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THE

AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL HISTORY.



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THE

AMERICAN MUSEUM OF NATURAL
HISTORY,

CENTRAL PARK, NEW YORK CITY.
(77th Street and Central Park, West.)

ANNUAL REPORT OF THE PRESIDENT,

TREASURER'S REPORT, LIST OF ACCESSIONS,

CONSTITUTION,

BY-LAWS AND LIST OF MEMBERS

For the Year 1897.



NEW YORK:
PRINTED FOR THE MUSEUM.



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, C. MARTIN PHMTINO MOUM.
NO. Ill MHN STNieT
NKW VOIIK



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RECEIVED,

JUN 8 1893
PEABODY MUSEUM.



BOARD OF TRUSTEES,
1898.



MORRIS K. JESUP.
ADRIAN ISELIN.
J. PIERPONT MORGAN.
•D. JACKSON STEWARD.
JOSEPH H. CHOATE.
JAMES M. CONSTABLE.
WILLIAM E. DODGE.
J. HAMPDEN ROBB.
CHARLES LANIER.

C. VANDERBILT.

D. O. MILLS.

GEORGE



ABRAM S. HEWITT.
ALBERT S. BICKMORE.
OSWALD OTTENDORFER.
ANDREW H. GREEN.
D. WILLIS JAMES.
ARCHIBALD ROGERS.
WILLIAM C. WHITNEY.
ELBRIDGE T. GERRY.
GUSTAV E. KISSEL.
ANSON W. HARD.
WILLIAM ROCKEFELLER.
G. HAVEN.



♦ Died February 9, i8«



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OFFICERS AND COMMITTEES

FOR 1898.



President.
MORRIS K. JESUP.

First Vice-President.
JAMES M. CONSTABLE.

Treasurer.
CHARLES LANIER.

Secretary and Assistant Treasurer.
JOHN H. WINSER.

Executive Committee.
JAMES M. CONSTABLE, Chairman.
MORRIS K. JESUP. J. HAMPDEN ROBB.

CHARLES LANIER. ANSON W. HARD.

WILLIAM E. DODGE. GUSTAV E. KISSEL.

ARCHIBALD ROGERS.

Auditing Committee.

ANSON VV. HARD. GUSTAV E. KISSEL.

GEORGE G. HAVEN.

The President ex-officio.

Finance Committee.
J. PIERPONT MORGAN. D. O. MILLS.

CHARLES LANIER. D. WILLIS JAMES.

The President ex-officio.

Nominating Committee.

D. O. MILLS. WILLIAM E. DODGE.

JAMES M. CONSTABLE.

The President ex-officio.



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DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC INSTRUCTION.
Prof. Albert S. Bickmore, Curator.



DEPARTMENTS OF GEOLOGY, MINERALOGY. CONCHOLOGY
AND MARINE INVERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY.

Prof. R. P. Whitfield, Curator.

L. P. Gratacap, Ph.B., I Aoo;»*««* r««.*/^«

Dr. Edmund O. Hovey. [ Assistant Curators.



DEPARTMENT OF VERTEBRATE ZOOLOGY.

Prof. J. A. Allen, Curator.

Frank M. Chapman, Assistant Curator. .

John Rowley. Taxidermist.



DEPARTMENT OF VERTEBRATE PALEONTOLOGY.

Prof. Henry Fairfield Osborn, Curator.
Dr. J. L. WoRTMAN, Assistant Curator.
Dr. W. D. Matthew, Assistant.



DEPARTMENT OF ANTHROPOLOGY.

Prof. Frederic W. Putnam, Curator.
Marshall H. Saville,

Assistant Curator of the Archaeological Division.

Dr. Franz Boas,

Assistant Curator of the Ethnological Division.



DEPARTMENT OF ENTOMOLOGY.
W. BeutenmOller, Curator.

LIBRARIAN.
A. Woodward, Ph.D.

SUPERINTENDENT OF BUILDING.
William Wallace.



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TWENTY-NINTH ANNUAL REPORT.



To the Trustees of the American Museum of Natural History :

I have the honor to present the following brief statement of the
work of the Museum for the year ending Dec. 31, 1897:

Finances. — Your attention is called to the fact that the expen-
ditures have been kept within the limits of the appropriations
made at the annual meeting.

Endowment account has a credit balance of $3,192.06, after
meeting the deficit in the receipts for maintenance during the
year. I am enabled to report this very gratifying result through
the generous assistance accorded by the Trustees at the annual
meeting, on which occasion $25,750 was subscribed to liquidate
the Dr. balance at the close of 1896, and the estimated deficiency
in the income for 1897.

It will be seen that the amount received from the city is not
sufficient to maintain the Museum.

The following summary of the Treasurer's report shows the
total receipts and disbursements:

Maintenance.

Receipts from the City $94,998 18

** '* other sources 12,040 26

Transfer from Endowment Account to balance

deficit, Jan. i, 1897 3,406 23

Transfer from Endowment Account to balance

deficit, Dec. 31, 1897 1,510 01 $111,954 68

Dr. Balance, Jan. i, 1897 $3,406 23

Disbursements 108,548 45 ^111,954 68



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lo Report of the President,

Endowment.

Receipts from all sources $69,548 80

Balance Jan. i, 1897 $7,258 10

Transfer to Maintenance Account to balance

deficit, Jan. i. 1897 3,406 23

Disbursements for the increase and deyelopment

of the collections 54*182 40

Transfer to Maintenance Account to balance

deficit, Dec. 31, 1897 1.510 01

$66,356 74
Cash surplus carried over to Jan. i. 1897 3,192 06 $69,548 8

Additions to the Building. — Early in April the State
Legislature enacted a law empowering the municipal authorities
to erect a new lecture hall and an addition to complete the comer
of the west wing. Plans for these structures were promptly
prepared, and received the approval of the Trustees, the Commis-
sioners of Parks, and the Board of Estimate and Apportionment ;
the latter at the same time authorized the issue of the bonds as
provided in the Act.

Within a brief time contracts were let for the structure to
complete the east wing, for the erection of the addition to com-
plete the west wing, and for the construction of the large lecture
hall at the north end of the old building.

Rapid progress is making on all of these buildings, and unless
some unforeseen delay prevents it is expected that the halls will
be ready for cases and fittings during 1899. The new lecture
hall may be ready for occupancy late in the coming autumn, and
will have a seating capacity for fifteen hundred persons. This
hall will provide ample accommodation for the large numbers
which at times heretofore have been unable to gain admission to
the courses of free lectures to the public.

Attention is called to the diagram inserted in this report which
exhibits the two end structures and the new lecture hall at the
north end.

With these additions the south front of the Museum will be
completed in accordance with the original plans adopted at the
time the first structure was erected.



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Report of the President, ii

AccESSiONS.^-The list of accessions published in the later
pages of this report is an evidence of the growing interest felt in
this Museum by our citizens. The donations were numerous,
and represent many valuable additions to the collections and
Library.

I desire to record our appreciation of the gift made by Mr.
Wm. F. Havemeyer of a painting and four studies of some of
the important works of Wm. Bradford. These have been hung
in the Library, with the large painting of the " English Expedition
in Search of Sir John Franklin," given to the Museum in 1892
by Mr. Havemeyer and a number of his friends. The celebrated
work owned by C. P. Huntington, and painted by the same artist,
entitled " The Polaris in the Ice at Thank God Harbor," also
hangs in the Library.

Mr. James A. Bailey has given an Indian Elephant, two Camels
and two Kangaroos, to the Department of Vertebrate Zoology.
Our thanks are also due to the Commissioners of Parks for a
number of animals which died at the Menagerie and at the
Aquarium.

Mr. James M. Constable and your President had the pleasure
of securing for the same department three excellent specimens of
Mountain Sheep, the types of a new species described in the
present volume of the Bulletin.

Gifts of rare and very desirable collections of mammals, birds
and reptiles were received from Dr. Edgar A. Meams, U. S.
Army; Mr. Morris M. Green, of Syracuse, N. Y., and Mr. W. R.
Horn, of Melbourne, Australia. Miss Annie Peniston, of Hamil-
ton Parish, Bermuda, has presented another collection of shells
from Bermuda, an addition to her previous donation.

The Copper Queen Consolidated Mining Company has added
to its previous gifts a number of valuable specimens, and Mr. I. F.
Elder, of Keokuk, Iowa, presented forty-two geodes from North-
western Missouri.

A collection of fossils and shells were donated by Mr. Wm. E.
Crane, of Tarrytown, N. Y., many of the shells being previously
unrepresented in the collection.

The Department of Anthropology has been greatly benefited
through the liberality of the Duke of Loubat. The means to



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12 Report of the President.

continue archaeological research in the Delaware Valley, near
Trenton, N. J., were provided by him, and the results sent to the
Museum. He has also presented the Department a number of
casts made from large sculptures in the National Museum of
Mexico, and a complete set of the casts from America, Asia and
Polynesia, in the Ethnographical Museum of Berlin. To these
he has added casts from the moulds, owned by Mr. A. Maudslay,
of the large sculptured stone at the ancient ruins of Quirigua,
Guatemala, known as the ** Great Turtle of Quirigua," a cast of
the largest of the stone idols at the same place, 27 feet in height,
and of a large stone of similar character from the ruins of Copan,
Honduras.

The Duke also provided the means for securing a number of
casts of other large sculptures from Copan, from moulds belong-
ing to the Peabody Museum, and we are also indebted to him for
a large collection of objects obtained in Mexico and Guatemala
by Dr. Edward Seler.

Mr. Francis C. Nicholas, General Manager of the South Ameri-
can Exploration Company, made an interesting collection of
archaeological material during his examination of the tract of
land belonging to this Company in the eastern portion of the
United States of Colombia. The gift contains a number of speci-
mens of special interest from a region hardly known to the
archaeologist.

Late in the year, forty-eight new water colors, painted by Mrs.
C. S. Sargent, were added to the Collection of North American
Forestry by the President; others will be contributed until the
collection is made complete. Sections of several new species of
trees, discovered during the year, were also added, and new maps
were prepared showing the geographical distribution of the trees.

We are greatly indebted to Mr. Wm. Schaus, of Twickenham,
England, who has recently donated his collection of Old World
Moths, in all eight thousand specimens. Mr. Schaus is engaged
in identifying the species still in his possession, and upon the
completion of this work will send them to the Museum.

The Trustees are also indebted to the Very Reverend Dr.
Eugene A. Hoffman, Dean of the General Theological Seminary
of this city. His interest in the Museum has induced him to



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Report of the President. 13

present us with a representative collection of the Butterflies of
America, North of Mexico. He has also authorized the Curator
to select for the Museum a representative collection of the Butter-
flies of Central and South America.

The Termitp and Ant Hill Nests, collected in Hayti and the
United States of Colombia, by Mr. Francis C. Nicholas, now
shown in the Gallery Hall, were presented by Mr. Henry C.
Pratt of this city.

Among the many accessions to the Library I make special men-
tion of the gift of Miss Laura P. Halsted, a warm friend of the
Institution, who presented three hundred and seven volumes as a
memorial to her brother, the late Robert Halsted.

Another important donation has been received from the British
Government, which, at the request of the Royal Society, has
presented to the Library the " Report on the Scientific Results pf
the Voyage of H. M. S. * Challenger,' " consisting of forty-four
volumes.

The Library has also received, through the generosity of the
Duke of Loubat, ninety-two volumes relating especially to
Anthropology, an exceptionally helpful gift to this department,
the works having been selected with reference to its needs.
Many of the volumes are very rare.

One hundred specimens have been added to the mammal
exhibit, among which are six Deer, a Puma, three Mountain
Sheep, a Rhinoceros, a Nilghau, and four dogs representing
prominent races.

Two new groups were added to the series of bird groups, pre-
pared with their natural surroundings ; one of these comprises
adult and young specimens of the Duck Hawk. The other con-
tains the old and young of the Red-shouldered Hawk. Both were
mounted with their natural accessories in a realistic manner, under
the supervision of Mr. John Rowley, and have been placed in the
main hall, at the entrance.

Skeletons of the Walrus, White-tailed Gnu, Polar Bear,
Narwhal, Rhinoceros and Boa Constrictor have been added to the
exhibition collection.

About 250 geological and mineralogical specimens were
purchased in various parts of Russia and Russian Armenia by



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14 Report of the President.

Dr. Edmund O. Hovey, Assistant Curator in the Geological De-
partment, while in attendance at the Seventh Triennial Session of
the International Geological Congress convened at St. Petersburg.
Dr. Hovey also made a short stay at the Marine Zoological
Laboratory, Bay of Naples, where he secured a very interesting
series of specimens. His leave of absence covered a period of
several months, a portion of the cost of the journey and his
salary being defrayed by the Trustees.

Expeditions. — Field exploration is an influential factor in the
growth of the Museum, and its importance increases with each
succeeding year. The brief mention here following gives but an
inadequate idea of the great increase in the collections due to
this source.

After remaining nearly four years in Mexico, Dr. Carl Luraholtz
returned in April last, and has since been engaged in preparing
his notes, and the labels for the material gathered by him. This
large and costly collection, secured among the tribes of Mexico,
adds greatly to our knowledge of their history. From the Hui-
chols a full series of objects was obtained relating to tribal cere-
monies. The specimens have been catalogued, and will soon be
arranged in the west wing.

Dr. Adolf F. Bandelier has continued his researches in
Bolivia and Peru, mainly in the vicinity of Lake Titicaca.
The collections received during the year were numerous and
valuable, and contained a number of trephined skulls, to which
attention was called many years ago by the late E. G. Squier.
The Museum now owns a large number of these skulls, and
very interesting results will accrue from their study, particu-
larly since one gives evidence of the remarkable surgical oper-
ation of bone-grafting. The Peruvian collection has not yet
been exhibited in its entirety, but will soon be placed in the
west wing.

The services of Mr. Ernest Volk were continued for the entire
year, exploring at several points near Trenton, N. J. As before
mentioned, the Duke of Loubat defrayed the cost of this work,
which has been carried on under the direction of Prof. F. W.
Putnam for the purpose of careful investigation of the question



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Report of the President, 15

which has arisen relative to the antiquity of man in the Delaware
Valley. In this connection it may be stated that a subscription
has been made by Mr. B. Talbot B. Hyde to defray the cost of
further continuing the work in 1898.

Acting under the concession granted to this Institution by the
Mexican Government, Mr. Marshall H. Saville, Assistant Curator
in charge of the division of Archaeology, has been for several
months in Mexico, engaged in the exploration of ancient ruins,
from which he has gained information of great scientific import-
ance, and has also sent valuable material for our exhibits. Mr.
Saville will not return until May next.

Messrs. B. Talbot B. Hyde and Frederick E. Hyde, Jr., have
at their personal cost continued the explorations in the ancient
pueblos in New Mexico. The present year forms the third season
of the work they have very generously prosecuted in the interest
of the Museum. Fully as valuable results are expected from the
continuation of the work next year, and it is a source of sincere
pleasure to feel that the efforts of the Trustees meet with such
earnest cooperation.

Another important expedition was undertaken in the interest
of the Department of Vertebrate Zoology by Mr. A. J. Stone, a
trained collector. His plans provide for a series of journeys,
begun this year, and to be continued till the close of the autumn
of 1900. His operations will cover the territory from Montana
to Bering Strait. The Department will thus acquire a full repre-
sentation of the game and other large animals to be found in the
countries he will visit. This material will greatly enrich our
display of North American Mammals, for which additions the
Museum is indebted to Mr. James M. Constable.

It is of interest to note that an important plan has been arranged
conjointly with the Carnegie Museum, whereby Mr. Herbert H.
Smith, late a curator there, and a skilled collector, will make
an extended trip to the United States of Colombia. He will
gather specimens for both institutions, which will provide this
Museum with a large series of species now unrepresented in our
collections.

Mention was made in the report of the preceding year of the
valuable results which would accrue to science from a systematic



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1 6 Report of the President,

investigation of the tribes inhabiting the coasts of the North
Pacific Ocean, and the acquisition of information disclosing their
historical development. In the same report a map was annexed
showing the region which it was proposed to cover in the course
of the research. The details of the plan were arranged in the
beginning of this year in order to enter upon the work at the
earliest practicable moment. Your President thereupon decided
to assume the expense involved in prosecuting the research, and
a revised map is incorporated in the present report showing the
localities to be visited during the next four years.

The plans for the work for the second year have been decided,
and reports will be made from time to time of the operations of
the parties in the field. Occasional articles, which have appeared
in the public press, have furnished a brief and popular narrative
of the progress made by the explorers up to the close of the first
season.

Thanks are due to the Imperial Russian Government for assur-
ances of its cooperation in the work to be undertaken on the
coast of Northeastern Siberia, and the State Department of our
own country has also given valuable assistance and counsel, in
relation to the movements of the explorers.

Our parties engaged in the field received important aid from
some of the transcontinental lines, and it is very gratifying to
record this manifestation of continued interest in the Museum's
work. In this regard, the Board is indebted to Mr. C. P. Hunt-
ington, Mr. George J. Gould, Mr. Eben B. Thomas, Sir William
C. Van Home, Mr. Edward D. Adams, Mr. James J. Hill, and
Mr. E. T. Jeffrey. The Wisconsin Central Railroad and branches
have aided the Museum in the transmission of freight, and the
New York & Cuban Mail S. S. Company, and the Panama R. R.
Company, have granted special rates on shipments from Mexico
and Peru.

Department of Vertebrate Zoology. — Additional room
and larger facilities were provided for the Study Collection, which
was rearranged during the year. A beginning has been made
toward gathering material to represent by means of casts, or
mounted specimens, the fish and reptile fauna of the State.



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Report of the President. 17

Labels were supplied for all new specimens of Mammals, and
many old labels have been replaced to conform to the recent
changes in nomenclature ; the Bird Collection has received similar
attention. The gain of the year is summarized as follows :
Mammals, 872; birds, 1356; reptiles, 146; fishes, 150.

Department of Geology and Invertebrate Zoology. —
The work of the department has mainly been devoted to the care
of the Shell Collection ; labels have been prepared for the general
collection, which has required the revision and preparation of
about 4500 labels. In bringing together the material, it is dis-
closed that the case room is insufficient for the proper installation
of this branch of our collections, and it will require therefore the
assignment of more space for the purpose.

Considerable attention has also been given to the specimens of
Invertebrate Zoology in the way of mounting and preparing
specimens brought in during the year. The corals and sponges
have been displayed to better advantage.

Department of Vertebrate Palaeontology. — In referring
to this department, a portion of the report of its Curator, Prof.
Henry F. Osbom, is incorporated, for the purpose of more clearly
expressing the gratifying results achieved through the efforts of
the force engaged in field work. The field parties consisted of
Dr. J. L. Wortman, Dr. W. D. Matthew and Mr. W. W. Granger
of the Museum ; and Messrs. Brown and Menke of Kansas Uni-
versity. The Curator also spent a short time in field work.

" In the Department of Vertebrate Palaeontology we have con-
tinued to devote the greatest care and study toward arousing the
interest of the public in our exhibits. Two large charts have
been made, showing clearly the succession of animals in the


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