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Arad Thomas.

Pioneer history of Orleans county, New York. Containing some account of the civil divisions of western New York, with brief biographical notices of early settlers, and of the hardships and privations online

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Online LibraryArad ThomasPioneer history of Orleans county, New York. Containing some account of the civil divisions of western New York, with brief biographical notices of early settlers, and of the hardships and privations → online text (page 6 of 32)
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house" was afterwards built, on Lee Street. A com-
mittee was appointed, who procured the necessary
gunpowder, liquor and sugar, at Batavia. Provisions
for the tables were furnished by voluntary contribu-
tion, and a dinner gotten up which was partaken of
by everybody in.pic-nic style. Dr. Orson Nichoson
delivered an oration and the customary patriotic
toasts were drank, to the sound of discharges of mus-
ketry, as they had no cannon. In the evening, the
remains from the tables and the bottles, were taken
to a neighboring log cabin, and there disposed of by
all who chose to take part ; and music and dancing,
and festivity, were kept up till next morning, by a
company of old and young. This was the first public
celebration of our National Independence in Barre.

Among the first settlers in Barre were William Mc-
CoUister, Lansing Bailey, Joseph Hart, Joseph Stod-
dard, Elijah Darrow, Reuben Clark and Silas Benton.

Th(^ first marriage, in what is now the village of Al-
bion, took place under the following circumstances.
An action was tried before Robert Anderson, a Justice
of the Peace, at the village of Gaines, to recover dam-
ages for a hog that had been killed by the defendant
wrongfully. The plaintiif recovered a judgment. As



OF ORLEAXS COUNTY. 79

soon as the result was declared, the defendant took
the Justice aside, and asked him to go at once to a
house mentioned and many him ; giving as his reason
for haste, that execution would soon be issued against
him on the judgment, which he was unable to -pay ;
that he would be taken to Batavia to iail, and, if he
was a single man, he did not know when he should
get out, but if he was married he could swear out in
thirty dn,js. The Justice objected, that it was then
midnight, the house named was three miles oif, the
night was dark, and the road was through the woods
most of the way. He finally agreed to go after get-
ting supper. In the mean time the would-be bride-
groom hurried to the house to wake up the family,
and the bride, and put a light in the window to guide
the Esquire. The marriage took place according to
programme. The house stood on the west side of
Main Street, about a quarter of a mile north of the
canal.



BIOGRAPHIES OF EARLY SETTLERS.

latnsing bailey.

The following is Lansing Bailey" s history, written
by himself, for the Pioneer Association :

' ' I was born in the town of Stephentown, Rensse-
laer County, New York, Nov. 11, 1787.

AVlien I was seven years old, my father removed to
Whitestown, Oneida County, New York.

In 1800, being then in my twenty-second year, I was
married to Miss Loda Parmelee, and in Nov. 1811, I
started, in company with two others, for the Grenesee
country, on foot, with knapsacks and provisions on
our backs.

On the evening of the fifth day, we arrived at Dan-
iel Pratt's, an old acquaintance and relative, then re-



80 PIONEER HISTORY

siding on tlie Ridge Road, in the town of Gaines, a
little west of Gaines Corners.

The best locations on the Ridge Road had been ta-
ken, and also the l)est lots on the Oak Orchard Road,
for several miles south of the Ridge Road, but they
were not settled south of the 'Five Corners,' in what
is now Gaines.

Myselt and brother, took an Article from the Hol-
land Land Company, of two hundred and sixty acres,
lying one mile west of where Albion now stands. — •
Five da3^s after making our location, we started for
home by the wa}' of Batavia. We had but little mon-
ey, consequently we bought but one meal on our out-
ward and homeward trip, $3.50 being the entire
amount of our expenses, which consisted in lodging
and a little of ' the creature' to w^ash down our diy
meals.

In February, 1812, putting all on board an ox sled
covered with cloth, with two yoke of oxen attached,
after bidding farewell to friends, with wife and child
aboard, whip in hand, we set out for our. wilderness
home, my brother driving two cows, and three 3'oung
cattle.

After a journey of nine days, we arrived at Daniel
Pratt's, wdiere w^e unloaded our goods, and I soon
started to find some wheat, wiiicli I found in Riga,
and got it ground in Churchville.

Soon after my return, myself and brother set out
for our future home.

There was a track as far as the Five Corners. Thus
far we took a grind stone, and six pail kettle, with
some other articles, were tljen about a mile and a half
from our place, and no track. The snow^ was about
three feet deep, with a hard crust about two feet from
the ground, sufficient to bear a man, but not a beast.

We commenced breaking the crust in the direction
of our place, and drove the cattle as far as we could



OF ORLEANS COUNTY. 81

break that day, fell some trees for them to browse,
and one across the path to keep them from returning,
and we went back to the Five Corners for our lodging.

In the morning, we took a straw bed and some oth-
er articles on our backs, and went and found the cat-
tle all safe. That day we got through just before
night, foddered our cattle on browse ; fell a dry stub
and made a good fire from it ; shoveled away the
snow, made us a bush shanty A\dth some boughs to
lay our bed on, took supper and went to bed.

Next morning the snow on our feet and limbs,
which were a little too long for our shant}', was two
or three inches deej). However, we had a good nights
rest. We staid there until some time in April, going
to the Ridge every Saturday night, and returning ev-
ery Monday morning, with a weeks' provisions.

On one occasion we found one of our cows cast. —
We divided the loaf with her, put a bell on her, and
if we could not hear the tinkle of the bell in the night
we got np and looked after her. Thus we carried our
cattle all safe through the winter.

AVhen we went to the Five Corners to fetch our ket-
tle, while the snow crust was hard, on our return, our
dog barked earnestly at a large hollow tree, that had
fallen down. On looking into the hollow, we saw
two eyes, but could not tell what animal it was with-
in. My brother went after an ax and gun, while I
watched the hole. After tilling the hollow %^ith sticks,
we cut several holes in tlie log, to ascertain the char-
acter of the animal. Soon however she passed one of
the holes, and we knew it was a bear. We then re-
moved the sticks, and put in the dog. The bear
seized the dog, and my brother reached in his hand
and pulled the dog out badly hurt. The bear pre-
sented her head at the hole, and I killed h



Online LibraryArad ThomasPioneer history of Orleans county, New York. Containing some account of the civil divisions of western New York, with brief biographical notices of early settlers, and of the hardships and privations → online text (page 6 of 32)