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THE ARABIAN NIGHTS
ENTERTAINMENTS



THE LANG FAIRY BOOKS

Crown Edition



THE ARABIAN NIGHTS ENTERTAINMENTS.

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W
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O



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X



THE

ARABIAN NIGHTS
ENTERTAINMENTS



Selected and Edited oy

ANDREW LANG



Numerous Illustration* by

H. J. FORD



C.



Eaitu



rown Jl,aitioru



LONGMANS, GREEN AND CO.

LONDON NEW YORK TORONTO

1939






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LANG
THE ARABIAN NIGHTS

COPYRIGHT '1898
BY LONGMANS, GREEN AND CO.



First Edition September 1898

Reprinted November 1902, October 1905

February 1909, March 1911, March 1914

June 1916, July 1918, October 1920

Febsuary,. .1923, March 1^26^ , August 1929
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PRINTED IN THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA



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To
EVELYN AND MARJORY SELLAR

IN MEMORY OF

URRARD AND BONNY DUNDEE



- 2






i-% R P-JBLI"3 LIBRARY



TRFAC

THE stories in the Fairy Books have generally been such
as old women in country places tell to their grandchil-
dren. Nobody knows how old they are, or who told
them first. The children of Ham, Shem, and Japhet
may have listened to them in the Ark, on wet days.
Hector's little boy may have heard them in Troy Town,
for it is certain that Homer knew them, and that some
of them were written down in Egypt about the time of
Moses.

People in different countries tell them differently, but
they are always the same stories, really, whether among
little Zulus, at the Cape, or little Eskimo, near the North
Pole. The changes are only in matters of manners and
customs; such as wearing clothes or not, meeting lions
who talk in warm countries, or talking bears in the
cold countries. There are plenty of kings and queens
in the fairy tales, just because long ago there were plenty
of kings in the country. A gentleman who would be
a squire now was a kind of king in Scotland in very
old times, and the same in other places. These old
stories, never forgotten, were taken down in writing
in different ages, but mostly in this century, in all



vu



viii THC <ARABIAH

sorts of languages. These ancient stories are the con-
tents of the Fairy Books.

Now 'The Arabian Nights,' some of which, but not
nearly all, are given in this volume, are only fairy tales
of the East. The people of Asia, Arabia, and Persia
told them in their own way, not for children, but for
grown-up people. There were no novels then, nor any
printed books, of course; but there were people whose
profession it was to amuse men and women by telling
tales. They dressed the fairy stories up, and made the
characters good Mahommedans, living in Bagdad or
India. The events were often supposed to happen in
the reign of the great Caliph, or ruler of the Faithful,
Haroun al Raschid, who lived in Bagdad in A. D. 786-
808. The vizir who accompanies the Caliph was also a
real person of the great family of the Barmecides.
He was put to death by the Caliph in a very cruel
way, nobody ever knew why. The stories must have
been told in their present shape a good long while after
the Caliph died, when nobody knew very exactly what
had really happened. At last some storyteller thought of
writing down the tales, and fixing them into a kind of
framework, as if they had all been narrated to a cruel
Sultan by his wife. Probably the tales were written
down about the time when Edward I was fighting Rob-
ert Bruce. But changes were made in them at different
times, and a great deal that is very dull and stupid was



TRCFACC



IX



put in, and plenty of verses. Neither the verses nor the
dull pieces are given in this book.

People in France and England knew almost nothing
about 'The Arabian Nights' till the reigns of Queen
Anne and George I, when they were translated into
French by Monsieur Galland. Grown-up people were
then very fond of fairy tales, and they thought these
Arab stories the best that they had ever read. They were
delighted with Ghouls (who live among the tombs) and
Geni, who seem to be a kind of ogres, and with Prin-
cesses who work magic spells, and with Peris, who are
Arab fairies. Sinbad had adventures which perhaps
came out of the Odyssey of Homer; in fact, all the
East had contributed its wonders, and sent them to Eu-
rope in one parcel. Young men once made a noise at
Monsieur Galland's windows in the dead of night, and
asked him to tell them one of his marvellous tales. No-
body talked of anything but dervishes and vizirs, rocs
and peris. The stories were translated from French into
all languages, and only Bishop Atterbury complained
that the tales were not likely to be true, and had no
moral. The Bishop was presently banished for being
on the side of Prince Charlie's father, and had leisure
to repent of being so solemn.

In this book 'The Arabian Nights' are translated from
the French version of Monsieur Galland, who dropped
out the poetry and a great deal of what the Arabian



x THC ^4RABIAH WIGHTS

authors thought funny, though it seems wearisome to
us. In this book the stories are shortened here and
there, and omissions are made of pieces only suitable for
Arabs and old gentlemen. The translations are by the
writers of the tales in the Fairy Books, and the pictures
are by Mr. Ford.

I can remember reading 'The Arabian Nights' when
I was six years old, in dirty yellow old volumes of small
type with no pictures, and I hope children who read
them with Mr. Ford's pictures will be as happy as I was
then in the company of Aladdin and Sinbad the Sailor.



PAGE

Introduction I

The Story of the ^Merchant and the Qenius ... 6

The Story of the First Old ^Man and of the Hind . . 13

The Story of the Second Old ^Man and of the Two

Ulac^ Vogs ... 19

The Story of the Fisherman 23

The Story of the QreeJ^ King and the Physician

"Douban 29

The Story of the Husband and the Tar rot . . . .32

The Story of the Vizir who was Punished 34

The Story of the Young King of the Tllacl^ Isles . 48

The Story of the Three (Calenders, sons of Kings, and

of Five Ladies of TSagdad 54

The Story of the First (Calender, son of a King ... 68

The Story of the Second (Calender, son of a King . . 75

The Story of the Cnvious ^Man, and of Him who was

Envied . 86

The Story of the Third (Calender, son of a King . . . 102

The Seven Voyages of Sindbad the Sailor . . . .122

First Voyage . 126

Second Voyage 131

Third Voyage 141

Fourth Voyage 153

Fifth Voyage 163

Sixth Voyage 173

Seventh and Last Voyage 180

xi



xii TH tARABlAH WGHTS



PAGE



The Little HunchbacJ^ . . . . -. 187

The Story of the TSarber's Fifth ^Brother 196

The Story of the TSarber's Sixth ^Br other 209

The Adventures of Prince Qamaralzaman and the
"Princess ^Badoura ... 216

poured din and the fair 'Persian 267

^Aladdin and the Wonderful Lamp . . . . . 295

The Adventures of Haroun-al-T{aschid, (Caliph of T$ag-
dad 316

Story of the "Blind Tlaba-^Abdalla 320

The Story of Sidi-TSiouman . . 331

The Story of ^Ali Qogia, ^Aderchant of Ttagdad . . 346

The Enchanted Horse ... . .... 358

The Story of Two Sisters who were Jealous of their
Younger Sister 390



ILLUSTRATIONS

COLOURED PLATES

Thus They T^ode <All Day . . . . Frontispiece

The Qenius (Commands the Young ^M.an

to Slay the Princess Facing page 80

The nd of the Dragon .... . 130

The Prince and the 'Princess Arrive at the (Capital of
Persia on the Cnchanted Horse 374

IN TEXT

PAGE

Scheherazade, T)inarzade, and the Sultan .... 3

The Qenius and the ^Merchants 9

The >// Hegs for its Life 15

The Qenius omes out of the Jar 25

The Prince Falls in with the Ogress 35

The King Turns over the Leaves of the TSooJ^ . 39

The Qirl Upsets the 'Frying-pan 43

/ TSecame Half ^Man and Half Marble 49

The <JVLan is ^Astonished at the ^Beauty of the
'Porteress 55

Zobeida Prepares to Whip the "Dog 61

The King's Son "Begs for his Life 71

The Princess Veils Herself when she Sees the
^M.on\ey .95

She ut the Lion's "Body into Two Pieces .... 98

7 "Burn, I "Burn!' .... . . . 100

The Overthrow of the TSrazen Horseman . . . 105

The Young ^Men Sew up ^4gib in the Sheepskin . .113

xiii



xiv THC ^ARABIAH HIGHTS

PAGE

^4 gib Entertained "By the Ladies 115

The 'Blac^ Horse Leaves ^Agib on the Terrace . . .119

Hindbad (purses his Fate 123

Sindbad (Carried off by the T(pc 133

Sindbad in the Valley of Serpents 137

The Qiant Cnters 143

The Qiants Hurl T^oc^s at Sinbad and his C om ~
panions . . ... . 147

Sindbad Lowered into the (Cavern ... ... 157

The First T{pc ^Aims a Stone at the Ship . . 165

The Old <J\Aan of the Sea . . . 169

Sindbad Left by the Elephants in their burial-place . .183
The "Death of the HunchbacJ^ .... .189

^Alnaschar KicJ^s over his "Basket ... . 199

The Lady Shows ^Alnaschar the (goffers Tacked with
Qold ... .205

The "Barmecide's Feast .... .... 211

She ould not Weary Qazing at amaralzaman . . 221
Qaschcasch is Unable to "Decide Which is the Fairer . 227
Camaralzaman Ill-treats the Qrand-Vizir . . . 231

The King of hina Loot^s at the T(ing on the 'Princess's
Finger . . . . 235

TJadoura Recognizes famaralzaman 241

The "Bird Flies off with the Talisman 247

amaralzaman Watches the 'Birds . . ... 255

The Talisman is Discovered in one of the Jars . . 259

The 'Beautiful Persian is 'Brought to Khacan . . . 269

TSioureddin Qets T^id of the Two Little Slaves . . . 273

Saouy Tries to Ta\e the 'Beautiful Persian from *N*ou-
reddin . . 279

The Fair Persian Lights the fondles 285

ISloureddin offers the 'Beautiful Persian to the Fisher-
man 289

T^pureddin Led to Execution 293



ILLUSTRATIONS xv

PAGE

The Slave of the Tfjng ^Appears to Aladdin . . . 297

^Aladdin's (^Mother brings the Slaves with the Forty
Tlasins of Qold before the Sultan 303

The <^4frican <J\dagician Qets the Lamp from the
Slave . . 309

The "Death of the ^African ^Viagician 313

The "Dervish Separates the SmoJ(e and the Palace ^Ap-
pears in the T^oc^ . . 323

The "Dervish ^Anoints the "Pjght ye of TSaba-tAbdalla 329
tAmina Sating the "Rjce ... 333

She Opened the Qate, Intending to Qrush <J\de as I
"Passed Through ... 337

tAmina is Transformed into a Horse 344

The Qold "Pieces Fall out of the Jar of Olives . . 349

The Indian Shows off the Cnchanted Horse before the
King of Persia . . .... . 359

Prince Firouz Schah in the (Chamber of the Princess
of TSengal 367

The Sultan of (Cashmere Rescues the Princess of Ben-
gal from the Indian .... ... . 381

The Prince of Persia and the Princess of Ttengal s-

cape from the Sultan of (Cashmere 387

The Sisters Launch the (Cradle in the Qanal . . . 393
Prince TSahman Prunes the "Dervish's "Beard . . .401
The Princess (Climbs over the "BlacJ^ Stones . . . 409
Parizade Shows the Singing Tree to the Sultan . . 421



THE ARABIAN NIGHTS
ENTERTAINMENTS



i . v . Ki,

CITY OF HEW YORK



THE

ARABIAN NIGHTS
ENTERTAINMENTS



IN the chronicles of the ancient dynasty of the Sassa-
nidae, who reigned, for about four hundred years, from
Persia to the borders of China, beyond the great river
Ganges itself, we read the praises of one of the kings of
the race, who was said to be the best monarch of his time.
His subjects loved him, and his neighbours feared him,
and when he died he left his kingdom in a more pros-
perous and powerful condition than any king had done
before him.

The two sons who survived him loved each other
tenderly, and it was a real grief to the elder, Schahriar,
that the laws of the empire forbade him to share his
dominions with his brother Schahzeman. Indeed, after
ten years, during which this state of things had not
ceased to trouble him, Schahriar cut off the country of
Great Tartary from the Persian Empire and made his
brother king.

Now the Sultan Schahriar had a wife whom he loved
more than all the world, and his greatest happiness was
to surround her with splendour, and to give her the finest
dresses and the most beautiful jewels. It was therefore
with the deepest shame and sorrow that he accidentally
discovered, after several years, that she had deceived him
completely, and her whole conduct turned out to have
been so bad, that he felt himself obliged to carry out the



2 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS

law of the land, and order the grand-vizir to put her to
death. The blow was so heavy that his mind almost
gave way, and he declared that he was quite sure that at
bottom all women were as wicked as the Sultana, if you
could only find them out, and that the fewer the world
contained the better. So every evening he married a
fresh wife and had her strangled the following morning
before the grand-vizir, whose duty it was to provide these
unhappy brides for the Sultan. The poor man fulfilled
his task with reluctance, but there was no escape, and
every day saw a girl married and a wife dead.

This behaviour caused the greatest horror in the town,
where nothing was heard but cries and lamentations. In
one house was a father weeping for the loss of his
daughter, in another perhaps a mother trembling for the
fate of her child ; and instead of the blessings that had
formerly been heaped on the Sultan's head, the air was
now full of curses.

The grand-vizir himself was the father of two
daughters, of whom the elder was called Scheherazade,
and the younger Dinarzade. Dinarzade had no par-
ticular gifts to distinguish her from other girls, but her
sister was clever and courageous in the highest degree.
Her father had given her the best masters in philosophy,
medicine, history and the fine arts, and besides all this,
her beauty excelled that of any girl in the kingdom of
Persia.

One day, when the grand-vizir was talking to his
eldest daughter, who was his delight and pride, Schehera-
zade said to him, ' Father, I have a favour to ask of you.
Will you grant it to me ? '

' I can refuse you nothing/ replied he, ' that is just
and reasonable.'

4 Then listen,' said Scheherazade. ' I am determined
to stop this barbarous practice of the Sultan's, and to
deliver the girls and mothers from the awful fate that
!iangs over them.'



THE ARABIAN NIGHTS



3



' It would be an excellent thing to do/ returned the
grand-vizir, ; but how do you propose to accomplish it ? '

4 My father,' answered Scheherazade, c it is you who
have to provide the Sultan daily with a fresh wife, and




SCHEHERAZADE, DINARZADE, AND THE SULTAN

I implore you, by all the affection you bear me, to allow
the honour to fall upon me.'

' Have you lost your senses ? ' cried the grand- vizir,
starting back in horror. 4 What has put such a thing into
your head ? You ought to know by this time what it
means to be the Sultan's bride ! '

4 Yes, my father, I know it well, 7 replied she, ' and I



4 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS

am not afraid to think of it. If I fail, my death will be
a glorious one, and if I succeed I shall have done a great
service to my country/

4 It is of no use/ said the grand- vizir, ' I shall never
consent. If the Sultan was to order me to plunge a
dagger in your heart, I should have to obey. What a
task for a father ! Ah, if you do not fear death, fear at
any rate the anguish you would cause me.'

4 Once again, my father,' said Scheherazade, 4 will
you grant me what I ask ? '

'"What, are you still so obstinate?' exclaimed the
grand-vizir. 4 Why are you so resolved upon your own
ruin ? '

But the maiden absolutely refused to attend to her
father's words, and at length, in despair, the grand-vizir
was obliged to give way, and went sadly to the palace
to tell the Sultan that the following evening he would
"bring him Scheherazade.

The Sultan received this news with the greatest
astonishment.

4 How have you made up your mind,' he asked, ' to
sacrifice your own daughter to me?'

4 Sire,' answered the grand-vizir, 4 it is her own wish.
Even the sad fate that awaits her could not hold her back.'

4 Let there be no mistake, vizir,' said the Sultan.
' Remember you will have to take her life yourself. If
you refuse, I swear that your head shall pay forfeit.'

' Sire,' returned the vizir. 4 Whatever the cost, I will
obey you. Though a father, I am also your subject.'
So the Sultan told the grand-vizir he might bring his
daughter as soon as he liked.

The vizir took back this news to Scheherazade, who



received it as if it had been the most pleasant thing in
the world. She thanked her father warmly for yielding
to her wishes, and, seeing him still bowed down with
grief, told him that she hoped he would never repent
having allowed her to marry the Sultan. Then she went



THE ARABIAN NIGHTS 5

to prepare herself for the marriage, and begged that her
sister Dioarzade should be sent for to speak to her.

When they were alone, Scheherazade addressed her
thus:

4 My dear sister ; I want your help in a very important
affair. My father is going to take me to the palace, to
celebrate my marriage with the Sultan. When his
Highness receives me, I shall beg him, as a last favour,
to let you sleep in our chamber, so that I may have
your company during the last night I am alive. If, as
I hope, he grants me my wish, be sure that you wake
me an hour before the dawn, and speak to me in these
words: "My sister, if you are not asleep, I beg you,
before the sun rises, to tell me one of your charming
stories." Then I shall begin, and I hope by this means
to deliver the people from the terror that reigns over
them.' Dinarzade replied that she would do with
pleasure what her sister wished.

When the usual hour arrived the grand-vizir con-
ducted Scheherazade to the palace, and left her alone
with the Sultan, who bade her raise her veil and was
amazed at her beauty. But seeing her eyes full of tears,
he asked what was the matter. ' Sire,' replied Schehera-
zade, ; I have a sister who loves me as tenderly as I love
her. Grant me the favour of allowing her to sleep this
night in the same room, as it is the last we shall be
together/ Schahriar consented to Scheherazade's petition,
and Dinarzade was sent for.

An hour before daybreak Diuarzade awoke, and ex-
claimed, as she had promised, 4 My dear sister, if you are
not asleep, tell me I pray you, before the sun rises, one of
your charming stories. It is the last time that I shall
have the pleasure of hearing you.'

Scheherazade did not answer her sister, but turned to
the Sultan. i Will your highness permit me to do as my
sister asks?' said she.

' Willingly,' he answered. So Scheherazade began.



THE ARABIAN NIGHTS



THE STORY OF THE MERCHANT AND

THE GENIUS



SIRE, there was once upon a time a merchant who
possessed great wealth, in land and merchandise, as
well as m ready money. He was obliged from time to
time to take journeys to arrange his affairs. One day,
having to go a long way from home, he mounted his
horse, taking with him a small wallet in which he had
put a few biscuits and dates, because he had to pass
through a desert where no food was to be got. He
arrived without any mishap, and, having finished his
business, set out on his return. On the fourth day of his
journey, the heat of the sun being very great, he turned
out of his road to rest under some trees. He found at
the foot of a large walnut-tree a fountain of clear and
running water. He dismounted, fastened his horse to a
branch of the tree, and sat down by the fountain, after
having taken from his wallet some of his dates and
biscuits. Whilst eating the dates he threw the stones
right and left. When he had finished this frugal meal
he washed his face and hands in the fountain.

Whilst he was thus employed he saw an enormous
genius, white with rage, coming towards him, with a
scimitar in his hand.

'Arise,' he cried in a terrible voice, 'and let me kill
you as you have killed my son ! '

As he uttered these words he gave a frightful yell.
The merchant, quite as much terrified at the hideous face
of the monster as at his words, answered him tremblingly,



THE MERCHANT AND THE GENIUS 7

Alas, good sir, what can I have done to you to deserve
death?'

' I shall kill you,' repeated the genius, ' as you have
killed my son/

4 But,' said the merchant, i how can I have killed your
son? I do not know him, and I have never even seen
him.'

4 When you arrived here did not you sit down on the
ground?' asked the genius, ' and did you not take some
dates from your wallet, and whilst eating them did not
you throw the stones about?'

4 Yes,' said the merchant, 4 I certainly did so.'

4 Then,' said the genius, ' I tell you you have killed my
son, for whilst you were throwing about the stones, my
son passed by, and one of them struck him in the eye
and killed him. So I shall kill you. 7

4 Ah, sir, forgive me ! ' cried the merchant.
I will have no mercy on you,' answered the genius.

*But I killed your son quite unintentionally, so I
implore you to spare my life.'

4 No,' said the genius, 4 I shall kill you as you killed
my son,' and so saying he seized the merchant by the
arm, threw him on the ground, and lifted his sabre to cut
off his head.

The merchant, protesting his innocence, bewailed his
wife and children, and tried pitifully to avert his fate.
The genius, with his raised scimitar, waited till he had
finished, but was not in the least touched.

Scheherazade, at this point, seeing that it was day,
and knowing that the Sultan always rose very early to
attend the council, stopped speaking.

4 Indeed, sister,' said Dinarzade, 4 this is a wonderful
story.'

4 The rest is still more wonderful,' replied Schehera-
zade, 4 and you would say so, if the Sultan would allow me
to live another day, and would give me leave to tell it you
the next night*



8 THE ARABIAN NIGHTS

Schahriar, who had been listening to Scheherazade
with pleasure, said to himself, ' I will wait till to-morrow ;
I can always have her killed when I have heard the end
of her story.'

All this time the grand-vizir was in a terrible state
of anxiety. But he was much delighted when he saw
the Sultan enter the council-chamber without giving the
terrible command that he was expecting.

The next morning, before the day broke, Dinavzade
said to her sister, ; Dear sister, if you are awake I pray
you to go on with your story.'

The Sultan did not wait for Scheherazade to ask his
leave. 'Finish/ said he, ' the story of the genius and the
merchant. I am curious to hear the end.'

So Scheherazade went on with the story. This hap*
pened every morning. The Sultana told a story, and the
Sultan let her live to finish it.

When the merchant saw that the genius was deter-
mined to cut off his head, he said : ' One word more, I
entreat you. Grant me a little delay ; just a short time to
go home to bid my wife and children farewell, and to
make my will. When I have done this I will come back
here, and you shall kill me.'

'But,' said the genius, 4 if I grant you the delay you
ask, I am afraid you will not come back.'

4 1 give you my word of honour,' answered the mer-
chant, ' that I will come back without fail.'

4 How long do you require ? ' asked the genius.

4 1 ask you for a year's grace,' replied the merchant.
4 1 promise you that to-morrow twelvemonth, I shall be



Online LibraryAndrew LangThe Arabian nights entertainments → online text (page 1 of 26)