear, or to perform
some act.

Affidavit. An oath of which the words are in writing, as dis-
tinguished from oral swearing.



THE

WAY TO PROVE A WILL, &c.



Preliminary Remarks.

THE words "probate" and "prove" are applicable,
strictly speaking, only where there is an executor who
acts. 1 Where there is no such person, the Court, if
there is a will, grants letters of administration with
the will annexed, 2 and the words mentioned above are
then inappropriate. Unfortunately, they are some-
times used in such cases, so that some confusion may
arise. In these pages we shall always use them in
the strict sense.

Whatever is stated in this work with respect to a
will may, generally, be assumed to apply equally to a
codicil.

We shall, in general, use the words " executor " and
" administrator " in the singular ; but, where there is
no indication to the contrary, a statement as to one

1 Seeder Cur. in In the Goods of Oliphant, 30 L. J., N. S., P. M.
& A. 82, 83, "not entitled to probate, but to administration with
the will annexed ; " see, further, as to this kind of administration,
p. 32, &c.

2 See p. 32.



14 THE WAY TO PROVE A WILL, ETC.

such person may be understood to apply equally to
several.

Any statement as to probate or administration
must be understood to apply only to probate, <fec., in
common form, as probate, tc., in solemn form is not
within the limits of this work. 1

Probate : Of what Wills, 14 ; Where, 17 ;
How, 24; When, 30.

Probate under 44 Viet. c. 12, ss. 33-36, and limited
or special probate, will be mentioned later. 2 Generally,
a will of personal property in England 3 must be proved
in England by the executor, if any, whether it deals
also with real property or not, 4 whether it is made in
exercise of a power or not, and, if made in exercise of
a power, whether it is made by a married woman or
not. 5 This statement extends to real property which,
by an instrument creating a power under which the will
was made, is directed to be sold, 6 and to property held
in trust for a married woman's separate use. 7 A will

1 " Common form " is where a will is accepted as validly exe-
cuted, &c., without the necessity of calling the witnesses, or one
of them, to prove its execution ; "solemn form" is the converse
of this. 2 See pp. 30, 51.

It must be remembered that this includes Wales ; see p. 19
for meaning of "personal property," see p. ix.

4 Netter v. Brett, Cro. Car. 391, 395 ; Partridge's case, 2 Salk.
[552] ; but not if it merely gives legacies "out of real estate " ;
per Cur. in Tucker v. Phipps, 3 Atk. [359], [361].

Tatnall v. Hankey, 2 Moo. P. C. C. 342 ; per Cur. in Golds-
worthy v. Crossley, 4 Ha. 140, 144, 145.

6 In the Goods of Gunn, L. R. 9 P. D. 242.

7 Brownrigg v. Pike L R 7 P. D. 61.



PROBATE, OF WHAT WILLS. 15

dealing only with real property, generally, may be
proved by the executor, if any, 1 but not if made by
a married woman under a power, even if she directs
a sale, so that the property will ultimately become
personal. 2 A will which does nothing but appoint an
executor must be proved like any other will.s

If a testator had no personal property in England,
the will cannot, generally, be proved in England; 4 if
he had personal property abroad and also in England,
it must be proved in England. 5

It has been said that a will appointing guardians
(i.e., merely appointing guardians) need not be proved. 6
This means that there need not be administration with
the will annexed ; for, as we have seen, a will must be
proved even if it merely appoints an executor. 7

If on executor does not prove, 8 he has no ownership
in the property, 9 and cannot bring an action 10 or get
testator's money paid to him out of court; 11 and he is

I Per Cur. in Netter v. Brett, ubi sup. ; per Cur. in In the
Goods of Toinlinson, L. K. 6 P. D. 209, 2IO.

- In the Goods of Tomlinson, ubi sup.

3 Godolph. Orphans' Legacy, pt. ii. c. v. I ; approved per Cur.
in In the Goods of Jordan, L. R. i P. & D. 555, and in Brown-
rigg v. Pike, L. E. 7 P. D. 61, 64.

4 In the Goods of Coode, L. K. i P. & D. 449.

5 See In the Goods of Harris, L. R. 2 P. & D. 83.

6 Per Cur. in Gilliat v. Gilliat and Hatfield, 3 Phillim. 222.

7 See above.

8 An executor can renounce if he likes ; see p. 42, &c. The
statement here made in the text explains, in a general way, what
we mean by saying that a will " must " be proved.

Pinney v. Pinney, 8 B. & C. 335.
10 See p. 54.

II The author has recently met with this in his own practice.



1 6 THE WAY TO PROVE A WILL, ETC.

subject to penalties, Jcc., for having taken possession
unless he proves within a certain time. 1

If a will gives property by reference to other docu-
ments, they must be proved with it. 2

Some kinds of property are, or may be, exempt
from probate, generally within a particular limit as to
value. The subject is too long to be treated fully
here, but the following are among the persons bene-
fited : Officers and others in the Royal Navy (in-
cluding R.N. Reserve and Naval Coast Volunteers) ; 3
merchant seamen and apprentices; 4 officers and soldiers
of H.M. Army; 5 superannuated civil servants; 6 (appa-
rently) persons insured in the Customs Annuity and
Benevolent Fund, so far as regards the insurance
money; 7 various classes of persons of small means, such

1 55 Geo. 111. c. 184, s. 37 ; see also p. 31.

2 Among numerous cases, In the Goods of Durham, 4 No. of
Ca. 365.

3 28 & 29 Viet. c. 72, s. 5 (no limit) ; c. Ill, s. 6 (not exceed-
ing 100).

4 17 & 18 Viet. c. 104, ss. 199, 200 (not exceeding .50) ; 19 &
20 Viet. c. 41, s. 5 (same limit).

8 II Geo. IV. & I Will. IV. c. 41, s. 5 (not exceeding ^50 ;
repealed except as to pensions and prize-money by 26 & 27 Viet,
c. 57, s. 3) ; 2 & 3 Will. IV. c. 53, s. 26 (no limit ; relates to
foreigners in British service) ; 27 & 28 Viet. c. 36, e. 3 (not ex-
ceeding ,50 ; repealing 2 & 3 Will. IV. c. 53, a. 25, erroneously
cited as still in force in Tr. & Co. Prob. Prac. 28).

6 50 & 51 Viet. c. 67, s. 8 (not exceeding .100).

7 In Be Rowsell (unreported ; mentioned in Att.-Gen. v. Abdy,
I Hurl. & Colt. 266, 297) such insurance money was held to bo
free from legacy duty, as not being actual property of the deceased
hence it seems that it must be free from probate duty (no limit).
The C. A. and B. Fund is a species of insurance office, established
under 56 Geo. III. c. Ixxiii., for the Customs service. The " pound-



PROBATE, WHERE. 17

as depositors in ordinary savings banks, members of
industrial and provident societies, &c. ; l (apparently)
Post Office Savings Bank depositors, as regards sums
paid by the Postmaster-General after depositor's death,
in pursuance of a nomination made in his lifetime. 2

Probate in England (including Wales) is granted
only by the Probate, Divorce, and Admiralty Division
of the High Court of Justice, 3 generally called, in this
work, the "Probate Division." Probate has the effect
of authenticating the will, and it is evidence of the
character of the executor, 4 who, however, is appointed
directly or indirectly by the testator. 5

The principal registry of the Probate Division is in
London ; the rest of England and Wales is divided
into forty districts, each having a " district registry." 6

age " out of the salaries for its support (erroneously stated to be
still payable in Tr. & Co. Prob. Prac. 40) was abolished in 1871

b J 34 & 35 Vict - c - I0 3, s > 1 8.

1 A useful enumeration will be found in Tr. & Co. Prob. Prac.
30, &c.

2 See Regulations of the Post Office Savings Bank, 44 (not ex-
ceeding ;lOO).

3 20 & 21 Viet. c. 77, s. 4, as affected by 36 & 37 Viet. c. 66,
s. 34 ; and see Priestman v. Thomas, p. 56. The later Act
transferred this duty to the Probate Division, and, by S. A. s. 18,
the President of that Division has many of the powers formerly
belonging to the Judge of the Court of Probate. As to "Wales
being included, see ihe words " England and Wales " in sched. A.
to the earlier Act.

4 Per Cur. in Matson v. Swift, 18 Be<l. 368, 378.

5 Per Cur. in Woolley ?. Clark, 5 Barn. & Aid. 744; and see
Godolph. Orph. Leg. pt. ii. c. 12. As to administrator leing
appointed by the Court, see p. 33.

K 20 & 21 Viet. c. 77, P. 13.



1 8 THE WAY TO PROVE A WILL, ETC.

An original application l for probate may be made
either to the principal registry or to a district registry
if it appears by the affidavit of the applicant or one of
the applicants that testator had a "fixed place of
abode " in that district at the time of his death ; 2 other-
wise it must be made to the principal registry. 3 Ap-
plication for a second or subsequent grant must be
made to the same registry as the first, and no affidavit
as to " fixed place of abode " can be required. 4 When
an affidavit as to " fixed place," <fec., has been made
and probate granted, the probate extends to all parts
of England, 5 and holds good even if it appears after-
wards that there was no such fixed place of abode.
Even if there is a defective affidavit, or no affidavit
at all, the probate discharges and protects persons
" paying to or dealing with " the executor. 6

The principal registry is at Somerset House, Strand,
London, W.C. It has no district assigned to it ; the
parts of England not included in any district are
Middlesex, Surrey, Hertfordshire, the City of London,
the Western Division of Kent, the Southern Divi-



1 As to applications for a second, &c., grant, see below.

2 S. A. SB. 46, 59. Proof of " fixed place of abode," usually
included in affidavit called executor's oath, p. 24. It will, of
course, be understood that no such proof is required in the
principal registry.

3 20 & 21 Viet. c. 77, s. 59. Through in that section is
clearly a mistake for to.

4 21 & 22 Viet. c. 95, s. 20. There is an exception as to grants
made before 1858, which need not be further mentioned here.

5 20 & 21 Viet. c. 77, s. 46. Including Wales ; see p. 19.
8 S. A. & s.



PROBATE, WHERE. 1 9

sion of Essex. 1 There are no parts of Wales not
included.

The several districts are constituted and defined in
the schedule just referred to, but the arrangement of
the schedule is not alphabetical. We shall here give a
table of districts, and counties, <kc., included in them,
arranged in the alphabetical order of the counties, &c. 2

TABLE A.

DISTRICT EEGISTRIES OF PROBATE DIVISION IN ALPA-
BETICAL ORDER OF COUNTIES, &c., INCLUDED IN
DISTRICTS.



Counties, Divisions of Counties,' &c., included
in Districts.



Places of Dis-
trict Registries



Ainsty see Yorkshire, East Riding.

Anglesea ........

Bath see Bristol and Bath.

Bedfordshire .......

Berkshire ........

Berwick-upon-Tweed (town and county) see

Northumberland.
Brecknockshire .



Bangor.

Northampton.
Oxford.



Hereford.



1 This will be seen from a careful examination of 20 & 21 Viet,
c. 77, sched. A., which includes all Wales, and all England
except the parts here mentioned. For meaning of " division," see
note, below.

2 A list of " Places of District Registries " in the alphabetical
order of the " places " themselves will be found later ; see Appendix
B., p. 81, where the places printed in capitals are places of dis-
trict registries.

* The " divisions " of counties mentioned in Table A. are divi-
sions as described in 2 & 3 Will. JV. c. 64 ; see 20 & 21 Viet,
c. 77, sched. A. The divisions are given at p. 79.



20


1 3 4 5 6 7 8

Online LibraryAlmaric RumseyThe way to prove a will and to take out administration : containing full instructions where, how, and when to apply, with alphabetical tables, forms of oaths, bonds, etc., rules for personal applications and other information required for obtaining probate or administration → online text (page 1 of 8)