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American University Bulletin Catalog Issue: Catalog (Volume 1951-1952) online

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Announcements for 1951-1952



A University Located in a Great World Capital



COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES

SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SCIENCES AND PUBLIC AFFAIHS

Graduate Division

Undergraduate Division

WASHINGTON COLLEGE OF LAW
DIVISION OF PROFESSIONAL INSTITUTES
AFFILIATED UNDERGRADUATE AND POSTGRADUATE
NURSING PROGRAMS



Accredited by the

MIDDLE STATES ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGES
AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS

Member of the

AMERICAN COUNCIL ON EDUCATION
ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN COLLEGES
ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN LAW SCHOOLS
ASSOCIATION OF UNIVERSITY EVENING COLLEGES
ASSOCIATION OF URBAN UNIVERSITIES
NATIONAL COMMISSION OF ACCREDITING
NATIONAL INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION



Schedules indicating the hour, location, and instructor of each course
arc published prior to the opening of each session. A color map of
Washington showing the locations of the University divisions in rela-
tion to the resources of the Capital will be sent to applicants on
request.

Please address all communications to:

Offiee of Admissions
The American University
Washington 6, District of Columbia

Volumi 27 NOVEMBER 1951 Number 3



THE AMERICAN UNIVERSITY



CATALOG

1951-1952



PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY
WASHINGTON 6, DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA



CALENDAR
1951



SEPTEMBER


OCTOBER


S M T W T F


S


S


M T W T F S




1

8
15
22
29


7
14
21

28


12 3 4 5 6

8 9 10 11 12 13

15 16 17 18 19 20

22 23 24 25 26 27

29 30 31


2 3 4 5 6 7

9 10 11 12 13 14

16 17 18 19 20 21

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30 .






NOVEMBER


DECEMBER


S M T W T F


S


S


M T W T F S


1 2

4 5 6 7 8 9
11 12 13 14 15 16
18 19 20 21 22 23
25 26 27 28 29 30


3
10
17
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2

9
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30


3 4 5 6 7 8
10 11 12 13 14 15
17 18 19 20 21 22
24 25 26 27 28 29
31





1952



JANUARY


FEBRUARY


S M T W T


F


S


S


M T W T


F S


... 12 3

6 7 8 9 10

13 14 15 16 17

20 21 22 23 24

27 28 29 30 31


4
11

18
25


5
12
19
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1 2

8 9

15 16

22 23

29 ..


3
10
17
24


4 5 6 7
11 12 13 14
18 19 20 21
25 26 27 28






MARCH


APRIL


S M T W T


F


S


S


M T W T


F S






1

8
15
22
29


6
13

20
27


12 3

7 8 9 10

14 15 16 17

21 22 23 24

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4 5
11 12
18 19
25 26


2 3 4 5 6

9 10 11 12 13

16 17 18 19 20

23 24 25 26 27

30 31


7
14

21

28






MAY


JUNE


S M T W T


F


S


S


M T W T


F S


1

4 5 6 7 8
11 12 13 14 15
18 19 20 21 22
25 26 27 28 29


2

•4

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30


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24
31


1

8

15

22

29


2 3 4 5

9 10 11 12

16 17 18 19

23 24 25 26

30


6 7
13 14

20 21
27 28






JULY


AUGUST


S M T W T


F


S


S


M T W T


F S


... 1 2 3
6 7 8 9 10
13 14 15 16 17
20 21 22 23 24
27 28 29 30 31


4
11

18
25


5
12
19
26






1 2

8 9

15 16

22 23

29 30


3
10
17
24
31


4 5 6 7
11 12 13 14

18 19 20 21
25 26 27 28





Fall Session
1951

October 1
Classes begin

November 22

Thanksgiving Day — a holiday

December 21

Christmas holidays begin —
10:45 p. m.

January 3

Classes resume — 8:00 a. m.

January 28

Examinations begin

Spring Session
1952

February 8
Classes begin

February 22

Washington's Birthday — a
holiday

February 24
Founders' Day

April 12

Easter holiday begins — 10:45
p. m.

April 21

Classes resume — 8:00 a. m.

June 2

Examinations begin

June 8

Commencement

Summer Session

June 16

Classes begin — first half

August 4

Classes begin — second half

September 19

Summer session ends

October 2

Fall classes begin



CONTENTS

Page

I. GENERAL INFORMATION

Calendar 2, 22

History 5

Map of Locations 8

Educational Program 9

Resources 13

Admission 17

Graduation 23

Cost 34

University Lkrary 35

Student Personnel Program 38

Pictorial 40

II. THE FACULTY 41

III. COURSES OF STUDY 51

Accounting 53

Art 56

Art History 60

Biology 62

Business Studdzs 66

Chemistry 72

Communication 74

Economics 76

Education -. 86

English and Literature 90

Geography 95

Geology 97

History 99

International Relations and Organization 105

Journalism 109

Languages Ill

Law 117

Mathematics 121

Music 126

Nursing 131

Philosophy 133

Physical Education 135

Physics 141

[3]



CONTENT S— Continued

Page

III. COURSES OF STUDY— Continued

Political Science and Public Administration 143

Professional Institutes 155

Psychology 157

Public Relations 161

Religion 162

Secretarial Studies 164

Sociology 165

Speech and Theater 170

Statistics 172

Television and Radio 176

IV. STUDENT AFFAIRS 178

V. UNIVERSITY STATUTES

1.00 General 181

2.00 Classhtcation of Students 182

3.00 Graduate Division 183

4.00 Comprehensive Examination Fields 191

5.00 Washington College of Law 199

6.00 Undergraduate Divisions 201

7.00 ELIGD3ILITY 204

8.00 Work-Study Program 205

9.00 Student Affadrs 205

10.00 Religious Policy 207

11.00 Greek Letter Socdzties 207

12.00 Finance 210

13.00 Fellowships and Scholarships 213

14.00 Student Loans 217

15.00 Residence 218

16.00 Dining Service 219

17.00 University Standards 220

VI. ADMINISTRATION 222

VII. CORPORATION 228



[4]



I. GENERAL INFORMATION



HISTORY



The American University was chartered by an act of the Congress of the United States
of America on February 24, 1893. Its incorporation was the result of a conviction in
the minds of Christian statesmen, educators, and industrial leaders that a significant
graduate institution should be established in the Nation's Capital to organize the
increasing rich opportunities for independent study and advanced research into a
rigorous curriculum which would make the whole city a veritable university.



Bishop John Fletcher Hurst of The
Methodist Church took the leadership
in the organization of the University.
In association with President Grover
Cleveland, Chief Justice Melville
Fuller, C. C. Glover, President of the
Riggs National Bank in Washington,
Senator Redfield Proctor of Vermont,
Governor Robert Pattison of Pennsyl-
vania, John S. Huyler and John M.
Andrus, New York business men, Presi-
dent William McKinley, and others,
Bishop Hurst established The Ameri-
can University as one of the four insti-
tutions founded before the turn of the
century to provide advanced education
on a graduate level and "to enlarge the
boundaries of human knowledge" by
means of investigation and research.
These four institutions were Johns
Hopkins University (1876), Clark
University (1888), University of Chi-
cago ( 1890 ) , and The American Uni-
versity (1893).

From the beginning the University
was independent of Government and
free in the scope of its intellectual
inquiry. "The mind is free," President
Woodrow Wilson declared in his his-



toric Lodestar and Compass address at
the campus in 1914. "It owes sub-
servience and allegiance to nobody
under God. The object of scholarship
is to release the human spirit from
every kind of thralldom of darkness.
It is knowledge, properly interpreted,
seen with a vision of insight, that is
uniting the spirit of the world."

Selection of Campus

On Christmas 1889 Bishop John
Fletcher Hurst reined his horse on
a wooded slope in the northwest
heights above the Potomac River, the
site of Fort Gaines, one of the key
defenses of the City of Washington
during the Civil War. Stepping from
his carriage, he looked toward the
plains of Manassas and the Blue Ridge
Mountains. "This hill is the place,"
he said to his companions. "On the
site of this crumbling fort we shall
build a university dedicated to the
love of peace and human understand-
ing."

The first university building, built
of Vermont marble in Ionic architec-
ture, was named Hurst Hall and desig-



[5]



The American University



nated as the College of History in
appreciation of the services of Bishop
Hurst, himself a distinguished his-
torian who had taken his doctor's
degree at Halle, Germany. The con-
cern for human experience as repre-
sented by history has continued to
be a dominant interest of the Uni-
versity.

With the twentieth century the role
of the United States in world affairs
placed a new emphasis on public serv-
ice in government. It was natural
therefore that the University should
be influenced in its development by
the needs of the Nation's Capital.

Metropolitan Campus

The increasing importance of gov-
ernment led the trustees of the Uni-
versity in 1919 and 1920 to acquire
property on F Street between 19th
and 20th Streets now located midway
between the White House and the
Department of State. In this con-
venient location the University ex-
tended its professional programs to
serve the more specialized needs of
government workers concerned with
the technical problems of governance
and the broad backgrounds which are
necessary to understanding the ob-
jectives of political action.

Undergraduate Studies

Until the organization of the Col-
lege of Liberal Arts on September 23,
1925, The American University con-
tinued as an exclusively graduate in-
stitution. When the College opened
the University therefore was already
heir to more than three decades of
graduate tradition. From the begin-
ning it was a universitij college, an



undergraduate division strongly influ-
enced by the University activities of
original inquiry and professional inter-
est which surround it.

School of Social Sciences
and Public Affairs

In 1934 the University's programs
of public administration were organ-
ized into the School of Public Affairs
which in 1941 was merged with the
Graduate School to form the School
of Social Sciences and Public Affairs
with graduate and undergraduate di-
visions. With the establishment of
the School of Public Affairs, the Uni-
versity called Dean Ernest Griffith, of
Syracuse University, to the direction
of the Graduate School, transferring
Arthur S. Flemming from the College
of Liberal Arts to the directorship of
the School of Public Affairs, and called
Professor Leon C. Marshall, for fifteen
years the dean of the College of Com-
merce and Administration, University
of Chicago, and later professor in the
Institute for the Study of Law of Johns
Hopkins University, to the chair of
economics.

Graduate Concentration in
Social Sciences

The growth of its programs com-
pelled the University in 1935 to con-
centrate its entire resources at the
graduate level in the field of social and
political sciences. During the next
decade and a half foundations con-
tributed more than a quarter million
dollars to the growth of the Univer-
sity. Of this sum more than $62,000
was given by the Rockefeller Founda-
tion for the support of work in public



The American University



administration, the extension of public
administration education to young
government officials in the American
republics, and for the assistance of
scholars and research projects. Grants
from the Carnegie Corporation of
New York and the Milbank Memorial
Fund made possible the develop-
ment of instruction and research in
the field of population problems, while
grants from the Carnegie Corpora-
tion directly to the University as well
as through the American Council of
Learned Societies gave the University
the opportunity to take the leadership
in the development of archival science
as an academic discipline. Grants
over a period of five years from the
Alfred P. Sloan Foundation for the
support of the Teaching Institute of
Economics gave strong impetus to
work in the field of economics which
had always been a major concern of
the University.

Washington College of Law

In 1949 the Washington College of
Law, established in 1895 and long a
neighbor of The American University
with its location at 2000 G Street,
merged with the University as a pro-
fessional division.

The American University

The component parts of The Amer-
ican University are the College of
Arts and Sciences located at Massa-
chusetts and Nebraska Avenues, the
School of Social Sciences and Public
Affairs located on F Street between
19th and 20th Streets, the Washington
College of Law located at 2000 G
Street, and a Division of Professional
Institutes related to all divisions of



the University with offices at 1901 F
Street, Northwest.

Bureau of Social Science Research

The Bureau of Social Science Re-
search, located at 1729 F Street, North-
west, conducts basic inquiry in the so-
cial sciences. It also carries on applied
research for governmental and private
organizations. For students it pro-
vides professional training on a grad-
uate level. It offers facilities and guid-
ance to assist students in carrying
out individual research assignments.
Through a system of internships and
the organization of graduate seminars
into research teams, the student has
the opportunity to participate in large-
scale research projects.

University Flag

The American University Flag, de-
signed on the occasion of the charter
jubilee, February 24, 1943, by the late
Professor C. Law Watkins, chairman
of the department of art, and director
of the Phillips Gallery Art School,
binds together the traditions of the
University. In the midst of the dark-
red field symbolizing human endeavor
and conflict is set the outline of an
ancient fortress to represent Fort
Gaines upon whose site the campus
stands. The University itself is sym-
bolized by the "compass of human life
with its great needle pointing steadily
at the lodestar of the human spirit,"
a thought expressed by President
Woodrow Wilson at the dedication of
the Graduate School in 1914.

The color of the compass is blue,
traditional symbol of intellectual and
spiritual life and of the virtue of



8



Tile American University



loyalty. Six bastions of the fort, in-
corporated in the design from a plan
by Marquis Sebastien le Prestre de
Vauban, the seventeenth century
master of siege warfare, represent his-
tory as the vivid continuum of man's
experience with other men in the phys-
ical world, language as the mechanism
for the exchange of ideas and the re-
cording and transmission of experi-
ence, mathematics as the tool for the



measurement of the dimensions of
living, science as a method for the
exploration of the world of man and
matter and the definition of laws by
which man can predict relationships
and exercise control of his world, the
fine arts as an expression of the insight
into the meaning of life, and philos-
ophy as man's effort to give life a
coherent direction in the pursuit of
values.



Map Showing University Locations



American l/nhersilu




EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM



The American University offers academic programs through (1) the graduate and
undergraduate divisions of the School of Social Sciences and Public Affairs, (2) the
Washington College of Law, (3) the College of Arts and Sciences, (4) the Division of
Professional Institutes, and (5) by interinstitutional agreement and Saint Elizabeths
Hospital. The programs of all divisions of the University are organized to provide
a high degree of flexibility in curriculums.



The offerings of the University are
therefore to be regarded as a whole
which may be approached by each
student according to his own intellec-
tual and professional variables. Gen-
eral inventories of achievement such
as the Graduate Record Examination,
in addition to the usual course exami-
nations, are available as reliable in-
dices of the student's own intellectual
development. Seminars and oppor-
tunities for independent reading and
research are provided to give "free
space" for the development of skill
and power in the manipulation of ma-
terials and ideas.

Each division of the University is
directed by its own dean or executive
officer responsible to the president.
The University faculty maintains uni-
form standards of performance in the
various divisions through the super-
vision of a Committee on Academic
Standards and a Committee on Admis-
sions. Students in any division of the
University have the privilege of taking
part in intramural activities, intercolle-
giate sports and contests, and student
affairs. All University facilities are
open to fulltime undergraduate stu-
dents without special fee, and to all
other students on payment of a nom-
inal student activities fee.



School of Social Sciences and
Public Affairs

The School of Social Sciences and
Public Affairs is located on the metro-
politan campus midway between the
White House and the Department of
State. Its programs of instruction and
research are designed to lay broad
foundations for the understanding of
the problems of human group relation-
ships and to develop a high standard
of professional skill and technical com-
petence in dealing with the control
and direction of society. A consider-
able part of the curriculum has been
developed for the benefit of persons
employed in the federal government
and for those who plan to enter the
service of the United States. It pro-
vides upon the basis of general educa-
tion programs for career specialization
in those areas where a thorough com-
prehension of the social sciences is
essential. One of the purposes of the
School of Social Sciences and Public
Affairs is to provide opportunity for
the continuing education of mature
students who recognize that contem-
porary society is changing so rapidly
in its demand for professional com-
petence that advanced study is neces-
sary if one is to keep in the forefront
of his field.



[9]



10



The American University



The School of Social Sciences and
Public Affairs is organized under one
faculty with deans designated to di-
rect the graduate division and the
undergraduate division.

The program of the School is co-
ordinated through a Standing Com-
mittee which includes representation
from the eight departments into which
the curriculum of the School is di-
vided:

Communication

Economics and Business Administra-
tion
History-
International Relations and Organi-
zation
Political Science and Public Ad-
ministration

Psychology and Education
Sociology and Public Welfare
Statistics and Mathematics

Courses of instruction are developed
in terms of the structure and inter-
relationships of ideas and social proc-
esses rather than in traditional aca-
demic segments. While counseling
and degree requirements are normally
administered by the departments, the
student is encouraged to lay out a
broad plan of study that promises to
achieve most effectively his own edu-
cational goals without undue regard
for academic boundary lines.

The faculty of the School comprises
a fulltime instructional staff supple-
mented by scholars in the service of
the specialized divisions of govern-
ment and of national agencies located
in Washington. This combination of
teaching and research personnel



brings to the class and seminar rooms
the interaction of theory and practice.
At all levels of instruction the Uni-
versity draws upon the extensive and
unparalleled resources of the Capital
City.

The Washington Semester

By interinstitutional agreement with
other colleges and universities, The
American University provides the
opportunity for groups of selected stu-
dents in their junior year to spend a
semester in Washington. The pro-
gram is thus known as the Washington
Semester. Institutions cooperating in
the program are Allegheny College,
Beloit College, Birmingham-Southern
College, Denison University, Dickin-
son College, Hamline University,
Hiram College, Hollins College, Ken-
yon College, Lake Erie College, Lin-
denwood College, Millsaps College,
Oberlin College, Transylvania College,
Westminster College, Willamette Uni-
versity, William Jewell College, and
Wooster College. The students live
in a University residence hall, carry
on individual and intensive study
under the auspices of the School
of Social Sciences and Public Affairs,
and enjoy first-hand the meaningful
experiences of the manifold national
and international activities centering
in Washington.

Washington College of Law

The Washington College of Law is
a professional division located on the
metropolitan campus at 2000 G Street.
Its purpose is to offer a sound profes-
sional education to equip a student
to pass the Bar examination, to enter



The American University



11



the profession of law, or to undertake
a career in the legal branches of the
public service.

College of Arts and Sciences

The College of Arts and Sciences
offers a four-year program of studies
leading to the degrees of bachelor of
arts and bachelor of science and dur-
ing the years of national emergency
the associate in arts and the associate
in science to provide a point for recog-
nizing academic achievement of stu-
dents prior to their induction into the
armed services.

The college is the basic unit in the
structure of any university. Located
on a residence campus in the north-
west heights of Washington, the Col-
lege of Arts and Sciences provides its
students with a stimulating educa-
tional environment characterized by
the fundamental values which reside
in the small college enriched by the
environing influences of a great world
capital.

The program of the College of Arts
and Sciences is organized by depart-
ments grouped into five divisions.
These are:

I. Natural Sciences and Mathematics
Biology
Chemistry
Mathematics
Physics

II. Social Studies
Economics
Education
Government
History
Psychology
Sociology



III. Humanities

English

Art

Modern Languages

Music

Philosophy

Religion

IV. Health, Recreation, Physical Edu-

cation, and Athletics

V. Student Affairs

Work-Study Program

The University offers a work-study
program planned to enable young
women to pursue academic work and
enjoy genuine campus residence life
while holding positions in govern-
ment, business, and nursing which
provide income to pay all the uni-
versity fees and living expenses. Work
for the baccalaureate degree under
the work-study program is completed
in six instead of the conventional four-
year period. The work-study pro-
gram meets the needs of two classes
of students: (1) those who of neces-
sity must earn while they learn; (2)
those who wish to relate life-experi-
ence to classroom study, constantly
testing theory by application in prac-
tical study. Work-study students live
together in a common residence hall.

Professional Institutes

As a continuing public service the
University offers through its various
divisions short, intensive programs of
study in professional institutes de-
signed to meet the needs of students
and persons already established in
their professional fields who desire to
increase their knowledge in special-
ized areas. The programs of these
institutes are developed with the ex-



12



The American University



pert advice of the national organiza-
tions covering the individual field in-
volved and are functionally related to
the resources, specialists, and interests
of the Capital.

Graduate Nursing Studies

The American University by inter-
institutional agreements and affilia-
tions cooperates in graduate programs
in nursing and nursing education, and
psychiatric nursing. Studies for gradu-
ate nurses are offered by the University
at the campus, and at Saint Elizabeths
Hospital. Graduate nurse programs
administered by a university director
of nursing studies provide opportunity
for carrying forward academic studies
from the completion of the three-year
program to the baccalaureate degree.

Washington Communities and
University Programs

The educational programs of the
University are closely related to the
several communities described below
which coexist in Washington because
the District of Columbia is the Capi-
tal of the United States.

1. Washington is first of all a politi-
cal community composed of the Presi-
dent, his cabinet, 96 senators, and 435
representatives. This community for-
mulates and executes national policy.
The American University provides
within its curriculum therefore law,
political science, and public adminis-
tration.

2. Washington is a civil service
cornmunity of hundreds of thousands
of widely diverse experts working in
some 15,000 specialized fields. The
American University therefore pro-



vides within its curriculum in-service
training and specialized courses deal-
ing with fundamental disciplines and
specific techniques.

3. Washington is a communicating
community, the nerve center of world
action. More than 1,000 reporters, ra-



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