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[BRARY



THE UNIVERSITY



OF CAL IFORNIA



LOS ANGELES




FRIEND OLIVIA



FRIEND OLIVIA



BY



AMELIA E. BARR

AUTHOR OF " JAN VEDDER's WIFE," " A DAUGHTER OF FIFE," " THE BOW

OF ORANGE RIBBON," " THE BORDER SHEPHERDESS,"

" THB HOUSEHOLD OF MCNEIL," ETC



"Breathe on us for the passing day
The charm of ancient story."



NEW YORK

DODD, MEAD, AND COMPANY
PUBLISHERS



Copyright, 1889-90,
BY THE CENTURY Co.



All rights reserved.



PS



TO

STfje S0netg of Jrimtog fn

I INSCRIBE THIS VOLUME.

AMELIA E. BARR.
1890









CROMWELL, our chief of men, who through a cloud
Not of war only, but detractions rude,
Guided by faith and matchless fortitude,
To peace and truth thy glorious way hast plough'd,

And on the neck of Fortune proud

Hast rear'd God's trophies, and his work persued,
While Darvven stream with blood of Scots imbrued
And Dunbar field resound thy praises loud,

And Worcester's laureate wreath. Yet much remains
To conquer still ; Peace hath her victories
No less renowned than War : new foes arise

Threatening to bind our souls with secular chains :
Help us to save free conscience from the paw
Of hireling wolves, whose gospel is their maw :
Cromwell our chief of men !

JOHN MILTON.



CONTENTS.



CHAPTER PAGE

I. THE KELDERS OF KELDERBY 'I

II. BLAME THYSELF 17

III. "THE WAY TO REST" 37

IV. JOHN DE BURG 61

V. ANASTASIA AND OLIVIA 79

VI. SORROW HATH MANY FEET 99

VII. DE BURG'S FIRST MOVE 117

VIII. THE KING'S SERVANTS 138

IX. THE BARON AND ANASTASIA 159

X. A MEETING 188

XI. OLIVIA AND CROMWELL 207

XII. ANASTASIA'S MARRIAGE 234

XIII. OLIVIA AND ANASTASIA WANTED . . . 251

XIV. JOHN RECKONS WITH CHENAGE .... 272
XV. IN APPLEBY JAIL 294

XVI. MISTRESS OF CHENAGE 311

XVII. PARTING . 337

XVIII. JOHN DE BURG'S FAILURE 371

XIX. ANASTASIA'S BEST SIDE 392

XX. FOR LOVE'S SAKE 415

XXI. KELDERBY AND SANDYS ....... 435



FRIEND OLIVIA.



i.

THE KELDERS OF KELDERBY.

w Though God as one that is an householder
Called these to labour in his vineyard first,
Before the husk of darkness was well burst ;

though the worst

Burthen of heat was theirs, and the dry thirst ;
Though God has since found none such as these were
To do their work like them : because of this,
Stand ye not idle in the market-place."

WHEN Oliver Cromwell held the sceptre of Eng
land, Odinel Kelder was baron of Kelderby and
Swaffham. He was not ignorant of the ancestors who
had mingled his clay and tempered the spirit within him.
For seven hundred years he knew their names and their
deeds. The farthest away of whom he had knowledge
he spoke of as " my fore-elder Jahl," and owned the pe
culiar blessings of his lot to be the result of Jahl's nobility
of nature and of his adventurous spirit.

For Jahl Kelder had been one of that earliest band
of pilgrims who, to escape the tyranny of Harald Haar-
fager, sought liberty of mind and person among the eter
nal snows of Iceland. A few years later Jahl joined
his friend Toddi, or Dodd, in that southward search for
a fairer home which resulted in their settlement on the
shores of Cumberland and in the dales of Westmore-



2 FRIEND OLIVIA.

land. Toddi found the Whitehaven, and bought from
the monks of St. Bees the great woods and lonely dak s
stretching back to Ennerdale. Jahl reached the solitary
seaward stretches of Silverdale, the very region of mystic
forgetfulness, with its rounded hills and wooded wastes,
and its great expanse of ribbed and wrinkled sand-flats,
a dim, misty sea, where the flood glides up to the land
swift and treacherous, or, beaten by conflicting winds,
is white with phantom foam and vexed with spray and
spindrift.

Behind him was a waste of sullen moss and craggy
mounds, unfruitful solitudes so bare and desolate that
he called them Hardanger, the old Norse name for a
place of hunger and poverty. But Jahl asked little of the
land ; he looked to the sea. It raced round its numer
ous promontories, and lay sleeping in its bays ; and he
saw the gray wings of his ships peopling the pallid waste.
They were his hands ; they would reach him the good
things that were not within his grasp. He built his big
stone hall on the height of Silver Scar ; and the lonely
land, and the misty waves bowling in and out of the fog,
became dear to him.

Once his friend Toddi sailed southward to keep a
feast with him, and he said, " Jahl thou art not wise to
build so high ; every wind of heaven will smite thee."

But Jahl answered, " This is what I think, Toddi,
the birds that build on the ground make very poor
nests."

Jahl built for his generations. They sat in his place,
and trod in his footsteps, and kept his memory green.
They married into the great Saxon families of Swaffham
and Millom, and twice the Norman De Burgs added the
quicksilver of their race to the life stream of the Scandi
navian stock ; and as one or the other of the race dis-



THE KELDERS OF KELDERBY. 3

tinctions predominated, so was the Kelder of his day.
In the course of seven centuries the original stone hall
had become a fine seat. Not that all the Kelders had
been wise life-tenants of it, but that the potency of the
Saxon element had been frequent enough to repair losses
and accumulate capital. So that at the beginning of the
seventeenth century the Kelders were one of the great
families of the North Country.

Odinel, the nineteenth of his name, differed widely
from his ancestor Jahl ; but the differences were mainly
in the inner man. Outwardly he had the great Norse
frame, the lofty stature, and the blond complexion of his
northern kin. His mother had been a De Burg, but he
owed nothing to her, except the high-bred nose and the
haughty upper lip of the Norman race. He had a large
compact forehead, eyes like tempered steel, shining with
a steady gleam, a square chin, a firm mouth, and a man
ner at once benignant and austere, the manner of a
true liegeman of Duty, kind, faithful, and intrepid. If he .
clasped hands it was with a flesh-and-blood warmth of
grip ; if he smiled, it was with the large, clear sincerity
of a man without guile. He had the heartiness of the
Norse nature, the breadth of the Norse imagination, and
the refreshing atmosphere of one who lived in the open
air, who went alone into the heart of the mists and into
the silence of the starry sky, who knew the visionary
majesties of the mountains, and the pale, pensive glooms
of the valleys, and who loved the flavour of the brine and
the damp fresh air of the northern ocean.

He was sixty years of age, and he had played the man
in Israel on every battlefield for liberty from long Mars-
ton Moor to Worcester. Life had been a stirring story
to him. He was sitting one evening very quietly on his
hearthstone talking it over with the man within him.



4 FRIEND OLIVIA.

This mighty / was truth itself. It told him plainly that
at Marston he might have been more merciful ; that at
Dunbar, in that great strait between the sea and the
Lammermuirs, he might have been more trustful; that
in the red streets of Worcester he might have been more
just. And he was humbled amid his valiant memories,
silently appealing from the accuser to Him who had made
the atonement.

The tall black chair in which he sat had been the
baron's own for generations. One foot was on its foot
stool, the other pressed down the soft white wool of the
hearthrug ; his left hand lay upon the basket hilt of his
long rapier, his right hand shaded his eyes, his fine head
drooped slightly forward. But though silent and motion
less, he was not alone. On the opposite side of the rug
Lady Kelder was spinning flax. The little black wheel,
richly carved and tipped with silver, was at her knee, and
between it and the snowy flax her white hands made
monotonously graceful movements. She wore a dress of
black silk with a lawn kerchief pinned across her breast,
and a black-silk hood lined with white fell slightly back
ward from her white hair. A handsome woman, of an
unchanging countenance, compact and conscious, who
knew what she meant and what she wanted and in what
she believed.

But though she spoke not she glanced frequently
toward her husband ; and presently he caught her glance,
and a loving smile flashed echo-like from face to face.
Then she said,

" Nathaniel stays away so much longer than was spoken
of. What think you, dear heart? "

" I think, Joan, that he will have business to be his
excuse. Between here and London are many hard
miles."



THE K ELDERS OF KELDERBY, 5

" And also he may come by Kendal. Our cousin De
Burg has a very fair daughter. I have heard that
Anastasia has bettered all expectations of her beauty;
she may be reason enough to stay even a wise man."

" Anastasia has Charles Stuart in all her thoughts. A
Puritan gentleman is her mock, and nothing else. What
agreement can there be between her and our son? "

" In troth and peace love has no politics. Any side
will suit him."

" Nathaniel's politics are the complexion of his creed.
Joan, think not evil of your son."

" As for creeds, he may take to one you think not of.
There is a beaten path now between Kelderby and San
dys, and Mistress Prid "

" Mistress Prideaux is a Quakeress. Dear Joan, keep
a rein on your thoughts. Nathaniel will give you a bet-
terly sort of daughter than that."

" I have the fear in my heart day and night, a fear
unfaceable. There are things I would never submit to ;
that is one of them. A Quakeress in Kelderby 1 God
forbid ! "

" Calmly, Joan. T is said they have spiritual gifts."

" What is the Protector doing to suffer them ? I would
he were more faithful to the truth."

" A Quaker may privately enjoy his conscience, in both
opinion and practice ; sure that is but reason. As for
Nathaniel, I think he is such a man as will take his own
way if it sorts with his faith and duty."

He rose as he spoke, and began to walk slowly about
the long low room, for the housekeeper, Jael, and a serv
ing-man had entered; and the woman put aside Lady
Kelder's spinning, and the man began to lay the table for
the evening meal. Jael was a noticeable woman fifty
years old, fresh and sturdy, the right hand of her mistress



6 FRIEND OLIVIA.

in all domestic concerns, the loyal friend of the Kelders,
bound so willingly by the kindly traditions of many gen
erations. She pushed the logs together "and added fresh
ones, and then straightening herself watched for a mo
ment the arrangement of the fine pewter service upon
the table. This being satisfactory, she turned so as to
face her mistress and said,

" My Lady, Susan of Lambrigg and Jock the second
shepherd want to marry ; it puts me about a bit."

" It is a fit marriage, I think, Jael."

" True, my Lady, but not a fit time, with the spring
cleaning to do in Kelderby, and the sheep casting their
lambs on every fellside. It is n't reasonable. But what
signifies talking? You can't think what a couple of fools
they be. They stand to wedding through thick and
thin."

"Then wedding it will have to be. Dear me, Jael,
how girls will run into trouble! Is it raining?"

" Dreeping wet, and very airy ; the wind being nor'ard
and weet'ard. You can hear the billow-bluster at the foot
of the Scar."

" Your young master is somewhere on the road between
here and London. I pray God he come to no ill."

" 111 keeps its own road, my Lady, and my young mas
ter is never found on it. He '11 be here anon. Perhaps,"
and she stooped to move the logs as she spoke,
"perhaps he is safe at Sandys."

"Jael!"

" Yes, my Lady ; facts will be."

" Facts give way to stronger facts. See that all the
men and maids come in to prayers. Some have made a
breach in the good custom lately. I will have them
all in."

" Speak to them yourself, my Lady ; it will be a long



THE KELDERS OF KELDERBY. /

way better. They have been backening badly in every
right thing lately. I am often hard set to manage
them."

At this moment supper was served, and Jael threw a
lamb's-wool shawl around her lady's shoulders and placed
her seat at the table.

In the midst of the meal she saw a sudden change on
the face of the serving-man. The loutish chaos of his
countenance coloured into life, and a gleam, of pleasure
brightened his pale eyes. He had heard a footstep that
no one else had heard, and the pasty in his hand was
only saved from a fall by his mistress's look of sharp in
quiry. Before a word could be said the door opened
with a swift, noiseless movement, and Captain Nathaniel
Kelder entered.

No one could have been more welcome ; but there was
a calm gravity in his manner which repressed any extrav
agant demonstration of feeling. Lady Kelder, however,
had a kiss and a whispered word of tenderness whicn
brought tears of joy to her eyes, and the baron such a
grasp and glance as interprets the greeting of kindred
souls. Then the meal was finished to that hurry of gen
eral conversation which usually follows an arrival; it
flitted here and there, to persons and things and events,
but touched none of the real subjects of interest until
prayers were over and the servants dismissed with the
usual blessing,

'' God be with you, each and all ! "

" And with you and yours, Master."

The head man lingered a few minutes to render his ac
count and to receive orders for the following day, and
during this interval Lady Kelder looked with a fond spec
ulation at her son. She thought of his cousin Anastasia
de Burg, and of lovely Mistress Prideaux, and wondered



8 FRIEND OLIVIA.

if he really was in love with either. She never doubted
but both were in love with Nathaniel. If this opinion
wanted any confirmation in her mind, she found it in
stantly in the beauty of the young man, leaning with
unstudied grace against the high chimney-piece of black
oak.

It has long been the false and silly fashion to ridicule
the Puritan garb; it is now full time to acknowledge
that Puritan gentlemen were dressed gracefully and pict
uresquely and in the most perfect sobriety of good taste.
They thought that dark or black garments were fittest for
grave and earnest men. We are now all of the same
opinion. They thought laces, perfumes, and jewelry
marks of vanity and foppishness. Every true gentleman
in Christendom now thinks with them. They thought it
more rational to cut their hair a comfortable length than
to wear it in womanish curls down the back. What sen
sible man of to-day will contradict them ? High Church
men who still delight to nickname them " Roundheads "
make a point of cutting their own hair much closer. Yes,
even in the matter of dress, the Puritan was wise and
brave beyond his time.

Nathaniel Kelder could have chosen no dress more
becoming, even if dress had been a- subject about which
he was troubled. His jack-boots covered his knees;
his breeches were of black leather dressed until it was
as soft as velvet ; his dark doublet showed undersleeves
of white linen ; and round his neck was a scarf of fine
lawn broidered at the edge with a band of needlework,
done by his mother's fingers. He was very tall, and had
a bright, spiritual face set in soft brown hair, a face so
fine that it gave the impression of being formed of some
rarer thing than flesh and blood. A smile made it lumi
nous. His gray eyes were large and dreamy, the down-



THE KELDERS Of KELDERBY. 9

ward sweep of the eyebrows toward the lashes of the
eyes when they were raised indicating not only a tender
heart, but a disposition to melancholy. A mouth of great
refinement, candid and loyal, softened the threat of his
resolute chin ; and he had an air of distinction which was
not consequent alone to the condition of his good birth,
but was partly the result of acquired self-restraint.
Nathaniel Kelder had the mastery over his spiritual man.
He could cross his will without a mutiny.

It was a relief to the family when the door was closed
upon them and they could speak freely together ; for ser
vants if more faithful in those days were not less curious,
and Master Nathaniel's journey to London had been a
matter of speculation among them.

"There be a woman in it," the head man said among
his fellows ; " there be a woman in it. I met De Burg's
man in Kendal market, and I dilly-dallied an hour with
him, talking of Mistress De Burg and what gentlemen
were her servants now ; but at the long end, what signi
fied ? He let no light into things. I could make nought
of him, back nor edge."

" You had much to do to name young master with
Mistress De Burg, a proud-souled madam that is hey-
go-mad for the Stuarts and their kind."

" There 's no need to be put about, Jael. It breaks
no squares to say that whether Stuart or Cromwell be
master, we be servants ; and I do think that young
master have been in London about the De Burgs.
It '11 turn out so, you '11 see it will."

Primitive natures who trust to their natural instincts
are rarely mistaken. Nathaniel Kelder had been to
London in the interest of the De Burgs. For although
the friendship between the families had been broken
by political differences, the tie of kinship was of stronger



IO FRIEND OLIVIA.

stuff; and when De Burg was threatened by the law,
and his lands in danger of confiscation, Kelder had
voluntarily offered himself as his cousin's security.

"What success, Nathaniel?" he asked.

" Better than was to be hoped for, Father. I had
two interviews with the Lord Protector, and at the first
moment he remembered you. He said, ' Kelder's word
is bond for a dukedom ; ' and then he asked how you
fared, and anon he turned to his desk and wrote some
what concerning the business ; afterward he bid me
dine that night at the palace."

"What think you of him now?"

" What I ever have thought. There is no man in
England to stand beside him. The glance of his eyes
pierced me like a spear. While I was present an
officer entered with a report concerning the plot of
the Fifth Monarchy Men. His anger was great ; but
he shut close his mouth, and I saw he was reining
up by a strong effort the prancing passions within
him."

Kelder was much moved by this information. In his
own heart was a strong leaning toward these fervent
visionary watchers for the visible coming of Christ the
King and the reign of the saints on earth. Unknown
to any soul he had cherished the same longing. There
was a high hill behind Kelderby, and many a morning
he had climbed it, and looking toward the east, watched
for the glory of the Second Advent. He was sorry that
those who watched with him should take up carnal
weapons and make divisions, and could hardly believe
it until Nathaniel said,

"This officer brought with him the standard which
they had prepared, a fine one truly. 'T was folded
close; but Cromwell, with a strange power, shook it



THE K ELDERS OF KELDERBY. II

open. So I saw that it was a lion couchant, and the
motto written, ' Who shall rouse him up ? ' I would
you had seen the Lord Protector as he stood holding
the standard. His face was like a battle-cry; but oh,
the sadness in his eyes ! I shall never forget it."

" Sure 't is a wonder so great a man should think
of dining; but I '11 warrant he kept his dinner-hour,
plots and standards and all to them ! And pray what
palace honours he now?"

" He is at Hampton Court, Mother."

" Those Cromwells at Hampton Court ! Sure 't is a
sight to make one think. Elizabeth Cromwell in the
seat of the queen ! I marvel not if she forget whence
she came."

" Dear heart, let the women alone. Oliver holds the
sceptre of England by right divine, and Mistress Crom
well is a godly consort to him."

" He has long wanted the king's place ; he has got
ten it then, it seems."

" The place wanted him. I, and many of my judg
ment, know that England is pleased and well content
that he should be there."

" Not all content, as these Fifth Monarchy Men
show."

" Such out of a godly jealousy misunderstand him.
In time he will make his work clear."

"But herein others are of a like dissatisfied mind,"
said Nathaniel. " Many Christians of good quality com
plain of the spiritual bondage in which he leaves them.
A deputation of tne people called Quakers was waiting
at Hampton Court. I saw not its manner of reception,
but they also say that ' Cromwell understands them
not ; ' nor are they wiser concerning his way of dealing
with them."



12 FRIEND OLIVIA.

" 'T is most likely," interrupted Lady Kelder, scorn
fully. " They are a silly set, so full of themselves that
they have no room for the grace of God. Quakers,
forsooth ! God give us patience when we speak of them !
And as for the Lord Protector being beyond their wis
dom, 't is most likely. A do.vn day for General Crom
well when he can fold himself to their size ! If you will
tell me shortly what is to be done with your cousins
De Burg, I will leave you to discuss the Cromwells. I
find them not so pleasant a subject for my sleeping
thoughts."

"De Burg has permission to remain within his do
mains. He is not to go beyond them."

" God knows he will cross seas whenever he has mat
ter to carry the king. I mean Charles Stuart."

" He is to give his word not to cross seas."

" His tenfold oath would not bind him."

"Then you must know that my father is surety for
his word. If it cannot be depended upon, we stand to
lose ten thousand pounds forfeit."

" Baron, you have done a wicked thing. Why should
you endanger your own estate to save De Burg's ? Con
ceive how merry a business it will be for him to cheat
and mock his Puritan cousin ! I say, it was ill done
to pledge your land."

" Dear Joan, I pledged my word. I will pillar my
word with my land. Is my land worth more than my
word? I trow not."

"De Burg called you traitor, and in the beginning
of this fight he did you many an ill turn. The Lord
of Hosts has given our side the victory ; 't is an open
insult to his mercy to make friends with your foes."

" De Burg was my cousin before he was mine enemy.
My mother was his mother's sister."



THE KELDERS OF KELDERBY. 1-3

"David says "

"Joan, I go not back to Sinai. He that came out
of Nazareth said, Love your enemies ; do good to them
that do ill to you."

Then there was a little silence. Lady Kelder was
trembling with anger. A verse of Scripture may bring
a wise decision in a question of right or wrong ; but
it oftener comes like a sword than as a peacemaker.
So though it was impossible for her at the moment to
dispute so plain an order, she felt that there were ways
of meeting it, and she held these in reserve.

Then Nathaniel leaned forward and took her hand,
and his bright face drove away the gathering shadows
on her brow. " We had a poor dinner," he said. " If
I had been curious about my food, I should have wished
myself at your table, dear mother."

" Mistress Cromwell knows neither how to cook nor
how to let cooking alone. 'T is a strange ordering
which puts her in royal rooms and royal dress ; but
many heads have learned to lift themselves not before
used to it."

" She is very quiet, and her dress not so brave nor
so becoming as your own. A black velvet she wore, but
shabby; and the lawn broidery poor and darned, and
wanting that spotless purity which is better in my eyes
than broidered bands."

" I have heard that Mistress Cromwell was not too
neat, a bad fault in a woman ; and the Lord Pro
tector was but a sloven ere the days of wearing steel
corselets and of sceptre holding."

" As for the room, there were some fine tapestry
hangings, and window curtains of scarlet baize, and a
couch covered with fly-coloured damask. And the Lord
Protector had an elbow chair, and there were backed



14 FRIEND OLIVIA.

stools for the rest of the company. But the long black
table compares not with the carved oak table and chairs
of this room ; and the andirons were neither so heavy
nor so bright as these ; " and Nathaniel, as he laid a
fresh log across them, lightly touched the brass hearlh
furnishings which were his mother's pride. So the brass
andirons and the carved oak furniture, though but dumb
comforters, softened the first stinging sense of the bar
on's improvident translation of the great Nazarene's
command.

In the morning it was decided to inform De Burg
as early as possible of the mercy shown him, espe
cially as it was necessary to be explicit concerning
the restraints and obligations upon which it was to
be continued. " 'T is only kind to ride over to
Kendal at once, Nathaniel," said the baron. " Sus
pense is ill company, and De Burg must be an anxious
man."

" 'T is you, Odinel, that should be the anxious man,"
said Lady Kelder. " De Burg counts the years of
Cromwell's life, and assures himself that with Cromwell



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