Andrew P. (Andrew Preston) Peabody.

The American entomologist: online

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Isosoma horde* .330, aS2, 867

Is the Vew York Weevil the cause of

Pear-blight? 176

lathe Ursula Butterfly more com-
mon in some sections of U s. than
Disippus? 177



Itch Mite 114

Itkycerus -nrn'oboracensis '. .176, 246

Ixodes nnipunctaia 160

J

^nlus marginatui 69

Jumping Cricket 909

K

Katydid Eggs 246

Killing Apple-worms by machinery 9
Knots on Apple- tree roots catised by
Itoot-lice 246

L

Ladder spider 374

Lagoa opercularis 20

Lapkria thoracica 306

La|ii>et Caterpillar on Apple-tree. . . 32

T.arder-beetle 246, 308

I..arge Asilus-fly 340

* * black Potato Beetles 275

*' Brood 90

'* Water-beeUe 32

Larvie in the Human Bowels . . 187, 240

Larva nametl— Q. W. Gordon 839

* ' of Abhor Sphinx 309

" '* clubbed Tortoise-beetle . 308

•« " Imperial M(>th 340

*' ** the Thoas Swallow-tail 308, :140

Lasioptera ruhi aSi

solidaginis 331

I^afy Oak-gall 26, 72

Lfbta ^randis 290

Lfcanium ( Pulvinaria) vitis 276

Lfma trilineata 274

Ltucania unipuncta. . . .106, III, 328, '.HO

Lice on Snowballs 24'»

Lilac-borer 61

Limarodes cippnt 20

pUkecium 25, 199, 340

• ' xnridus 3»i7

*• fpkippiaius 373

Umenitis dtsipput 246, 276

* * Proserpina 341

' * Ursula 276

Limexyjon navale 165

Litkobius Americanus 294

I atlle Cicada 308

Lobesia botrana 307

Locust-l>orer 68, 127, 246, 373

Locust Year for Tennessee 87

I^)custs in India 94

Long-tailed Ophlon 100

Ijook out for a4»ad Bug 154

Lopkyrus Abbottii 16

* * abietts 16

Lucanus dama 26

Luminous? Leaf-hopper 371

Luna-moth 25

Lygodesmia juncea 73

Pea-gall 73

* pisum 73

Lytta atrata 4, 1.55

• ♦ cinerea 5, 7, 274, 275

** marg^nata 6, 165, 176

** murtna 4

'* vittata 5, 28, 801

M

Macrodartylus subspinosus .^1

Macrobasts cinerea .^ 8

* * Fabricii 6

Madams ampelopsidos 106

Mangold wurzel-lly 156

Mantis Carolina 272

Mantispa brunnea 308

Maple- worms 61

Matter crowded out 372

Melancholy Chafer in Apples 61

Metapodius nasalus 25

Methodical 'I able of the Crickets ... 206

Microscoi^es 178

Missouri Entomological Report 126, 179

Mite-gall on Sugar Maple 889

Mole Cricket 840

More about the Cow-killer 837

Mossy Kose-gall 213

Moth named 31,308

Moth of saddle-back 873

Mr. Walsh's Portrait 125, 129

" * ' successor 92

Musca dome*tica 189

*' vomitoria 830



Mutilla coccinea 82, 69, 155, 837

Mygale Hentxii 288, 244

Bly Baspberry and Verbena Moths,

and what came of them 90S

Myodites Walshii 888

Myrmica molesta 112

Mysia XS-punctata 840

N

Native Apple-tree Bark-lice 181

' • Currant- worm 90

Nebraska Bee-kUler 887

Necrophorut marginatus 61

Nematus mendicus 47

• * quercicola 78

* ' salicis pomum 19, 46

«• M.pisum 73

• * veniralis 276

• * ventricosus . , . .15, 900, 242,

274, 276, 304, 306, 838

Nepkila plumipes 69

Nest of the Baid-f&ced Hornet 308

Neuroterus lanuginosus 831

New Beau-weevil 118



Bee enemy . .
>Uen



Curculio ftemedy 943

*' Food for Silk-worms 42

** Hesperian 271

* * Insecticide 86

*• Pear-tree Insect 212

Nisioniades catullus 176

•' iycidas 806

'* Py lades 306

No Apple-plttut Lice 241

• ' Pins for Sale 276

*♦ Plant-lie* Eggs 178

N A. Lepidoptera wanted 374

Northern l^ady-bird; Its larvje 873

Not a Gall but a Wasinnest 341

Not Eggs, but parasitic cocoons — 873
Notes and Exi>erimeuts ou Currant-
worms 900

Notes fi'om Wilkinson ville 886

' ' on tlie 1 arantula-killur 62

Notodonta concinna 27

• * unicornis 841

Noxious LarviB 232

Nympkalis disippus 121 , 177

o

Oak-leafGall 29

Oak Pruner 28

Oberei perspicillata 26

•* tripunctata 807

Odynerus Jiavtpes 10

(Ecantkus niveu* : 128

(Edipoda corallines 82

Carolina 196

Ofwhat Use is Entomology? 88

Olibrus nitidus 236

One day's Journal of a State Ento-
mologist 197

Onion Maggots 61

*• Worm— Wemedy tor 386

On our Table 168, 179, 211, 338

On the Group Eurvtomides of the
Hymcnopterous Family Chalcidi-

die 297.899, £67

On the transformations of SimuJliim. 229
Onward march of the Colorado Po-
tato-beetle 980

Opkion macrurum 100, 156

Oi-antre Raspberry Rust 246

Orckelimum gracile 194

* * glaberrimum 64

' * vulgare 64

Orgyia leucostigma 181 , 306

Orockaris saltator 209

Ortalis arcuata 110

Osage Orange for the Mulberry Silk-
worm 293,373

Otus cnoius 92

Oyster-shell Bark-louse in Missouri 213
<« *' Mississippi 302



Papkia glycerium 121 , 879

Papilio Ajax J76

♦ ' asUrias 80. 176, 340, 341

* * glaucus 835

" Marcellus 806

*• Pkilenor 176

•* tkoas 176,308, 840

•* tumus 176



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vl



Index to Volume //*



Pardsaviridi » 807

Parasites of the Cecropia-moth .'.*.'.* 100

' ' ' ' Human animal .

'\ nponaSyrphosLArva .
Parasitic Cocoons .



114
306

, 160

Mites on the House-fly ... 87
Paris Green for the Curculio. ....... S38

* ' poisonous 93

Parsnip Caterpillar 80,64

Peaoh-rnib Man 143

Pearl Wood Nymph .*.' 150

Pear- leaf Fungus 286

Pear-tree Worms 26

Pea-weevil l[\\ 155

Pelidnoia punctata ".* 285

Pemphigus vitifolia 857

Peulkina Fulltrea 204, 871

* ' vitivorana '^ —

P*psi$ formosn

Perilampus platygasier

Periodical Cicada, alia* 17 and

year Locust 211

„ ^ *' ** Brood IV 337

Periodical Cicadas m Georgia 372

* ' Cicada not in Kreutz Creek

Valley 372

Pkacellura nitidalit 61, 107

Pkilampelus ackemon 54

**^ aatellitia 89 211

Philenor SwaUow-tall 241

Pkycita nebulo 32, 181, 3(»7

Phyl''^' 1».-_.^.. .-« - . -.



.180, ;



28. '273
13



Phylloptera oblong i/olue\y&^ 182, 29G, 369

Phylloxera vitifotitt 353

* * vastatrix 354

Phylomma Henrietta 304

Phymapkora pulckella 242

Phymata erosa 25

Phy sails viscosa ..!!..!! 87

Pkysonota helianthi 4

' * quinqnepunctata 4

' * unipunctata 4

Pieris oleracea 70

;; protodice 60, 76, 90 1 804

• ' rap<t .60, 75, 79, 1&5, 205, 838, 341

PIpeon Treraex in Apple 128

Ptmpla melanocepkafa 266

Piopkila casei. 78

Piophila casei 180, 339

Pirates ptcipes 809

Pissodes strobi 26

Pithy Blackberry-gall 150

Plague of Beetles 266

Plant-lice and their enemies 141

Platycerus quercus 212

Plum Curculio 53, 180

* ' * • breeds tn Apple .... »76

" •* wUl deposit in Fruit

which overhangs water 119

Plutella cruciferarum 79

Podisoma clavaris/orme 162

** junipertnum 162

;/ sabinm 162

Podtsus placidus 903

Pod-Uke WlUow-gall 214

Poisonous qualities of the Colorado

Potato-bug 86

Polistss fuscatus 156

** metricus 166

Polyphemus Moth 88

Pompilus formosus 238

Potamantkus marginatus 868

Potato-beetles— I^urge black 275

** -bugs 28

Potter Wasp 10

Preservation of Entomological Cab-
inets 9

Preserving and mounting Beetles . . 245

** InsecU 180

'* Larvn 874

Prickly Rose-gall 246, 809

Prionus imbricornis 8«0

Pristipkora grossularia 20

Procrts vitis 173

Prodenia autumnalis 829, 863, 8tt5

'* commelina

•* JOaggyi 43, 828

Progfress of the Potato- bug 84

Promachus Bastardii 337, 340

Prosopis aJSnis 807

Psickekeltx . 884

Psocris Americana 27, 178

Procus amabilis 324

'* bipunctatus 884

* * domesticus 824

*• geologus 824

*' variegatus 884

*« venosus 180, 246, 8 »

Pterophorus carduidactylus 235

* • periscelidaciylus 284



Ptinus brunneus

'* frontalis ^^

Punctures on Bose-twig .' 2I8

Pupa of Disippua Butterfly 246

•' "the Girdled Sphinx 241

Py rolls cos talis joo

** farinalis ,***.* igo

** Jimbrialts ',* 100

* * olinalis loo

Q

Oiieen Humble-bee 803

^ercus inanis \,\\ 882

** pseudotinctoria * 882

** spongifica 332

Questtons answei ed 309

R

Radish Maggots 273

Ranatrafusca 29, 246

* * linearis 29

Range of the Eiear-horsc .' . 63

Ransom Curculio Remedy 288

Rape Butterfly 60,155,838, 374

* * * * our new Cabbage Pest 338
Bare Capture 241 , 242

'• ** inniinois 340

Raspberry-borer 26

** Geometer 205

; ; Gouty-gaU 108, 128

** Root-gall 181

* * Rust— Orange 245

Ratzebuiyd Works on Forest Trees,
tbeirDiseases and Insect Enemies. 95

Rearing Eggs of Butterflies 305

Red Ant ofTexas 824

Red-hurapeU Caterpillar on Apple

and Pear 27

^Spider 180,305

Reduvtus serratus 335

Remarkable Tenacity of Life in a

Butterfly 872

Report ol Committee on Entomology 106
'* ** the Department of Agri-
culture for 1868 178

Remedy for Onion-worm 885

** ** Canker-worm 239

Rkixopertka pusilla 109

Rhodttes bicolor 246, 309

• • radicum 181

*• rosa 213

Rkyssa lunator 96

Rocky Mountain Grasshopper can-
not live in Pennsylvania 88

Raestelia cancellata 162, 235

* ' comifera 162

* * penicillata 162

Roman-nosed Pujia 276

Rose-grall and Pupa of Archippus

Butterfly T.... 807

Rose-gall, mossy 2I8

Rose-twig, punctures on 218

Rot in Peaches and other Fruits.... 209
Rove-beetle as a Parasite on the

Cabbage Maggot 302

Royal Uomed-catei^illar 30, 52, 64, 840

S

Saddle back Larvas 69

Salt-marsh Caterpillar 836

Samia Cynthia 39

Saperda bivittata 143, 148, 276, 806

Sarcoptes hominis . 116

Satellite Sphinx 89

Satumia Jo 31, 339

Scab in Apple v«. Apple-tree Plant-
lice 178

Scteva ( Syrphus) Pkiladelpkicu*. .. 142

* * ribesii 142

Scarcity of the Boll-worm and Cot-
ton-worm 63

Sclerostoma syngamus 149

Scientific Language 171

* * Nomenclature 5

** Phraseology 56

•* Symbols 60

Scolopendra castaneiceps 58

*• keros 238

Scorpion in Kansas 126

* * - and Tarantulas in Tenn. . . 238

Scorpio (Telegonus)boreus 238

Seed-ticks under bark of Apple-trees 160
Selandria cerasi 286, 309, 340

•* rosa 19, 276

*• rubi 186,976

*' vitis 809



Semlbtellus ckatcidipkaguM »»

Seventeen-year Cicada at Geonre^
town, Ohio, in 1871 ..... _T^ ^

Seventeen-year Locust two years too
late " m^M

Shed Snake-scale .... ?i«

Silk Spiders T^..... ^

Silk-worm Eggs V.*. 109

•5^'/*?. (Necropkila) peltaui. '.'.'.'. \^\ 806
Stmulium mofestum.. \ ^

** reptans 28I

ptscicidium 3^7

Sttodrepa panicea " " 32S

Skunk as a Tomato- worm Dentroyer 63
Slug on Pear and Cherry lYees. . : . . 296

Slugs on Plum Trees .^40

Small reddish Snout-beetle on Apple 308

Snout-beetle ^^ 213

Solenobia Walskella *.!*.*.!.*.* I. "i 182

Some Friends and Foes 340

** good Thoughts from an emi-
nent Entomologist 826

' inu>resting Ii.aects 307

Southern Cabbage Butterfly 7«

;; „ ** Worms 90

** Notes... 90, 124. 153,175, 288

Sow-bugs ;....; 181

Sparrows 102

Specific Names *.!*.'..'.".'!*. 6

Specimens Lost ..... 276

Spectrum bivittatum .*.!.!!.. 874

*/ femoratum 96

Sphinx Carolina 339

* * cingulata 241

* * b-maculata 87, 91 , 176, 241

;; (Darapsa) myron 22

Spilosoma acrea 836

^ . '* Virginica 272,836

Spined Slug- worm 181

** Spider 32

Spotted Pelidnota 806

* * * * —Error regwdlng it 309
*• Rove-beeUe 128

Squash-bug 91

* ' and White-bush Scallop 166
** does not touch White-
bush Scallop 65

Staphilinus maculosus 128, 245

State Entomologist for Minnesota . . 94
*« Wisconsin.. 169

Stinging-bug 25

** LarviD 32

Stiretus Jimbriatus 201

Stisus speciosus 87

Strachta histrionica 79, 80, 164, 155

Striped Blister-beeUe 806

^*^ Cucumber-beetle 24

** ** in a new role 239

Strongylus concortus 149

Jilaria 149

*' ^i^as 167

** mtcrurus..,. 149

Sugaring for Moths 874

Supposed Trout Enemy 179

Sylvanus surinamensis 889

Syrphus concava 142

•• pyrastri 142

'• ribesii 142



Tabanus lineola 887

Tarantula ofTexas 244

** KiUer 62

Tarnished Plant-bug 291

Tenebrio molitor 110

*' obscurus HI

Tent Caterpillars 61

*' ** and Fall Web- worms 89

** ** ofthe Forest .... 245, 261

Termesjtttvipes 266, 824

•• fronlalU lU

Tetracha Virginica 808

Tettigonia obliqua 871

Texas Fever and Ticks 160

The Antlopa Butterfly 807

* * banded Ips in calyx of Pear. ... 808

< < Botanical Department 161

*< brown Mantispian 808

•* coming Cotton- worm 124

** Fall Army- worm 8-28

** green Hag-moth 807

*' UtUeCicada 808

*' Ransom Curculio Remedy 268

** red Ant of Texas 324

*' Slug on Pear and Cherry Trees. 296
*' 00-called Web- worm of young
Trout 86S



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Index to Volume II.



vu



TIfeeSpaiTOWB 102

« * Unioom prominent 841

«< Walsh Kntomoloffioal Cabinet. . 27R

*' Year's intermission 858

Tkeeia stri£0sa 176

Tktiia himaeulata 27

Tboas Swallow-tail— Larva of 806

ThooiMUid-l^^ged Worms 69

Tlu«e-lined Potato- beetle 274

Tkynnnia Zenohia 841

T%yreu% Abboiii 128,309, 826

TkfridopUrtje tpktmeraformis . . Mt 246
Time of appearance of Polyphe-
mns Moth In Kentucky and Ten-
nessee 156

Tinta tapHsdlu 90

** vsiiamtlla 90

Toads hi Gardens 60, 176

«« YS.Bogs 91

«« " Insects 287

Ti> destroy Plant-lice 180

< * exterminate Cockroaches 246

<< kill the Pea-weeTil 241

•'onrSabscribers 93

«« *» *• inCaoada 208

Tbmato-feeding Worm 62

•' Fruit •* 172

* ' Worms not poisonous 11

€* *' again 91

«« *« on Ground Cherry . 87
«• •« Parasites 88



Tomfeus mattriarius 241

<* monograpkus 207

Tortoise-beetles 2

Toririx Rileyttna 246

Trockilium kosfes 296

Trombtdium Ularium 180, 805

Trout Enemy 180

•* Web-worm 274

Trumpet Grape-trail 28, 118

Trypeta pomontlla 273

"* * (Acinia) $olidagin%$ 29

Twig-borer 246

Two-striped Walking SUck 874

u

Unicom Prominent 841

Uniyersal Remedies 83

Unknown Larvaa 63

Unnatural Secretion of Wax 26

Urtdo ruhorum 246

Ursula Butterfly more common than
Disippus in some sections of the
countiy 177

V

Vanesia Antiopa 176, 807, 372

«* arHcii 826

*« profne 175

Verbena Bud-moth in the West 871

Vtspa macultUa 167



w

Walsh Entomological Cabinet . . 96, 276

Walnut Caterpillars 806

Water-bug 29,246

* * -larva 276

Wheat-barberry Rust 243

' ' Rust and Barberry Rust 162

White Grub Fungus 53

* * Grubs in Strawberry-beds . . 807

* * lined Morning Sphinx 257

*• PlneWeevU 26

** WlUow-worm 276

Why noxious Insects increase upon

us 1

WiUow Apple GaU 45

** Bud •• 49

*' Ewf *' 49

** Gafl, pod-like 214

Wire- worms in Potatoes 68

Wool-sower Gall 71

Wooly slug-like Worm on Apple ... 29

Worms boring iuto Cucumber 81, 61

<i i« .« Peach 246

** Exterminator 170

* * on Cherry and White Beech 31
** *' Horse-chestnut— gregari-
ous 246

<* under mulch Hay 212

X

XyleuUs robinia 127

Xylocopa Carolina 96



EIIII.A.T-A..



Page 5, col. 1, line 11, omit the second '<of." Page
6, col. 1, line % for ? read 1 Page 8, col. 1, line 1, for
"thirty" read "twenty.' ' Page 27, col. 2, line 18 from
bottom, for "Gold Gilt-beetle" read "GUt Gold-beetle."
Page 81, col. 1, line 80, for ''OiOoptmm** read ^' Galop-
teron.^* Page 31, coL 1, line 41, for **No[ 8 pin" read
"No. 18 pin." Page 82, col. 2, line 10, for ''GoHera-
eauiha'* read '^OatieraooiUha.'* Page 45, col. 1, line
17 flrom bottom, for <*35" read "47;" line 12 Irom bot-
tom, for "33" read '*45," and for "34" read "46."
Page 85, coL 1, line 28, for "hist" read "this." Page
97, over the illustration, for "Fig. 69" read "Fig. B9*."
Page 101, col. 2, line 26, for " Cecrapia^' read " Cfeervpioj;"
same oolomn, note, for " ChaloU maria^' read " Chalets
maria.'' Page 111, col. 1, Une 2 fi*om bottom, for
*'Pepru' ' read ''PUru.^ > Page 131, col. 1, line 10 fl-om
bottom, for ''oval" read "oblong-oval." Page 152,
ooL 1, line 21, fbr * *one' ' read "our. ' ' Page 168, col.



2, line 6, for "results" read * 'result." Page 168, col. 1,
lines 15 from top and 6 from bottom, for ^^Alanda^* read
''Alauda.'* Page 159, col. 2, line 13, for "8. C." read
"C. W." Page 188, col. 2, line 21 from bottom, for
"Fig. 113" read **Fig. 115." Page 188, col. 1, line
16, for ** (Vm" read "Cbw»." Page 211, col. 1, line
20 trom bottom, for * 'as" read "and." Page 244, col.
2, Une 24, for "((7. tht/oidssy* lead "(C. distieha, Linn.)"
Page 271, col. 1, line 8 from bottom, add a comma after
"lelt." Page 276, col. 1, line 8 from bottom, for
^^quinquemacalata^^ read '^quinquetnaculaia;** same page,
col. 2. line 16 from bottom, for "Shaffer" read "Saffer."
Page 302, col. 2, Une 25 from bottom, for **in" read
''and." Page 339, col. 1, Une 22 from bottom, for
" Colandra' ' read " Calandra,'* On page 126, note, we
referred all the drawings of Figure 85 to Bruehw gra-
nariu$: in reaUty a, 4 and/ only, represent that species,
whUe I, e, d and g represent Bntchus pisi.



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VIU



Index to Volume IT.



INDEX TO BOTANICAL DEPARTMENT,



A

Abutilon Avicenna tU

Acer datcycarpum 185

»' rubrum 185

American Holly 2J-3

** PulBatilla 216

AmpeloptU quinqu^oUa 286

Anemone patent 216

Answers to Correspondents 192,

224, 296, 288, SIO, 352, 884

Apioe tuberota 191

A question 311

Arborescent Grasses 877

ArUtolochia terpentaria 815

Aepleniutn ruia-tnuraria 880

B

Blackjack 313

Blood-root 187

Botanical Miscellany 282

• ** Notes, No. 1 817

** '« No.2 852

** Notes 879

Burr Oak 250

C

Cactus 882

Canobea multifUla 884

Cercie Canadeneit 187

Chestnut Oak 281

Chinquapin Oak 281

Classification of Oaks 282

Claytonia Virginica 181

'• Caroliniana ia3

ClematU Virginiana 216

Common Virgin's Bower 216

Camut Morida 221

Corrections 287

Cottonwood, which is it ? 311

D

Darlingtonia, Flowering of 815

Definite and Indefinite Vegetable de<

▼clopment ^54

Distribution of Immigrant Plants . . 378
Dogwood, The flowering Til

E

BditorUlJottings 191

Epiphytes or Afr-plants 217

Errata 315

European Correspondence 3J6

F

Ferns and Mosses 223

Field and Meadow Mosses 'J'23

Flowers, The love of 253

Foxglove Pentstemon 310

G

Gaultheria procumbent 189

Gerardias, The 378

Oleditechia triacanthot 222

Grasses, The 188

** Our cultivated 222

Ground-nut 191

Oymnocladtu Canadentit 852



H



Herbarium, The ,

Heuchera, A peculiar form of. .

Holly, The American

* ♦ • * European

Honey Locust, The

Hop Tree, ITie

How to study the Grasses

Hybrid Oak



215
310
283
284
222
261
219
191



I



/7c* opaca

** aquifolium.
Ivy, Poison



K

Kentucky CoflTee Tree .
L



Laurel Oak

Leaf as a Worker, The 247,

Liber Cells of Cinchona

Live Oak

List of Plants, Chicago 313,



Maratimc Plants of the Great Lakes
Maples, The Soa.



284



892



812

284
219
282
345



Silver-leaf 1R5

•' ** Red la5

Morphology of Lemna 848

N

New Plants 288

*' Book 223

Notes irom Corresiwndeiits — 191,

224, 317, av2, 883

Notes, Botanical 317, 352, 379

** on some Wisconsin Plants.. 189

O

Oaks, The 249. 28'», 311 , 344, 375

♦ ' Synoptical Table ol 376

Opuntia itqfinesquii 25.3

Origin of Prairie Vegetation 277



Palms 882

Pine Barren Plants 818

Pin Oak 376

Pith of Geranium 218

PenUtemon Digttaht 810

Plants for name 256, 288, 352, 384

Poison Ivy 285

• ' Plants 220, 266

Post Oak 250

Prairie Apple 28.1

Preservation of Forest Trees 348

Prickly Pear family 2&3

Ptelea Mfoliata 251

Pultatilla, American 216

Q

Querctu alba-macrocarpa 191

*» alba 249

** aquatica 812

*« bicolor 280



QuerctM cattanea 28i

* * coccinea 844

" falcata 375

** imbricaria 8I3

* * Leana 316

* * macrocarpa 250

'* nigra ,.... 813

' * obtusiloba 250

** pahistris 376

** phello$ 311

** prinoiden 281

** rubra 375

* * virent 282

** in Menard Co., Uls 191

R

Ranunculxu Cymbalariut 286

Red-bud 187

lied Maple 185

•• Oak 375

*' Snow 190

Rhus toxicodendron ... 285

Rose. The 2.H

Bue-leaved Spleenwort 380

S

Sanguinaria Canadentie 187

Saxtfraga Forbetii 288

Scarlet Oak 344

Seaside Crowfoot 286

Silver-leaf Maple 185

Some interesting Plants of Western

Missouri 877

Spanish Oak 376

Sphagnum fimbria turn 219

Spicy Wintergreen 189

Spring Flowers 183

Starch cells of Cinchona 219

Study of Natural History 383

Swamp White Oak 280

Synoptical Table of the Oaks 876

T

The Herbarium 215

* * Gerardias 378

* * Love of Flowers 253

'* Rocky Mouut'n Alpine Region 381

To «»ur Ueaders 183

TrausverBC cut of Hyacinth 218

V

Vegetable Cells 217, C55, 349

Velvet Leaf 224

Virginia Creei)er 280

Vitality of Seeds 3W

W

Water Oak 312

Weslern Botany 220

WhiteOak 249

Whitc-lruited Fragana 362, 384

Who should study Bolany 186

Wintergreen , The Spicy 1S»

Willow Oak 811

Wild Rice »5i

Woody Composit» 223

Z

Zanthoxylum Clava Herculit 251



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TBCE



VOL. 2,



ST. LOUIS, MO., SEPT.— OCT., 1869.



NO. 1.



Cl^e %mtxxcun (^iTt0mol0gi;st.



PUBLISHED MONTIILT BY

I>- STTJIDXiETr Ss CO.,

104 OLIVX STBXar, 8T. I.OTT18.



TERMS Two dollars per annum in advance.

EDITORS :

BESJ. D. WALSH Rock Island, III.

CHAS. V. EiLEY, 221 N. Main Street St Louis, Mo.

WHY NOXIOUS INSECTS INCRE.\SE UPON US.

It is au old and a very true remark, tliat the
various insects that afflict the Gardener and the
Fruit-grower are 3'ear by year becoming more nu-
merous and more destructive. One principal rea-
son for this result is sufficiently obvious. The con-
tinual tendency of modern improvement is to con-
centrate vegetable gardens and fruit farms in
certain peculiarly favorable localities, instead of
scattering them evenly and uniformly over the
whole country. Hence every injurious insect
that troubles the Gardener and the Fruit-grower
has an abundant supply of such vegetation, as
forms a suitable nidus for its future offspring,
close at hand, instead of having to search for it
with much labor over an extensive surface of
countiy. Such insects are therefore enabled by
this means to increase and multiply with greater
ease and gi-eater rapidity. Upon precisely the
same principle, if you scatter over the surface
of a whole county the amount of shelled corn
that is just sufficient to feed a certain gang of
hogS; and compel them to seek it out and pick
it up every day of the year, they will not tlirive
so well nor multiply so fast, as if you feed out
the very same amount of corn to them in a ten-
acre lot, day after day for a whole year.

To a gentleman in Arkansas, who had ex-
pressed the opinion that that State was the
best in the Union for the peach and the grape,
and that Illinois was not naturally adapted to
the culture of fioiit, Dr. E. S. Hull recently re-
plied in the following masterly manner. We
copy from the Journal of AgHculture for Au-
gust 14, 1869:

Sir— Your confidence in the superior adapta-



bility of your soil and climate will probably not
be maintained after a few years' experience.
Just in proportion as you increase improved
fruits, just in that proportion will fruit insects
and fruit and fruit tree diseases increase with
you. A recognition of this fact will each year,
as vou multiply your orchards, become more
and more apparent. Your Hale's Early peaches,
at first, will be free from rot, your pear trees
measurably exempt from pear tree blight, your
vines free* from vine hoppers, the grapes free
from grape codlings and rot, etc., etc. From
some cause, not yet well understood, all or
nearly all young vineyards are for the first few
years' of fruitage, free from rot, and then ever
afterwards subject to it. The same is true of
cherry, i)each, and plum rot. Therefore to
those engaging in horticultural pursuits, a
knowledge of the several difficulties likely to
be encountered should be recognized, and so
far as known the remedies for each difficulty
must be promptly applied.

In this State, or in certain portions of it,
many persons believe that horticulture is un-
dei-going a great revolution, and ultimately
that the business will be mainly in the hands
only of the well-informed — those who under-
stand and promptly apply the proper means.
In view of known facts ancl observations, made
during the past twenty-three years in this part
of the AVest, and further South, I am convinced
that all sections alike must recognize as facts
these statements*.

Here the matter seems to have dropped. No-
body has thought of accusing Dr. Hull of being
an atheist and a blasphemer, because he has said
that the more you multiply your orchards, and
the more you increase improved fruits, the more
will bugs and other kinds of destructive organ-
isms multiply and increase upon yon. Nobody,
in fact, has even gone so far as to insinuate that,
simply because he has written the letter which
we have printed above, he leans towards Socini-
anism, or Arianism, or Erastianism, or any of
the other fine shades of ism, whereby hetero-
doxy (whatever that may be) difiers from



Online LibraryAndrew P. (Andrew Preston) PeabodyThe American entomologist: → online text (page 2 of 26)