Alpheus Crosby.

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9hort), when it wants a whole foot at the end ; hyperctUalectic
(vnsQy over), when it has one or two syllables over ; and ac^*



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<«.2.J KINDS OF YERSB. O^SURA. 419

phalotu {ixitpaXog^ headless) when it wants a syllable at the
beginning.

RwMARKB. m, A catalectio verge is said to be eaialeetie on one BjfOaiik (in
fylUibam), on two tyUablu (in dissyllabum), &c^ according as the imperfect
foot lias one, two, or more syllables. Dactylic ver&es ending with a spondee
or trochee (§ 692) are by some regarded as acatalectic, and by others as cat-
alectic on two syllables ; e. g. the common Hexameter (§ 704).

/S. A lyric Terse sometimes begins with an introductory syllable, termed an
muMtnuU («M»^«vri«, ttrUdng vp) ; or with two such syllables, forming what
b termed a bam (fiti^is, foundation). In these introductory syllablei^ the
quantity is commonly indifferent. A base sometimes consists of more than
two syllables, and the term is sometimes applied to a monometer in any spe*
des of Terse.

y. In the dramatic poets, exdamations often occur extra metrum (L e. not
included hi the metre) ; as, ^ivl Eur. Alo. 536, 719, 1 102. Ti fS % Soph,
(Ed. C. 315. Tdkmifm I lb. 318.

^ 000« CiBSURA. Composition in verse consists of two
senes ; the metrical series^ divided into feet and verses ; and
the significant series^ divided into words and sentences. These
two series must, of course, correspond in their great divisions ;
but if this correspondence is carried too far, it gives to the
composition an unconnected, mechanical, and spiritless char-
acter. The life and beauty of poetry depend essentially upon
the skilful and varied interweaving of the two series. The
ciUUng of the metrical series by the divisions of the significant
series is termed ccMura (Lat from ctedoj to cut). It is of two
principal kinds ; the c<esura of the foot^ and the casura of the
verse. The former is the cutting of a foot by the ending of a
word ; the latter is the cutting of a verse by a pause permitted
by the sense (termed the caswrdl pause).

RBacABKS. I. (a) The csssura of the verse is more frequently, but not
Decessarily, a ccsura of the foot (6) When a foot-cssnra separates the arsis
from the thesis, it is likewise termed a aesitra of the rhythm, (c) A caesura is
. aometimes allowed between the parts of a compound word ; as, Kmj /* «ff|rr
^XJ^ykmrettf \ wtii»Df. JEach. Pr. 172. (d) A syllable immediately pre-
ceding a csBSura is termed a e*Bmral tyUabU.

2. The coincidence d the diyisions of the metrical series with those of the
significant series is termed dueresie Osmi^i^sf, dimeion). The most important
di iBTo e es are those at the end of verses, systems, or stansas. A foot-diaeresis
occurs whenever the division of words corresponds with the division ot feet.
Hence a verse-caBsnra may be a foot-diaeresis ; e. g. the pastoral (Rbk. 5).

8. The verse-caBsura (often called simply the caBsura) not only contributes
to the proper interweaving of the metrical and significant series, but affords ^
gratefbl rdief to both the voice and the ear. See Bsm. 6. j»

4. When the caesura follows a syllable pronounced with the arsis, it ii
ivmed wuuaJine; with the thesis, feminine. A caesura in the second foot ii



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[loot »▼

mmt\ Ac TW»





Metnod eoampmilkm b eidKr id HOKOsn^as,
' srAwrA%, (m) lf<»08ncBS (^ww^ag, of c m^
by die repetiliaB of die same metiicml line, as
(§ '3MX b^bic Ttiineter (§ 712), &e.
(^) Si M Jm* are femed bj die repedtioo <^ aiiiiSar rfajthms,
w& co et imiooa wtaiwkw (§ 693. N.) and an appro|Hiale ckne.
Stt§§-7€6,714,7ia (c) Sta^izas (also called xtrupte) are
fimed bj die onioa of different kmds oi v^se. A stanza
r laaiiliin^ of two liaes k calkd a disUck {dimwtjtog^ efiwQ hmes) ;
of diree, a trutick ; and of four, a tetrmstiek.



Sa TbB GlCCk CuOKmL OQBi WVB WlitlCB IB StSBXSS of VCIJ lUNlI ^BCtUTB^

%■! c Miml y arnmgri n dmmd$ or triadt 'aoaeCmias in fefrwdb or pemtatb).
A daad co n s cU a of two wtanIa1^ eocraponfing in metre throagfaoiKL Of tbcM
the first is termed tiie ttrofie (rr g « f« , Iwmn^ Tmosd; jtema^, and the seeand
the imlnfropAe (^mwn^^^tfi, tommter-imrm, or •«tas2a). A tried ooBsists of a
itrapbe and antistroplie, preceded, £viM, or followed bj a third staioa of
dilBaeal metre, whidi eccordlng to its place is termed prnode («r^««3^ from
w^ b^cn, and ^U, ode\ maode (/u#ay, muddk\ or epodt (Iv-i, afirr). Of
flkBse, the cpode is fiv the rooet commoo. The odea of Rndar are writtea
caefa in a peealiar metre, bat nearly aD in strophes, antistroiibea, and epodes.
In the sme ode, the strophes and antistrophes are all written in one metres
and the epodes aD in a second, <fifRerent from the first In the drama, on the
contmy, the metre of ooe dnad or triad is not repeated in a second.



% 79 1 • Rbxaskb. 1. In 8CA3RnKO, obrarve not oolv ^ divlskB
into dipofies and feet, bat also the arsis or metrical Ictos (§ 695), and the
▼sueuusurm (5 ^9). Unless these aracarefaOy marked, tin mebical duv-
•eter and expression of the verse are loet.

^^nnzBsis (5 30;. (a.J In Epic poetry synizesia is ver^ ftv^Mdt



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Cfl. 2. J' DACTTUC TBRSB. ,4SU



espedally when tiie first vawel is i ; thus, tm, tf, um ; t«, im, m» ; •«» t^ ,
as, niiW<(^M> A. I ; %(uy$^ i\U 15 ; see ^ 121. 2, f 23. We find more
rarely m ; m, mi, <n> «^ «« ; «< ; m ; vm ; &o. Synizesis sometimes occurs
between two words, when the fint ia tit Ht )<ft f*^, i^ni, or a word ending in
the affix .« OT .^ ; as, f»ix & 349, %S^Sy^Zf n. 261, Unkgsin^Utk' A. 277,
*rCi#ryr«i^ P. 87.

(b.) In Attic poetry, synizesis occurs chiefly, — (a) In the endings .<««,
••Mv, .M of Dec in. (§ 116. «)• — (6) In a few nngle words and forms ; as,
Stit Ear. Or. 399. — (c) In the combinations H oh and ft,^ ov, which are
always pronoonoed as one syllable. — (<f) In some other combinations in
which the first word is 4> i* ftti, l^rti, orlyti • as, f^hit^iuu Eur. Hipp. 1335,
tytTtlf* Soph. Ph. 585.

8. Hiatus. Hiatus between words was admitted the most fi:eely in Epic
poetry, where however it may be <rften removed by the insertion of the di-
gamma (§ 22. )). It was the most studiously avoided in Attic poetry, es-
pecially in' the Tragic Trimeter (§ 712), where it was scarce allowed, except
after the interrogative r/, and some interjections, or words used in exclama-
tion ; as,«7lyi;i lyii! .£sch. Ag. 1257.

§ 703« 4. In the following exhibition <^ metres, the division of feet
win be marked by a single bar ( i ) ; the division of dipodies by a double
bar ( II ) ; and the verse-caesura by an obelisk ( f )• sometimes doubled ( ^).
A base is denoted by B. In the examples which are given, the accents and
breathings are mostly omitted, that they may not interfere with the marks oi
quantity ; and these marks are employed alike to denote the metrical quan-
tity, whether natural or local. Hence the common syllable at the end of a
Hue (^ 692) is marked according to the rhythm in which it ooeurai. Some
examples are added of analogous metres in our own language.

A. Dactylic Verse.

§ 703. The place of the fundamental dactyl is often sup-
plied by a spondee (_ w w = ).

§ 704. I. The common Hexameter or Heroic Verse
consists of six feet, of which the first four are either dactyls or
spondees, the fifth commonly a dactyl, and the sixth always a
spondee.

Remabks. 1. When the fifth is a spondee, the verse is termed ijimdatc^
and has commonly an expression of greater weight or dignity. This occurs
most frequently when the verse ends with a word of four syllables;

2. The favorite caesura of the verse is the penthemim, which is almost
equally masculine and feminine (§ 699. 4). After this, the most frequent c»-
suras are the masculine hephthemim, and the pastoral (6 699. 5). — Even
when the penthemim is not the principal verse-cseeura, it is yet seldom wanting
as a ibot-CiBflura. It is stated, that in the first book of the Iliad, 290 lines
tigve the masc penthemim, 315 have the fun., and only 6 have neithv.
36



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498. VBfiSlFlCATlON. [bO&C IT

ScusMB A2ii> Examples.
1 2. 3. 4. 5. 6.

r - li-jli:-:-lt: - -:h - h-

AXA* Mm\»m •^r'lr.t »(&rt(n9 r *rwt I fiuP6f VlrfXXff. A. 25,
2n>/MAT' '• x*^ '•'» I ;c«"C'^» t V>«CoX#fi I 'Aw^XiAiSi^j. A. 14.
Ar Mi** I «'M '«<|Niy »«rrirjff f «f lr«» vi' «^ Xir«v. A. 66.
•H-r#r 'dy I 'iSj iriiri5» »«It •«j I *f^/r« • f. «'«f'^ ^* '«.«Vt»i. A 68.
Bf 2f Mtr I O£X0/»|«r«ro »A|^vwy, t| X'^f^^^^f *^e* -^^ ^^'

Ookridg^B "Homeric Hexameter Deteribed and ExempUfied/*

StnSngly it I be^ us a! long f in I 8^<^lllDg and I limitless j billows,
Kdthing bejfdre and I nothing be, hind, f but the 1 sky and the i <5oeaii.

§ 70S. II. The Elegiac Pentameter consists of twc
dactylic penthemims (§ 699. 4), the first containing two dac-
tyls or spondees with a caesural syllable, and the second two
dactyls with a final syllable. It commonly alternates with the
Hexameter, forming what is termed, from its early use in plain-
tive song, the Elegiac Metre.

Scheme and Exampl&s.
'A#riV ' ^«5^«!wi» t ^Sy«lrf{ Ar«f. t: •#. *ky&\fa/MO»

Described and Exemplijied by Colerulge,

Tn the Hexjdmeter | Hises f the | fodntain's | silvery | column ;
In the Penltdmeter | i£ye ft faUing in | melody | back.

§ 706i III. Other Dactylic Metres are, (a.) Pure, con-
sisting of dactyls only ; (b.) Impure, consisting of dactyls and
spondees ; (c.) Molic, containing, in place of the first foot, a
mere base (^ 698. /J) ; (d.) Logaoedic (§ 696. 3), in which
dactyls are united with trochees. Thus,

1. Dimeter.
(a.) Uv0t6W»Ss ^Sf^iS' Ar. Nub. 303.
(b.) Adonic ( j.^^ | i__)- TifrvTij | B^Sfd*. Sapph. 1. 4.
(b.) Hypercat., Dactylic Penthemim. 'Ax^ijIfjT* «-*|j#"». iEsch. Sup. 844.

2. Trimeter.
H).) n«XX« y«^ \'S^r '&xA fi£frce. Soph. Tr. 112.

(e). Pherecratic(B. 1^.^^ I J-_)- "'-ExSr mKpixs^ | W«{. Find. 0.1. 8.
GLTcoNia 1i rdv | r«r «-if*JJi/y^* '(x»**i

TAcAMff 1 OilJr6\U, fieirA,. Soph.CEd.T. 119&



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CH, 2.] tACTYLIC AHD ANAP^STIC VERSE,

^d.) Mjirr* •«!«•< pS\yafi* "*». JEa(^. Pr. 907.

U.) Hjpejcat. n«xxi /3^!r*^ Jr&|^»rC«^-l,*. iEsch. Sup. 643.

3. Tetrameteb.

(a.) Alchanian. Mtfr*. 'Ayr, | Kiixx/dk* ^0y&\Ti( Ayai. Alcm.
(b.) Spondaic Zti;; ««Xi;i«»df^or | «^^r yfil»ar«ffj. ^.sch. Ag. 62.
(c) rMM6. itl»^9*i\fUx^*i' {"ie'^iTdf. Sapph. 20 (37).
(d.) Lbsseb Alcaic (^ww|j.^^|j_^| j,^).

X^pr<»i!^^ ZipOf^ fiOlyari, Ale 5^(24).
(a.) Hypercat. Tth faym\Kth A&9i\m •««-«|«xf^«^»l*». Soph. Aj. 225.

4. I'emtambter.

rb.) •ATfir!^«# f$&x^\M*^(y tViiU A«y«|J«/T«f. -^Esch. Ag. 123.
fc) Or»«j, I *S pTki I «r«r, t Xiyi rcti-', mT 'm\X£^fi. Theoc. 29. 1.
(d.) 'a- wiXtf, I '^5 yfff ;• r& X«r»«, I fDf H. Soph. EL 1314.
H-^^^t I V# tJtT I fiecif6fa\f^ J;Cv | 'fff^^. Soph. Ant. 135.

Sapphic (j_^ |i.^|j |j_w|i_^).

Kta ydf I cr ^iD'yir, T&x'\«if li^sitr,
Ar 2r I 2iS(« I ^if SfAj-r, I '£XX& I d«0-ir. Sapph. 1. 21.
Phat/kcian (B. I ^ _ ^ I j_ _ I ^ ^ I I ^ ).

TSv Xir.«yrtf^|;^«v, rcSr j 'S^S x»'\»' TheOC £p. 20.

5. ff ICT ATW le i'ICIL.

(a.) U^f ft yTlttiAUsj I '« ^rxXr, I « ^»^ fASririt \ "Exxc^. Enr. Sup. 277.

ib.) 'Ax^i' 's I «ri?vr0r|ir« ^rAJ'ritrSf 'a|^irC0^*|Mr x^t^*' Soph. EL 134.
0.) KiXi[fM rUi I rtfy ;^«^r |f trii M/|»«»« M)Xfrr«r. Ale 49.
(d.) "H- iriX&lfnf rtfi | r«y ^r«|X«rov 'i\XH rU | '««;c«'* ^^Bsch. Pr. 165.

B. Anapjestic Vebse.

§ 707. The place of the fundamental anapsest is often
supplied by a spondee or dactyl, and sometimes, though very
rarely, by a proceleusmatic (^^_ = = =

^708* I. The Anapsestic, from its strong, even move-
ment, was a favorite metre for marching songs ; and it was
greatly employed in systems, by the dramatic poets, as inter-
mediate between the Iambic of the common dialogue, and the
lyric metres of the choral odes.

Kemarks. 1. The general distinction (to omit modifications and excep-
tions) was this. The Iambic portions of the drama were spolcen while th«
performers were stationary ; the lyric, while they were dancing ; and the Ana-
pnstic, while they were coming in, or going out, or marching to and fro.

2. These systems are scanned continuously (§ 692. N. \ but are usually ar*
ranged, so far as convenient, in dimeters (whence the common name of thia
•pecies of verse, the Anap.vstic Dimeter). They uniformly close with tht
dimeter catalectic, called, from its use in proverbs (irae(0i^««i), the parctmiac
vene (see ^ 700. 1). The use of the paroemiac, however, is not confined tm
tiM dose of regular systems.



Digiti^by VjOOQIC



498. VEKSIFICATION. [sodiE IT

ScusMB A2n> Examples.
1 2. 3. 4, 5. 6.

AXX* »Si\xAt *i^r\a,^ m^AtV^Z* V V«-r I ftm* VlrfXXff. A. 25.
IrifAfOt^ 7 x^ '^* I ;C'V^» t V>«CoX#fi I 'Aw^XiA^St^r. A. 14.
Ar Mfy I «r^ *4i^|vMV »»rrir<ff t mr\yt*9 r{ ri Xir«». A. 66.

Bf ^r »£r I Oi/X0^|«r«ro xAl^vwy. t| ;^«d/eti'ii^r x^e* A. 44.

Colendg^B "Homerie Hexameter Deecribed and ExempUfiedJ*

StnSngly it | be^ us a!l6ng f in ' 8^<^ng and I limitless j billows,
Kdthing belfore and I nothing behind, f but the 1 sky and the i <5oeaiL.

§ 70S. II. The Elegiac Pentameter consists of twc
dactylic penthemims (§ 699. 4), the first containing two dac-
tyls or spondees with a caesural syllable, and the second two
dactyls with a final syllable. It commonly alternates with the
Hexameter, forming what is termed, from its early use in plain-
tive song, the Elegiac Metre.

Scheme and Examples.

I I f i I

JS:t0i0%''6T' I 'is Teir|«f tl To-xri' I tnO^i ^\nu
'^a ftif I rtfvrj, :^ », t> ^/a»^9, i\f*0l it (d\y€, Theog. 11
Described and Exemplified by Coleridge,

Tn the Hexjdmeter | riises f the | foiintain*8 | silvery | cdlumn ;
In the Penjtdmeter | aye tl £EUlmg in I melody j back.

§ T06i III. Other Dactylic Metres are, (a.) Ptare^ con-
sisting of dactyls only ; (b.) Impure^ consisting of dactyls and
spondees ; (c.) Molic^ containing, in place of the first foot, a
mere base (^ 698. p) ; (d.) Logaoedic (§ 696. 3), in which
dactyls are united with trochees. Thus,

1. Dimeter.
(a.) Uo^rSWuSs ^/as, Ar. Nub. 303.
(b.) Adonic (_l«^ | j__). n»-r»r«, | B^Dftiv. Sapph. 1. 4.
(b.) Hypercat., Dactylic Penthemim, *Ax^^|r»T* 9ri\^iu i£sch. Sup. 844.

2. Trimeter.
.) n«XX« y&( I 'SiTT 'cixH f*mi>Tlf, Soph. Tr. 112.
[e), Pherecratic(B. 1^.^^ I x_)- '•ExS? mnpixSt \ V«f. Pind.O.l.ft.
GLTCONia T« rd» I Tri wif-tJJi/y/t* 'ix''*y

(B- i J. ^ ^ I X « ^ ) Ttf» rtf» I ietTfidvi, I TO* trCt, *A

Txd/idw 1 Or$/«-dl$4S. fieirAK Soph. (Ed. T. 119&



£



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CH. 2.] tACTYLIC AHD ANAP^STIC VERSE. 48ft

^d.) UHrtf '8\9r€ ^jy^r/"**. JEach. Pr. 907.

'*•) Hjpe^cat. HiXki fi^Win li&\fiiiC9/*i:\vM. Mach. Sup. 643.

3. Tetrameteb.

(a.) AlchaniAN. MiSr*. 'Ayr, | KdXXr8\m'd ^Sy&lrif AtSg, Alcm.
(b.) Spondaic. Zgvt ^ks\&*6fct | 'd/A^r yOlvmiKot. -5^h. Ag. 62.
(c.) rM»6.itl»^v 'i\fAAx^»89 I "B^v'iTiv. Sapph. 20 (37).
(d.) Lbsseb Alcaic (^ww|j.^^|j_^| j_^ ).

X^i/r«»i!^^ Zr^C^^ ^/lyifff-A. Ale. 5'(24).

(a.) Hypercat. Tm fUymlkdp A&fi{ih *ii9r6\»>.y^8faf\df. Soph. Aj- 225.




Ar ^r I )<?(« I ft^ ^ixir\ I 'iixx& I Wt7. Sapph. 1. 21.

Phat/kcian (B. I J I J_ w I 1.W I '. w).

Tsv xa ,i9rifM\xd9, rSv j *«^i; ;^ir(«. Theoc £p. 20.

5. ff ICT ATW le i'ICIL.

(a.) U^t H yglvad'itt, I '« ^rxXr, I 'i? ^»t ftSrarSg \ "Exxs^. Eur. Sup. 277.
(h.) *Aa.V 'iS I irdfTar\dt ^rki'TiirSf 'i\fttlC6fti\9mT xi*'^*' ^P^* ^- ^3^*
(o.) K/Airi/Mr r/Ml | rtf» ;^«^r |f tr* Mr|y«»« M)Xfrr«r. Ale 49.
(d.) "H- flrftX«l/«^ rj^rf I r«» ^Wl|XiBro» YlA-il r/r | "&VC^9' -^^sch. Pr. 165.

B. Anapjestic Vebse.

^707. The place of the fundamental anapaest is often
supp'lied by a spondee or dactyl, and sometimes, though very
rarely, by a proceleusmatic (^^_ = = =

^708. I. The AnapcBstic, from its strong, even move-
ment, was a favorite metre for marching songs ; and it was
greatly employed in systems, by the dramatic poets, as inter-
mediate between the Iambic of the common dialogue, and the
lyric metres of the choral odes.

Kebcarks. 1. The general distinction (to omit modifications and excep-
tions) was this. The Iambic portions of the drama were spo'ken while th«
performers were stationary ; the lyric, while they were dancing ; and the Ana-
pestic, while they were coming in, or going oat, or marching to and fro.

2. These systems are scanned continuously (§ 692. N. \ but are usually ar*
ranged, so far as convenient, in dimeters (whence the common name of this
■pedes of verse, the Anap.vstic Dimeter). They uniformly close with tha
^meter catalectic, called, from its use in proverbs (ir«(0i^«««), the pantmiae
vene (see ^ 700. 1). The use of the panemiac, however, is not confined tm
tiM dose of regular systems.



Digiti^ by VjOOQIC



4M



VERSlFICATlOn.



[book it



3. This verse requires a ctBtura after eadi dipody, exeept in the psnJbniMO*
This cflBsora is sometiines deferred, so as to follow a short syllable at. the begin-
ning of the next dipody.

4. In respect to the feet, the following should be observed, (a) An ana-
past most not follow a dactyl in the same dipody, and rarely follows it in sue*
oessive dipodies. (6) A dactyl rarely follows an anapant or spondee in th«
lame dipody. (c) The third foot of the paroemiac is r^ularly an anapcest ; so
that the system may close with the cadence of the common Hexameter. A
•pondee, however, is occasionally admitted (cf. § 704. 1).



SCHBMB AND KyATH'T^inir



1.






Dimeter Acatalectie.
2. 3.



4.

— -L

^ w



1.

w w X

— i-



Pansmiac
2. 3.

- xlK. x)



'AXX« r V I M«r«f til ^fAVmVif 'if mi
n/XcriTl' ^fiioTf, til '<5» r *fVrlyM«l»
"Iv^dUTs I itarix*** til *{«5«<l«#, *imi

Mytuy I woif fftM II Sf'^/xJiVar. Ear. Med. 759.
j^fX^^^* I •**^* t II «r«r Ur*-r». JBsch. Pr. 93. ,

•H'wfe I ^Sif^n^lWSs t Vt 'iir I kol^a- Soph. Aj. 146.

Though her 4ye I shone otft, t || yet the Ifds | were fix'd.
And the gl^ce [ that it g^ve t H was wild | and immix'd
With i£ught I of change, t II ^^ <^® ^7^ \ i^ay seem
Of the r&tjless who wilk t II ui * trodblled dr^m.

Bt/ron*8 Siege of CormdL

§ 709* n. The combination of the regular dimeter with
the paroemiac (cf. §^ 713, 717) forms the Anap-«stic Tetra-
meter Catalectic of comedy, also called, from its use by the
great master of comic verse, the Aristophanic:





Scheme and Examples.




1.


2. 3. 4. 5.


6. 7.




- ^tll _ ^
_^^tll_.^^




-stl-


4,^


H_A^


II



K«r ict«f I tmt y 1 11 "&«^ i3«x|CrJ«» t II <rfer riff j "s.^x'^s || a««^«r!^

Tffr 'al/iciTi^&t t H 'e!f aO'hiftiB.t X II '«Tra5» | 'i^rU || /S-Jsr/XiTJAf.

Tr ya^ iZ\1a'ifAA9 t || ««»" ^«%l(rr<r6» J l| ftdXXSv | »Pi» 'ftf-llrf J/««rlT*ff,

*H' T^v(l^\^a>ri^69f X\\ *^ iultOTt^f J II ^A>dy» | x«i T«c||Ti yf'(5» rSf,

Ar. Vesp. 548,

At your wdrd | off I g<5, t II and at stalling will sh6w, J || convinciing tka

stfffllest op& ion,
That reg^llia and throne, t H ao^tre, kfngjdom and crown, } || are but dirt •

to judfjlcial domm ion.



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en. 2.] ANAPJBSTIC AND IAMBIC VERSE. 425

Fint in pl^^ore and gl^ 1 1 ^^ aMund | more than w^; { | who with

ItCxIniy B^ljer are welded?
Then for iM(nlic and fights, f || the world thiodgfa | none excftes, % || ^hat

your df|cast does, ^en || tho' gray-h^Bdjed.

MUcheWg TranOatum.

§ 7 1 Q« in. ' Examples are added, from lyric poetry, of
other kinds of Anapaestic verse, both common and logcuBdie
(§ 696. 3) ;

Monom. Hypero. T^r#«X0^|«'ro»r||»av. Find. O. 13. 1.
Dim. Hyperc Tiri fU* | wi(uJ{\ftir&rig | »mX 'mft^Hg. Eor. Here 1018.
Irim. Brachye. ^ ^i fa* «0v | jar«Xti7||#o/a\ '«|^A^ || ^fiX9- Ar. Aoh
285.

ioGAOEDia 1 An., 1 lam. Ni>i'^ | ^ rft. Find. N. 6. 34.

1 An., 8 lam. Ai';^o^v|#« »«r | ^Sf \ yifSs. Ar. Thesm. 312.

1 An., 4 lam. Cat. XSk^trOv \ V»A|n rJv|^* »«tA<oV Find. O. 4. 14.

S An., 1 lam. T« fu* *k^\x^XfX'^ \ t^^^-^t- Find. O. 9. I.

S An., 2 lam. Cat. 'O'xiyfl'i^Mm* \ "ixTiuSf, iEsch. Fr. 547.

S An., 3 lam. ^iffg»c^\0' 'i^Mn]rot 'Hl^pa i | itSit*. Ear. Ion, 1447.

8 An., 2 lam. ASxtfSf | ^*» *Aif | »irm wdfWi ^ | r^^Sf, Ar. At. 451.

4 An., 1 lam. 'lirm\n yi^t^ \ "iri ««» | *o>c«««|r^rdv. iBsch. Ft. 558.



C. Iambic Verse.

§ 71 1. The place of the fundamental iambus may be
supplied by a tribrach (^ _ = w w w)» except at the end of a
line. To add dignity and variety to the verse, the first foot of
a dipody is very often lengthened to a spondee, and not unfre-
quently to a dactyl or an anapaest

Noras. The comie poets admit the am^mt in every place except the last
of a TerM or system. The same license exists in trage^ in proper names
eootaining two short between two long syllables.

§ 7 1 9. I. The Iambic Trimeter Acatalectic (oflen
called the Scnarius^ § 697. p) is the principal metre of dra-
matic dialogue (^ 708. 1).

RmtABKB. 1. This Terse has for its caesura the penthemim at the heph-
tkemim, the former much the most frequently. The latter is sometimes an'
iic^paUd by the elisioo of tlie syllable after which it would properly fall, form-
ing what has been termed by Person the quan-e^Bsura. lines occur, though
fwely, which have neither of these ccsnras.

2. The Tragic Trimeter admits the tribrach in every place but the last ;
IhB spondee in the let, 3d, and 5th places ; the dactyl in the Ist and 3d ; and
the anapmt in the 1st. The feet which are admitted only in comedy or in
proper names ($ 711. N.) are placed within parentheses, in' the following

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Love w^tchling M^||nes8 f wfth | iinfl|',terilble mien.

ByroiCg OtUde Harold,

^713. II. The Iambic Tetrameter Catalectic is pe-
culiar to comedy. It consists of two dimeters, the second cal»
alectic (cf. ^§ 709, 717) ; and has commonly a caesura after
the first dimeter.

Note. The same metre (following of oonrse accent and not quantity) is a
fiivorite verse <^ modem Greek poetry. In onr own langnage, it is diSety
used in comic songs and ballads.



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'QT Jitf-jwoV^f II y£^ ^altrrf 'y\\f*df *M^tAs || 'ecwdwirig, Ar. Hut 260.

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TEMS of the common form (§ 700. 1) ; as,

Kmf Tsff j «dx«rf,
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TAMBIC AMD TROCHAIC VERSE.



427



§ T 1 S. IV. Examples are added, from lyric poetry, of
other kinds of Iambic verse (for the iambus in logaoedic verse,
see § 710).

Monom. Hyperc 'EV«r!^'( *^^||'«v* Pind. P. 6. 7.
Dim. Brachyc. 'f <rfr rl fAti \\ ^^&v6s. Soph. EI. 479.
Dim. Hyperc 2tf T#r | rt? ra || ««rfil5/«5|[r«f. Soph. Ph. 1095.
Trim. Cat. *0-« «r i* V«>!|oV | *^^^s || »tirai\6t, Msch. Pr. 429.
Tetram. Tav 'hii\foi rXS^f&Vf ^ifjvs V tH^l^oD^&t | w^( m1i\i»ifAm \ wuAi. Sopit
(Ed. C. 1077.

8cAZ02f («-»«^«v, limping) or Cholumbus (;^«X/s^C«f, ftune /am^iM), a



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