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Almon D. (Almon Danforth) Hodges.

Genealogical record of the Hodges family of New England, ending December 31, 1894 online

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1164716



GENEALOGY COLLECTION



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY



3 1833 01363 3380



GENEALOGICAL RECORD



THE HODGES FAMILY



NEW ENGLAND.



This Edition is limited to Three Hundred Copies,
of which this is JVo..^Z^.t.



GENEALOGICAL RECORD



OF



THE HODGES FAMILY



OF



NEW ENGLAND,

ENDING DECEMBEK 31, 1894.

ftjirti l&itfon.

Compiled by ALMON D. HODGES, Jr.

AND OTHER MEMBERS OF THE FAMILY.



BOSTON:

PRINTED FOR THE FAMILY

BY FRANK H. HODGES.

1896.



University Press :
Presswork by John "Wilson and Son.



CONTENTS.

1164716

CHAPTER I.

Page
Introduction, Explanations, Double Dates, Abbreviations,

Authorities 1-5

CHAPTER II.
Seventeenth Century Immigrants 6-26

CHAPTER III.

Genealogy of the Salem Branch 27-70

CHAPTER IV.

Genealogy of the Taunton Branch 71-470

CHAPTER V.

Military Service of the Family in the Colonial Wars,

the Revolution, and the Civil War 471-500

INDEX.

With Explanation at Beginning 501-566



INTRODUCTION.



CHAPTER I.

INTRODUCTION.

The history of the Hodges family is a pleasant one. New Eng-
land has produced more brilliant and more noted families; but it
may well be doubted whether it has produced a single one which,
taken from beginning to end, has had fewer weak spots or has been
more genuinely useful to the community. In sturdy independence,
fair-mindedness and loyalty, the tribe has probably been unsurpassed.
Indeed, its very preeminence in these qualities, which are so valuable
for the public good, has interfered with the prominence of individual
members, and with their obtaining a reputation and position justly
deserved ; for they have refused to take anything not earned, have
refrained from pushing themselves forward at the expense of their
neighbors, and have made constant sacrifices for the sake of their
country. Evidences of these facts abound in the following pages.
One example may be cited here. Had that officer [No. 462] who,
during the Civil War, performed " one of the most brilliant feats of
logistics ever recorded" and "without a parallel on record," been
less modest, less independent, less observant of the rights of his fel-
low officers, or willing to seek advancement by political methods, he
would be Brigadier General now without doubt ; whereas, in fact, he
retires from active service with the rank of Colonel, on account of the
irregular advancement of an inferior officer through political in-
fluences.

In attestation of the loyalty of the family, the chapter on their
military service is given. It may be pointed out that not a few
examples are given where, at the call of duty, members of the family
have waived the higher rank then held by them, and gone out as
privates. In one case, it will be found, a Colonel seized a musket and
marched in the ranks as a private soldier.



Eufus Hodges, of Cincinnati, published in 1837 a small duodecimo
of 22 finely printed pages, entitled Record of the Families in New
England of the Name of Hodges, with the hope, expressed in the pre-
face, that some one, more favorably situated than he, would pursue
the undertaking until it was rendered complete. The size of the book,
which is printed in very small type, gives no adequate idea of the
amount and value of the contents. The facts were compiled with
great judgment and the errors are surprisingly few.

In 1853, Almon D. Hodges published an octavo of 71 pages, en-
titled Genealogical Record of the Hodges Family in New England, in
which he continued the work begun by Eufus Hodges. At the date
of this publication, interest in genealogy was confined to a compara-



2 EXPLANATIONS.

tively few persons in this country, and great difficulty was experienced
in obtaining replies to genealogical queries. The compiler succeeded,
however, in collecting the names of more than 1,500 persons.

In 1891, a member of the family, while tracing back his ancestry,
had occasion to write a letter of enquiry to that very able lawyer and
enthusiastic genealogist, Hon. Josiah Hayden Drummond of Port-
land, Me. Mr. Drummond, mistaking the import of the questions,
answered far more than was asked, and began to accumulate and
rapidly send facts about the early members of the Taunton branch.
His correspondent could not do otherwise than co-operate, and in a
short time the principal data of the first four generations of this
branch were collected, the greater part being obtained by Mr. Drum-
mond. Many persons now became interested in the work, which was
pushed until this book, containing 15,000 names, was completed.
Mrs. Harriet (Hodges) Stone, of Newton, Mass., was an early con-
tributor, and to her belongs the credit of compiling the account of the
Salem branch, as well as of giving many other valuable facts and sug-
gestions. Mrs. Stone has made a study of the early immigrants of
the name and of English families, and has found so many clews to the
possible English ancestry of the New England families, that a solu-
tion of this as yet unsolved problem seems probable. Mr. Isaac W.
Wilcox of Taunton, whose knowledge of Bristol County genealogy is
remarkably accurate and extensive, has been a most valuable and able
assistant, without whom the work could not have been done so speed-
ily and so well.

The list of members of the family, 800 in number, who have co-
operated with the compilers, is so large, that to give the individual
names would require more space than the necessary limits of this
work allow. Persons in all parts of the United States have con-
tributed to these pages. The evidence of the strong and widespread
affection of the Hodges family for their kin, has been most gratifying.
One name, however, may be mentioned, as the bearer has passed
away while the work was in progress — that of Deacon Edgar Hodges
Reed of Taunton, who had devoted years to historical studies of Bris-
tol County families, was always most courteous and generous in im-
parting the results of his researches, and was a most important
co-worker in the compilation of the edition published 42 years ago, as
well as of the present edition.

EXPLANATIONS.

The different generations are denoted by the exponents placed after
the Christian names. Thus: William 1 Hodges is William Hodges of
the first generation; George 2 Hodges is George Hodges of the second
generation ; Henry Clay'' Hodges is Henry Clay Hodges of the seventh
generation.

The names are arranged and numbered according to generations,
and in each generation according to priority of birth.

Only those children of any one generation are numbered who are
carried forward, with their numbers, to the next generation as heads
of families.



DOUBLE DATES.— ABBREVIATIONS. 3

After the name of each head of family, there follow [in brackets] a
number (which is the number of the father of said head of family),
and then, in italics, the names of the ancestors in genealogical order.
Some of these names are abbreviated. When the names of father and
son are identical, the name is given only once, but with the exponents
of both generations.

Two examples (from the Taunton branch) will explain the method
of indicating the line of ancestry : —

663— ELEANOR 8 HODGES [418. Sam 7 - 6 Simeon 5 Sam*- 3 John 2
Wm l ] That is: No. 663 is Eleanor Hodges of the 8th generation;
her father's number (to which turn back for details of her parents) is
418 ; she is the daughter of Samuel Hodges of the 7th generation, who
was son of Samuel Hodges of the 6th generation, who was son of
Simeon Hodges of the 5th generation, who was son of Samuel Hodges
of the 4th generation, who was son of Samuel Hodges of the 3rd
generation, who was son of John Hodges of the 2nd generation, who
was son of William Hodges of the 1st generation.
769— GILBERT 8 HODCES [575.Jose2)h' ! - 6.5.4.3 Henry 2 WmA~\ That
is : No. 769 is Gilbert Hodges of the 8th generation, son of Joseph
Hodges (whose number is 575) of the 7th generation, who was son of
Joseph Hodges of the 6th generation, who was son of Joseph Hodges
of the 5th generation, who was son of Joseph Hodges of the 4th
generation, who was son of Joseph Hodges of the 3rd generation, who
was son of Henry Hodges of the 2nd generation, who was son of
William Hodges of the 1st generation.

DOUBLE DATES.

In England and her colonies the legal year began on March 25,
from the 14th century until 1752, when a change was made to Janu-
ary 1, as at present. Other nations had made this change before
1752, and even in English documents the beginning of the year was
often reckoned from January 1 long before this reckoning was made
legal. Hence, to avoid ambiguity, arose the custom (which is fol-
lowed in this book) of "double-dating" the year for all days from
January 1 to March 25. Thus January 1649/50 (or 1649-50 or 16f $)
means January 1649, as it would have been written legally at that
time, and January 1650, as we should write it now.

ABBREVIATIONS.

b. for born. m. (1), m. (2) for married first, married second,

bapt. for baptized. m. pub. for intention of marriage published,
d. for died. perh. for perhaps,

dau. for daughter. prob. for probably,
m. for married.

See also abbreviations at beginning of Chapter V.



AUTHORITIES.



AUTHORITIES.



In addition to family records, numerous published genealogies and
town and county histories, the collections of gravestone-inscriptions
and other data of Dea. Edgar H. Eeed, the following records have
been searched for the name of Hodges, and for the names of all other
persons connected with the family which were known at the time of
the search. In a number of cases the records have been searched
twice.

By " town records " is meant town records of births, deaths and
marriages.

MAINE.

Kennebec Co. Deeds.

" " Marriage Beturns, Office Clerk Of Courts.

Augusta town records. Portland town records.

Belgrade " " Vassalboro " "

Gardiner " " Wayne " "

Hallowell " " Winslow « "

NEW HAMPSHIRE.

State Papers, published copy.

Grafton Co. Western Judicial District. Probate Eecords.

« " " « " Deeds.

Dunbarton town records. Orange town records.

Lyman " " Westmoreland town records.

VERMONT.

State Archives. Eevolutionary Eolls.

" " Eebellion Eolls.

Eecords of the Governor and Council, published copy.
Barnard town records. Pomfret town records.

Clarendon " " Somerset " "

Dover " " Williston " "

Hartford « " Wilmington " "

Moreton " "

MASSACHUSETTS.

State Archives. Muster Eolls, Prench and Indian Wars. Vols. 91-99.

" " Pepperrell Papers, (Copy.)

« « Eevolutionary Eolls, 60 vols.

" " Continental Army Books, 21 vols.

Massachusetts Bay, Eecords of. Printed Copy.
Plymouth Colony Eecords. Printed Copy.
Bristol Co. Deeds and Probate Eecords.

Essex Co. " " " " and early Court Piles.

Pranklin Co. Probate Eecords.
Hampden Co. " « and Deeds.

Middlesex Co. « " " " and early Court Files.

Plymouth Co. " « " «

Suffolk Co. " " ** " and early Court Piles.

Worcester Co. " " u «







AUTHORITIES.






Amesbury town records.


Marblehead town records


Andover "


a


Middleboro


a


tt


Attleboro "


a


New Bedforc


a


it


Berkley "


a


Newbury


a


it


Beverly "


U


Newburyport


11


a


Boston «


it


Newton


u


a


" early church


a


Norton


a


a


" record commissioner's


rep'ts. " church


tt


Boxford town records.


Orange town


a


Bradford "


a


Pembroke


it


a


Braintree "


ii


Petersham


a


a


Bridge water "


ii


Plymouth


a


a


Cambridge early


ii


B-aynham


it


it


Charlestown town


a


Behoboth


a


a


Chelmsford "


a


Rochester


a


it


Dana "


a


Bowley


u


tt


Dartmouth "


a


Boxbury


a


a


Dighton "


a


Rutland


a


it


Dorchester "


a


Salisbury


a


a


Duxbury "


a


Savoy


a


a


Easton "


a


Scituate


a


it


Foxboro "


a


Sharon


a


a


Freetown "


a


" church


a


Gloucester "


a


Springfield


town


a


Hadley "


a


Stoughton


a


tt


Hardwick "


a


Sturbridge


a


tt


Haverhill "


a


Sutton


a


tt


Hingham "


a


Taunton


a


a


Hull


a


Topsfield


a


a


Ipswich "


a


Wales


a


a


Kingston " "


a


Walpole


a


a


Leicester "


a


Warren


a


a


Lowell "


a


Wenham


tt


tt


Lynn "


a


Westford


a


a


Mansfield "


a


Wrentham

CONNECTICUT.


tt


a


Kevolutionary Bolls published by Adj't Gen'l.






Ashford town


records


> Pomfret town records


East Windsor "


a


Preston


tt


it


Enfield "


a


Willington


a


a


Hartford "


a


Windsor


tt


tt


Mansfield "


a


Woodstock


a


a


Norwich "


n


RHODE ISLAND.







Vital Statistics of Rhode Island, edited by James N. Arnold,
being the vital records of all the towns of Rhode Island.



SEVENTEENTH-CENTUR T IMMIGRANTS.



CHAPTEK II.

SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY IMMIGRANTS.

In the 17th century occurred the great Puritau Exodus, the like of
which has never been recorded before or since. From devotion to an
idea, within 20 years more than 20,000 picked men and women — the
families of the sturdy, thrifty, self-respecting country squires and
yeomen of England — left their comfortable homes, and went to the
savage land of America. "God sifted a whole nation," said William
Stoughton, " that he might send choice grain into the wilderness."

Among these chosen colonists were numerous representatives of
the Hodges family. Just how many of this family crossed the
ocean, and how they were related to one another, has not yet been
determined. The name occurs in many counties of England, held by
respectable and sometimes eminent persons, and it is hoped that the
studies of one of the principal contributors to this present book will
result in a subsequent publication determining the English ancestry
of some at least of the immigrants. But the careless manner in
which names in our early New England documents have been
spelled, copied and translated into print, has caused unsurmounted
difficulties, and made it impossible, in certain cases, to tell from
individual entries whether the person mentioned was or was not
named Hodges. The same name has been given to different families,
and the same person has been given different names. Hedge,
Hedges, Hodge, Hodges, Hogge, Hogg and other possible syno-
nymes are apt to be confused in the records and the copies, so that a
person searching for any one of these names, must take note of all of
them. Even Hodgkins may not be neglected; for Savage in his
Genealogical Dictionary says that it was Hannah Hodges, who, on
Jan'y 17, 1671, married John Berry of Ipswich, while the Salem
records state that it was Hannah Hodgkins. Furthermore, in later
years, persons named Hogg have changed their name to Hodge in a
number of instances ; persons named Hodge have added a final s in
some cases; and in one or two families, it is said, Hedges has
become Hodges.

For the purpose of determining, so far as possible, their true
names and families, there has been prepared the following list of
persons migrating to or living in New England in the 17th century.
This list includes the names mentioned above except Hodgkins
which, it may be noted, is modified in the records into Hodgskins,
Hodgskine, Hodgekine, Hodgekins, Hodgkinson, Hoskine, Hoskins,
Haskins and Hotchkiss. That this name could be confused with
Hodges, did not occur to the compilers of this genealogy until late in
their searches.



SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY IMMIGRANTS. 7

An incomplete list of persons known to have settled in the
Southern states, the Barbadoes and the West Indies, is also given, as
it is probable that some of these were near relatives of some of the
New Englanders.

The names are arranged chronologically according to the earliest
date of appearance in the records, except where a possible or proba-
ble relationship between certain persons has made it convenient to
bring their names together. It is quite possible that the same per-
son appears more than once in the lists, as is occasionally noted.

An index of Christian names is appended to the New England list.

A. Virginia, Bermudas and West Indies.

\_H. = Hotten , s Lists of American Emigrants; Gen. Beg. = New England
Historical and Genealogical Register. ~\

1. John Hodges died between April, 1622, and Feb. 16, 1623, "at
ye Plantacion over against James Cittie." [i/.] This is the earliest
date (in this book) of any one of the name in America.

2. Elizabeth Hodges was living at James City, Feb. 16, 1623,
and also Jan'y 30, 1624, having come from England (at some undeter-
mined date) in the Abigaile. \H.~\

3. Robert Hedges was living at James City, Feb. 16, 1623, and
" at Mulbury Hand," Jan'y 25, 1624, at the last date being 40 years
old. [//.] George Washington's grandfather, John Washington, in his
will mentions "land which I bought of Mr. Robert Hedges." \Gen.
Reg. xlv, 200.]

4. Thomas Hodges was in Maryland in 1633. ^Founders of Mary-
land. By Rev. E. D. Neill.]

5. John Hodges, 37 years old, was a passenger, Jan'y 2, 1634/5,
in the ship Bonaventure for Virginia. [H.~]

6. John Hodges, 17 years old, was a passenger, July 6, 1635, in
the ship Paule of London for Virginia. \_H.']

7. John Hogg was master of the ship David, Sept. 2, 1635, with
41 passengers bound from London to Virginia. \_H.~]

8. John Hogg, 21 years old, was a passenger, Dec. 19, 1635, in
the ship Falcon bound from London to Virginia. \_H.~\

9. Thomas Hodges, 20 years old, was a passenger, May 21, 1635,
in the ship Matthew of London for St. Christophers. \_H.~]

ha-™ -ir ho u ) passengers, June 10,1635,

10. Francis Hedges, 13 years old, '

11. Roger Hodges, 17 years

12. Francis Hodges, in 1652, was Secretary of Nova Scotia with
the title of Secretary of the Commission for the Affairs of America.
In 1655 he was Treasurer and Paymaster of the forces in the Island
of Jamaica, and seems to have held this position until Charles II was
"restored" to the throne of England. For in 1663 charges were
brought against him of "unjustly detaining several sums of money
due to his Majesty: he was by the late pretended authorities and the
then Council of State appointed Treasurer and Paymaster of the
forces in Jamaica." Of course an officer of Oliver Cromwell would
be attacked by the government of Charles II. Francis Hodges



, , ) passengers, June 10, 1635,

, -,' )- in the ship Truelove of Lon-

d ' ) don for the Bermudas. [IT.]



8 SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY IMMIGRANTS.

acquired estates in Jamaica, and from him the Hodgeses of Jamaica
are supposed to be descended. He is thought to have been a descend-
ant of Sir Nathaniel Hodges of Middlesex, England, and related to Rev.
Dr. Hodges, Chaplain of the House of Lords at the Eestoration, and
also to Dr. Nathaniel Hodges who distinguished himself in his pro-
fessional capacity during the Great Plague of London in 1665.
[Calendar of State Papers, Colonial Series, 1574-1660, 1661-1668;
Momimental Inscriptions of the British West Indies.']

13. Ellen Hodge and her husband Francis Eldrtdge. Certifi-
cate for 100 acres granted to Jno. Dier, March 16, 1649/50, for bring-
ing these into Virginia.* [Gen. Reg. xlvii, 66.]

14. Charles Hodges. April 15, 1651. Certificate for him granted
to Richard Joanes.

15. Margarett Hodges. Oct. 30, 1651. Certificate for her granted
to Savill Gaskin.

16. Charles Hodges. Jan'y 16, 1653/4. Certificate for him
granted to Richard Joanes.

17. Augustine Hodges, Virginia, 1655, witnessed George Lud-
low's will. Capt. Augustine Warner was one of the overseers.

18. James Hogge. Oct. 17, 1664. Certificate for him granted to
Mr. John Custis.

19. Thomas Hodges. Nov. 15, 1665. Certificate for him granted
to Rob'te Butt, sen'r.

20. Edward Hodge. May 2, 1666. Certificate for him granted
Wm, Porter.

21. William Hodges went from Virginia to Maryland in 1665. He
was a member of the Church of England, and of Kentish parentage.
He settled in Maryland near Huntingfield, and died in 1697, leaving
3 sons: — Robert, William and John. [Hanson's Hist, of Old
Kent, Md.~\

22. Richard Hodges, godson, ) ™ l?^ T *l}? V oi r Virginia,

23. Roger Hodges, witness, { d f ted ?gff 29 ' 16 ' 9 " l Gen ' Be ^

' ' ) xlvn, 355.]

24. Anthony Hodges was at the Island of Montserrat, West Indies,
with the title of Captain in 1674, and was Lieut-Governor of the
island in 1690. He may have been the Anthony Hodges who was
Judge of the Admiralty Court about the same time. In 1702, then
called Colonel, he was one of the owners of the ship John & Abial,
100 tons, built at Scituate, Mass., in 1698, and said to be the largest
vessel built there up to this date. He was probably descended from
Francis Hodges, above named, Secretary of Nova Scotia and Treas-
urer of Jamaica. [Calendar of State Papers, Colonial Series,
1669-1674; Monumental Inscriptions, British West Indies; Ship
Building on North River, Plymouth Co., Mass.]

25. Thomas Hog, buried Sept. 21, 1678, St. Michael's Parish, Bar-
badoes. [H.]

* For every person imported into Virginia in the early days, without regard to age,
sex, or condition of life, 50 acres of land were granted. On making oath in the County
Court, a certificate for the land was issued. All the certificates here mentioned were
issued by the County Court of Lower Norfolk, Va. [Gen. Reg. xlvii, 66, 192, 193,
196, 352.]



SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY IMMIGRANTS. 9

26. Joan, wife of Christopher Hodges, buried Oct. 1, 1678, St.
Michael's Parish, Barbadoes. [i£]

27. Peter Hodges. His will, dated 1697, July 21. Late of the
Island of East West Guersey, America, planter, now in the parish of
St. Mary Magdalen, Bermondsey, County of Surrey, England, unmar-
ried. Left all his property, 200 acres of woodland, horses, cattle,
etc., in the Island of East West Guersey, America, to his dear friend,
Elizabeth Willis of said parish, whom he had intended to marry.
[Gen. Beg. xxxix, 332.]

B. New England.

1. John Hodges of Charlestown, Mass., mariner, the first of the
name in New England, so far as known, appears in the year 1632. In
tracing his career, great difficulty has arisen from the statements of
Wyman (in Charlestown Genealogies and Estates) that he married
Mary Miller and that the Mary Hodges who married John Anderson
on January 3, 1654/5, was his widow. No authority for Wy man's
statements has been found by the compilers of this genealogy, some
of whom consider the statements erroneous, while others accept them
as probably correct. Owing to this diversity of opinion, the two
following accounts (la and lb) of the probable career of John Hodges
are offered. Until new documents are discovered, the matter cannot
be decisively settled.

la. The first account, denying the marriage of John Hodges, as-
sumes that the name of John Hodges which occurs frequently in the
records during a long series of years, is the name of one and the same
person. Some of the reasons for supposing that Wyman's statements
are erroneous are, that there is no record of the existence of any
Mary Miller, or of any marriage of John Hodges, or of his death,
and that Savage (in his Genealogical Dictionary) states that Mary's
maiden name was Hodges and not Miller, for the correctness of which
statement evidence is given below under the names of Mary Hodges
and Joanna Hodges. Another reason for supposing that Mary was
not John's wife or widow is the fact that, so far as known, she never
became owner of any of John's real estate, which she would have
inherited if she had married him. More detailed consideration of
these reasons is given under 2a and 3a following.

John Hodges of Charlestown, mariner, mate of the ship Lion and
captain of the Rebecca, appears in the year 1632, takes a prominent
position and is frequently named in documents for over twenty
years, and then disappears without leaving any record of his birth,
parentage or family. Gov. John Winthrop of Massachusetts writes
of him often and in terms implying friendship, if not relationship.
Hotten's Lists of Emigrants to America, and the Middlesex County
(Mass.) Deeds and Court Records contain his name. But all his re-
corded doings are professional and business transactions, and of gene-
alogical matter there is not a trace. The same seems to be true of a
man with whom John Hodges was intimately associated, Capt. Will-
iam Peirce, perhaps the most noted shipmaster sailing into New Eng-
land harbors in the days of the founding of Massachusetts. Capt.



10 SEVENTEENTH-CENTURY IMMIGRANTS.

William Peirce is said to have left a brother, Capt. Michael of Scitu-



Online LibraryAlmon D. (Almon Danforth) HodgesGenealogical record of the Hodges family of New England, ending December 31, 1894 → online text (page 1 of 66)