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U. S. Navy, Eighth District: Veneral Disease Control Officer, Lt. Comdr. T. A.
Fears (MC), Naval Air Station, Corpus Christi. See also Louisiana.

U. S. Office of Education, Civilian Morale Service: To receive material for
War Information Centers, Dr. T. F. Mayo, Agricultural and Mechanical Col-
lege of Texas, College Station; Baxter Polk, College of Mines and Metallurgy,
El Paso; Opal Williams, East Texas State Teachers College, Commerce; O. J.
Baker, Prairie View State College, Prairie View; J. W. St. Glair, Southern
Methodist University, Dallas; Prof. Cecil Home, Texas Technological College,
Lubbock; Dr. Roy A. Crouch, University of Houston; C. D. Simmons, Uni-
versity of Texas, Austin.

U. S. Public Health Service: Director, District IX, and Liaison Officer, Eighth
Army Corps Area, Medical Director Knox E. Miller; District Venereal Disease
Control Consultant, P. A. Surgeon Thomas H. Diseker, 1604 Smith Young
Tower, 310 S. St. Mary Street, San Antonio; State Venereal Disease Control
Consultant, P. A. Surgeon Joseph S. Spote, Pan American Union, El Paso.

Work Projects Administration: State Director of Community Service Program,
Mrs. Mary K. Taylor, Smith Young Tower Bldg., San Antonio.

State Department of Health, Austin. Since the organization of the
Venereal Disease Program in Texas, the work has been in close
cooperation with the State Medical Society, and its Committee on
Venereal Disease Control. They have approved the program and
policies before the work was started, and also any changes since
its inauguration.

In counties having a sufficient population to justify it, clinics have been
established. To date, 101 clinics in 65 counties are in operation. All treatments
at clinics are free. Physicians are furnished drugs, free of charge, for their
use in treating those in the low income group. In 124 counties that do not
have clinics, physicians are furnished free drugs, through their medical society,
for use in treating indigent and low income patients. Indigency is defined by
each medical group.

At present, over ninety per cent of the people in Texas have some form of
treatment available, and 111 of the 128 medical societies are actively engaged
in promoting this campaign.

Education is carried on through lectures, motion pictures, exhibits, news items,
and the radio; also, technicians are trained at the State Laboratory. During
the past year, the State Health Department has made 64,729 blood tests for
the Selective Service, and 100,525 tests for Texas physicians. Close cooperation
is given the armed forces in the suppression of prostitution. Case finding, and
case holding are continuous.

Houston Social Hygiene Association. This organization which for
the past ten years has conducted a voluntary program, is at present
inactive, but officers and board maintain a framework on which
future effort may be built when the time is ripe.



Texas is a state where a good deal of interest has centered on the repression
of prostitution in connection with the war effort. A.S.H.A. staff members,
including Dr. Snow, Dr. Clarke, Mr. Johnson, Mr. Gould and Miss Pinney have
visited the cities of San Antonio, Houston and El Paso during the past year
for conference with health officials, army and law enforcement authorities and vol-
untary workers concerning the special problems involved. In San Antonio in par-
ticular Mr. Johnson spent some time working out a program which resulted in close
cooperation between the various agencies concerned and a much better under-
standing of the social hygiene program generally, as well as in a marked improve-
ment in conditions. In El Paso the special problems of a border city have been
studied by the U.S.P.H.S. and steps taken for cooperation with health and law
enforcement officials in Juarez, Mexico, which resulted in the closing of houses
of prostitution in that city in June, 1942.



STATE AND COMMUNITY SUMMARIES 339



UTAH

Population Population rank among states 41

Urban 305,493 A.S.H.A. members in state 31

Rural 244,817

550,310

Social Hygiene Societies and Committees

Provo: Public Health Committee, Utah Junior Chamber of Commerce: Chairman,

D. Elden Beck, M.D., Brigham Young University.
Salt Lake City: Utah State Social Hygiene Association: President, Elias L. Day,

Suite 621-24, Melntyre Bldg.; Secretary, Winifred H. Dyer, 1319 Kensington

Avenue.

Other Voluntary Agencies

American Legion: Department Adjutant, A. 8. Horsley, B-10 State Capitol,

Salt Lake City.
Kiwanis International:*
Lions International:*
Rotary International:*

United Servicce Organizations, Region XI: See Missouri
Utah Congress of Parents and Teachers: President, Mrs. L. K. Nicholson, 357

8th Avenue, Salt Lake City; Social Hygiene Chairman, Philo Farnsworth,

M.D., 3234 S. State Street, Salt Lake City.
Utah Congress of Social Workers: First Vice-President, Mrs. Euth P. Loh-

moelder, 139 State Capitol, Salt Lake City.
Utah Federation of Women's Clubs: Chairman Public Welfare, Mrs. George

Matson, 600 24th St., Ogden.

Utah Junior Chamber of Commerce: President, Jack H. Swenson, Spanish Fork.
Utah Nurses Association: Executive Secretary, Mrs. Eldo Halliday, 414 Boston

Bldg., Salt Lake City; Secretary, State Organization for Public Health

Nursing, Mrs. Euth Mumford, 130 Capitol Bldg., Salt Lake City.
Utah State Medical Association: President, John B. Anderson, M.D., Spring

ville; Secretary, D. Q. Edmunds, M.D., 610 Melntyre Bldg., Salt Lake City.
Utah Tuberculosis Association: Executive Secretary, Ada Taylor Graham, 314

Beason Bldg., Salt Lake City.
Utah Woman's Christian Temperance Union: President, Mrs. Alice M. Ault,

Tremonton.

Official Agencies

National Youth Administration, Region XI: See Colorado.

Social Protection Section, Office of Defense Health and Welfare Services,

Region XI: See Colorado.
U. S. Army, Ninth Corps Area: Headquarters, Fort Douglas, Salt Lake City;

Venereal Disease Control Officers, Captain Wayne C. Sims, MC.
U. S. Department of Agriculture, Extension Service: State Extension Director,

William Peterson; State Home Demonstration Leader, Myrtle Davidson, Utah

State Agricultural College, Logan.
U. S. Navy, Twelfth District: See California.
U. S. Office of Education, Civilian Morale Service: To receive material for

War Information Centers, Dr. L. H. Kirkpatrick, University of Utah, Salt

Lake City; David Davies, Utah State Agricultural College, Logan.
Utah Council of Defense: Vice-chairman, Gus P. Backman, 207 S. Main St.,

Salt Lake City.
Utah State Department of Education: Superintendent of Public Instruction

and Director of Vocational Education, Charles H. Skidmore, Salt Lake City;

Director of Health, Physical Education and Becreation, Bernice Moss.

* See page 239 for national headquarters.



340 JOURNAL. OF SOCIAL HYGIENE

Utah State Department of Public Welfare: Director, J. W. Gillman, Salt Lake

City.
U. S. Public Health Service: Ninth Army Corps Area: Liaison Officer, Paul D.

Mossman, Fort Douglas, Salt Lake City, Utah.
Utah State Board of Health: Acting State Health Commissioner, William M

McKay, M.D., Salt Lake City; Director, Bureau of Venereal Disease Control,

Welby E. Bigelow, M.D.

Clinics or Cooperating Clinicians at:
Ogden, Salt Lake City (2).

Work Projects Administration: State Director of Community Service Programs,
Mrs. Ruby S. Garrett, 304 Newhouse Bldg., Salt Lake City.

State Board of Health, Salt Lake City. Utah is keenly aware of
the added health and welfare problems involved in the war emergency
and has been taking steps to repress prostitution and step up its pro-
gram for prevention and control of venereal diseases during the past
two years. While clinics are not generallj' practical because the
population is largely rural, three clinics are in operation, in Ogden
and Salt Lake City. The Board maintains a continuous program of
education.

Utah was one of the states that passed both premarital and prenatal
examination laws for syphilis in 1941, the former becoming effective
July 1, 1941, and the latter May 13, 1941. Both laws require a blood
test by an approved laboratory, with results to be filed with the State
Board of Health.

Utah Social Hygiene Association, Salt Lake City. This new
society, chartered in March, 1942, has a three-point program:
1. To enlarge its membership and to become established as a self-
supporting organization ; 2. To work in conjunction with the health
authorities in spreading proper educational information on venereal
diseases and related subjects ; 3. To continue the program of proper
law enactment and law enforcement.

Cooperation in educational efforts is reported on the part of newspapers;
radio stations KSL, KDYL and KUTA, the latter carrying the Social Hygiene
Day program this year; Junior Chamber of Commerce, Parent- Teacher groups,
Board of Education and study groups in churches.

The Association reports that the Police in Salt Lake City closed up houses
of commercial prostitution in. May, 1941, and they have remained closed since then.

The Association cooperates closely with the state health department, and
with the health departments of Salt Lake County and Salt Lake City. Chief
efforts at present are in the organization and membership campaign to achieve a
Btate-wide organization and cooperation of other groups interested in social
hygiene objectives.

Provo Junior Chamber of Commerce. The Junior Chamber's Public
Health Committee reports excellent cooperation in educational
efforts by newspapers, radio station KOVO, schools and colleges,
and church and family welfare groups. These institutions generally



STATE AND COMMUNITY SUMMARIES



341



give aid to the program of law enforcement against commercialized
prostitution. The Chamber is attempting to sponsor adjustment to
new social conditions which have come and are still developing as
a result of the national war program.



Utah groups participate regularly in National Social Hygiene Day observances.
During past months Dr. Snow and Miss Shenehon have been visitors to Salt
Lake City.



VERMONT



Population

Urban 123,239
Bural 235,992



Population rank among states 46
A.S.H.A. members in state 28



359,231



Social Hygiene Societies and Committees

Brattleboro Social Hygiene Committee: Chairman, Donald B. Hoyt.
Burlington: Social Hygiene Committee, Vermont Conference of Social Work:

Chairman, F. S. Kent, M.D., State Health Department, Burlington.

Other Voluntary Agencies

American Legion: Department Adjutant, Leslie E. Wilson, 213 Elm Street,

Montpelier.

Eiwanis International:*
Lions International:*
Rotary International:*

United Service Organizations, Region I: See Massachusetts.
Vermont Conference of Social Work: Secretary, Margaret F. Brainerd, Vermont

Children's Aid Society, Burlington.
Vermont Congress of Parents and Teachers: President, Mrs. Wallace M. Fay,

Proctor; Social Hygiene Chairman, Mrs. G. S. Bennett, Manchester.
Vermont Nurses Association: Executive Secretary, Mrs. Abbie L. Starkey, 3

Nelson Street, Montpelier; Chairman, Public Health Nursing Section, Mrs.

Hortense Harwood, 348 College Street, Burlington.

Vermont State Medical Society: President, Ernest H. Buttles, M.D., Burling-
ton; Secretary, Benjamin F. Cook, M.D., 154 Bellevue Avenue, Rutland.
Vermont Tuberculosis Association: Secretary, Harold W. Slocum, 348 College

Street, Burlington.
Vermont Woman's Christian Temperance Union: President, Mrs. Nettie B.

Shedd Kidder, Irasburg.



Official Agencies

National Youth Administration, Region I: See Massachusetts.

U. S. Army, First Corps Area: See Massachusetts.

U. S. Department of Agriculture, Extension Service: State Extension Director,

J. E. Carrigan; State Home Demonstration Leader, Marjorie E. Luce, College

of Agriculture, University of Vermont, Burlington.
U. S. Navy, First District: See Massachusetts.
U. S. Office of Education, Civilian Morale Service: To receive material for

War Information Center, Frederika B. Northrop, University of Vermont,

Burlington.

* See page 239 for national headquarters.



342 JOURNAL OF SOCIAL HYGIENE

U. S. Public Health Service: For Director, District I, see New York; for
Liaison Officer, First Army Corps Area, see Massachusetts.

Vermont Council of Safety: Executive Vice-chairman, Albert A. Cree, State
House, Montpelier.

Vermont Federation of Women's Clubs:

Vermont State Board of Health: Secretary, Charles F. Dalton, M.D., Burling-
ton; Acting Director, Division of Venereal Diseases, Henry M. Fanner, M.D.

Clinics or Cooperating Clinicians at:
Burlington.

In addition to the clinic listed, the addresses of physicians giving treatment
for venereal diseases under the state plan may be obtained from state,
county and municipal officers.

Vermont State Department of Education: Commissioner of Education, Ealph
E. Noble, Montpelier; Supervisor of Health and Physical Education, Alice C.
Aldrich.
Vermont State Department of Public Welfare: Commissioner, Timothy 0. Dale,

Montpelier.

Work Projects Administration: State Director of Community Service Program,
Mrs. Marion Warner, Odd Fellows Bldg., Court Square, Rutland.

State Board of Health, Burlington. Vermont has taken advantage
of Federal allotment of funds matched by the state legislature to
expand its social hygiene work. Since the population of the state is
almost entirely rural, clinics are not practical, but the private physi-
cian is recognized as the one best qualified and fitted not only to keep
in contact with the infected case that comes to his attention, but also
to render treatment. Contact is kept with the private physician, his
needs in the way of drugs attended to, consultation in the matter of
treatment provided when desired. A general check-up of cases is
carried on; drugs, and other treatment facilities for patients are
given out to authorized sources.

The fact that both the Director and the Assistant Director of the Division
of Venereal Disease Control have been called to Army duty has made it necessary
to carry on the work with a minimum of time, but results are considered good.

Several important war industry plants are operating in the State with a
resulting increase in population.

Particular attention is being given to an industrial hygiene program under the
slogan Tours for Health. Primarily an educational program, the major objec-
tives are: "(1) to promote healthy working conditions in a plant through elim-
ination of hazards and unhealthy conditions; and (2) to improve workers' health
in the plant and at home." Workers are enlisted in the Yours for Health plan
to develop a sense of responsibility in maintaining good conditions in the plant
and making suggestions, either individually or through workers' committees, to
management pertaining to health conditions. Services of the Department of
Public Health are available to management. Health education material is sent
through the mail to workers participating in the program who also receive mem-
bership letters and a Tours for Health button.

Vermont's military population has also trebled during the war emergency and
the USO and other organizations have arranged for recreational and leisure-time
activities for soldiers on leave.

Vermont was one of the states which passed both premarital and prenatal
examination laws for syphilis in 1941, both laws becoming effective on July 31,
1941. Vermont also has adequate laws against prostitution, according to the
standards set up by a commission of the Federal Government following the first
World War.



STATE AND COMMUNITY SUMMABIBS 343

In the field of sex education and training of young people for marriage and
family life, as well as in venereal disease control education, the State Board of
Health has done outstanding work in cooperation with the State Department of
Education. Lectures are regularly given on all aspects of social hygiene to
high school students by a member of the Board of Health staff, and A.S.H.A.
films shown.



Vermont School of Family Life, Burlington. Sponsored by a com-
mittee which included representatives of the State Board of Health,
the State Department of Public Education, the State Ministerial Asso-
ciation, the University of Vermont, the American Social Hygiene
Association, and a number of other agencies, a three-day Institute
on Family Life Problems has been conducted during the summer
session of the University of Vermont at Burlington for some years
past, with an average attendance of 150 or more. Classroom meetings
and open forum discussions led by a panel, and an extensive exhibit
of educational materials have been interesting features of these
sessions.



Among A.S.H.A. visitors to Vermont health agencies recently have been
Dr. Snow, Mr. Gould and Miss Pinney. Close cooperative relations are main-
tained with the State Department of Health, the Vermont Conference of Social
Work and the club and parent-teacher groups.



VIRGINIA

Population Population rank among states 19

Urban 944,675 A.8.E.A. members in state 57

Rural 1,733,098

2,677,773

Social Hygiene Societies and Committees

Alexandria: Social Hygiene Committee, Alexandria Council of Social Agencies:

Chairman, Mrs. John Eobinson, 930 South St. Asaph Street.
Arlington: Social Hygiene Board of Arlington County: Executive Secretary,
Mrs. Virginia O'Dell, Court House.

Other Voluntary Agencies

American Legion: Department Adjutant, W. Glenn Elliott, 11 State Capitol

Bldg., -Richmond.
Civitan International: Lt. Governor, Chesapeake District, Frank W. Burnett,

2704 N. Pershing Drive, Arlington.
Kiwanis International:*
Lions International:*
Medical Society of Virginia: President, Eoshier W. Miller, M.D., Richmond;

Secretary, Miss A. V. Edwards, 1200 East Clay Street, Richmond.
Rotary International:*
Virginia Conference of Social Work: Secretary, Raleigh C. Hobson, 403 Grigsby

Place, Norfolk.
Virginia Congress of Parents and Teachers: President, E. L. Fox, Ashland.

* See page 239 for national headquarters.



344 JOURNAL OF SOCIAL HYGIENE

Virginia Federation of Women's Clubs: Chairman Public Welfare, Mrs. William

G. Watt, 2600 N. 16th Street, Arlington.
Virginia Junior Chamber of Commerce: President, Martin B. Williams, 3324

Loxley Eoad, Richmond.
Virginia Nurses Association: Executive Secretary, Mrs. Jessie Wetzel Faris, 811

Grace- American Bldg., Richmond; Chairman, Public Health Nursing Section,

Mrs. Virginia Campbell, Bureau of Health, Richmond.
Virginia Tuberculosis Association: Executive Secretary, Leslie C. Foster, 504

Atlantic Life Bldg., Richmond.
Virginia Woman's Christian Temperance Union: President, Mrs. Amy C. Weech,

1333 8th Street, N. W., Washington, D. C.
United Service Organizations, Region IV: Executive, Chester D. Snell, 1010

Mutual Bldg., Richmond.

Official Agencies

National Youth Administration, Region IV: See West Virginia.

Social Protection Section, Office of Defense Health and Welfare Services,

Region IV: See District of Columbia.
U. S. Department of Agriculture, Extension Service: State Extension Director,

J. R. Hutcheson; State Home Demonstration Leader, Maude E. Wallace, Vir-
ginia Polytechnic Institute, Blacksburg.
U. S. Navy, Fifth District: The Commandant, Headquarters, Norfolk; Venereal

Disease Control Officer, Commander R. B. Henry (MC), District Headquarters;

Lt. Comdr. A. E. Rosenberg (MC), Naval Operating Base, Norfolk; Lt. F. F.

Weiner (MC), Marine Barracks, Quantico.
U. S. Office of Education, Civilian Morale Service: To receive material for

War Information Centers, J. N. G. Finley, University of Virginia, Charlottes-

ville; Ralph M. Brown, Virginia Polytechnic Institute, Blacksburg; James A.

Hulbert, Virginia State College for Negroes, Petersburg.
U. S. Public Health Service: For Director, District II, for Liaison Officer,

Third Army Corps Area, see Maryland.
Virginia Council of Defense: Acting Coordinator, J. H. Wyse, Old Memorial

Hospital Bldg., Richmond.
Virginia State Department of Health: State Health Commissioner, I. C. Riggin,

M.D., Richmond ; Director, Division of Venereal Disease Control, E. M. Holmes,

Jr., M.D.

Clinics or Cooperating Clinicians at:

Abingdon, Alexandria (2), Altavista, Alton, Amherst, Appalachia, Arlington,
Arvonia, Ashland, Beaver Dam, Bedford, Berryville, Blackstone, Blairs, Bluefield,
Boykins, Bristol, Buckingham, Burkeville, Cape Charles, Charlotte Courthouse,
Charlottesville (2), Chase City, Chatham, Chesterfield, Christianburg, Clarksville,
Clifton Forge, Covington, Cumberland, Danville, Denbigh, Disputanta, Drivers,
Dublin, Eastville, Ellerson, Emporia (2), Fairfax, Falls Church, Farmville,
Fincastle, Franklin, Fredericksburg, Front Royal, Gordonsville, Gretna, Grundy,
Hampton, Harrisonburg, Hopewell, Hurley, Lawrenceville, Lebanon, Lexington,
Luray, Lynchburg, Madison Heights, Manassas, Marion, Martinsville, Mathews,
Middleburg, Nassawadox, Newport News (2), Norfolk (3), Norton, Orange,
Petersburg, Portsmouth (2), Princess Anne, Pulaski, Radford, Richlands, Rich-
mond (4), Roanoke, Salem, South Boston, South Hill, Staunton, Stony Creek,
St. Paul, Suffolk, Tappahannock, Toano, Townsend, Urbanna, Vinton, Virginia
Beach, Wakefield, Waverly, Waynesboro, Williamsburg, Woodstock, Wytheville,
Yorktown.

Virginia State Department of Education: Superintendent of Public Instruction,

Sidney B. Hall, Richmond; Supervisor of Physical and Health Education,

E. V. Graves.
Virginia State Department of Public Welfare: Commissioner, William H. Stauf-

f er, Richmond.
Work Projects Administration: State Director of Community Service Program,

Ella G. Agnew, 11 South 12th Street, Richmond.



STATE AND COMMUNITY SUMMARIES 346

Virginia State Department of Health. At a meeting held in June,
1940, with representatives of several coast cities and the military,
it was unanimously agreed that a concerted effort should be made
to strengthen the venereal disease program in that area. The
State Department of Health was designated to coordinate this
program. On July 1, a program was inaugurated with the hope
of preventing any increase in venereal disease infection. At the
end of the year there had been no increase in the reported number
of cases of syphilis, while in other defense areas of Virginia there
had been. Control measures, with the cooperation of military
authorities, police and court officials, and civilian clinics in the
area, alone were responsible for the results which have been
obtained.

On October 1, 1940, a new program was inaugurated to have all men rejected
because of syphilis by the Selective Service examining boards brought to treat-
ment. Since then the Division has handled over 46,000 records of laboratory
reports of serologie tests, for the local medical examiners; sent, at monthly
intervals, lists of infected individuals to local health authorities for their investi-
gation; and later recorded reports of the results of the investigations received
from local areas.

Based on preliminary analysis, after eight months' experience with the program
of the serologie tests given, approximately 4,039 were reported as positive and
placed under suspicion of being infected with syphilis. They must be located
and re-checked to establish their status as to infection. At the end of June, 1941,
over 50 per cent of them had been investigated and placed under treatment.

In December, 1940, and January, 1941, a second study of the performance of
serodiagnostic tests for syphilis was conducted by this Division in cooperation
with the Department's laboratory. Under the terms of the Premarital Exam-
ination Act, laboratories must be approved by the State Health Department to
perform such tests. Approval is based on the demonstration of a satisfactory
sensitivity and specificity rating. In the first study in May, 1940, only 30 labora-
tories participated, and the ratings were so low that the second study was made
within a year. Fifty-four laboratories were evaluated in the two studies and
36 were approved.

In April, 1941, a program for the control of gonorrhea was announced. This
new activity necessitated the preparation and release of clinic records, educa-
tional material, and instructions on the treatment and clinic management of
cases of gonorrhea to all health departments. Sulfathiazole was added to the
free drug list for the treatment of clinic cases of gonorrhea.

In May arrangements were made with the Selective Service Board to investigate
selectees rejected by the local examining board because of infection with gonor-
rhea. A system was developed to refer these individuals to physicians or clinics
in the hope that they would be rehabilitated and called for re-examination by



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