American University.

American University Bulletin Catalog Issue: College of Arts and Sciences Catalog (Volume 1947-1948) online

. (page 1 of 14)
Online LibraryAmerican UniversityAmerican University Bulletin Catalog Issue: College of Arts and Sciences Catalog (Volume 1947-1948) → online text (page 1 of 14)
Font size
QR-code for this ebook


Digitized by the Internet Archive

in 2010 with funding from

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation



http://www.archive.org/details/bulletinartsscie1947amer



P^-da^^^f;^^




ANNOUNCEMENTS FOR THE ACADEMIC YEAR 1947-1948



A Four- Year Coeducational College ok T.iheral Arts



Member of the

ASSOCIATION OF AMERICAN COLLEGES
AMERICAN COUNCIL ON EDUCATION
ASSOCIATION OF URBAN UNIVERSITIES



Accredited by the

MIDDLE STATES ASSOCIATION OF COLLEGES
AND SECONDARY SCHOOLS

UNIVERSITY SENATE OF THE METHODIST CHURCH



Schedules indicaiing the hour, location, and instructor of each
course are published prior to the opening of each session. A color
map of Washington, showing the locations of the University divi-
,s-ions in relation to the resources of the Capital, ivill be sent to
applicants upon request.



Please address all communications to

Committee on Admissions
The American University
Washington 16. District of Columbia

Volume 2:3 DECKMBEU 19t7 Xi mber 3



The American University Bulletin is issued monthly during tlie academic year
from October to Julv, inclusive. Entered as second-class matter, March 23, 192(i,
at the Post Office, Washington, D. C, under Act of August 24, 1912.





€tM4nm€can




COLLEGE OF
ARTS AND
SCIENCES

CATALOG 1947-1948



PUBLISHED BY THE UNIVERSITY
WASHINGTON 16, DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA



1948



CALENDAR



1948



JANUARY

gWi^ON TUE WED tHU|[FRl ! [SAT|

□piljLJLrr2^^

BI 12 iyi4 15 16 17]
51 19 '20 21 22 23^

liiiiTiiiiiiiojBi]



FEBRUARY

jSUNlpOf^ PfUE WED THU ™][pTl

(MirS 4" 5 "6 'T]
[T][1]^0 11 12 13 141
fl5^l6 17 18 192621]
[22 23 24 25 26 27 28]



MARCH

ISUNI MON TUE WED THU FRI SAT]

[ZJt^'^ '47 5 ^61
[T][8:[9^ 10 11 12 13]
af fl5 16 17 18 I9J2O]
[2i"22 23 24 25 26^7]
18 29 30 131 r



APRIL

ISUNlSaCT^'lTUglWEDTHU FR1!SAT|

[M3TG ■ri8""r9]rio^

[Ul2ri3 14 15 16 17]

[18 19 20 21 22 23 241

O [2|;[2aL2Z;28,;29^Ll]



MAY JUNE

|SUN!iilplTjE| ?WEPTHUI^™j SAT]

□□[CfflSjBliE

33 14 J5 16 17 1819]
f20 2122 23 24^[2i

27 28 21-igL^nn



jJ[yi5T5ir6ir7n[8]

^10 11 12 13 1415]
11617 1819 20 2122^
[23 24 25 26 2J 28 291

iaIsiLjDLjLjL]



JULY

|sON!ii40N'TUEiW

□[Zjnn[T][2][3]

[S[l][l][I]rF^ioi

[11][12![13![14 [15 16 171
[li[19 ^11 22 23 24
(25l[26l7 28 29 30 311



SEPTEMBER

|SUN;MON tUE WEDTHU' ^ FRI !|SAT|

I r2;^3U[4]

[5678 9 10[11]
[12 13 14 15 16 17 18
[19 20 21 22 2324 25]

[26 27 28 29!3i[I][Z]

LL_L_n[D[Z]n



NOVEMBER

|SUNjiMOK !TUE W^THU I FRI IfSiVfl

[T][8]®l0'irT2^'p]
Ml5 16 17 18 19 20]
[2r^2 23M!2S^|27]

^293oiunn[zi



AUGUST

ISUN MON TUE WED THU FRI SATJ

[T]r2 34 5 6 7]
^9 10 11 12 13 14]
15 16 17 18 19[ 20 2j
:22 23 24 25:^i27jli

^3031^[I]n[D



OCTOBER

ISpNi MON! TUE WED THU ! raJ] SATl

[Z]nnn[i][Effi
[3i[4nr5ir6is[8][9]

Iffll 12 13 i4^l5][16l
[17 18 19 20 21 22f23]
[2? 25 26 27 28 29 30]

[sEiZjLijLiiLi^nrD



DECEMBER

|SUN!MON TDElWED ^fHD ; rFRr| [SAr|

[Z]nn[T]S[3]ffl

[5^r6n[^ir8^r9njg][ii]
12 13 14 15 16 17 [18]
[I9 20 2122 23 24i2i



1948 ^prina ^esdion

February 6

Classes begin.
February 21

Seniors and sophomores peti-
tion to take Graduate Rec-
ord Examination.

February 24

Founders' Day.
March 1

Seniors petition for graduation
honors.

March 19 and 20

Graduate Record Examina-
tion required of all seniors
and sophomores.

March 26

Good Friday — classes ad-
journed from noon to S:00
p.m.

April 14

Campus Day — a holiday.

May 21

Examinations begin.

May 31

Commencement.

.Summer .^eddion

June 7

Classes begin — first half.
July 4 and 5

Independence Day — a holi-
day.

July 26

Classes begin — second half.

September 6

Labor Day — a holiday.

September 14

Summer session ends.



Zrati S^t



ession



September 23
Classes begin.



i^ontentd



GENERAL IXFORMATIOX



THE FACULTY 33



COURSES OF STUDY 37



UNIVERSITY STATUTES 105



ADMINISTRATION 119



THE CORPORATION 122



INDEX 127



PICTURES 128



l^e^Ute. of WoM War IIS.



ervice



The College, continuing the tradition established in
World War I, made facilities and services available to
these groups during the national emergency:



OCTOBER 1940-1944

United States of America, Selective Service Board Number 3

OCTOBER 1941—

Communications Schools, Chesapeake and Potomac Telephone
Company

JANUARY 1942-JUNE 1943

American Statistical Society, National and Editorial Offices

JULY 1942-DECEMBER 1945

United States Armed Forces Institute, Editorial Staff

JULY 1942-NOVEMBER 1945

United States Navy Bomb Disposal School

AUGUST 1942

United States Office of Education, Institute on Education and
the War

JANUARY 1943-JULY 1946

Wave Quarter D, Recreation Center and Officers' Quarters

JUNE 1943-JUNE 1946

American Red Cross, Services of the Armed Forces School

MARCH-SEPTEMBER 1944

Spars

NOVEMBER 1945-MAY 1947

National Service Officers' Career Program, Veterans Adminis-
tration

NOVEMBER 1945-OCTOBER 1946

American Association for the Advancement of Science, Edi-
torial Staff of Science

NOVEMBER 1945-JULY 1946

Special Committee of the Social Science Research Council on
the Social Psychology of American Troops in World War II



^J^istoru of the L^otieae

The American University was chartered by an act of the Congress
of the United States of America on February 2Jf, 1893. Its incorpora-
tion was the result of a conviction in the minds of Christian states-
men and educators that a significant Protestant graduate institution
should be established in the Nation's Capital to organize the increas-
ingly rich opportunities for research and cultural living into a curric-
idum which would make the whole city a veritable university. The
College as an undergraduate division was organized in 1925. It is
therefore one of the younger coeducational institutions in the East.



ON Christmas 1889 Bishop John
Fletcher Hurst of the Methodist
Church reined his horse on a wooded
slope in the northwest heights above
the Potomac River. Stepping from
his carriage, he looked toward the
Manassas Plains and the Blue Ridge
Mountains. "This hill is the place,"
he said to his companion. "On the
site of this crumbling fort we shall
build a university dedicated to the
love of peace and human understand-
ing."

Bishop Hurst, a distinguished
church historian, recognized in Wash-
ington an environment richly stimu-
lating to students concerned with
the original investigation of source
material and the primary observation
of men and problems at the center
of political action and national cul-
ture. As a result of his leadership
The American University became one
of the four institutions established
before the turn of the century to
provide advanced education on a
graduate level and to "enlarge the
boundaries of human knowledge" by



means of investigation and research.
These four institutions were Johns
Hopkins University (1876), Clark
University (1888) , University of Chi-
cago (1890), and The American Uni-
versity (1893).

Two common qualities distin-
guished the work of these institu-
tions: (1) the precedence given to
the human being in the educational
enterprise, teachers and students
working together under conditions of
teaching and learning that go with
this emphasis on persons; and (2) the
placing of educational leadership in
the hands of men highly qualified
both in their special fields and in the
educational process.

A UNIVERSITY COLLEGE

When the College opened as an
undergraduate division in 1925, it was
already heir to more than three dec-
ades of graduate tradition. From the
beginning it was a university college,
an undergraduate division strongly
influenced by the university activities
of original inquiry and professional
interest which surround it.



J he l/lnluerditu ^la



^



%



THE AMERICAN UNIVERSITY FLAG tvas designed on the
occasion of the charter jubilee, February 24, 1943, by the late Pro-
fessor C. Law Watkins, chairman of the Department of Art and
director of Phillips Gallery Art School.



IN THE MIDST of the dark -red field
of human endeavor and conflict
is set the outline of an ancient fortress
to represent Fort Gaines upon whose
site the University now stands. The
University itself is symbolized by the
"compass of human life with its great
needle pointing steadily at the lode-
star of the human spirit," a thought
expressed by President Woodrow
Wilson at the dedication of the Grad-
uate School in 1914. The color of the
compass is blue, traditional symbol
of intellectual and spiritual life, and
of the virtue of loyalty. Six bastions
of the fort, incorporated in the design
from a plan by Marquis Sebastien le
Prestre de Vauban, the seventeenth
century master of siege warfare, rep-
resent history as the vivid continuum
of man's experience with other men in
the physical world, language as the
mechanism for the exchange of ideas
and the recording and transmission of
experience, mathematics as the tool



for the measurement of the dimen-
sions of living, science as a method
for the exploration of the world of
man and matter and the definition of
laws by which man can predict rela-
tionships and exercise control of his
world, the fine arts as an expression
of insight into the meaning of life,
and philosophy as man's effort to give
life a coherent direction in the pursuit
of values.

The great needle of the compass is
the torch of liberal learning, "an en-
during watchfire against social evils,
man's malice and greed, cruel war,
chaos, and despair," as Bishop Hurst
declared when he located the Uni-
versity on the hill. The light of its
flame frees the spirit from the thrall-
dom of darkness. The lodestar of the
human spirit to which it points is
isolated in the dark red field of life's
struggle as a symbol of the indi-
vidual's responsibility to his fellow
man the world over.



^he ^^^cudemic /~^



i^oarcim

THE COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCES of The American
University is a coeducational division of limited enrollment, offering
courses of study in the liberal arts to men and women of earnest
academic purpose and deep convictions about the obligations of
democratic citizenship. Courses of study lead to the degrees of
Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Science.



COLLEGE IS A HUMAN
RELATIONSHIP

COLLEGE is a human relationship in
the world of ideas. The faculty
represents one group in the fellowship
through which a selective cultural
heritage is communicated to a new
generation for the purpose of effective
human living. The typical professor
of The American University is one
who considers his teaching mission to
be his paramount obligation, who is
readily accessible to his students, who
extends the work of the campus to the
sources which make Washington a
veritable laboratory, who is himself
active in some area of significant re-
search, who participates in community
life, and who is as willing to work
with his hands as with his mind.

The students represent the other
group in the campus community. The
representative student desired by the
College is one who has (1) demon-
strated a genuine intellectual interest
in secondary school or junior college;
(2) expressed emotional stability in
academic and social relationships; (3)
shown a capacity to work unselfishly
with other people in curricular and



extra-curricular activities; (4) evi-
denced an intellectual curiosity by
reading and certain interests and hob-
bies; (5) indicated a desire to be use-
ful by the voluntary assumption of
responsibility for tasks which must
be performed by human beings who
live together; and (6) expressed out-
reach in an active will to organize
life for useful purpose and spiritual
meaning.

II

COLLEGE IS A "TRAVEL PLAN"
IN THE WORLD OF IDEAS

Because the College recognizes that
each student is unlike every other in
important respects, it provides the
opportunity for each man to plan a
curriculum that is his individual ap-
proach to the world of ideas in terms
of his interests and in accordance
with the quality of his mental equip-
ment. Just as a traveler plans his
itinerary by reference to railroad sys-
tems, timetables, maps, junction
points, and stations of departure and
destination, the student schedules his
college course as a journey into the
world of ideas. This educational
process is thus more than a standard-
ized series of minute, hour, and day



8



The American University



chores executed against a session time
schedule. It is a program for dealing
with ideas at a pace which the student
sets for himself.

The design of a student's program
within the framework of studies re-
quired by the College is planned by
him in conference with his advisors
and recorded on a Travel Plan. This
document describes the itinerary
which the student proposes to follow
in the world of ideas. It covers eight
sessions of work. The student may
revise this program several times dur-
ing his college career in reference to
his maturing objectives, but each re-
vision must be made in terms of his
whole college program. The College
wants him to think of his study in
orderly and purposeful sequences and
to project his thinking by reference
to trunk-line ideas rather than in
terms of the mere piecemeal selection
of courses by sessions. The work
sheets for building the Travel Plan
are obtained from the Registrar.

When a Travel Plan has been ap-
proved and signed both by the student
and by his advisor, the student files
it with the Protocol Chief in the office
of the Registrar. From that time it
becomes his official program, clarifying
his purposes in the light of his inter-
ests and abilities and relating them
to the broad objectives of a hberal
education as well as to the practical
problems of earning a living.

The student's cumulative record is
kept in the office of the Registrar by
the Protocol Chief. The basic docu-
ment of control is call the "Protocol."
This is a cumulative and diagnostic
record of the student's growth toward



the achievement of the objectives set
up in the Travel Plan for graduation.
By reference to it a student may at
any time check his progress.

ni

COLLEGE IS GROWING TO
ADULTHOOD

The young man and the young
woman on the campus are establishing
ways of living which will presently
bring them into the community as
parents, citizens, professional leaders,
and human beings who want to live
normal and useful lives. The College
therefore has the obligation to serve
the student as a whole person in his
emotional, moral, social, physical, and
economic life, as well as in his intel-
lectual development. The College
provides personnel services and pro-
grams to foster the growth of mature,
integrated personalities.

IV

COLLEGE IS A PARTNERSHIP
OF MINDS

General Colloquiums

Monthly during the first two years
of College the students in groups of
twenty come together to spend an
evening "talking ideas over" in what
is known as the General Colloquium,
an informal conference for the refine-
ment of ideas by exploring meaningful
relationships. The instructors who
meet with the students in these in-
formal gatherings are selected to rep-
resent the various areas of the basal
and distributed studies. The discus-



College of Arts and Sciences



9



sions help the student to '"grow" into
an understanding of how his courses
fit together into trunk-hne ideas and
into patterns of meaning and how his
studies relate to life. Single courses
are tied together with understanding
and outlook through the partnership
of experience which characterizes the
campus as a neighborhood of minds.

Integrating Seminars

Monthly during the junior and
senior years the students by major
fields meet with their professors in
Integrating Seminars. The object of
these intimate and informal groups
is to unify the ideas which the student
has experienced into a coherence use-
ful in the problems of human living
and important in outlook toward a
chosen field of vocational specializa-
tion.

Intellectual Initiative

To encourage intellectual initiative
and responsibility, the College pro-
vides five incentives which go beyond
the general academic requirements.
These opportunities include the privi-
lege of (1) taking content achieve-
ment examinations; (2) electing the
Junior Reading Project; (3) electing
the Senior Problem Analysis; (4)
taking the Graduate Record Examina-
tion in the sophomore and senior
years; and (5) joining the Washing-
ton Semester in the spring session of
the junior year.

Content Achievement Examinations

1. At any time a student may
apply through the Office of the Pro-
tocol Chief to take an examination
to test his competence in a content



field. These examinations are given
by the University Examiner in
Hutchins House and are available
in many fields covered by course
offerings. If the examination
demonstrates that a student has
competence in a field, he may peti-
tion the faculty for permission to
pursue advanced work to the extent
indicated by the test results, the
examinations serving the purpose of
waiving prerequisites to advanced
courses. A student by the indi-
vidual examination may not shorten
the time necessary for the com-
pletion of degree requirements or
receive credit for courses which he
is not required to take because of
his competence already demon-
strated; he merely qualifies to
pursue studies on a level where his
equipment fits him to work. To
know the measured level of his
achievement is just as important
for the student as it is for the track
man who asks his time in the 100-
yard dash from the stop-watch
keeper. Like the runner, the
student needs to appraise his per-
formance by reference to standards
set and records established by good
performers who have preceded him.

Junior Reading Project

2. Through the Junior Reading
Project the College provides oppor-
tunity for a performance which is
distinctly the student's own. In
conference with an instructor the
student sets up an individual pro-
gram of inquiry in a field of his own
special interest. He goes to source
material, reads systematically and



10



The American University



extensively, thinks through funda-
mental problems, prepares reports
which express his competence in
the use of materials, and demon-
strates his reaction to ideas. The
Junior Reading Project places em-
phasis upon reflection and the in-
tegration of knowledge into co-
herent meaning, recognizing that
the moment a student begins to
reflect, he of necessity observes
analytically.

Senior Problevi Analysis

3. The Senior Problem Analysis
continues the Junior Reading Proj-
ect. It provides further oppor-
tunity for individual performance
and demonstration of competence.
The student takes the responsibility
for setting up a problem, seeking
information about it, applying
necessary techniques, and arriving
at conclusions which have validity.
Here again the emphasis is upon
individual responsibility and the in-
tegration of experience and knowl-
edge. In the working out of the
Senior Problem Analysis, the
faculty expects the student to
utilize the primary source material,
the availability of which makes
Washington so intriguing to the
adventuring mind.

An ancient maxim of the law
urges students to "go to the
sources," "to seek the fountains."
This admonition has real meaning
for the students of the College be-
cause Washington is a treasure
house of primary source materials.
Libraries, archives, laboratories,
museums, governmental assemblies



and agencies, and areas for field
study provide continuing oppor-
tunity to the student who has
learned how to formulate his prob-
lems and to pursue their solutions
independently to the sources. The
student's power of observation and
his ability to refine data are given
range when confronted with actual
objects, primary sources, and real
situations.

Graduate Record Examinations

4. How successful is the student
in completing the job he sets for
himself in his travel plans? How
balanced is his liberal education
when judged by standards external
to the College? These are questions
to which the College wants as ex-
actly measured answers as it can
obtain. To compare the student's
development in the pattern he has
set with the generally accepted pat-
terns of American undergraduate
work is one means taken by the
College to evaluate the range and
balance of a student's knowledge
and his ability to use it.

One of the most important of the
external evaluations is that pro-
vided by the Graduate Record Ex-
amination. Since 1941 this has
been regularly administered by ar-
rangement with the Carnegie Foun-
dation for the Advancement of
Teaching. Near the end of the
sophomore year and again near the
end of the senior year the student
takes his examination over a period
of two days in eight basic areas of
the liberal arts: general mathe-
matics, physical science, biological



College of Arts and Sciences



11



science, social studies, literature,
arts, effectiveness of expression, and
vocabulary. The student also takes
an advanced examination in the
field of his specialization. The re-
sults of the examination are pro-
jected on a profile chart. One copy
of this profile becomes a part of
the student's cumulative records; a
second is given to the student for
his growing file of information
about himself. A comparison of
the sophomore profile with the
senior profile gives a rough index of
intellectual growth, and a com-
parison of the scores with na-
tional norms indicates the student's
achievement in relation to that of
students in equivalent studies in
other major institutions.

Washington Semester

5. Becoming conscious of matur-
ing competence, some few students
desire to be free of the routine of
established course patterns to try
themselves on their own in the
world of men and ideas. The Col-
lege provides opportunity for such
experience in the spring session of
the junior year. The program is
an intensive and individualized unit
conducted by the School of Social
Sciences and Public Affairs. The
group electing the Washington
Semester includes students from
Allegheny, Hiram, Oberlin, West-
minster, and Wooster Colleges.

Accepting the definition that
democracy in America is the oppor-
tunity for excellence in perform-
ance, the College directs its pro-
gram to provide the organized ways



in which a student may "stretch"
himself to the extent of his ability.
The College acts on the faith that
the best way to ensure knowledge
and understanding is to hold its
students responsible for the mas-
tery of ideas. To use academic free-
dom a student must first be en-
trusted with it. The College knows
that at some point of maturity the
student becomes a scholar in his
own right. In the genuine educa-
tional process the self takes the
leadership of the self. It becomes
both student and teacher, the
student formulating inquiries, the
teacher being a person, book, or
laboratory answering the questions
wherever the solutions are sought
and found. The College wants to
produce an individual who can
stand on his own feet in his own
right and at the same time work
with and for other people.



COLLEGE APPRAISES THE
STUDENT'S POWER

After a student has spent a forma-
tive period of his life on the campus
and in the Capital, he is entitled to an
appraisal of his development and pres-
ent ability. The diploma indicates
that he has performed his tasks satis-
factorily and that his college years
have been terminated with the tradi-
tional parchment. The faculty wants
the student to have something more;
it collaborates therefore in the formu-
lation of a carefully worded and con-
firmed estimate of each candidate for
graduation. This appraisal, drafted



12



The American University



by a board of experienced professors
on the basis of the cumulative evi-
dence of the student's development
and submitted to the whole faculty
for review and approval, describes as
exactly as possible in educational
terms the student's demonstrated abil-
ities and the areas in which they lie.
This final evaluation in short presents
the mirrored image of the student in
qualities of mind and character con-
sidered important by the College.

When the student meets the Dean
to discuss his final appraisal, he sub-
mits for the College record a gradua-
tion protocol. Analyzing his own pat-
tern of growth as he has observed it
in himself and clarifying his projected
objectives in life as an alumnus of


1 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

Online LibraryAmerican UniversityAmerican University Bulletin Catalog Issue: College of Arts and Sciences Catalog (Volume 1947-1948) → online text (page 1 of 14)