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Political life

1832-1857, early political life: hears
name of Martin Van Buren in school
catechism, i. 46; recollections of
Harrison and Tyler campaign of
1840, i. 46-51; thought creation of
Sub-Treasury a "wicked outrage,"
i. 52 ; Tyler appeared the " incarna-
tion of evil," i. 53 ; recollections of
Polk and Dallas campaign of 1844,
i. 53-55; impression made by lectures
of John Parker Hale, i. 55 ; Taylor
and Fillmore campaign of 1848, i. 56-
60; recollections of State conven-
tions, i. 57 ; left his father's party, i.
69; feeling of abhorrence for Fill-
more, i. 60; Fugitive Slave Law and
the Jerry Rescue, i. 60-64 ; one of the
few Yale students to remain anti-
slavery, i. 67; essays and speeches
against slavery, at Yale, i. 68 ; doubts
as to his position on slavery ques-
tion, i. 68, 69; influence of James
Hadley,i. 69 ; commencement speech,
"Modern Oracles," i. 70; influence
of Thomas Hart Seymour, i. 70, 72 ;
attache" at St. Petersburg, 1854-1855,
i. 447-472 ; study of Jefferson, i. 38,
70; discussion with Erving in the
Legation at St. Petersburg, i. 71;
political studies at University of
Berlin, i. 72 ; return to America, i. 72 ;
favored John c. Fremont, published
articles in the interest of anti-slav-
ery, i. 73; cast his first vote for
Frempnt in 1856, i. 73-75; visited
Washington in 1857, i. 76; refused
presentation to President Pierce, i.
77 ; influence of Buchanan's inaugu-
ral address, i. 77 ; visit to Congress,
i. 78 ; lectures on Russia and the serf
system, i. 80-82

1857-1864, Civil War period : aim of his
teaching at University of Michigan,
i. 83, 87 ; his lectures outside of the
university, i. 84 ; presiding officer at
discussions by students, i. 86 ; inter-
est in speeches of Carl Schurz, i. 86 ;
reads first account of battle of Bull
Run, i. 88 ; volunteers to go to the
war but is rejected, i. 89; assists in
raising and equipping troops, i. 89 ;
dear friends in the war, i. 90, 91 ;
military drill for students, i. 91 ;
breakdown in health and start for
Europe, i. 92 ; changes mind, returns
home, and enters the governorship
campaign of 1863 as a speaker, i. 93 ;



604



INDEX



visits Europe at the suggestion of
Thurlow Weed, i. 93; finds bitter
feeling against the United States, i.
93-95 ; published reply to Dr. Rus-
sell's " American Diary " in the Lon-
don " Times," i. 94, 99 ; met Cairnes
in Dublin, i. 95 ; found Frenchmen
indifferent, i. 96; at Frankfort-on-
the-Main met Consul-General Mur-
phy, i. 97; contributed to paper
called " L'Europe," i. 97 ; Fourth of
July anniversary at Heidelberg, i.
98 ; return to America, i. 99 ; speech
in the New York Senate, on the war
bounty bill, concerning the issue of
paper money during the French
Revolution, i. 113-115

1864-1867, senatorship at Albany : elec-
tion to Senate, i. 99 ; equipment for
senatorial duties, i. 100, 101 ; young-
est member of the Senate, i. 101;
colleagues, i. 101-105 ; appointment
to various committees, i. 105 ; maiden
speech on the governor's message, i.
105 ; attitude toward the land-grant
fund, i. 106, 295,330; codification of
the educational laws, i. 107 ; State
normal school bill, i. 107; work on
the special committee investigating
the " Health Department " in New
York City, L 108-111; opposes plan
of Catholic priests for acquiring
Ward's Island, i. Ill ; speech in the
Senate on the bounty bill, i. 112-115 ;
substitute delegate to National Con-
vention at Baltimore, i. 117 ; visit to
Washington and meeting with Presi-
dent Lincoln, L 121 ; 1865 : efforts to
secure the charter for Cornell Uni-
versity, i. 123 ; death of Lincoln, i.
123 ; delivers oration in the Senate,
i. 123, 124; renomination to Senate,
i. 125; 1866: reports on the investi-
gation of the New York " Health
Department," i. 126; commence-
ment address at Yale, " The Great-
est Foe of Republics," i. 127 ; election
to a professorship at Yale declined,
i. 127 ; the trial of an Oneida County
judge for " bounty jumping," i. 128 ;
President Johnson's visit to the
North and his reception by the New
York Senate, i. 128-132; 1867: his
speech seconding the nomination of
Roscoe Conkling for United States
senator, i. 135-137 ; efforts for the bill
to improve the procedure in crimi-
nal cases, i. 137-139; relations with
Judge Folger, i. 137, 140 ; efforts to
defeat the Sodus Canal Bill, i. 140-
142 ; interest in the Constitutional
Convention, i. 142-146; delegate to
State Convention, political speeches,
i. 148

1868-1871, General Grant and Santo
Domingo: visit to Auburn to hear
Mr. Seward, i. 150; at State Judici-
ary Convention of 1870 nominated
Charles Andrews as judge of Court
of Appeals, i. 152 ; secured Judge
Folger's nomination, i. 153 ; meeting
with General Grant, i. 154; a dele-
gate to State Convention of 1870, i.
156; a member of the Santo Domingo
Commission, i. 157, 159, 434, 483-507

1872, Greeley campaign : public recep-
tion of Greeley in New York, i. 159 ;
W. becomes president of State Con-
vention in 1871, i. 164-167 ; attacks
by newspapers, bribing charges, i.
168, 169; a substitute delegate to the



Republican National Convention in
1872, i. 171; speeches, i. 172; Grant
reflected, i. 172 ; meeting with Sam-
uel J. Til den, i. 174; an elector at
the meeting of the Electoral College,
i. 174; visit to the South, i. 175
1871-1881, Grant, Hayes, and Garfleld :
impressions of President Grant, i.
177 ; and meetings with, in Europe,
i. 180; the President's purpose to
make W. Secretary of State, i. 181 ;
commissioner to the Paris Exposi-
tion in 1878, i. 181, 435, 511 ; interest
in the Hayes campaign of 1878, i.
182-188; minister to Germany in
1879, i. 188, 434, 528 ; address at cele-
bration of Garfleld' s funeral, i. 191
1881-1884, Arthur, Cleveland, and
Blaine : efforts for reform in the civil
service, i. 194-197; address in New
York in "The New Germany," i.
198; address at Yale on "The Mes-
sage of the Nineteenth Century to
the Twentieth," i. 200; address at
the funeral of Eduard Lasker, i. 201 ;
delegate to the National Conven-
tion of 1884, i. 201-207 ; supports Mr.
Blaine, i. 208 ; experience as presid-
ing officer of a Syracuse mass-meet-
ing, i. 210

1884-1891, Hendricks, Sherman, Ban-
croft, and others : visit to Washing-
ton, meetings with public men, i.
213-221 ; resignation of presidency of
the university, i. 222 ; a position on
the Interstate Railway Commission,
offered by President Cleveland, de-
clined, i. 222 ; trip to Europe, i. 222 ;
urged to accept nomination to Con-
gress, but declined, i. 223 ; member
of a committee on civil-service re-
form, i. 224 ; argument before Presi-
dent Harrison, i. 225
1891-1904, McKinley and Roosevelt:
candidacy for the governorship of
New York, interviews with Thomas
C. Platt, not the choice of the con-
vention, i. 229-!235; minister to Rus-
sia, i. 235, ii. 3-116; member of a
commission to investigate the Vene-
zuelan-Guiana boundary line, i. 237,
ii. 117-130; part in the McKinley
campaign of 1896, i. 237 ; addresses in
Western universities, i. 239 ; experi-
ence in the Minnesota legislature, i.
239-241; appointed ambassador to
Germany, i. 241, ii. 131 ; president of
the American delegation at The
Hague Peace Conference, ii. 250;
urged to accept the vice-presidency
in 1900, i. 242; but suggested the
name of Theodore Roosevelt, i. 242 ;
address at Cornell on "The True
Conduct of Student Life," i. 244 ; vis-
its to Washington, interviews with
President McKinley, i. 244-246 ; with
President Roosevelt, i. 247
Politics, dislike of, i. 253
" Politics and religion, Mr. White's, are

C9rpell University," i. 201
Religious development, first recollec-
tions of public worship, ii. 515 ; influ-
ence of Henry Gregory, ii. 517, 518;
family influences, ii. 519; revelations
of the " Ursuline Manual," ii. 523 ; in-
fluence of Bishop DeLancey, ii. 524 ;
results of "Christian evidences," ii.
527; influence of New England Con-
gregationalism, ii. 529-541 ; of histor-
ical reading, ii. 532; religious views
broadened by experiences in Europe,



605



1853-1856, 11. 542-556; influence of
George Park Fisher, ii. 557 ; readings
in ecclesiastical history, ii. 558; influ-
ence of Stanley's " Life of Arnold," ii.
560; of preachers at Cornell Univer-
sity, ii. 564; of the Positivist Conven-
ticle at London, ii. 566; impression
made by the "Bible for Learners," ii.
566; recognition of an evolution in
religious beliefs, ii. 56&-S73
Santo" Domingo Commission, 1871, a
member of, i. 157, 158, 159, 434, 483; goes
to Washington for instructions, i. 484 ;
hears and talks with leading men, i.
484-487; given a special charge by
President Grant, i. 487; in charge of
the scientific experts, i. 488; confer-
ence with church authorities, i. 492;
conducts expedition across the moun-
tains, i. 493-500 ; presented with a rifle,
i. 495 ; study of earthquakes, i. 496 ; ex-
perience with a priest at Vega, i. 497 ;
with cockroaches, i. 499, 500 ; the com-
mission in Jamaica, i. 502 ; incident on
the Potomac steamer, i. 504 ; report of
the commission, i. 506
Seal ring, use of, i. 174, ii. 345
Throat troubles, cause of, i. 433
University of Michigan, election to pro-
fessorship of history and English, lit-
erature, i. 42, 82, 83, 257; aim of his
teaching, i. 83, 87, 255, 256, 262; his
methods of teaching history, i. 257-264 ;
knowledge of geography as a basis for
historical study, i. 258; "extempora-
neous speaking," i. 260, 261 ; use of in-
terleaved syllabus in lecture-room, i.
262; use of original material in lec-
ture-room, i. 263; presided over stu-
dents' discussions, i. 264; difficulties
with students, i. 266-268; lectures
throughout Michigan and other States,
i. 268-271 ; a young David, prepared by
W., makes speech in Ann Arbor, on
free trade, i. 271 ; reminiscences of Dr.
Tappan and professors, i. 272-280 ; re-
lations with Dr. Tappan, i. 281 ; plants
trees on the campus, i. 282 ; students'
military drill, i. 91; students in the
war, i. 90, 283; severs his connection
with the university, i. 283
Venezuelan commissioner, 1895-1896, i.
237, ii. 117-130 ; duty, to study and re-
port on material brought in, ii. 122;
acquaintance with leading men at
Washington, ii. 126; visit to Monti-
cello and the University of Virginia,
ii. 128, 129

Yale College, life and studies at, i. 26 ;
faulty system of instruction, i. 26-29 ;
influence of fellow-students, i. 30;
greatest interest in political and his-
torical studies, i. 30 ; prize essays, i.
31-33 ; vocal gymnastics, i. 33 ; inter-
est in boating, i. 33 ; influence of Yale
on the " Cornell idea," i. 289 ; ad-
dresses and speeches against slavery,
i. 68, 70 ; election to professorship in
School of Art declined, i. 127, 257, ii.
557 ; resident graduate in 1856, i. 256 ;
hopes for historical professorship, i.
256 ; representative of, at the Bodleian
tercentenary at Oxford, ii. 208
White, Asa (grandfather), i. 35
White, Gilbert, of Selborne, W.'s visit to

the grave of, ii. 431
White, Hamilton (uncle), i. 87
'White, Horace (father), early responsi-
bilities, i. 5; great respect for men of
thought, i. 6; church relations, ii. 513,
514 ; in charge of bank at Syracuse, i. 8,



ii. 517 ; active part in establishing parish
school, i. 17 ; opposition to son's leaving
Geneva College, i. 23 ; accompanies son
to Yale, i. 25; "encourages him to work
for prizes, i. 32; in politics, a devoted
Whig, i. 45; attitude toward abolition-
ists, i. 55 ; death of, i. 86
White, Peregrine, tradition concerning,

White, Sir William, British, ambassador
at Constantinople, ii. 440

Whiting, Judge, and the investigation of
the 2S~ew York " Health Department,"
i. 108-111

Whiton, James Morris, journalist, of the
Yale class of 1853, i. 254

Wieting, John, i. 182

Wilder, Burt, lecturer at Yale University,
i. 363

Wilhelmina, Queen of Holland, her recep-
tion of the members of The Hague Peace
Conference, ii. 267, 331

Willard Asylum for the Insane, creation
Of, i. 332-334

William I, his golden wedding festivities,
i. 533 ; his welcome to W., i. 533 ; W.'a
acquaintance with, i. 572, 573

William II, as prince, i. 533, ii. 218, 219;
W.'s presentation to, as ambassador of
the United States, ii. 135, 136, 224 ; on the
"open-door" policy for China, ii. 158;
his view of the destruction of the Maine,
ii. 164, 238 ; his dismissal of Bismarck, ii.
220; his speeches to young recruits, ii.
221 ; the " Caligula " pamphlet, ii. 222 ;
his knowledge of art and music, ii. 225;
his interest in dramatic art, ii. 226-228;
in education, ii. 229; in city improve-
ments, ii. 229 ; in literature, ii. 231 ; his
freedom from fads, ii. 232 ; his gifts as
a statesman, his devotion to the army
and navy, ii. 233 ; his ability in selecting
men, ii. 234 ; his relation to the legisla-
tive bodies, ii. 234 ; his devotion to work,
ii. 235; his view of international ques-
tions, ii. 235; the breadth of his views,
ii. 237; his impulsiveness, ii. 238; his
sympathy with the workingmen, ii. 239 ;
his ability as a speaker, ii. 239 ; his re-
ligious views, ii. 239 ; his dealings with
Roman Catholics, ii. 240; his theory of
monarchy, ii. 184, 242 ; his feeling toward
parliamentary government, ii. 244 ; his
alleged violations of the German Con-
stitution, ii. 244 ; attitude toward the
United States during the Spanish War,
ii. 245 ; his dealings with the Venezuelan
question, ii. 246 ; his feelings toward the
United States, ii. 248 ; summary of his
position in contemporary history, ii.
249; his attitude toward The Hague
Peace Conference, ii. 236, 259, 293, 297,
308

Williams, " Cerro Gordo," story concern-
ing, i. 215

Williams, Eleazar (the Dauphin of
France ? ), sermon by, ii. 525, 526

Wilson, William Dexter, professor of
Cornell University, i. 381; registrar, i.
436

Wischniegradsky.at the Paris Exposition
of 1878, i. 513; his opinion of govern-
ment railways, ii. 34

Witte, Sergei Yulievitch, his strength and
early history, his offer of loan of gold to
the United States, ii. 33 ; dismissal from
the finance ministry, ii. 35

Woeikoff, of St. Petersburg University,
ii. 45

Wolkenstein, Austrian ambassador at
St. Petersburg, ii. 23



606



INDEX



Wolkenstein, Countess, her salon, ii. 46
Wolkonsky, Princess, her salon, ii. 46
Wolkonsky, Serge, his ability and versa-
tility, his lectures in the United States,
ii. 45
Wood, Fernando, Mayor of New York, a

" brilliant desperado," i. 59
Woodford, Stewart L., delegate to Na-
tional Convention of 1860, i. 86 ; lieuten-
ant-governor of New York, i. 141 ; can-
didate for the governorship in 1870, i.
156 ; president of the Electoral College,
i. 174 ; at the opening of Cornell Univer-
sity i. 315

Woolsey, Theodore Dwight, president of
Yale, i. 28, 29 ; attitude on the slavery
question, i. 67; his support of W.'s
views, i. 425 ; his sermon on " Righteous
Anger," ii. 531

Woolworth, principal of Cortland Acad-
emy, i. 6 ; on coeducation, i. 398
Woronzoff-Daschkoff, his honesty, ii. 42
Wraskoy, Galkin, and the Russian prison
system, ii. 43



WUrtemberg, King of, his public spirit

ii. 168
Wiirzburg Palace, i. 573

Xavier, St. Francis, W.'s plan for a study
of the life of, ii. 499

Yale College, faulty system of instruction
at, i. 26-29 ; first rowing challenge sent
to Harvard, i. 33; difference between
the Yale and Harvard spirit, ii. 487 ; pro-
slavery tendency, i. 66 ; in disrepute in
the South, i. 67 ; W.'s ideal for, i. 289 ;
gate-tower in memory of W. W. Phelps,
i. 289; religious influences at, ii. 529

" Yale Literary Magazine," edited by W.,
i. 68, ii. 486

Zorn, of the University of Konigsberg, a
delegate to the Peace Conference, ii.
259, 294



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Online LibraryAndrew Dickson WhiteAutobiography of Andrew Dickson White (Volume 2) → online text (page 54 of 54)