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Angela Georgina Burdett-Coutts.

Woman's mission; a series of congress papers on the philanthropic work of women, by eminent writers online

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with the Duchess of Abercorn as president of a committee of eighteen
ladies. By the end of the year the nurses had made 8535 visits to 342
cases ; and between January i and November 10, 1892, 9803 visits were



Appendix. 449

made in 495 cases. The cost of the work is about ^300 a year. There are
now three nurses on the staff, who are quartered in the Nurses' Home,
Kennedy Place. All three are " Queen's Nurses." The Society is affiliated
with the Victoria Jubilee Institution. Even at the beginning, the nurses
who sought to relieve the sufferings of the poor of Londonderry met with
none of the rebuffs which similar efforts had to encounter elsewhere. On
the whole, there could scarcely be a more cheering instance than this of
the success which generally attends the exertions of women to mitigate,
by their kindly influence and sympathetic help, the pains of the indigent
sick, which ever fall heaviest on the women of the household.

TEMPERANCE WORK IN LONDONDERRY. By Miss E. Alexander.
A branch of the British Women's Temperance Association was organized
in the city of Londonderry, in 1892. Special results are anticipated from
" cottage meetings," held weekly in different parts of the city, and from
home-visiting. The work is principally among the working class.

WOMEN'S WORK IN Co. MEATH. By Lady Adelaide Taylour. This
is a report of work in an exclusively agricultural district. A considerable
amount of school-visiting is done, two wood-carving classes are con-
ducted by Lady Adelaide Taylour, and Mrs. Brownlow interests herself
in the stone-workers employed in a quarry near her home, encouraging
them to work, after hours, on artistic lines. A temperance refreshment-
room has been established by Mrs. Penrose and Miss Fowler, at places
where fairs are held, and branches of the Soldiers' and Sailors' Families'
Association and of the Young Women's Christian Association are also
maintained.

MIDDLETOWN INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL, Co. Armagh. Fifty children
are here trained as teachers, cooks, laundresses, domestic servants, and
assistants on the farm, housemaids, parlour- maids, etc., and are also
instructed in all kinds of needlework. Employment is often found for
them afterwards.

MOUNTMELLICK WORK, Queen's County, Ireland. By Sister M. S.
Callaghan. This work of embroidery in cotton or linen thread is taught
in the schools of Presentation Convent, Mountmellick. Quilts, toilet-sets,
night-dress cases, and similar things are made. This is quite a distinct
industry from that known as " sprigging."

MUNSTER DAIRY AND AGRICULTURAL SCHOOL. By Mrs. A. M.
Barber. To a committee of Cork gentlemen the credit is due of having
established the first Dairy School in the kingdom. The main object of
the School was to impart a practical knowledge of dairying in all its
branches ; but it also supplies a knowledge of domestic economy. For
this purpose, classes are held for teaching plain cookery, the economical
management of food, cookery for the sick, laundry and needle work. All
the girls take their turn at general housework, and, in order to encourage
them, special prizes are awarded for neatness and good conduct. So suc-
cessful has the School been, that kindred institutions have been opened in
many places. The dairy industry, for which Ireland is so fitted, owes much
to the indefatigable efforts of Canon Bagot, who has done so much both to

2 G



450 Appendix.

improve the produce and to secure what is scarcely if at all less important,
cleanliness and neatness in packing and sending. The main characteristic
of this Association is the quick perception and activity shown by the
ladies' committee in seizing the opportunity of making the Munster Dairy
a source of incalculable benefit to the young girls employed, and a means
of raising their self-respect. The dairy industry thus confers on them an
indirect boon, besides providing healthy and desirable employment.

SEWING-SCHOOL, CONVENT OF MERCY, Newry, Co. Down. By
Sister Mary E. Russell. High-class needlework, chiefly underclothing
for ladies, is executed in this School, some of which is for London ware-
houses. Saleswomen travel through England soliciting orders for the
School, which also has customers in Australia and New Zealand. Similar
work is carried on by the Sisters of Mercy at Rosstrevor.

LACE-CLASS, at Newtownbarry, Co. Wexford. By Mrs. Hall Dare.
In 1868 this lady began teaching twenty girls how to make the Greek
lace or Italian reticella, for which they were paid when competent workers.
The class is now self-supporting, and the workers earn from $s. to ior.
a week.

MISS ROBERTS'S WORK AMONG THE " ROSSES." By Miss Dorothy
Roberts. This lady provides employment for some hundreds of poor
women in the north-west corner of Ireland, called, locally, the " Rosses,"
meaning " Headland." The Rosses women are excellent knitters, and the
work consists of knitting stockings and socks. The work has so grown
and flourished that there are sympathizers and customers all over Great
Britain. A Government order was given not long since for 13,000 pairs
of army socks. For ten years past the average amount of wages paid has
been about ;io a month.

TURKISH BATH AND HOME FOR PATIENTS OF THE POORER CLASSES,
at St. Ann's Hill, Co. Cork. By Mrs. Barter. This charity has been a
great boon, particularly to poor people in Ireland. The Turkish Bath
was erected by the late Dr. Barter, in 1859, but the Home for patients
attending the bath was not erected till after his death. It will accommo-
date twelve patients ; men and women, young and old, are admitted. As
a Hydropathic Home, it is conducted on strictly teetotal principles. The
only expenses to patients are those of board and lodging, which vary from
5-f. to los. per week. In very needy cases these charges are cancelled.

THE WEAVING INDUSTRY : THE SISTERS OF MERCY OF THE CON-
VENT, at Skibbereen. By Sister Mary de Sales Dooner. Attached to this
convent is a large National School for Girls, and difficulty being found in
providing employment for old pupils, the sisters have started a weaving
industry. They began, in 1889, with nine looms, and now have twenty-
three. The work done is of the best quality, and competes in the open
market with that of the ordinary factories. Weaving having been
recognized as a " technical subject," the cost of teaching the art in the
School has recently been undertaken by the Commissioners of National
Education. As the trade develops, the sisters intend lending out looms
to poor families around them, thus reviving an old industry. An exten-



Appendix. 451

sion of weaving, with that of the fishing and dairy industries, which have
lately made such an advance, should do much to provide employment
and improve the present condition of Ireland. At the least it will give
employment to girls, for whom as domestic servants there is but little
demand in the district, and who would otherwise have to work in the
fields for a bare subsistence.

CONVENT OF OUR LADY OF MERCY, St. Patrick's, Sligo. By Sister
O'Beirne. Many years ago the sisters anticipated the movement for
" home industries," by building training-schools at a cost of ^8000.
They include a large laundry, school of hand-sewing, embroidery, and
hosiery, a school of cookery, a bakery and dairy ; in all which girls
receive a thorough practical training. This School seems to be very
ably conducted, and with great practical knowledge on the part of its
managers.

VALENCIA ISLAND KNITTING INDUSTRY. By Miss E. Fitzgerald.
This work was begun, with the patronage of Archbishop Trench, in
1880, and is self-supporting. Stockings, socks, gloves, mittens, and
jerseys are made, and sent to the United States and Canada ; and many
orders are received for the latter article from shipowners. Ninety women
and children are thus employed.

LACE-MAKING, at Cappoquin, Co. Waterford. By Miss Keane. This
lady first taught the making of Venetian point lace to the girls and
women of Cappoquin, in 1868. For ten years thirty workers were em-
ployed, but they are now scattered over the world, carrying their
knowledge with them. " The epidemic of emigration," Miss Keane says,
" has proved a great bar to the spread of industry " in her own district.

LACE INDUSTRY, Presentation Convent, Youghal. In the famine
year the superior of this convent, Mother Mary Anne Smyth, began
teaching the making of the old Italian point lace to the children attend-
ing her class in the schools. She had learned the art herself only by
unravelling a piece of old work. The children learned quickly, and so
great was the demand for their work, that before long their earnings
amounted to over ^1600 per annum. Fifty new stitches having been
invented, Youghal point lace may be considered an original fabric.
Work has been done for the Pope, for the Queen, and for several
members of the Royal Family. A flounce at ^70 per yard has been sent
to the Chicago Exhibition.

WORK OF WOMEN IN INDIA, THE COLONIES, AND
ABROAD.

* ILLUMINATED TEXT MISSION. By Mrs. Flatten. This Mission
was founded in 1881. In 1884, through the help of Sir William and
Lady Muir, its scope was enlarged. The object of the Mission is to
send God's Word, in the form of illuminated texts, to India, Palestine,
China, Japan, Africa, and North America, in the languages spoken by
the natives in the different countries. The Mission has upwards of two
hundred volunteer workers. During the year ending September 30,



452 Appendix.

1891, 3259 texts were sent out. Missionaries in all parts of the world
have borne testimony to the efficacy of the work of the Mission. It
appears natural that printed words of sacred import, carefully translated,
must sink more deeply into the brain from the eye than a thousand
spoken words uttered in a bad accent, or in that lingua franca of
which there is generally one in all nations. The Illuminated Text
Mission deserves notice as a medium for religious, humanizing effort,
where language separates man from man.

* SOCIETY FOR PROMOTING FEMALE WELFARE IN THE EAST. By
Miss Webb. This Society was established fifty-eight years ago, for the
purpose of promoting female welfare in the East. Its sphere of labours
embraces India, China, Japan, the Straits, Ceylon, Mauritius, Africa,
the Levant, and Persia. It carries on zenana, medical, and village
missions, house and hut visitation, boarding, day, infant, and Sunday
schools, Bible and sewing classes, mothers' meetings, and the training of
native missionaries, visitors, and teachers.

LADIES' ASSOCIATION FOR THE PROMOTION OF FEMALE EDU-
CATION IN INDIA AND OTHER HEATHEN COUNTRIES. By Miss
Louisa Bullock. This Association is in connection with the Society for
the Propagation of the Gospel, its objects being to provide female
teachers for the instruction of native women and children in the missions
of the Society, and also to assist female mission-schools by providing
suitable clothing and a maintenance for boarders. It is a very able,
carefully written paper, freely explaining the scope of the Association
work, and the relation in which it stands to the parent Society. The
importance of reaching the native woman in her home, in which, owing
to the marriage customs of the country, she is so soon secluded, is fully
brought out. Unless this is done, the influence of the missionary over
the men is neutralized by the heathen influence of the women of the
family. It is a work that can only be done by women, and will be best
done by native women ; and in it, lies the great hope for the success of
Christianity in India.

* THE CHINESE BIBLE- WOMEN'S MISSION FOR WOMEN AND
CHILDREN. By Mrs. E. Woodcock. This Society was founded, in
1889, by Mrs. Elborough Woodcock, in connection with the Church
Missionary Society in China. Its objects are (i) to support native
Bible-women, as only women can teach women in China ; (2) to educate
and bring up Chinese girls in Christian boarding-schools ; (3) to support
beds in women's wards in the hospitals at Hangchow and Fuchow,.

* CHURCH OF ENGLAND ZENANA MISSIONARY SOCIETY. In 1879
a division took place in the Zenana Bible and Medical Mission, which
had been carried on unconnected with any religious denomination.
Some of the members continued to labour on the old principles and with
the original title, whilst the remainder decided to work under the auspices
of the Church of England. There are now, in connection with the
Church Society, sixty stations in India, China, and Japan, occupied with
a staff of 157 lady-missionaries, under whom are working 536 native
Christian Bible-women and teachers. The medical work has taken a



Appendix. 453

great hold upon the people, and has frequently prepared the way for the
reception of Christian truth. In connection with the hospital at
Amritsur, there is a refuge for poor women, a school for the blind, and
a medical training department. The mainstay of the Mission, however,
is the steady, plodding, oft-repeated work in schools, and the systematic
teaching given in zenanas. It has been reported by the Education Com-
mission that the natives show a decided preference for schools conducted
by missionaries, over those managed by Government or even by them-
selves. The Industrial Converts' Homes are intended for the shelter of
women who, having embraced Christianity, are abandoned by their
family and friends.

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR SUPPLYING FEMALE MEDICAL AID
TO THE WOMEN OF INDIA. By Miss C. Sutcliffe. This Association
was founded, in 1886, by the Marchioness of DufFerin and Ava, to supply
a need to which her attention had been drawn by the Queen- Empress
herself. Its single object is to bring medical knowledge and medical
relief to the women of India, and among other means adopted to secure
this end have been the establishment of new hospitals and of female
wards in existing hospitals. Grants in aid are made to the medical
schools of the country, in which female medical education has been very
successfully undertaken, and nurses are trained and sent out into country
districts. On Lady Dufferin's return to England, in 1889, she organized
the United Kingdom Branch of this Association, which, besides giving
useful assistance to the Association in India, provides Indian scholarships
in our schools of medicine, and occasionally makes grants to the students
preparing for work in India.

ZENANA BIBLE AND MEDICAL MISSION. By Miss Gilmore.
The Normal School in connection with this Mission, at Calcutta, was
opened in 1852. As numbers increased, it was found desirable to have
English ladies to superintend the work carried on by the young native
teachers. Operations were soon extended to other cities, and English
ladies, trained in the London School of Medicine, went out to assist in
the work. In 1879 there was a division in the Society, some of the
members preferring to labour under the auspices of the Church of
England, and others remaining to carry on the Mission on undenomi-
national lines. At the present time the Society has forty-seven English
missionaries, with twenty-six assistants, and 203 native teachers and
Bible-women. It has five fully qualified medical ladies at work, and
five more training for medical practice in London. During 1891 the
patients in the hospitals numbered 343, and iout-patients 8179 ; while
382 were attended in their zenanas, and the total attendance at the dis-
pensaries amounted to 24,387.

MlSS COLNAGHI'S REPORTS UPON PHILANTHROPIC WORK DONE

BY ENGLISH LADIES IN FLORENCE. Decorative Arts and Industries :
This Society was started during the winter season 1891-92, by English
and American ladies, with the object of affording an opening to the
numerous women in Florence both Italian and foreign who have great
capabilities for various kinds of artistic and useful work, but have hitherto



454 Appendix.

found it very difficult to dispose of their productions, or to reap any
benefit from their sale, owing to the large percentage charged by shop-
keepers. The articles are now exhibited for sale in the rooms of the
Society ; and the results, so far, have been very satisfactory. Villa
Bethany Hospital: Established by Swiss residents, and managed by
a German and a Swiss lady. English ladies give their assistance in
many ways. Protestant Orphanage for Girls : Founded by an American
lady, Mrs. Marsh. The committee is at present composed of seven
English, two American, and several Russian and Italian ladies. Miss
Hall is vice-president. Medical Mission : Originated by Miss Roberts,
an English lady, and supported by contributions from English and
Scottish people. The Mission is doing a good work amongst the Italian
poor ; and many English ladies assist Miss Roberts. Needlework Guild:
Started by an English lady, Madame de Tchihatcheff, married to a
Russian. The president and vice-president and the majority of the
members are English.

* PROTESTANT ORPHANAGE FOR GIRLS, Florence, Italy. This work
owes its origin to Salvatore Ferretti, an Italian Protestant refugee, who
became professor of Italian at Eton. While here, he devoted a great
deal of time and attention to the welfare of his Protestant countrymen,
and particularly of the orphan girls, exposed to the greatest hardships
and dangers in a foreign country, and, with the help of some influential
English friends, he established a home for a few such children. When
events permitted his return to his own land, he continued the same work
in Florence, partly with the hope of raising the position of women in
Italy to something approaching the level they have reached in England.
He died in 1874, and the Institution is now under the management of a
committee of American and Italian ladies.

WALDENSIAN CHURCH MISSIONS IN ITALY : MRS. BOYCE'S REFUGE
(AsiLO) FOR ORPHANS AND DESTITUTE CHILDREN, Bordighera, Valle-
crosia, Italy. This Institution took its rise in 1865. Mrs. Boyce, when
staying at Bordighera, was informed by the master of the hotel that there
were some people in the neighbourhood who had renounced the Romish
faith in consequence of reading the Scriptures obtained from a colpor-
teur. Mrs. Boyce addressed them in Italian, and, on leaving, the hotel-
keeper promised to read the Scriptures to them every Sunday. A colpor-
teur was afterwards appointed, then a school was opened, and in 1867 an
evangelist was placed in charge of the Mission. On the work progress-
ing, a refuge for orphans and destitute children was established, where
the children might be educated, protected, and trained to earn a liveli-
hood, free from the interference of the priests. Mrs. Boyce afterwards
took up her residence in the village, devoting herself to the spread of
Protestant doctrine in Italy by means of this Institution. On the death
of this lady, the Asilo was left by her will to the Waldensian Church in
the valleys. There are at present about forty inmates, and the expenses
amount to ^800.

* CHURCH OF ENGLAND WOMEN'S MISSIONARY ASSOCIATION. By
Miss Lloyd. Established for sending nurses into the villages and homes



Appendix. 455

of the people of Palestine. It has institutions in Judaea and in the Leba-
non. It is composed entirely of ladies, who devote their time and means
to carrying out the objects for which it was begun. They are trustees of
all the properties acquired for its use, and are responsible for all its
expenditure.

LADY ARTISTS' AND STUDENTS' CLUB, 17, Rue Notre Dame des
Champs, Paris. By Miss Vernon. This Club has been recently opened
for students of British nationality living in Paris. The facilities for study-
ing under the great French artists, which Paris ateliers afford to all
comers, have attracted a colony of English girls, who, with little money
but much enthusiasm, contrive to exist on a sum that can only provide
the barest necessaries of life. With the help of the Rev. George
Washington, a committee was formed, and the sum of ^120 raised for
the initial expenses of a Club, and rent for a year. Miss Miller, a lady
well qualified to advise girls in the perplexities which beset them in a
foreign country, has volunteered to give her services as lady-resident.
The students can defray only a small part of the expense of maintenance,
and for the remainder the committee will have to appeal to sympathizers
in England.

Miss DE BROEN'S MISSION IN BELLEVILLE, PARIS. By Miss Ellen
E. White. This work began as a sewing-class for women, established
by Miss de Broen, in 1871, as a means of helping the widows and chil-
dren of the Communists. Three women attended the first day, and now
the number varies between two and three hundred. Payment for
work is given by " bread tickets." The sewing-class is open only in the
winter, but other agencies are at work without intermission all the year
round. Sunday and week-day services for both men and women are
regularly held, the Holy Communion being administered by ministers of
the French Reformed Church. A lending library has been organized,
and men and women, boys and girls, receive instruction in night schools.
Home-visiting, medical relief afforded to nearly five hundred thousand
patients, a soup-kitchen, and an orphanage for girls, are some of the other
features of this work. The story told in this paper is one that should
be read by all who are interested in the work of women.

THE BOARDING-OUT SYSTEM IN SYDNEY, New South Wales.
This short paper states that the family system, which has supplanted the
barrack system of housing destitute children, is a reform which was
brought about in consequence of the persistent efforts of three ladies,
designated " The Dauntless Three " Mrs. Garran, Mrs. Jefferis, and Lady
Windeyer.

THE GOOD SAMARITAN CONVENT, Sydney, New South Wales.
This is a sisterhood which is doing a useful work. In 1857 a com-
munity of ladies founded the Good Samaritan Convent in Sydney, their
object being the exercise or practice of works of charity, spiritual and
temporal. There are now seventeen convents of the order in New South
Wales, 133 religious, nineteen primary and thirteen boarding-out and
high schools, one industrial school, and two refuges for women. All are



456 Appendix.

under the care of the sisters, and are self-supporting. There is also a
non-sectarian branch institution at Tempe, Cooke's River, known as " St.
Magdalen's Retreat," founded in 1887.

THE INFANTS' HOME, Sydney, New South Wales (originally the
" Sydney Foundling Hospital"). In 1873-74 so many cases of infanticide
occurred in Sydney, that a number of ladies resolved upon an endeavour
to diminish this terrible crime. In 1874 a house was taken, and con-
ducted partly on the principles of the London Foundling Hospital. In
1875 a larger building was secured at Ashfield, and in 1878-79 the pro-
moters received for the first time a Government grant of ^500. The
Home is conducted on the cottage system, and admits both legitimate
and illegitimate children. Many of the latter have been rescued from the
ill-treatment of " baby-farmers."

PHILANTHROPIC INSTITUTIONS IN SYDNEY, New South Wales. This
paper gives an account of the work of various philanthropic institutions
in Sydney. The Young Women's Christian Association was founded, in
1 880, by Mrs. Barker, wife of the then Primate of Sydney. It givesawelcome
to all girls, irrespective of creed or class, and includes a factory mission,
sewing and cookery classes, etc. There is a Working and Factory Girls'
Club, where working girls can spend their evenings pleasantly ; also a
Female School of Industry one of the earliest foundations of New South
Wales for the domestic training of female children of poor parents.
Both these institutions were founded by ladies. Other foundations
mentioned are a Ministering Children's League, with which is incorporated
the Fresh-Air League ; a Boys' Brigade ; and a University Women's
Society. All these, with the exception of the Boys' Brigade, were started
by ladies.

THE QUEEN'S JUBILEE FUND, New South Wales. In 1887 Lady
Carrington initiated this fund for the relief of distressed women, as a
memorial of the Queen's jubilee. The income of the fund the accumu-
lated capital of which now exceeds ; 16,000 is over ^800, and is disbursed
by a council of twenty ladies.

THE SACRED HEART HOSPICE FOR THE DYING, Darlinghurst,
New South Wales. This is an institution, founded in 1890, for minister-
ing to patients when human skill can do no more. It is under the care
of the Sisters of Charity. There is accommodation for fifteen sufferers.

ST. CATHERINE'S, Waverley, Sydney, New South Wales. This
work includes a school founded for the benefit of daughters of the clergy
of the Church of England ; a women's guild ; and a home for consumptive



Online LibraryAngela Georgina Burdett-CouttsWoman's mission; a series of congress papers on the philanthropic work of women, by eminent writers → online text (page 45 of 49)