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THE



IRISH ABROAD AND AT HOME



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AT TPIE COURT AND IN THE CAMP.



WITH



SouiJMVS of '%\t '^%dbe/'



REMINISCEI\CES OF AN EMIGRANT MILESIAN.



Vixere fortes ante Agaraemnoaa
Multi: sed omnes illacrimabi'les
Urgentur ignotique longa
Nocte, carent quia vate sacro.

HORACB.

Les HfUesif.ns etaient braves jadia.

French version o/tJu Greek Proverb.



NEW YORK:

D. APPLETON AND COMPANY,

346 & 348 BROADWAY.

1856.



y ^



S'JI.'jb



CONTENTS



CHAPTER L

Choice of a theme — M. Menneval — General Petiet — Mr. John Wil-
son Croker's "Familiar Epistles" — John Lawlcss's "Trial's AH" . 13

CHAPTER 11.
Fionn Mac Cumhal — "A Giant Refresheil" 19

CHAPTER III.

The Irish Codes or Bayard — Maolraordha O'Reilly — "Myles the
Slasher" — His heroic defence of the bridge of Finea — Death —
Burial and epitaph 24

CHAPTER IV.

The first step the only difficulty — Pigault Lebrun — Capriciousness of
memory — Lord Roscommon 27

CHAPTER V.

Professor Playfair, Horace, and Lord Roscommon on gas-light — Ful-
ton, Franklin, Napoleon, and Marshal Saxo on steam — Strada and
the electric telegraph 29

CHAPTER VI.

Fall of Irish families — Conquest — Penal laws — Cousin Robin — Confis-
cation — Voltaire and his contemporaries — Inconsistencies — William
Todd Jones 32

CHAPTER VII.

Ingratitude of kings, states, and princes — Oblivion of public services
— The Irish nearly forgotten in the theatres of their exploits — Ame-
rican Order of Cutciunatus 36

CHAPTER VIIL

J, ally Tollendal — A soldier at eight years of age — A model parent
— Lally rescues his father at Ettingen — Death of Marshal Berwick
at the siege of Philipsburg — Lally is sent on missions to England
and to Russia — Insures the victory at Fontenoy by his covp d'ceil
on the eve of that battle — Is wounded in the engagement and
thanked and honoured by the king, which he playfully acknow-
ledges in a bon-mot — The O'Briens, Dillons, Johnsons — Prince
Nugent — Bon-mot of a trooper of Fitz James's" — Guard-room

song of " Berwick's"— The Ca Ira of Franklin 40

(3J



IV CONTENTS.

CHAPTER IX.

Career of Lally Tollendal — He joins the Pretender in Scotland — Bat-
tle of Selkirk — Visits London secretly — The Jacobite English
Peers — Lally is about being arrested, but escapes as a smuggler —
Is present at the defence of Antwerp, the battle of Lansfeldt, and
the siege of Bergen-op-Zoom — Is again wounded — Is made prisoner
— Is exchanged and becomes a favourite and friend of Marshal
Saxe — Is consulted upon the means for making war cu England —
Recommends attacking her by invasion, by a descent on her Ameri-
can colonies, or in India — Is appointed to command an expedition
to this last-mentioned quarter — Arrives there — Takes Fort Saint Da-
vid and Devicotta — Marches on Tanjore — Takes Madras — Battle of
Vandravaches — Is besieged in Pondicherry, and obliged to surrender
— Is sent to England a prisoner of war — Visits France on parol . . 48

CHAPTER X.

Lally is accused of peculation and high treason — Surrenders himself
and is imprisoned in the Bastille — His trial, conviction, sentence,
and execution 66

CHAPTER XL

General discontent at the execution of Lally — Immorality of Louis
XV., and his (probably) hypocrisy — Voltaire aids the son of Lally
in his endeavours to have the judgment against the father reversed,
and which is at length pronounced by a decree of parliament, with
the hearty assent of Louis XVI 60

CHAPTER XIL

Lally Tollendal the younger — Voltaire on his death-bed congratulates
Lim on the success of his efforts — The States-General — Lally a
member of that body — His admirable conduct on the eve of and after
the taking of the Bastille — Mirabeau, Fox, Sheridan, and Plowden
(the Historian) 62

CHAPTER XIIL

Lally's legislative labours — History of a constitution, and of its alter-
nate reign and reversal — The throne and the monarch in peril —
The king's advocates, and their loyalty and devotion to him ... 67

CHAPTER XIV.
Progress of the revolution — Memoirs of Mounier, Montmorin, Ma-
louet, and (Bertrand de) Molleville 70

CHAPTER XV.

The Reign of Terror — Maillard and the massacres at the Abbaye —
His horrible sang froid and dissimulation — The Swiss Guards —
"A la Force!" — Death of Count Montmorin — Malouet — Henry
Brougham — Lord Castlereagh's figure of speech — The Abb6 Gre-
goire, " I'Ami des Noirs" — Bertrand de Molleville 73

CHAPTER XVL

Lally returns to France on the advent of Napoleon to the Consulate,
and flatters him — Becomes acquainted with his uncle. Cardinal Fesch
— Discourteous bon-mota of Napoleon and Wellington respecting
Lally Tollendal and Surgeon O'Reilly. — Lally and Madame de Stael 77



CONTENTS. V

CHAPTER XVII.
Political inconsistency — Pitt — Lord Castlereagh — The latter enaWes
a, chief of the United Irishmen to escape — William IV. and tho
tenacious memories of the royal family 80

CHAPTER XViri.

Coincidence of opinion of Lally ToUendal the elder and Napoleon of
the most efSeacious mode of making war on England — The faith-
lessness of Xapoleon towards the Irish — Pretends to follow the
counsel of Arthur O'Connor, Thomas Addis Emmet, and Doctor
MiicNeven — The camp of Boulogne — The invasion of England re-
nounced for the Austrian campaign — Mr. Pitt and Lord Nelson on
the subject of invasion 84

CHAPTER XIX.
Napoleon's egoisme and fatal ingratitude to Poland 88

CHAPTER XX.
The United Irishmen and the question of French assistance — Father
Denis Taaffe — His misgiving touching French good faith — The
Poles — Ill-treated by Napoleon, are neglected by his successors
Louis XVIII. and Charles X. — They are cajoled, deceived, all but
betrayed by Louis Philippe — Terrible apathetic phrase of Marshal
Sebastiani, " Order reigns in AVarsaw" — Louis Philippe's ruse to
secure momentary popularity 91

CHAPTER XXL
The Revolutions of 1830 and of 1848 in Paris — Combated respectively
by descendants of Irishmen — General Wall and Marshal Bugeaud
— Colonel Hugh Ware (of Rathcoffey) and General Coutard — The
Irish Legion at Astorga 93

CHAPTER XXIL
Charles X. — Marshal Marmont — General Wall — The Revolution of

1830 — Lord Dundonald — Culinary acumen of the Due de . —

General Vincent's counsel to Charles X. to resist — Is overborne by
the Archbishop of Paris, and retires 97

CHAPTER XXIIL

Marshal Bugeaud — Louis Philippe and tho Revolution of 1848 — The
disaflFected unprepared for aud surprised by it more than the king
and his ministers — Poltronnerie — The change effected by gamins . 101

CHAPTER XXIV.

Louis Philippe's elevation to the throne in 1830 — He mystifies La
Fiiyette, Laffitte, and all but Arthur O'Connor — La Fayette's "best
of republics," and Talleyrand's bon-viot thereon — Mr. Rives, the
American envoy 107

CHAPTER XXV.
Ingratitude of Louis Philippe to La Fayette — Mr. Rivea and his
imputed influence on the Revolution of 1830— La Fayette's visit to
the United States — His bonhommie HI)



Vi CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XXVI.

Louis Philippe's insincerity and selfishness — Proves them at the com-
mencement of his reign — His solicitude to obliterate all marks and
traces of his ascent 113

CHAPTER XXVII.

Un pent trap t6t — The republicans and Bonapartists, who alone effected
the revolution, roused by Louis Philippe's reactionary policy, and
set "all right" again for the moment — A Bonapartean emeute —
Marshal Lobau's receipt for dispersing a crowd without firing . . 116

CHAPTER XXVIIL
"The schools" of Paris — Their daring audacity and revolutionary
principles — Their pugnacity in presence of c/eua cl'armes — They
powerfully contributed to the success of the Revolujtion of 1830 —
Battle of the Rue Plumet — Death of Vanneau, of the Ecole Polytech-
nique — "A good mass" for the repose of his soul — Accidental deaths
of General Pajol and of Marshal Excelmans 121

CHAPTER XXIX.

Causes of the Revolution of 1848, viz. : Republico-Bonapartism of the
nation ; exasperated by the impolitic demonstration of principles
of legitimacy by Louis Philippe, who dissembled not his pretension
to reign by Divine right, nor his horror of democracy; his grasp-
ing at money; his accepting, with Madame do Feucheres, participa-
tion in the property of the Prince de Conde for his son; tho ru-
mours that that prince had come by his end unfairly; the Spanish
marriages; the impunity with which corruption and embezzlement
were practised ; the writings of Thiers, Louis Blanc, and Lamartine;
and finally, tho murder of the Duchess of Praslin by her husband . 123

CHAPTER XXX.
Coincidences — Napoleon — The Generals Counts O'Reilly — Their ex-
ploits respectively — The Chevalier O'Gorman 133

CHAPTER XXXL
Mysterious death of the Viscount Wall, now for the first time ex-
plained — Tho gallant and unfortunate Theobald Dillon 136

CHAPTER XXXIL
Duels and duellists : George Robert FitzGerald ; Dick Martin ; Count
Rice ; Nicholas French ; Jack Geoghegan ; Du Barri ; Lord Delvin ;
"Delvin" O'Reilly — Anomaly in the regulations of the British ser-
vice—An island taken by an unqualified officer (Colonel Keating)
— Baron Hompesch and his "Hussians" 141

CHAPTER XXXIII.
Duraouriez orders Theobald Dillon to Tournay, whose troops mutiny,
run back to Lille, and assassinate their general — Executions "a la
lantenie" and d la guillotine!" — The murder of Theobald Dillon
avenged 14g

CHAPTER XXXIV.
Arthur Dillon — His distinguished career — His friendship with Camilla



CONTENTS. vii

Desmoulins, devoted on both sides, and a cause of Camillo's destruc-
tion; that of Danton and of their fellow sufferers — Dillon's polite-
ness at the foot of the scaffold— His execution — "Vive le Roi !" — •
The widows of Camille-Desmoulius and of "Pcro Duchcsno" guillo-
tined with him 151

CHAPTER XXXV.

Heroic women — Madame Camille-Desmoulins — Madame Lab^doycre
— Solicit death respectively 155

CHAPTER XXXVI.

Camille-Desmoulins incurs the resentment of Robespierre, partly be-
cause of his noble defence of Arthur Dillon in the Convention, and
pays the penalty of provoking the tyrant 15S

CHAPTER XXXVII.

The guillotine en permanence — General James O'Moran — Remarkable
coincidence — The first and the last shots of the war fired by Irish-
men — Sergeant Rousselot the first French soldier distinguished in
that war — M. Jouy — "The Hermit of the Chaussee d'Antin" — Aide-
de-camp of General O'Moran — M. Tissot, the veteran historian . .161

CHAPTER XXXVIII.

Continued Reign of Terror — The Luxembourg and "the Carmes" —
General O'Hara; Miss Catherine O'Reilly ; T.Ward; Burke; John
Malone — The massacre of one hundred and seventy-eight bishops
and other ecclesiastics at the Carmes, with MacCurtin, C. E. F. H.
Macdon.ald and others — Thomas Paine — Petition of American citi-
zens to the Convention in his favour — Danton (presiding) accords to
them "the honours of the sitting" — Danton, himself, arrested and
imprisoned in the Luxembourg — Recognises Paine — Anacharsis
Cloots — His rebuke to the mob at the scaffold 1(56

CHAPTER XXXIX.

Commissaires de la Repnhliqne direct the operations of her fleets and
armies — Whimsical nominations to that office — Provost Hely Hutch-
inson, of Trinity College, Dublin — His avidity — His daughter ap-
pointed captain of dragoons as a pis al/cr — Bon-mot upon him (Lord
Donoughmore) — The French Provisional Government of 1848 —
Named as commissar}' of the army in the North the editor of the
Charivari — Indignation of colonels reviewed by him — Jean Bon St.
Andre (an ex-parson) appointed commissary of the Brest fleet in
1791 — Orders that the fleet (which only put to sea to protect the
arrival of provisions from America) fight the fatal battle of the 1st
June — Military and nautical incivility Ifl

CHAPTER XL.

French politeness and gallantry — Splendid instance of it cited by Lord
Palmerston — Laughable experience of a similar impulse by the au-
thor — An Englishman's love of fair play — Battle of Carapcrdown —
Lord Duncan at prayer — Jack's disapproval of its object — An Irish
sailor's reason for not going to mass — Bitter reflection of the Turk-
ish admiral on the battle of Navarino — Wellington's sagacity and
foresight 175



VIU CONTENTS.

CHAPTER XLI.

"The glorious 1st of June" — Jean Bon St. Andr6 scratched and runs
below — Lord Howe and his sailing master — "Tom Packenham"
(uncle of General Packenham, killed at New Orleans in January,
1S15) — Lord Howe's estimation of the qualification for the rank of
prince — Duquesnoy, an ex-monk, appointed commissaire of the
army of the North — His atrocious brutality and infamous reports . 180

CHAPTER XLir.
Emigration of the French princes in 1791 — Causes the dissolution of
the Irish Brigade — One portion remains with the Republic; the
other follows the princes — Their names 185

CHAPTER XLIII.
Colonel Stack and the Duke of York — A new religion — Surgeon Egan
is made prisoner after the battle of Talavera in Spain — His inter-
view with Marshal Mortier and its fortunate consequences for him —
Death of the Marshal by the infernal machine of Fieschi .... 190

CHAPTER XLIV.

Egan's journey to France — Extraordinary adventure of an English
orphan — The Irish Legion — Egan arrives in Paris — Is courteously
received by Marshal Clarke (Due de Feltre), and munificently re-
warded by the Emperor Napoleon — Egan arrives in London — His
interview with the Duke of York — The O'Maraa 194

CHAPTER XLV.

The Forty-second — "He is my son I" — French and British sentimen-
tality 200

CHAPTER XLVL
Egan in the 23d Light Dragoons — Captain Power and fatality — Egan
challenges his captain — Is broke, but reinstated — Is appointed to
the 12th Light Dragoons (now Lancers) — The gallant Colonel Frede-
rick Ponsonby — AVaterloo famous swordsmen and horsemen — Gene-
ral La Houssaye — His desert (according to English orthography) lea
qnntre mendiana — Captain Newpor.t — Colonel Ponsonby unhorsed
and desperately wounded — Private John Murphy's occupation at
Waterloo— Whistles "the Grinder"— Fate— Ned Kelly and Mon-
tague Liud 203

CHAPTER XLVIL

"Waterloo Kelly" of the 1st Life Guards — Contributes to the preser-
vation of the British army on the eve of the battle of Waterloo —
The Marquis of Anglesey — Major Berger — Captain Perrott — Fate
favourable to Kelly — His death in India 203

CHAPTER XLVIII.
Irish colleges and seminaries abroad — The Irish college of Paris —
Monarchical principles of its inmates in 1789 — Irish foot-ball in the
Champ de Mars — The altar of the country profaned by an Irish
student (Charles O'Reilly) — Fearful consequences — La Fayette —
Bailly — " A la lanterne les calotins !'' 214



CONTENTS. ix

CHAPTER XLIX.
St. Patriek's Day in Spain — The n'olon — The brigand monk — Colonel
Hugh Ware — The fruits of a skinful of wine 217

CHAPTER L.

The Abb6 Kearney coadjutor of the Abb6 Edgworth in attendance on
Louis XVI. in his last moments — The execution of that monarch —
The Abb6 Kearney imprisoned in the Temple, but becomes after-
wards superior of the Irish College — The Abbe Edgeworth dies at
Mittau — His epitaph (by Louis XVIII.) 221

CHAPTER LL

The Reign of Terror — Doctor MacMahon — He is accused of iiictvt'sme
— Conceals himself — Ventures abroad — Is detected, but spared, and
escapes miraculously — Repairs to the frontier and makes two cam-
paigns 228

CHAPTER LII.

Omens, precursors, and causes of the Revolution of 1789 — Charles X.
and Captain Morris — Tho Bastille — Louis XVI. and the Abb6 O'Neill 233

CHAPTER LIIL

The Irish College closed — Interregnum— The Abbe MacDermott — Ma-
dame Campan — Eugene Beauharnais — His mother (Josephine) —
Jerome Bonaparte — Scholastic revels — The beauties of the Republic
— Madame Tallien (Princess of Chimay) — Madame Rocamier —
"The Vestris" — Napoleon returns from Egypt — Examines Jerome
in history — "Priests and tyrants" — Jerome flies from the cabinet of
the First Consul, and takes refuge at the house of his mother (Ma-
dame Laetitia) — Is sent to sea — Lands in America and marries there
Miss Patterson — Returns to France — Is created King of Westphalia
— Distinguishes himself at Waterloo 236

CHAPTER LIV.

The Irish College under the Restoration — Church militant — The Abbfi,
Captain, and Duellist, Ferris — A banquet — Captain Murphy — A
New York clipper — The Irish renegade, Somers — Is denounced,
tried, and shot in twelve hours for corresponding with Lord Castle-
reagh — The Abb6 Ferris twice President of the Irish College — Chal-
lenges Hely d'Oissel (Minister for Public Instruction) to mortal
combat — Generals O'Connell and O'Mahony— Napoleon and the
nuns — The British parliament and a cardinal's hat 239

CHAPTER LV.

The Irish at home — British misrule — Sufferings of the Irish — Resist-
ance — Antagonism — Protection afforded to insurgents and political
offenders by the peasantry — Remarks on education, and suggestions
for the amelioration of Ireland 246

CHAPTER LVL

Disaffection — Secret societies : Rapparees ; White Boys ; Defenders;
Black Hens ; Caravates; Shanavests ; Rockites; Moll Doyle's Sons;
Carders; Ribbonmen (this last sect founded by Orangemen) . . . 249
1*



V



X CONTENTS.

* CHAPTER LVII.

Attack of the Journal des Debats upon the Irish character — Reply of
the author of this work — The Island of Saints — Saints Columbanus,
Colombkill, and Killian — The law of "wager of battel" — Counsel-
lor MacNally 251

CHAPTER LVIII.

The penal laws — Their fearful effects on the Catholics; reduce them
to the lowest point of the social scale — The Balfes — Plundered by
means of a bill of discovery — The chief of the family a turner in
the United States 258

CHAPTER LIX.

The Geoghegans — A sham convert — Geoghegan of London conforms;
sells his property and relapses into popery — His ribald excuse for it
— Geoghegan of Dunowen — A new team 2G3

CHAPTER LX.

The reign of intolerance — AKject condition of the conquered party —
Orange lilies — Lord Chesterfield and Miss Ambrose (Lady Palmer),
"the Dangerous Papist" — His Lordship's repetition of that fine sen-
timent and compliment to George II. — The author's reception by
Lady Palmer seventy years afterwards — His interview with Madame
de Genlis — Lord Edward and Lady Pamela FitzQerald — Green cra-
vats — " The glorious and immortal memory !" — " Captain Moll Nu-
gent"— Her toast— The Chevalier D'Eon 266

CHAPTER LXL

The Luttrells — Junius (Sir Philip Francis) and Henry Lawes Luttrell,
Earl of Carhampton — The Earl accused of a capital offence by Doc-
tor Boyton, whom he challenges — Father Fay and Mary Lewellyn
— Hamilton Rowan and Lord Carhampton — The commander-in-
chief out-generalled — Scene at Connelly, the bootmaker's .... 272

CHAPTER LXn.

General Montague Mathew — Who sold the Pass? "Luttrell, the trai-
tor" — He is assassinated in a sedan chair — His compact with the
evil one — The devil's mills — "La chose impossible" 280

CHAPTER LXIII.
Lord Carhampton aggravates his unpopularity by his persecution of
the United Irishmen and his espiotinarje of the troops — Two militia
men shot for conspiring to murder him — Two doves rise from their
bodies and soar to heaven — Saratoga — The Highland "watch" and
the red Indian 283

CHAPTER LXIV.
Administration of justice in Ireland — State prisoners — Bernard Coile
— Toasts of the disaffected — Latet anguis in herba — The betrayer of

Robert Emmet — Fitz-Patrick Knaresborough — Judge B 1 bribed

— Knaresborough's life is spared — Strange commutation — Lord Nor-
bury's inhumanity and repartee 287



CONTENTS. XI

CHAPTER LXV:

Draco in Dublin — From the court to the gallows — Cheap detective — A
farthing candle watches over a purse of gold 293

CHAPTER LXVI.

The unspotted ermine of the bench — Bob Moore — His enormous in-
come — Brutality and wit — Justice Hickey — Duelling — Grattan, Cor-
ry, Curran, FitzGibbon, Napper Tandy, Toler, Daly, and James
Moore O'Donncll 296

CHAPTER LXVII.

Irregularities in the administration of the laws — Resisting the sheriff
— "Fighting FitzGerald" — His hon-mot at Versailles — His encounter
with Dick Martin — His reception by Lord Tyrawley d la Baillie
Nicol Jarvie 300

CHAPTER LXVIir.

Elegant, educated, travelled, George Robert FitzGerald, the epitome
of riot, turbulence, tyranny, and treachery — Imprisons his father in
his own Castle of Turlogh- — Receives the high sheriff warmly — Takes
for his adviser Brecknock of the London bar, and engages a band of
North-country bravos, through whose counsel and agency he effects
the murder of Pat Randall MacDonnell — Origin of Lynch law — A
"Porteous Mob" — George Robert and Brecknock tried, found guilty,
and executed for the murder, as accessories, on the evidence of the
principal in it 304

CHAPTER LXIX.
Counsellor Costelloe and Brantome — Dutch ducats — Cheating the
hangman 310

CHAPTER LXX.
Nero Norbury — Bank prosecutions — Walter Cox — "Billy MacDowell"
(jailor of Newgate) — Horrible application of the laws to bank note
forgers — Toler in his glory — The Duchess of Richmond — Moore
hanged 317

CHAPTER LXXL
Irish Independence declared in 1782 — How lost — The Duke of Rut-
land Lord Lieutenant — "Dying scarlet" — Convivialism extinguishes
patriotism 325

CHAPTER LXXII.
"A hard drinking neighbourhood" — The Duke and Sir Hercules Lan-
grishe — In vino Veritas — Tommy Moore — Sheridan — Byron — The
Rivals 328

CHAPTER LXXIIL

Corporate decorum— The Duke of Rutland at the Mayoralty— " Wipe
your eye, my lord"— "No sky-light !"—" No heel taps !"— Lord
Muskerry's theories 331

CHAPTER LXXIV.
A fast man— St. George Caulfield— His incredible prodigality— Is ex-



XU CONTENTS.

polled Paris and France by order of Napoleon — Kitchen wine —
George Nugent Reynolds — Kilkenny theatricals — Roger O'Connor
— Sir Francis Burdett — A start from the post 334

CHAPTER LXXV.

The Rutland reign — "Manners, you blackguards !" — Vice-regal nights
and knights — The Duke and the shoe-boy 337

CHAPTER LXXVI.

The Duchess of Rutland and the beautiful Mrs. Dillon — Aldermnn
Poole — Black Pits — " More pigs than Protestants" — The Duke breaks
up — Dies — His funeral SiO

CHAPTER LXXVII,
"Clubs:" "The Cherokees;" "The Kildare Street;" "The Hell-fire
Club" — Costume of the Cherokees — Lord Llandafif and his brother
General Montague Mathew — Beau Brummel 343

CHAPTER LXXVIII.

Arthur O'Connor — Henry, Lord Paget (Marquis of Anglesey) — "Mur-
der in jest" — Lord Santry sentenced to be hanged — Is saved by the
water ordeal — Five Irishmen contemporary ministers of war — The
Empress Maria Theresa and O'Donnell and the Empress Josephine
and William Harrison of Belfast 347

CHAPTER LXXIX.
Ireland and the Irish 351

CHAPTER LXXX.
Postliminous preface 355



THE



IRISH ABROAD AND AT HOME.



CHAPTER I.



Les MUesiens avaient iii le peuple le plus puissant de la Carie. lis
avaient ontrepris, et soutenu plusieurs guerres mSuiorables. Elles avaient
envoys de nombreuses colonies dans le Propontide et le Pont Euxin.

C. De Mery.

I am curious in Euch matters — believing as I do that Secret History with
her tittle-tattle is far more to be relied on than her statelier sister with all
her sonorous periods — solemn falsehoods — stately didactics, and inconse-
quent conclusions. — "Liverpool Fifty Years Ago." {In the Boston Liberty
Bello/1S49.)

THE late excellent M. Mdn^val, in his " Historical Recol-
lections of Napoleon and Marie Louise," gives the following
reason for undertaking that interesting work :

" I have long hesitated about a task which diffidence in
my capability rendered me fearful I should not be able worthily
to fulfil. In the mean while, age advances ; and, however in-
sufficient be my pen, I can no longer postpone giving to the
world — not memoirs, but some recollections."

With similar modesty General Petiet exclaims, in his '' Sou-



Online LibraryAndrew O'ReillyThe Irish abroad and at home; at the court and in the camp → online text (page 1 of 33)