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Spencer, Philip, student at Geneva Col-
lege, i. 17; hanging of, for mutiny, on
coast of Africa, i. 18 ; relic of, at Geneva
College, i. 18

Spinoza statue at The Hague, unveiling
of, i. 560

Sprague, H. B., professor at Cornell, i. 364

Staal, Baron de, president of the Peace
Conference, ii. 258

Stallo, John Bernhard, American minis-
ter at Rome, i. 569, ii. 420

Stanford, Leland.Jr., i. 569

Stanford University, W.'s lectures at, i.
235, ii. 447 ; character of its buildings, ii.
448



Stanley's " Life of Arnold," effect of, on
W.'s historical teaching, i. 256 ; on his
religious views, ii. 560

State Agricultural College of New York,
failure of, i. 330, 333

Stead, W. T., at the Peace Conference, ii.
260

Stengel, Baron yon, a delegate to the Peace
Conference, ii. 259, 284

Stevens, Morse, his history of the French
Revolution, ii. 490

Stevenson, Adlai E., as a story-teller, ii.
126

Story, William Wetmore, his meeting
with Judge Brady, whom he resembled
in appearance, i. 515; he receives the
cross of the Legion of Honor, i. 525;
W.'s acquaintance with, ii. 418. 420, 424

Stowe, Harriet Beecher, W.'s visit to, in
Florida, ii. 387

Straus, Oscar S., American minister at
Constantinople, W.'s friendship with,
ii. 440

Struve, Russian minister at Washington,
ii. 5, 43

Sub-Treasury of the United States, crea-
tion of, used as a weapon against the
Democratic party in 1840, i. 51

Sumner, Charles, his friendship with W.,
i. 262; effect of his speeches against
slavery, i. 485 ; assaulted by Preston
Brooks, i. 485 ; his attacks on President
Grant's administration, i. 484, 485 ; his
views on the Santo Domingo question,
i. 484, 486, 490, 504-506 ; his break with
Hamilton Fish, i. 485 ; his lack of humor,
ii. 382

Sumner, George, i. 87

Suttner, Baroness von, her writings, 11.
260, 307

Sweden, W.'s visit to, in 1893, ii. 450 ; the
liquor problem, ii. 451

Switzerland, W.'s visit In, 1887, ii. 423

Sybel, Heinrich von, his opinion of Lan-
frey's " Histoire de Napoleon," i. 558

Syracuse, size of, in 1839, i. 8, ii. 375 ; ac-
tivity lii political affairs, i. 16, 47, 57 ;
known as the " Central City," i. 57

Syracuse Academy, W. a pupil at, i. 8 ;
teachers, i. 8, 10 ; method of teaching
spelling, i. 9; W.'s studies, i. 9, 10; de-
cline of school, i. 12

Talmage, Thomas De Witt, reference to,
by the Empress of Russia, ii. 9

Taney, Roger Brooke, Chief Justice, and
the Dred Scott decision, i. 77, 79

Tappan, Henry Philip, president of Mich-
igan University, his advice on extem-
poraneous speaking, i. 261 ; his study of
German university systems and his ef-
forts to benefit American institutions,
i. 272, 276, 292 ; his influence over faculty
and students, i. 276 ; his address to stu-
dents on the stealing of the college bell,
i. 277 ; story concerning Mrs. Tappan, i.
279; opposition of small colleges and
members of the legislature, i. 279 ; his
prophecy, i. 279 ; the " Winchell War," i.
280, 435 ; his death abroad, i. 281

Tariff difficulties between the United
States and Germany, ii. 134, 144-149, 158

Tariff discussed by Bismarck and William
D. Kelly, i. 581-585

Tariff for protection, W.'s views on, i. 270,
271, 379, 380

Taylor, Bayard, his lectures at Cornell
University, i. 317, 356, 359, 365; Bis-
marck's feeling toward, i. 580; minister
to Germany, i. 594 ; birthday celebration
at house of James T. Fields, ii. 381



600



INDEX



Taylor, Sedley, W.'s acquaintance with,
if. 402

Taylor and Fillmore campaign of 1848, i.
55-59

Telegraphic work done by Ezra Cornell, i.
310

Telephone, exhibit of, at the Centennial
Exposition of 1876, i. 611

Temperance question in America and
abroad, i. 516^21, ii. 451

Tennyson, reminiscences of, by James T.
Fields, ii. 382 ; his fear of being stared
at, ii. 459

Tetuan, Duke of, Spanish delegate to the
Peace Conference, ii. 264

Tewfik Pasha, Khedive of Egypt, W.'s
meeting with, ii. 435

Thacher, Thomas A., professor at Yale
University, i. 354

Thayer, Alexander, the biographer of
Beethoven, i. 40

Theater in Germany, ii. 226-228

Thiergarten at Berlin, the renovation of,
ii. 230

Thiers, Louis Adolphe, W.'s estimate of,i.
523, 578; Bismarck's opinion of, i. 578,
579; Louis Blanc's opinion of, i. 578

Thomson, William (Lord Kelvin), i. 560

Throndheim Cathedral, ii. 451

Ticknor, George, W.'s acquaintance with,
11.380

Tilden, Samuel J., W.'s acquaintance with,
i. 174

" Tippecanoe and Tyler, Too," a campaign
song, i. 47, 49

Tolstoi, Leo, Pobedonostzeft's feelings
toward, ii. 61 ; W.'s visit with, ii. 72-100 ;
arrangement of his household, ii. 72, 73 ;
his views of Quakers, ii. 74 ; of Russian
thought, 11. 75 ; of the Jews, ii. 77 ; his
relations with the imperial govern-
ment, ii. 78 ; his love for pictures, ii. 78-
81; his views of French literature, of
American literature, ii. 81-83, 93; his
almsgiving, ii. 83, 95 ; his views of relig-
ion, Ii. 86, 90 ; of woman, ii. 88 ; his man-
ual labor, ii. 95 ; his view of Napoleon,
ii. 95; W.'s estimate of, ii. 96, 99; his lim-
itations, ii. 85, 96-100 ; his great qualities,
ii. 96, 98

Townshend, Meredith, his knowledge of
American affairs, i. 530

Treitschke, Heinrich Gotthard von, deaf-
ness of, i. 559

Tresca, director of the French National
Conservatory of Arts and Trades, i. 513

Tricoupis, prime minister of Greece, W.'s
talk with, ii. 439

Trinity College, Cambridge, " audit din-
ner" at, ii. 407

Trinity College, Hartford, effort of W.'s
father to place his son at, i. 25

"True Conduct of Student Life," an ad-
dress by W. at Cornell University, i. 244

Tschaikovsky, death of, from cholera, ii.
54

Tweed, 'William M., and New York poli-
tics, i. 168, 174 ; " New York Times " ex-
posure of, i. 199

Twining, Kinsley, journalist, of the Yale
class of 1853, i. 254

Tyler, John, his unpopularity with the
Whig party, i. 52

Tyler, Moses Coit, as professor at Cor-
nell, i. 383

Universities
Instruction bearing on public affairs

proposed, ii. 493
Literature courses, W.'s criticism of, i.

384, 385



Readerships in English literature sug-
gested by W., i. 428, 429
Relations between teachers and stu-
dents, in England, ii. 400
Scholarships and fellowships awarded
by competitive examination versus
general gratuitous instruction, i. 391-
395

Shortcomings of American university

teaching and the better systems in

foreign universities, i. 255, 256, 272, 291,

318

University of Chicago and its work, ii.

449

University of Michigan, W. elected pro-
fessor at, i. 42, 82, 83, 257 ; students enlist
for the war, i. 90, 283 ; military drill, i.
91; W.'s historical teaching, i. 257-265;
unsectarian, with optional courses of in-
struction, i. 272, 276, 292 ; Dr. Tappan and
his professors, i. 272-281 ; Frieze memo-
rial organ, i. 274; Dr. Tappan and the
stealing of the college bell, i. 277 ; oppo-
sition of smaller colleges, i. 279; W.'s
work in adorning the campus, i. '282;
resignation of Dr. Tappan as president,
i. 280 ; results of coeducation, i. 400
University of Virginia, character of build-
ings, ii. 129, 448

Upsala, W.'s visit to university and cathe-
dral at, ii. 450

Van Buren, John D.,i. 48, 59; on committee
which investigated Cornell University,
i. 322

Van Buren, Martin, financial conditions
during the term of, i. 47 ; campaign song
concerning, i. 48 ; commendation of M.
de Bacourt, i. 49 ; " gold spoons" in use
at the White House, i. 51 ; creation of
the "Sub-Treasury," i. 51; Free Soil
party's candidate for President in 1848,
I. 56, 57 ; campaign story concerning, i.
58

Van Stoetwegen, Dutch representative
at St. Petersburg, his views regarding
peace in Europe, ii. 23

Venezuela Boundary Commission, rea-
sons for the appointment of, ii. 117, 118;
members of, ii. 119 ; first sessions, ii. 119 ;
study of historical side by George Lin-
coln Burr, ii. 120-122 ; discreditable fea-
tures of the British Blue Books, ii. 121 ;
distribution of duties in the commis-
sion, ii. 122 ; boundary line accepted by
Lord Aberdeen, ii. 122, 123 ; attitude of
Lord Salisbury, ii. 118, 123 ; award of the
Arbitration Tribunal at Paris, ii. 124

Venezuela revolution, conduct of the Ger-
man Government toward, ii. 246

Victoria (Empress Frederick), death of,
ii. 194 ; her conversations, ii. 195

Villari, Pasquale, W.'s acquaintance with,
i. 569, ii. 415

Virchow, Rudolf, W.'s acquaintance with,
ii. 5

Vladimir, Grand Duke, ii. 12

Vodka, the Russian's favorite drink, i. 461

Vogue, Vicomte de, his knowledge of
Russia, ii. 5

Wade, Benjamin F., a member of the
Santo Domingo commission in 1871, i.
484, 489, 506

Wagner, Joanna, leading singer at the
Berlin Opera, i. 40

Wagner, Richard, his music first heard
by W. at the Liebig concerts in Berlin,
i. 40

Wahl, General von, prefect of St. Peters-
burg, ii. 37, 42



INDEX



601



Waite, Chief Justice, i. 219

Walter, John, of the London "Times,"

W.'s acquaintance with, ii. 401
Ward's Island, efforts of Catholic priests

to secure possession of, i. Ill
Warsaw, Archbishop of, W.'s conversa-
tion with, ii. 8

Warships with beaks, ii. 424
Washburn, Emory, Governor of Massa-
chusetts, W.'s visit with, i. 144
Washington, D. C., W.'s first visit to, i.
76^-79 ; his visit in 1864 and his meeting
with President Lincoln, i. 121 ; his visit
in 1895, ii. 128

Wayland, Francis, his influence on W.'s
decision to teach in a Western college,
i. 257
Webster, Daniel, speeches on the Fugitive

Slave Law, i. 62

Weed, Thurlow, his reminiscences of the
New York Assembly, i. 50; he suggested
W.'s trip to Europe in 1863, i. 93 ; his dis-
like of civil-service reform ideas, i. 195,
ii. 493
Wellington, Duke of, story concerning, i.

220

Wells Cathedral, W.'s visit to, ii. 392
Welsersheimb, Count, delegate to the

Peace Conference, ii. 262, 264
Werner, Anton Alexander von, his paint-
ing of William I, i. 562

Westbury, Lord, story concerning, ii. 392
Whately, Archbishop, stories concerning,

ii. 408

Wheeler, William A., president of the
Constitutional Convention, i. 139; on
committee which investigated Cornell
University, i. 322
Whigs called " coons," i. 48
Whipple, Edwin P., W.'s remembrances
of, ii. 381

White, (mother), serene career, i.

5 ; education at Cortland Academy, i. 6,
398; church relations, ii. 513, 514 ; on the
admission of women to Cornell Univer-
sity, i. 397

White, Andrew Dickson
Aim of his teaching, i. 83, 87, 255, 256, 262,

268

Ambassador to Germany, 1897-1903,
nomination, i. 241, ii. 131; selection of
secretary and military attache, ii. 131,
132 ; discussion of questions between
the United States and Germany, ii.
134 ; first interview with William II, ii.
135, 136 ; presentation to the Empress,
ii. 137 ; visits to Hohenlohe and Von
Billow, ii. 138-141; difficulties in find-
ing a suitable house, ii. 141-143, 182;
German feeling unfriendly to the
United States, ii. 144-149 ; Haitian the-
ory of the Monroe Doctrine, ii. 150;
the Samoan question, ii. 151; atten-
dance at Parliament, ii. 153; the Chi-
nese question, ii. 157 ; American in-
surance companies, ii. 158 ; American
sugar duties, ii. 158 ; the meat question,
ii. 159; the fruit question, ii. 159; Span-
ish-American War, ii. 160 ; conference
in Paris with Porter and Woodford, ii.
161 ; relations with Spanish ambassa-
dor, ii. 165 ; presents letter from Presi-
dent McKiuley to Saxon King at Dres-
den, ii. 165 ; conduct of Germany dur-
ing Spanish-American War, ii. 168,
170 ; address at American celebration
in Leipsic, ii. 169 ; protection of Amer-
ican citizens, ii. 170; duty toward
American students, ii. 173; relations
with Mommsen, ii. 177 ; reception of
President and Mrs. Harrison, ii. 181 ;



bicentenary of the Royal Academy of
Sciences, ii. 183 ; visit from the Ger-
man-American " Kriegerverein," ii.
188; revolution in China, and the
American policy, ii. 188 ; visit to Amer-
ica, ii. 191 ; anniversary of the Prussian
Kingdom, ii. 192 ; death of the Empress
Frederick, ii. 194 ; assassination of
President McKinley, ii. 197 ; relations
with the Chinese minister at Berlin,
ii. 198 ; President Roosevelt's message
to the Emperor, ii. 202 ; duties regard-
ing St. Louis Exposition, ii. 204; vaca-
tion in Italy, ii. 205 ; presented to the
Crown Princess of Saxony, ii. 206;
death of King of Saxony, ii. 206 ; visits
to Oxford and St. Andrews, ii. 208,
209; celebration of birthday, ii. 210,
214-217 ; farewells, ii. 211, 212 ; letters
from President Roosevelt and others,
ii. 214-217 ; stay in Italy, ii. 212

Ambition of his life, i. 6, 224

Ancestors, i. 3, 5

Architecture, first interest in, i. 15;
tours in France, i. 36, 568, ii. 425 ; ad-
dress at Yale, i. 127 ; evolution of the
" Cornell idea," i. 287-293 ; his gift to
Cornell University, i. 375; visits to
various cathedrals, ii. 392, 440, 450, 451,
456

Attache" at St. Petersburg, 1854-1855, in-
vited by Minister Seymour, i. 38, 447 ;
duties, i. 449; study of the life and
writings of Jefferson, i. 38, 70 ; study of
Russian history, i. 449, 464 ; memories
of Nicholas I and Alexander II, i. 451-
453; received by Count Nesselrode, i.
453 ; experiences with American resi-
dents, i. 454-460; visit to the Kazan
cathedral, i. 460; aspects of Russian
life, i. 464, 465 ; visit to Moscow, i. 467 ;
illustration of Russian officialism, i.
468, 473; overland journey, from St.
Petersburg to Pans, i. 472-477; the
bearer of despatches to Paris minister,
i. 473, 477 ; tour in Switzerland and ex-
perience at the hospice of the Great
St. Bernard, i. 481

Berlin student days, 1855-56, lectures
on history, study of the best dramas,
attendance at the Berlin Opera and
the " Liebig Classical Concerts," i. 39,
40 ; journey to Austria and Italy, i. 40,
41

Birth at Homer, N. Y., i. 4, 45 ; baptism,
ii. 513

Boyhood, 1832-1850, recollections of
home, i. 4, 5, ii. 513, 514 ; attendance
at primary school, i. 7 ; his love for his
grandmother, ii. 519 ; respect for men
of thought, i. 7 ; physical recreation,
i. 8, 11 ; family moves to Syracuse, i.
8, ii. 517 ; first interest in Indians, i. 8 ;
entrance to Syracuse Academy, i. 8;
fondness for geometry, i. 10; con-
structs electrical machine, i. 10 ; study
of music, i. 11 ; interest in machinery,
i. 12; at a "classical school," i. 12;
discovery of Scott's novels, i. 14; in-
fluence of debating club, i. 14 ; of " The
Gallery of British Artists," i. 15; in-
terest in architecture aroused, i. 15;
interest in historical studies, i. 16 ; in-
fluence of lectures, conventions, and
public meetings, i. 16; preparation
for college, i. 17; life at Geneva Col-
lege, i. 17 ; left college without father's
consent, i. 23 ; life at Moravia, i. 24

Business interests about 1867, i. 335

Centennial Exposition of 1876, a member
of the educational jury, i. 508-511



602



INDEX



Cornell idea, 1850-1865, evolution of, i.
287-293; Hobart College, reading of
Huber and Newman's book on English
universities, i. 287 ; began to dream of
the ideal university, i. 288; influence of
Yale College, i. 289 ; of Bristed's " Five
Years in an English University,"
i. 290 ; opinion of chemical investiga-
tions, i. 290 ; influence of English col-
lege life and the French university-lec-
ture system, i. 290, 291 ; ideal realized at
Berlin, i. 291 ; partly realized in Mich-
igan, i. 292 ; plans for faculty, site, and
endowment, i. 292 ; sympathy of G. W.
Curtis, i. 292 ; failure to interest Gerrit
Smith, i. 293; project first presented
to Ezra Cornell and his offer, i. 298;
the name of the university proposed
by W., L 299
Cornell University
Administrative duties, i. 414, 427, 431,

432
Attacks on, by smaller colleges, for

irreligion, i. 422-426
Bell, gift of, i. 386, ii. 454
Charter, efforts for, in the legislature,
i. 300-305, 331 ; use of the word " per-
son," i. 398

Coeducation, allusion to, in opening
address, i. 398; report on, to trus-
tees, i. 401

Degrees, opinion on, i. 389, 390
Deprived of family, which lived at

Syracuse, i. 433

Discipline of students, i. 348-351
Evolution of the Cornell idea, i. 287-
293 ; his life's ambition, t 6, 224 ; need
of a university, presented to Ezra
Cornell, i. 298
Financial difficulties, 1868-1874, i. 412-

421

Gateway, erection of, i. 442
Historical lectures by W., i. 381; ef-
forts to establish a professorship of
American history, i. 383
Lecture-room work, his love for, i. 432,

433

Memorials, i. 407-409
Name of university suggested by W.,

i. 299

Opening day, his speech, i. 315, 341-344
Plan of organization, i. 146, 306, 330-

374, 435, 436
Preachership, selections for the, i. 403-

405. ii. 564

Presidency, i. 307, 334
Resignation as president, i. 439; trip
to Europe, i. 441 ; continued rela-
tions with university, i. 442
Scholarships and gratuitous instruc-
tion, i. 391-395, 416

Trip to Europe in 1868, i. 150, 309, 317, 338
Trustee and member of executive

committee, i. 440
Vacations, good effect of, on health, i.

434-438
Degrees from Oxford and St. Andrews,

ii. 208, 210

Education at primary school, i. 7 ; Syra-
cuse Academy, i. 8 ; " classical school,"
i. 12 ; Geneva College, i. 17 ; Yale Col-
lege, i. 26; in Paris, i. 34; at Univer-
sity of Berlin, i. 39 ; trip to Italy, i. 40
Electoral College of 1872, a member of,

and use of seal ring, i. 174
Essays, lectures, addresses, etc. : "The
Greater Distinctions in Statesman-
ship," Yale essay, i. 32 ; " The Diplo-
matic History of Modern Times," Yale
essay, i. 32; "Modern Oracles," Com-
mencement Day speech at Yale, L 70 ;



" Civilization in Russia," his first pub-
lic lecture, i. 80, 82, ii. 488 ; " States-
manship of Richelieu " appeared in the
" Atlantic Monthly," i. 84, ii. 488 ;" A
Word from the Northwest" in reply
to Dr. Russell's letters in the London
" Times," i. 94, 99, ii. 489 ; " The Great-
est Foe of Republics," Yale com-
mencement address, i. 127, ii. 489;
" Cathedral Builders and Mediaeval
Sculptors," address at Yale, i. 127, ii,
488; "The New Germany," address
before the Geographical Society, i.
198, ii. 508; " The Message of the Nine-
teenth Century to the Twentieth," ad-
dress at Yale, i. 200, ii. 494 ; " Contri-
butions of Germany to American
Civilization," i. 230, ii. 490; "Causes
of the French Revolution," lectures
at Stanford University, i. 236, ii. 490;
"Paper Money Inflation in France,"
i. 113-117, 238, ii. 490; "The True Con-
duct of Student Life," address at Cor-
nell University, i. 244; "German In-
struction in General History," pub-
lished in the "New Englander," i. 256,
ii. 488; "A Patriotic Investment,"
address at Yale, ii. 214, 503; "The
Diplomatic Service of the United
States," "Democracy and Educa-
tion," "Evolution vs. Revolution in
Politics," "The Problem of High
Crime in the United States," ii. 460,
503-505 ; " Jefferson and Slavery " pub-
lished in the " Atlantic Monthly," ii.
488 ; "Do the Spoils Belong to the Vic-
tor I" published in "North American
Review," ii. 493; "Evolution of Hu-
manity in Criminal Law," ii. 495-497 ;
evolution of " The History of the War-
fare of Science with Theology," i. 425,
ii. 394, 427, 456, 494, 495, 500

Free-trade ideas, i. 270, 271, 379, 380

Governorship of New York, proposed
nomination for, i. 201

Hague Peace Conference, 1899, presi-
dent of the American delegation, ii.
251, 253 ; diary of the conference, ii.
252-354 ; " House in the Wood," ii. 256 ;
queer letters and crankish proposals
received, ii. 261, 273, 285 ; organization
of the conference, ii. 263; instructions
from the State Department, ii. 253,
266, 271; presentation to the Queen of
Holland, ii. 267, 331 ; American delega-
tion lays wreath of gold and silver
upon tomb of Grotius, ii. 291, 316-318,
320, 326, 327, 329, 330 ; conversation with
Count Miiiister regarding the attitude
of the German Emperor toward arbi-
tration, ii. 301-306, 308; Holls sent to
Berlin with letter to Von Billow, ii.
309-314, 316-318; speech on the immu-
nity of private property on the high
seas, ii. 328; signing of the conven-
tions, ii. 343, 346 ; seal used, ii. 345 ; re-
port to the State Department, ii. 346-
347

Historical studies, influence of Scott
and first apprehension of principles
underlying history, i. 15, 16 ; reading
of D'Aubigne~'s "History of the Ref-
ormation " led to study and teaching
of modern history, i. 24; studies at
Yale, i. 30, ii. 486 ; Paris student days,
i. 34; studies while in St. Petersburg
with Minister Seymour, i. 38 ; at Uni-
versity of Berlin, i. 39 ; in Italy, i. 41 ;
while professor at University of Mich-
igan, i. 42 ; effect of Stanley's "Life of
Arnold," i. 256



INDEX



603



Historical teaching, aim of, i. 83, 87, 255,
256, 262; shortcomings in American
universities in 1857, i. 255 ; methods at
Michigan University, i. 257-264 ; know-
ledge of geography as a basis for his-
torical study, i. 258; use of an inter-
leaved syllabus in the lecture-room,
i. 262 ; use of " original material," i.
263

Ideals of childhood and early manhood,
i. 251-253

Lecture, first public, i. 80

Lecture-courses, purpose of, i. 80, 83, 84,
87, 255, 256, 262, 268

Library, beginning of, i. 22 ; father's
offer of the "best private library in
the United States," i. 25 ; use of " orig-
inal material " at University of Mich-
igan, i. 262 ; gift of books to Cornell
University, i. 375, 440; his historical
library, i. 381; gift of historical and
general library to Cornell, i. 440

Literature, early view of, ii. 488, 489

Literature courses at some universities,
criticism of, i. 384, 385

Minister to Germany, 1879-1881, i. 188,
434, 538 ; visit in London, i. 530 ; at the
dinner of the Lord Mayor, i. 531 ; ar-
rival in Berlin, i. 533; reception by
royalty and the diplomatic corps, i.
533 ; duties as minister, i. 534-546 ; as-
sociations with the diplomatic corps,
i. 547-556 ; with members of university
faculties, i. 557-560 ; with men of let-
ters, i. 560, 567, 569; with artists, i.
561-563; excursions to historical places,
i. 564; to Oberaminergau, i. 564; to
France, i. 565^568 ; to Italy, i. 568-570 ;
secured American exhibit for the In-
ternational Fisheries Exhibition at
Berlin, i. 571 ; farewell dinner to, i. 573 ;
recollections of Bismarck, i. 574-601 ;
the "Affaire Kelly," i. 581-585; inter-
view with Bucher concerning German
interference in South America, i. 596-
598

Minister to Russia, 1892-1894, appoint-
ment, i. 235, ii. 3; visits in London,
Paris, and Berlin en route to St. Peters-
burg, ii. 3-5 ; received by the Emperor,
il. 7 ; by the Empress, ii. 9 ; presenta-
tion to Nicholas II, ii. 9 ; to the grand
dukes and duchesses, ii. 11 ; members
of the diplomatic corps, ii. 12, 22-25;
the Behring Sea question, il. 13-21 ;
American representatives at St.
Petersburg not properly provided for,
ii. 18-21, 50 ; relations with Sir Robert
Morier, ii. 22; intercourse with Rus-
sian statesmen, ii. 25-40; with "all
conditions of men," ii. 41-54; diplo-
matic questions between United States
and Russia, ii. 51-54; Israelite cases,
ii. 51 ; Buchanan treaty found worth-
less, ii. 52 ; watchfulness during chol-
era epidemic, ii. 53; recollections of
Pobeclonostzeff, ii. 55-71; visit with
Tolstoi, ii. 72-100; official life in St.
Petersburg, ii. 101-116; censorship of
newspapers and books, ii. 102 ; troubles
with Russian-Americans, ii. 103; let-
ters from cranks concerning Chicago
Exposition, ii. 107 ; entertainments at
the Winter Palace and court balls, ii.
109, 110; court episodes, ii. Ill; wed-
ding of the Grand Duchess Xenia, ii.
113 ; funeral of the Duchess Catherine,
ii. 114 ; music in Russia, ii. 114 ; thea-
ters, ii. 115 ; excursions, ii. 116 ; resig-
nation, ii. 116

Music, first lessons, i. 11; at Trinity



Church, ii. 376; at "Liebig Classical
Concerts," i. 40; his enjoyment of
Frieze, i. 273; of music at Berlin, ii.
225, 240, 546

Paris Exposition of 1878, honorary com-
missioner to, i. 181, 435, 478, 511 ; report
on courses of study in political and
economic science in European univer-
sities, i. 378, ii. 492 ; a member of the
jury on awards, i. 512; his souvenir of
Meissonier, i. 513 ; his speech on Edi-
son's behalf, i. 514; visits to institu-
tions of learning, i. 522 ; to the Reform
School at Mettray, i. 523 ; a member of
the international copyright conven-
tion, i. 524; his speech at the closing
banquet, i. 525 ; received officers' cross
of the Legion of Honor, i. 525
Paris student days, i. 34, 37, 448 ; walking

tour in France, i. 36

Physical education, early boyhood, i. 8 ;
at Syracuse Academy, i. 11 ; boating
at Yale College, i. 33



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