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THE MATERIAL WHICH FOLLOWS IS FROM THE
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AND THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY.



IT WAS PREPARED AND MICROFILMED TO

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MICROFILMED

1991

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PHOTODUPLICATION SERVICE



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COLLECTION: REEL CONTENTS

ALABAMA

MICROFILM NUMBER (o) 90/5000 MicRR

White Pages and Yellow Pages for:

CITY: BIRMINGHAM METROPOLITAN (Yellow Pages)

JUNE 1973

THRU

LEEDS to TRUSSVILLE
JUNE 1973

(Note: See targets preceding White Pages and Yellow Pages for full listing of cities

covered.)



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Civic Section .



for BIRMINGHAM and
METROPOLITAN AREA



For the information and convenience of both local residents and visitors, The South Central
Bell Telephone Company presents this section of local civic information.



cover story



From a railroad crossing In a cornfield to an "All-America City is a
long way to come, but Birmingham has done just that during her first
hundred years.

Disaster, disease and corruption plagued the city during her early
years, yet Birmingham and her people trudged onward And. in return
for what they gave, Birmingham has become a model city A city moving
and changing. A city that feels and experiences the needs and desires
of her people. A city not stagnant in her ways, Birmingham has the
maturity and tradition that comes from experience and the flexibility
with which youth abounds.

The 1,200 settlers who inhabited Birmingham in 1871 have grown to
743,500. Dirt paths have given way to super-highways linking the tour
corners of this great metropolitan area.

The steam engine passenger train has become a swift freight con-
necting Birmingham with the entire South And the Jriany passengers are
now served by a municipal airport with 120 scheduled flights.

Birmingham is indeed the Magic City. On the go. Constantly deveiop-
ine new ways to help serve the people who live here. Dynamic exciting
and willing to look forward-Birmingham sees her second century as a
challenge she will succeed in conquering.



As she moves into her second hundred years, Birmingham sees before
her the completion of an interstate system befitting a city of her size.
In the past, lack of an adequate highway system has hindered the City's
ability to expand to further outlying areas. But, this is a thing of the
past. By 1975 the interstate system will belt Birmingham, making her
the crossroads of the state.

Birmingham can also foresee the day when pollution is no longer a
problem. Present legislation and efforts by local industries are working
toward clean air and water for all of Birmingham.

Birmingham also sees her $41 million airport project nearing readi-
ness for the 1 million passengers it will serve annually.

Amidst the industrial growth at hand, Birmingham sees gracious
living and culture flourishing. "Birmingham Green", a local project to
beautify the central city, will be completed by the end of 1973.

In addition, the city has contributed four downtown blocks to the
Birmingham-Jefferson County Civic Center. Its main features include a
100,000 square-foot exhibition hall, an approximately 16,000-seat col-
iseum, 3,000-seat concert hall and 800-seat theatre. , , , x

Indeed, Birmingham has a bright and promising future to look for-
ward to. A future which Includes the magic of the Old South and the
best of what's yet to come.



The following information is furnished by the Birmingham Area Chamber of Commerce.
Additional information will be furnished by the Chamber, 1914 6th Avenue, North, Tele-
phone 323-5461.



HISTORY

The first settlers to arrive in Jones Valley (now Birmingham) did so
In 1813. These men were followed by hardy frontiersmen from Georgia,
Tennessee and the Carollnas. Elyton became the county seat of Jeff er-
son County In 1821. Fifty years later on December 19, 1871, Birming-
ham was incorporated as a city.

SInre her beginning Birmingham has experienced a century or

growth .of chfnge .'. . and of achievement. On'V f.,^,^"*"7,^f 'L^kl
was little more than a settlement near a sma 1 1. Southern town Lke
many other parts of the South, this area was JH^tgettrng over the
horror and devastation of the Civil War Ye Birmingham differed f^^^^^^
other such budding areas. She had a rich collection of natural resources
Including coal, iron ore, limestone and water ... the TOur necessities
for making steel. More important, she had the courage of dedicated

men and women. • j * ^«„«i«r^

,.,.., 1... r .*:«« D;rr«;nr.ham hpaan a raoid oeriod of aeveiop-

ment which earned her the title of the "Magic City With n he r^t
two years, some 4,000 young men and women came to settle mBirm
Ingham. These young citizens had felt the pams of war defe^^
eagerly grasped the opportunity to rebuild their lives by building a
city of their own. .

Through the efforts of these first pioneers and the many men ana
women who followed In their path, Birmingham has forged a booming
metropolis in the heart of the Southland.

FACTS ABOUT BIRMINGHAM

Area: 2,727 square miles

Metropolitan Population; 743,500

Climate; Average high— 73.5, average low— 53.2

Median Family Income; $8,295, Fastest growing of any Southeastern

city.



Higher Education; 3 universities, 3 colleges, 3 junior colleges, 3 tech-
nical schools, 2 religious training schools.

Fire Department; A total of 27 fire stations and one airport crash station

manned by 578 firefighters protect the population of the city of Birming-
ham from destruction of life and property from fire. The Birmingham
Fire Department consistently ranks tops in the nation in its fire preven-
tion program. The headquarters of the Fire Department is located in its
new quarters at 1808 7th Avenue, North. The building is one of the
finest stations with a heliport on the rooftop. There has been a total
of 49 landings on the roof since the heliport was completed. The De-
partment answered 6,916 alarms during the year 1972. There were
715 resuscltator calls. 28 emergencies, other than vehicle rescue, and
94 rescue calls to citizens In automobiles and other motor driven
vehicles. The fire alarms increased 7.14% for the year 1972. The fire
loss decreased $159,664 or 5.59%. There were a total of 18 fire deaths,
a decrease of 2 or 10% less, compared with 1971.

Police Department: The Birmmgham Police Deparimenl Is one of the
more progressive law enforcement agencies of cities with a Population
of 300,000 or more. It has an authorized enforcement strength of 639
sworn officers, averaging 2.12 men per 1,000 population and 7.81 per
square mile. This Department provides 24-hour police services with
precincts in the central, eastern and western areas a tie-m terminal
with the Alabama Crime Information Center, the National Crime In-
formation Center and many other modern crime fighting innovations,
giving better protection to citizens and visitors alike.



POINTS OF INTEREST

Arlington Antebellum Home & Gardens — 331 Cotton Avenue, S. W.

Dating back to the 1820's, Its doors are open to visitors year-round.
It's rooms have been completely restored to reflect the pre-Civil vvar
era of Arlington's early years. Furnished with antebellum period
antiques, it has been designated as a National Historic Preservation.
it is open from 9 - 5 five days a week (closed on Monday) and from
1 - 6on Sundays; small entrance fee.

01190 © South Central Bell Telephone Company 1973



Birmingham Museum of Art — housed in the Oscar Wells Memorial

Building, 2000 8th Avenue, North. The two-story building of Italian
Travertine and Vermont marble contains 17 galleries with American
paintings; a portion of the fabulous Kress collection; classical, near
Eastern and Oriental antiquities; American Indian and pre-Columbian
artifacts; contemporary paintings including some local work and touring
exhibits; European silver, glass, porcelains. Including the Dwight and
Lucille Beeson collection ofWedgewood porcelain. A new addition of
32,000 square feet Is planned for November, 1973 completion.

Botanical Gardens — 2612 Lane Park. The largest conservatory and

garden area In the Deep South, occupying 67 acres of landscape and

natural floral beauty. A central conservatory houses species of rare and

delicate flora from across the globe.

A new Garden Center Building has been completed at a $200,000

expenditure, primarily from donations from the Federated Garden Clubs

and the Botanical Garden Society.

Touch and See Nature Trail — available to all sightless persons wanting

to learn more about nature.

Open daily 9:30 - 5:30. Free to the public.

The Japanese Gardens — 2612 Lane Park Road. The Japanese Gardens

were designed especially for Birmingham by noted Japanese landscape
architect Buffy Mural. Through the Torii Gate, the majesty of Old World
Japan is recreated in flowers, shrubs and stone statuary. Symbolic
oriental bridges, linked by pebble pathways, cross the gardens lakes
and brooks. The Tea House overlooking the gardens was a gift from
Japan to Birmingham. Open daily 9:30 - 3:30. Free to the public.

The Jimmy Morgan Zoo — located on 200 acres of Lane Park. Open

year round. It is the only public zoological park In the state of Alabama
and Is the largest zoo In a nine-state area of the Southeast; yet, the
youngest of the nation's big zoos. Visitors can ride a mini-train and
view animals from every continent in natural environmental settings.
It is particularly famous for international trading of zoo animals. ^

Childrens Zoo— a new master plan has been approved by the city s
Park and Recreation Board and construction of facilities is expected to

begin soon.

Admission charged, open daily 9:30 - 5:00.

Miss Liberty— 301 20th Street, South. This bronze replica of the
Statue of Liberty, weighing more than 20,000 pounds and 1/5 the
size of the original, is erected atop the home office building of Liberty
National Life Insurance Company. Tours conducted Monday through
Friday, 10:00 a.m. and 2:00 p.m.

Vulcan— Vulcan, mighty iron god symbolizing Birmingham's steel in-
dustry^ Is the world's largest iron statue, 55 feet in height. A world-
famous tourist attraction. Vulcan stands atop a 124-fo9t pedestal on
Red Mountain, overlooking the city. In 1971 over $1 million mimprove-
ments were made to the statue and the park surrounding it. These
improvements include an elevator to a glass-enclosed observation deck
new gift shop and snack bar, increased parking to accommodate 200
cars and new formal gardens. Open daily 8:30 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.
Admission charged.

Birmingham-Jefferson Civic Center— No. 1 Civic Center Plaza. The
Civic Center, a unique $48 million complex, consisting of an exhibition
hall, concert hall, theatre, coliseum and centra P'a^a, is taking shape
on a four-square-block tract of land downtown. It offers the finest facili-
ties for conventions, trade shows, rallies, and expositions . . . tor
Indoor sports, circuses, Ice shows and other mass spectaculars ...
for a full ranee of performing arts. The exhibition hall is complete^and
has been in use for one year. The concert nan ana medire w... uc
completed In the sprmg of 1974.

COMMUNITY FACILITIES

Alabama State Fairgrounds— 3rd Avenue, West. Home of the Alabama
State Fair which attracts visitors from all over the South. Held an-
nually the first week in October.

Birmingham International Raceway— 3rd Avenue, West, at Fairgrounds.

Stock car races held every Friday night from Spring through Labor

Day.

Legion Field— Graymont Avenue, West. Football and track stadium

accommodating a capacity crowd of more than 70.000, it is the scene

o?Te state's major CO and professional exhibition football

clashes, plus other outdoor events throughout the year.



01190 © South Central Bell Telephone Company 1973



Rickwood Ballpark — 1137 Second Avenue, West. Home of the Birm-
ingham "Athletics," "AA" minor league team of the Oakland Athletics.
The Birmingham "A's" season runs from mId-Aprll through August.
The renowned high school East-West Baseball classic sponsored by
the Alabama Lions Clubs Is held here annually.

Many local high school baseball games are held in this park which
has a seating capacity of 10,500.



Municipal Golf Courses

North Birmingham — 2100 36th Avenue,
Charlie Boswell- 3300 Highland Avenue
Cooper Green — Powderly Hills
Roebuck — 8920 Roebuck Boulevard



North



Parks — The Birmingham Park and Recreation Board supervises and

maintains some 65 park and recreation centers throughout the Birm-
ingham metropolitan area. Some of the larger parks include:

Avondale — 5th Avenue, South and 41st Street, softball diamond
and tennis facilities.

Woodrow Wilson Park — between 7th and 8th Avenue, North on 20th
Street, is a beautiful park of pools filled with goldfish and gardens of
flowers arranged to form the All-America City Seal awarded to Birm-
ingham in 1971. The park is the center of the municipal complex with
the Birmingham City Hall facing the County Court House and the main
branch of the public library with the Municipal Auditorium and Birm-
ingham Museum of Art to the rear of the park.

Kelly Ingram Park — 5th Avenue, North at 17th Street, beautifully
shaded par^ covering a square block.

George Ward Park — 16th Avenue, South at 4th Street, annual Soap
Box Derby held here, picnic area, softball diamond.

Harrison Park — Pearson Avenue at 16th Place, recreational center
with lighted tennis court.

BUSINESS & INDUSTRY

Downtown Birmingham is undergoing the greatest building boom
In the city's history, with current construction projects totaling more
than one-half billion dollars. New office towers, hotels and the 60-
Block Medical Center are creating a "new" Birmingham. Birmingham's
newest and tallest buildings are the First National — Southern Natural
Gas located at 5th Avenue, North between 19th and 20th Streets, and
South Central Bell, diagonally situated at 600 North 19th Street. Both
are 30 stories.

Banking — Eleven major banks with 83 branches in the Birmingham Area

listed resources at the end of December, 1972, $2,106,108,298 and
deposits at $1,809,371,454. Debits for the SMSA total $34,591,973,-
000.

Retail — Birmingham's retail district is one of the finest In the South.

The Birmingham SMSA has approximately 6,196 retail and service
establishments, employing 82,400 persons December, 1972 with an
annual payroll covered under the Unemployment Compensation Law
of $373,544,400. Retail sales for the Birmingham SMSA In 1971
totaled $2,071,476,000. It Is the shopping capital for a radius of 150
miles, which includes not only the downtown shopping area but several
rnajor shopping centers in the suburban areas.

Convention Facilities — The Birmingham-Jefferson Civic Center brings

the Birmingham area to a position of national convention prominence.
The Greater Birmingham Convention and Visitors Bureau is the civic
agency which encourages, Invites and services conventions in Jefferson
Couiily. Edch year many hundreds of conventions are heid here bringing
in a growing number of convention delegates. The major hotels and
motels in Birmingham can furnish some 4,000 first-class rooms for
conventions and group business. During 1973, it is estimated that $11
million dollars In convention Income will be generated. The addition
of several new hotel and motel properties and the presence of the
Civic Center will make Birmingham an increasingly attractive conven-
tion city.

Industrial — Leading the South Industrially, energy-paced Birmingham

employs approximately 68,700 manufacturing workers. In the last
decade, she has become primarily a city of diversified manufacturing."
Of the 3,300 products labeled "Made in Birmingham", furniture, roofing,
siding, steel tubing, industrial safety equipment, chains, bus and truck
equipment, steel strapping, air cleaners, cast iron pipe, structural
steel, car wheels, freight cars and parts, chemicals, meat, heaters,
corrugated boxes, screen wire and builders hardware are among the
most Important.

At the end of June, 1972, the Alabama Department of Industrial Re-
lations listed approximately 868 manufacturing firms In the three-



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county area covered under the Unemployment Compensation Law. In
December. 1972, this department listed total wages and salary employ-
ment for the metropolitan area as estimated at 271,400. These esti-
mates were prepared by the Alabama Department of Industrial Relations
in cooperation with the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics.

TRANSPORTATION

Airlines — Birmingham Municipal Airport, daily 120 scheduled flights
— serving 1,094,104 passengers in 1972, Is currently undergoing a
$40 million construction program. Construction started in March, 1971,
on a $12.5 million terminal, parking facilities and the extension of the
north-south runway with completion expected January, 1974.
Birmingham Municipal Airport is served by four major airlines and one
commuter airline, with daily flights to principal cities across the U. S.

Bus Service — Two interstate bus lines serve the city. Greyhound
Bus Lines and Continental Trailways Bus System. .

Birmingham Transit Company provides local service, having 160 buses
covering 330 miles of route, over 45 lines and routes, with seating
capacity of 7,200. , ,^ ^ ^

Motor Freight Lines— The Birmingham-Jefferson County area is
represented by some 70 major carriers In the Eastern half of the U. S.,
as well as several transcontinental carriers. The coverage by the inter-
state carriers represented in Birmingham, 100 motor freight terminals,
makes through routes possible to every major market area m the
Eastern half of the country; and with transcontinental representation,
Birmingham's distribution and service capabilities are second to none
In the Southeastern United States. , ....,_.. • * d- «,

Railway Systems — Ideally located as a rail distribution point, Birm-
ingham, the transportation and geographical center of the South, is
served by six major railroad systems plus two belt and cpnnectmg
lines. Fast, dependable freight service is offered to every important
market In the Southeast and in the nation. ..,...,, .m u

Major Systems— Illinois Central— Gulf Railroad; Louisville and Nash-
ville Railroad; Seaboard Coast Line Railroad; Southern Railroad System
and the St. Louis and San Francisco Railroad. Connecting Lines —
Birmingham Belt Railroad and Birmingham Southern Railroad.

AMTRAK passenger service daily. , ^ - ^ • u*. * a^.^.

Freight Forwarders— Birmingham is served by 4 freight forwarders
providing coast to coast service. United Parcel Service provides an out-
let for small shipments to the major parts of the United States.
REA provides air surface express service to 50 states.

COMMUNICATIONS

Newspapers— The two dally newspapers are The Birmingham News
(afternoon and Sunday) and the Birmingham Post-Herald (morning).
Weekly newspapers in the Birmingham area include: Birmingham
Mirror, Birmingham World, The Birmingham Times, The Bessemer
Advertiser, The Bessemer News, The Center Point Times and The Sun.

Postal— 1972 postal receipts were $22,757,213, ranking Birmingham
among the leading Southeastern mail and parcel post centers.

Radio Stations— There are 13 area radio stations and they are:
WAPI, WATV, WBUL, WCRT, WDJC, WENN, WERC, WJLD, WLPH,
WSGN, WVOK, WYAM and WYDE. ».,.„. -rw ^u iio

Television— Three commercial TV stations, WAPI-TV— Channel 13,
WBRC-TV— Channel 6, and UHF Station WBMG-TV— Channel 42,
located atop Red Mountain adjoining Vulcan Park bring the three major
networks, ABC, NBC and CBS, into the area. , -r , • ■«„

WBIQ-TV, Channel 10, is a part of the Alabama Educational Television
Network of nine stations which gives the state total coverage. ^

Telephones— Southern Bell Telephone Company established the city s
first telephone exchange in May 1882, when Birmingham s population
,,.^r. o noc A* +h3t time there were 39 telephone snh<;r.rlbers.
rn!july,''l968,"southern"Beri telep"hone Company split to form a new
operating company. South Central Bell, serving Alabama, Mississippi,
Kentucky, Louisiana and Tennessee; locating its Headquarters in
Birmingham. . , . . .

As of January, 1973^ the total number of telephones in service m
Birmingham's extended area service network was 434,548.

Telegraph — Birmingham ranks ninth among the telegraph centers of



Online LibraryArthur Conan DoyleU.S. Telephone Directory Collection (Volume Alabama - White Pages - Birmingham Metropolitan - June 1973) → online text (page 1 of 161)